Petroglyph

National Monument - New Mexico

Petroglyph National Monument stretches 17 miles (27 km) along Albuquerque, New Mexico's West Mesa, a volcanic basalt escarpment that dominates the city's western horizon. The western boundary of the monument features a chain of dormant fissure volcanoes. Beginning in the northwest corner, Butte volcano is followed to its south by Bond, Vulcan, Black and JA volcanoes.

location

maps

Official Visitor Map of Santa Fe National Historic Trail (NHT) in Colorado, Kansas, Misouri, New Mexico and Oklahoma. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Santa Fe - National Historic Trail

Official Visitor Map of Santa Fe National Historic Trail (NHT) in Colorado, Kansas, Misouri, New Mexico and Oklahoma. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Petroglyph National Monument (NM) in New Mexico. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Petroglyph - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Petroglyph National Monument (NM) in New Mexico. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument (NM) in New Mexico. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Salinas Pueblo Missions - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument (NM) in New Mexico. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/petr/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petrified_Forest_National_Park Petroglyph National Monument stretches 17 miles (27 km) along Albuquerque, New Mexico's West Mesa, a volcanic basalt escarpment that dominates the city's western horizon. The western boundary of the monument features a chain of dormant fissure volcanoes. Beginning in the northwest corner, Butte volcano is followed to its south by Bond, Vulcan, Black and JA volcanoes. Petroglyph National Monument protects one of the largest petroglyph sites in North America, featuring designs and symbols carved onto volcanic rocks by Native Americans and Spanish settlers 400 to 700 years ago. These images are a valuable record of cultural expression and hold profound spiritual significance for contemporary Native Americans and for the descendants of the early Spanish settlers. GPS: Lat: 35.139 Long: -106.711 From Interstate 40, take the Unser Blvd. exit (#154) proceed north 3 miles to Western Trail. Turn left or west onto Western Trail and follow road to the Visitor Information Center parking lot. From Interstate 25, take the Paseo del Norte exit (#232) and proceed west to Coors Road exit south (must be in center lane to veer left at the Y). Proceed south on Coors Road to Western Trail. Turn right or west onto Western Trail and follow road to the Visitor Info Center parking lot. Visitor Information Center Information only. There are no hiking trails at the visitor information center. The visitor information center is open 8:30 am to 4:30 pm daily. It is located at the intersection of Unser Blvd. NW and Western Trail. From Interstate 40, take the Unser Blvd. exit (#154) and proceed north for 3 miles. GPS Lat: 35.1385 Long: -106.711 Park Store open 9-4. You must drive to a petroglyph viewing trail system from the visitor information center. They are located 2-6.5 miles away from the information center. GPS Lat: 35.138 Long: -106.711 From I-40 take the Unser Blvd. exit (#154). Proceed north 3 miles to Western Trail. Turn left or west onto Western Trail and follow road to the visitor information center parking lot. From I-25 take the Paseo del Norte exit (#232). Proceed west to Coors Road exit south. Proceed south on Coors Road to Western Trail. Turn right or west onto Western Trail and proceed west through the Unser Blvd. intersection. Follow road to the visitor information center parking lot. Hand Print Petroglyphs Rock art on dark boulders with a cloudy sky. Hand prints and other petroglyphs on boulders at Piedras Marcadas. Hawk Petroglyph at Mesa Prieta A hawk petroglyph on a dark boulder with a cloudy sky and mountains in the background. A petroglyph of a hawk at Mesa Prieta. It can be visited from the South Point trailhead. Desert Mammal petroglyph Mammal petroglyph along the Mesa Point Trail in Boca Negra Canyon. Mammal petroglyph along the Mesa Point Trail in Boca Negra Canyon. Macaw petroglyph Petroglyph of a macaw parrot along the Macaw Trail in Boca Negra Canyon. Petroglyph of a macaw parrot along the Macaw Trail in Boca Negra Canyon. Coyote and Rattlesnake watching over Rinconada Canyon Petroglyph imagery of a coyote and rattlesnake in Rinconada Canyon. Petroglyph imagery of a coyote and rattlesnake in Rinconada Canyon. Grazing Sheep in Rinconada Canyon Petroglyph panel of sheep grazing in Rinconada Canyon. Petroglyph panel of sheep grazing in Rinconada Canyon. Snow Dusted Cinder Cones Winter scene of snow covered cinder cones at the Volcanoes Day Use Area. Winter scene of snow covered cinder cones at the Volcanoes Day Use Area. Coyote and Rattlesnake Petroglyphs Petroglyphs of a coyote and a rattlesnake on a dark boulder. These petroglyphs could possibly depict a coyote and a rattlesnake, two of the more commonly seen animals at the monument. Bird Petroglyph A petroglyph of a bird on a dark boulder. A petroglyph of a bird at Rinconada Canyon. Bird and Footprint Petroglyphs Petroglyphs of a bird and a footprint on a dark boulder. Petroglyphs of a bird and a footprint at Piedras Marcadas Canyon. Line of Volcanoes A line of dead grass covered cinder cone volcanoes. A line of cinder cone volcanoes at the Volcanoes Day Use Area. Increasing temperature seasonality may overwhelm shifts in soil moisture to favor shrub over grass dominance in Colorado Plateau drylands Increasing variability of temperature favors a shift to shrublands over grasslands in arid southwestern landscapes. This effect is greater than the effect of increasing soil moisture, which favors a shift to grasslands over shrublands. Grassland with scattered junipers and hills in the background. The Colorado Plateau The Colorado Plateau is centered on the four corners area of the Southwest, and includes much of Arizona, Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico. Hazy Fajada Butte, Chaco Culture National Monument NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Petroglyph National Monument, New Mexico Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] person photographing a petroglyph panel Monitoring Upland Vegetation and Soils on the Southern Colorado Plateau Vegetation and soils are the foundation upon which all terrestrial ecosystems are built. Soils provide the medium for the storage and delivery of water and nutrients to plants, which in turn provide animal populations with both habitat and food. Sampling grassland vegetation at a long-term monitoring plot at Wupatki National Monument Going Green at Petroglyph National Monument Petroglyph National Monument has installed the National Park Service’s first solar powered electric vehicle charging station! Built in 2016, this solar station was built so that visitors and the staff alike could charge their car using direct sunlight. There are four charging stations available and free or charge to any visitor that has to charge up their electric vehicle. Visitor plugging in electric vehicle to charger Shaping the System under President George H.W. Bush President George H.W. Bush was an ardent supporter of the national parks. Explore some the parks that are part of the legacy of the presidency of George H.W. Bush, who served as the 41st president of the United States from January 20, 1989 to January 20, 1993. President George H.W. Bush shaking hands with a park ranger at the World War II Memorial Modeling Past and Future Soil Moisture in Southern Colorado Plateau National Parks and Monuments In this project, USGS and NPS scientists used the range of variation in historical climate data to provide context for assessing the relative impact of projected future climate on soil water availability. This report provides the results of modeled SWP generated for 11 ecosystems in nine Southern Colorado Plateau Network parks. Extensive grassland at Wupatki National Monument Southern Colorado Plateau Bird Inventories Birds are considered to be good indicators of environmental change. Inventories of bird populations not only provide valuable information that can help manage bird populations, but can also be helpful in managing other resources as well. Yellow-rumped warbler Vegetation Characterization and Mapping on the Southern Colorado Plateau Vegetation mapping is a tool used by botanists, ecologists, and land managers to better understand the abundance, diversity, and distribution of different vegetation types across a landscape. Vegetation plots used for the classification and mapping of El Malpais NM Climate Change on the Southern Colorado Plateau The combination of high. elevation and a semi-arid climate makes the Colorado Plateau particularly vulnerable to climate change. Climate models predict that over the next 100 years, the Southwest will become warmer and even more arid, with more extreme droughts than the region has experienced in the recent past. One result of climate change may be more, larger floods, like this flash flood in Glen Canyon NRA Southern Colorado Plateau Mammal Inventories Mammal inventories help to close the gap in our knowledge and understanding of some taxonomic groups on the Colorado Plateau. Coyote (Canis latrans) Geomorphologic Modeling Example—Knickpoint Arroyo Geomorphologic Model of Knickpoint Migration Arroyo Petroglyph National Monument, New Mexico color model of arroyo showing depth Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Defining the Southwest The Southwest has a special place in the American imagination – one filled with canyon lands, cacti, roadrunners, perpetual desert heat, a glaring sun, and the unfolding of history in places like Tombstone and Santa Fe. In the American mind, the Southwest is a place without boundaries – a land with its own style and its own pace – a land that ultimately defies a single definition. Maize agriculture is one component of a general cultural definition of the Southwest. Series: Photogrammetry Applications and Examples Photogrammetry is the science and art of using photographs to extract three-dimensional information from a series of well-placed images. Paired with either a standard ruler or GPS locations of camera positions provides the scale in completed models. This Series provides examples of photogrammetry projects for a variety of resources in National Parks. fossil redwood stump trio Find Your Park on Route 66 Route 66 and the National Park Service have always had an important historical connection. Route 66 was known as the great road west and after World War II families on vacation took to the road in great numbers to visit the many National Park Service sites in the Southwest and beyond. That connection remains very alive and present today. Take a trip down Route 66 and Find Your Park today! A paved road with fields in the distance. On the road is a white Oklahoma Route 66 emblem. Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Judith Córdova Judith Córdova experienced discrimination as a child in her Denver-area neighborhood. As an adult, she continued to fight against it in her job as an equal opportunity employment specialist for the National Park Service (NPS). Eventually she rose through the ranks herself, becoming the first Latina superintendent in 1993. Judith Cordova in an NPS baseball cap looks into the camera. Robin White Robin White experienced profound loss and the injustices of discrimination as a child. Surrounded by women, she grew up understanding the importance of nature, family, cultural heritage, and her own worth. During more than 40 years in the National Park Service (NPS) White valued community engagement and diversity, first as an interpretative ranger and later as a superintendent. Robin White in her NPS uniform and ranger flat hat stands in front of a brown sign. Cinder Cones Cinder cones are typically simple volcanoes that consist of accumulations of ash and cinders around a vent. Sunset Crater Volcano and Capulin Volcano are cinder cones. photo of a dry grassy field with a cinder cone in the distance Water Resources on the Colorado Plateau Describes the origin, uses, threats to, and conservation of water on the Colorado Plateau. Dark green body of water winding through red rock formations with brilliant sun overhead. Volcanic Inverted Topography Inverted topography arises when lava flows that filled valleys at the time of their eruption later hold up mesas because their resistance to erosion is greater than most other rock types. photo of volcanic rock with petroglyphs and a distant mesa Series: Volcano Types Volcanoes vary in size from small cinder cones that stand only a few hundred feet tall to the most massive mountains on earth. photo of a volcanic mountain with snow and ice Monogenetic Volcanic Fields Monogenetic volcanic fields are areas covered by volcanic rocks where each of the volcanic vents typically only erupt once. Monogenetic volcanic fields typically contain cinder cones, fissure volcanoes, and/or maars and tuff rings. They also usually encompass large areas covered by basaltic lava flows. oblique aerial photo of a lava flow that extended into a body of water Fissure Volcanoes Fissure volcanoes erupt from elongated vents (fissures) rather than a central vent. The lava flows in Craters of the Moon National Monument were erupted from fissures. aerial photo of a line of volcanic cones and lava flows

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