Petroglyph

National Monument - New Mexico

Petroglyph National Monument stretches 17 miles (27 km) along Albuquerque, New Mexico's West Mesa, a volcanic basalt escarpment that dominates the city's western horizon. The western boundary of the monument features a chain of dormant fissure volcanoes. Beginning in the northwest corner, Butte volcano is followed to its south by Bond, Vulcan, Black and JA volcanoes.

maps

Official Visitor Map of Santa Fe National Historic Trail (NHT) in Colorado, Kansas, Misouri, New Mexico and Oklahoma. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Santa Fe - National Historic Trail

Official Visitor Map of Santa Fe National Historic Trail (NHT) in Colorado, Kansas, Misouri, New Mexico and Oklahoma. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Petroglyph National Monument (NM) in New Mexico. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Petroglyph - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Petroglyph National Monument (NM) in New Mexico. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument (NM) in New Mexico. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Salinas Pueblo Missions - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument (NM) in New Mexico. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/petr/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petrified_Forest_National_Park Petroglyph National Monument stretches 17 miles (27 km) along Albuquerque, New Mexico's West Mesa, a volcanic basalt escarpment that dominates the city's western horizon. The western boundary of the monument features a chain of dormant fissure volcanoes. Beginning in the northwest corner, Butte volcano is followed to its south by Bond, Vulcan, Black and JA volcanoes. Petroglyph National Monument protects one of the largest petroglyph sites in North America, featuring designs and symbols carved onto volcanic rocks by Native Americans and Spanish settlers 400 to 700 years ago. These images are a valuable record of cultural expression and hold profound spiritual significance for contemporary Native Americans and for the descendants of the early Spanish settlers. GPS: Lat: 35.139 Long: -106.711 From Interstate 40, take the Unser Blvd. exit (#154) proceed north 3 miles to Western Trail. Turn left or west onto Western Trail and follow road to the Visitor Information Center parking lot. From Interstate 25, take the Paseo del Norte exit (#232) and proceed west to Coors Road exit south (must be in center lane to veer left at the Y). Proceed south on Coors Road to Western Trail. Turn right or west onto Western Trail and follow road to the Visitor Info Center parking lot. Visitor Information Center Information only. There are no hiking trails at the visitor information center. The visitor information center is open 8:30 am to 4:30 pm daily. It is located at the intersection of Unser Blvd. NW and Western Trail. From Interstate 40, take the Unser Blvd. exit (#154) and proceed north for 3 miles. GPS Lat: 35.1385 Long: -106.711 Park Store open 9-4. You must drive to a petroglyph viewing trail system from the visitor information center. They are located 2-6.5 miles away from the information center. GPS Lat: 35.138 Long: -106.711 From I-40 take the Unser Blvd. exit (#154). Proceed north 3 miles to Western Trail. Turn left or west onto Western Trail and follow road to the visitor information center parking lot. From I-25 take the Paseo del Norte exit (#232). Proceed west to Coors Road exit south. Proceed south on Coors Road to Western Trail. Turn right or west onto Western Trail and proceed west through the Unser Blvd. intersection. Follow road to the visitor information center parking lot. Hand Print Petroglyphs Rock art on dark boulders with a cloudy sky. Hand prints and other petroglyphs on boulders at Piedras Marcadas. Hawk Petroglyph at Mesa Prieta A hawk petroglyph on a dark boulder with a cloudy sky and mountains in the background. A petroglyph of a hawk at Mesa Prieta. It can be visited from the South Point trailhead. Desert Mammal petroglyph Mammal petroglyph along the Mesa Point Trail in Boca Negra Canyon. Mammal petroglyph along the Mesa Point Trail in Boca Negra Canyon. Macaw petroglyph Petroglyph of a macaw parrot along the Macaw Trail in Boca Negra Canyon. Petroglyph of a macaw parrot along the Macaw Trail in Boca Negra Canyon. Coyote and Rattlesnake watching over Rinconada Canyon Petroglyph imagery of a coyote and rattlesnake in Rinconada Canyon. Petroglyph imagery of a coyote and rattlesnake in Rinconada Canyon. Grazing Sheep in Rinconada Canyon Petroglyph panel of sheep grazing in Rinconada Canyon. Petroglyph panel of sheep grazing in Rinconada Canyon. Snow Dusted Cinder Cones Winter scene of snow covered cinder cones at the Volcanoes Day Use Area. Winter scene of snow covered cinder cones at the Volcanoes Day Use Area. Coyote and Rattlesnake Petroglyphs Petroglyphs of a coyote and a rattlesnake on a dark boulder. These petroglyphs could possibly depict a coyote and a rattlesnake, two of the more commonly seen animals at the monument. Bird Petroglyph A petroglyph of a bird on a dark boulder. A petroglyph of a bird at Rinconada Canyon. Bird and Footprint Petroglyphs Petroglyphs of a bird and a footprint on a dark boulder. Petroglyphs of a bird and a footprint at Piedras Marcadas Canyon. Line of Volcanoes A line of dead grass covered cinder cone volcanoes. A line of cinder cone volcanoes at the Volcanoes Day Use Area. Increasing temperature seasonality may overwhelm shifts in soil moisture to favor shrub over grass dominance in Colorado Plateau drylands Increasing variability of temperature favors a shift to shrublands over grasslands in arid southwestern landscapes. This effect is greater than the effect of increasing soil moisture, which favors a shift to grasslands over shrublands. Grassland with scattered junipers and hills in the background. The Colorado Plateau The Colorado Plateau is centered on the four corners area of the Southwest, and includes much of Arizona, Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico. Hazy Fajada Butte, Chaco Culture National Monument NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Petroglyph National Monument, New Mexico Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] person photographing a petroglyph panel Monitoring Upland Vegetation and Soils on the Southern Colorado Plateau Vegetation and soils are the foundation upon which all terrestrial ecosystems are built. Soils provide the medium for the storage and delivery of water and nutrients to plants, which in turn provide animal populations with both habitat and food. Sampling grassland vegetation at a long-term monitoring plot at Wupatki National Monument Going Green at Petroglyph National Monument Petroglyph National Monument has installed the National Park Service’s first solar powered electric vehicle charging station! Built in 2016, this solar station was built so that visitors and the staff alike could charge their car using direct sunlight. There are four charging stations available and free or charge to any visitor that has to charge up their electric vehicle. Visitor plugging in electric vehicle to charger Shaping the System under President George H.W. Bush President George H.W. Bush was an ardent supporter of the national parks. Explore some the parks that are part of the legacy of the presidency of George H.W. Bush, who served as the 41st president of the United States from January 20, 1989 to January 20, 1993. President George H.W. Bush shaking hands with a park ranger at the World War II Memorial Modeling Past and Future Soil Moisture in Southern Colorado Plateau National Parks and Monuments In this project, USGS and NPS scientists used the range of variation in historical climate data to provide context for assessing the relative impact of projected future climate on soil water availability. This report provides the results of modeled SWP generated for 11 ecosystems in nine Southern Colorado Plateau Network parks. Extensive grassland at Wupatki National Monument Southern Colorado Plateau Bird Inventories Birds are considered to be good indicators of environmental change. Inventories of bird populations not only provide valuable information that can help manage bird populations, but can also be helpful in managing other resources as well. Yellow-rumped warbler Vegetation Characterization and Mapping on the Southern Colorado Plateau Vegetation mapping is a tool used by botanists, ecologists, and land managers to better understand the abundance, diversity, and distribution of different vegetation types across a landscape. Vegetation plots used for the classification and mapping of El Malpais NM Climate Change on the Southern Colorado Plateau The combination of high. elevation and a semi-arid climate makes the Colorado Plateau particularly vulnerable to climate change. Climate models predict that over the next 100 years, the Southwest will become warmer and even more arid, with more extreme droughts than the region has experienced in the recent past. One result of climate change may be more, larger floods, like this flash flood in Glen Canyon NRA Southern Colorado Plateau Mammal Inventories Mammal inventories help to close the gap in our knowledge and understanding of some taxonomic groups on the Colorado Plateau. Coyote (Canis latrans) Geomorphologic Modeling Example—Knickpoint Arroyo Geomorphologic Model of Knickpoint Migration Arroyo Petroglyph National Monument, New Mexico color model of arroyo showing depth Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Defining the Southwest The Southwest has a special place in the American imagination – one filled with canyon lands, cacti, roadrunners, perpetual desert heat, a glaring sun, and the unfolding of history in places like Tombstone and Santa Fe. In the American mind, the Southwest is a place without boundaries – a land with its own style and its own pace – a land that ultimately defies a single definition. Maize agriculture is one component of a general cultural definition of the Southwest. Series: Photogrammetry Applications and Examples Photogrammetry is the science and art of using photographs to extract three-dimensional information from a series of well-placed images. Paired with either a standard ruler or GPS locations of camera positions provides the scale in completed models. This Series provides examples of photogrammetry projects for a variety of resources in National Parks. fossil redwood stump trio
Park News National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior The official magazine of Petroglyph National Monument 2017 Volume Fourteen A B e aut i f ul Mystery What’s Inside... Manhatten Project NHP Valles Caldera NP & PRES Page 5 park magazine 2017.indd 1 Page 8 Page 14 8/29/2017 10:49:48 AM 1916 Celebrating 100 Years of the Welcome to Petroglyph National Monument Rio Grande Rift Valley and how landforms influence culture over time. New Mexico has 15 national park units. Each of these places shares a unique story, preserves a part of history, or offers inspiring natural beauty. I invite you to visit and experience the wonders of each of the national parks in New Mexico and other public lands managed for your enjoyment. A visit to Petroglyph National Monument will begin a lifetime of experiences exploring your national park system or can be another stop on your life-long journey. In 2016, the National Park Service celebrated its 100th anniversary as a federal agency caring for special places saved by the The centennial of the National Park SerAmerican public so that all may experience vice is the perfect opportunity for each of our heritage. As we engage the next genus to create a new relationship or rekindle eration of park stewards, we invite you to an old one with our public lands and our Find Your Park. shared natural and cultural heritage. Explore Petroglyph National Monument, As you visit Petroglyph National Monuexplore New Mexico, and explore the ment, I hope that you find something that country! With over 400 units of the nainspires wonder, provokes a question, tional park system in all 50 states and the piques your curiosity, or leaves you wantterritories, get out there and... ing more. The thousands of petroglyphs Find Your Park! etched into ancient volcanic rocks offer a tangible connection to this land and its Experience your America, people over a long continuum. These images hold profound significance for the Dennis A. Vásquez native peoples of the middle Rio Grande Superintendent Valley and others, and offer an opportunity for visitors to contemplate the meaning of cultural continuity in our world of accelerating change. A brief silent moment surrounded by the ancient images may lead you to a mental exploration of land stewardship and cultural identity in the American Southwest. You may find that a walk through the field of volcanic cones and lava flows can facilitate both an understanding of the rich geologic history of the Page 2 park magazine 2017.indd 2 Petroglyph National Monument 8/29/2017 10:49:50 AM 2016 f the National Park Service Dennis A. Vásquez Superintendent Photo: Mark Bohrer Globemallow (Sphaeralcea incana) Photo: NPS Bird of Paradise (Caesalpinia gilliesii) Photo: NPS Apache Plume (Fallugia paradoxa) Photo: NPS Albuquerque, NM park magazine 2017.indd 3 Blanket Flower (Gaillardia pinnatifida) Photo: NPS Page 3 8/29/2017 10:49:57 AM Understanding the Petroglyphs Allison Martin, Interpretation and Outreach Some of the most important questions we get asked are,“What do these petroglyphs mean? Who made them and why are they here?” These are my favorite questions, as it opens up topics for interpretation and communication between myself and the visitor. The easy answer is that we have no way of possibly interpreting an image to mean something specific because the individual who created the image can not tell us the meaning. This begs the question, How can we begin to understand these images? One place to start is to understand the lifestyle and culture of the Ancestral Puebloans, the ancient Native people that lived here 400-700 years ago. Then, we must look at how that culture shaped not only Native lifestyle during that time, but the lifestyles of those living in New Mexico today. When we see a petroglyph of an animal we may ponder, “What purpose did this animal serve to the Ancestral Puebloans?” Many animals were used for meat, skin and other necessities to help aide survival. Other animals were domesticated and used for protection or celebration. These are the perspectives that help shine light on the reason of the petroglyphs. The more questions we ask, the more knowledge we obtain. Many different cultural groups in and around New Mexico recognize this area, from the petroglyphs to the volcanoes, as a sacred place. The Ancestral Puebloans settled in this area for a reason. The Rio Page 4 park magazine 2017.indd 4 Grande supplied them with water, food, and a place to flourish. It holds special meaning to the Pueblo people as they created a community of life here some 700 years ago. Everything that they depended on for survival was found in this area, which makes every rock and tree a part of their life and culture. The images here were carved not only by the Ancestral Puebloans, but also the Spanish settlers traveling through this area. Some petroglyphs in the monument appear to represent sheep brand
Park News National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior The official newspaper of Petroglyph National Monument ECHOES from the EARTH 2012 Volume Eleven Inside... Page 16 Page 6 Page 2 A Midsummer Night’s Dream And Other Important Business By Dr. Joseph P. Sánchez Superintendent of Petroglyph National Monument Petroglyph National Monument is pleased open air environment under our New Mexico sky. to announce that the construction of the new amAside from the accessible seating area at the phitheater is nearing an end. By fall, Petroglyph top and bottom portion of the amphitheater, an acNational Monument cessible sidewalk will will offer programs to facilitate entrance and the public at the new exit from it. Interpretive structure. Without wayside exhibits will doubt, the amphithealso be developed. Two ater opens a new chapgeologic and cultural ter for Petroglyph Nawaysides, for example, tional Monument in its will be placed along services to the visiting the walkway leading to public and our neighthe amphitheater. The bors. The amphithewayside exhibits will ater offers an opportuexplain such features nity for visitors to enjoy of the land and people open air evening and that have historically day time lectures and NPS Photo surrounded the west presentations, cultural The new amphitheater, constructed with Federal mesa escarpment with demonstrations, and Lands Recreation Enhancement Act funds. its marvelous natural impromptu programs. and cultural resources. Special groups incluRestroom facilities and sive of students from neighboring schools within drinking water are available nearby. Albuquerque Public Schools and other school disThe use of new media technology marks a tricts around the state will be welcome at the new new approach to the presentations at Petroglyph facility. National Monument. The amphitheater, for examAdditionally, the amphitheater will allow ple, will feature large visual aids, visually interacfor tiered stadium-style seating. Truly, there is not tive programs, and large screen presentations. Fua bad seat in the place! The new structure adds ture plans will include live streaming of programs flexibility to our programs. With it, we can move that can be viewed by anyone across the country as our programs away from the visitor center patio, well as by students utilizing long distance learning. although the patio will be used for different pro- These technological amenities at the amphitheater grams that don’t require an amphitheater such as place Petroglyph National Monument more in the book signings. The location of the amphitheater, league with other National Parks that do have ammoreover, provides more isolation from the city’s phitheaters. ambient lights and sounds and allows for a more 2 Petroglyph National Monument’s Federal Fire Plan Natural and Cultural Resource Advisors damage assessment report will be completed and if arson or negligence on the part of an individual and or commercial entity is identified, the responsible parties will be held accountable according to law. One additional effort carried out by Petroglyph National Monument, within the Federal Jurisdiction of the Monument, has been to clear debris and undergrowth from the boundary line as much as possible. To that end, we continue to remind our neighbors that the cleared areas are not trails, but act more of a firebreak along the boundary. We also remind our neighbors whose back yards straddle the boundary not to throw cuttings, leaves, or other debris into that area. As a reminder, throwing cut brush and construction debris from residential and commercial property over walls and across fences into Petroglyph National Monument is strictly prohibited. Every year wildfire dangers increase with each successive drought. It looks like this year will be no different. It is important to know that Petroglyph National Monument has a Fire Plan that spells out the responsibilities of the Park Superintendent, the Chief Ranger, as our key fire management contact person, and other City of Albuquerque, Bernalillo County and State authorities. There are two fire control agencies with direct jurisdiction and responsibility within Petroglyph National Monument. They are the Albuquerque Fire Department and the Bernalillo County Fire Department. Effective in May of 2011, a Mutual Aid Agreement was signed between these two fire departments and the National Park Service’s Wildland Fire Four Winds Group, located in Grants, NM. This defines the responsibilities for general fire control and initial attack. The Albuquerque Fire Department has full suppression and control authority over all fires that occur within Albuquerque’s city limits. Should a wildland fire incident occur within Petroglyph National Monument, a Unified Command will be set up with the Albuquerque Fire Management Officer and the initial attack agency per jurisdiction. The NPS Fire Management Officer of the Four Winds Group will be notified and the fe
Park News National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Earth & Sky The official newspaper of Petroglyph National Monument 2010 Volume Ten Inside... Page 14 Page 6 Page 2 20 Years of Earth and Sky By Dr. Joseph P. Sanchez Superintendent of Petroglyph National Monument Since its establishment on June 27, 1990, the creasingly evident. Changes in the last decade, in staff at Petroglyph National Monument has been particular, have been dramatic to a stretch of land dedicated to the preservation and protection of that was once vacant. Residential and commercial the invaluable cultural and natural resources with- development around the Monument has occurred on all of its sides makin its boundaries. As ing it an island within we approach the annithe city limits. Today, versary of Petroglyph two roads, Unser Blvd. National Monument’s and Paseo del Norte first twenty years, we have divided Petrotake time to ponder the glyph National Monuantiquity of the petroment into three parts. glyphs made by NaWhile the results have tive Peoples and their been positive in regard relationship to earth to the progression of and sky. The secrets the City of Albuquerof such knowledge que, the effects on are buried in timeless wildlife have been sigpetroglyphs and arnificant. For example, cheological sites along White House Photo many river valleys, ra- President George H. W. Bush signs the law creating disruption of animal patterns for hunting vines and escarpments Petroglyph National Monument on June 27, 1990. and migration through of the American Southa once unencumbered west and northern habitat has been affected. Visitor uses have been, Mexico. Notably, Petroglyph National Monument preserves over 20,000 petroglyphs many of which to an extent, fragmented as the two roads have segtell of equinoxes, solstices, and other features of mented visitor activities within the Monument to possible sun-moon-earth relationships. That many areas between the roads. Currently, Petroglyph National Monument Indian cultures had sophisticated knowledge about is developing a Visitor Use Plan to define activithe sun, moon and night sky is especially evident at Chaco Canyon, the many Mayan sites, and Az- ties and uses within the Monument. In that retec temples. There are other stories behind each gard, the staff has taken a pro-active approach to petroglyph, some of which were made by Spanish managing the Monument. Within the context of these changes, consultation with associated tribes, colonial settlers. Their legacy is our inheritance. In the last twenty years, the challenges to who consider the Monument to be a sacred place, Petroglyph National Monument’s mission to pre- is ongoing. Thus resource protection takes many serve and protect its resources have become in- forms. To that end, the staff at Petroglyph National 2 Monument is engaged in visitor services, law enforcement activities, natural and cultural resources monitoring programs, and facility management projects. These activities serve to preserve and protect the Monument’s resources for the enjoyment of future generations. As an urban park, Petroglyph National Monument is located within the fastest growing area of Albuquerque. Recent expansive plans for additional residential development near the south end of the Monument are underway. Additionally, three new elementary schools are within walking distance of the Monument. On the very edge of the city, residential lots adjacent to Petroglyph National Monument enjoy panoramic views that, by dint of their locations, are protected in perpetuity. Monument neighbors appreciate having a National Park in their own back yard. Today land acquisition is almost complete. When the monument was established in 1990, half of the 7239 acres were already in public ownership. The State of New Mexico transferred 640 acres to the Federal Govern- ment in 2001. In addition, the City owns several thousand acres of Major Public Open Space lands immediately adjacent to the monument. Those lands, while not within the monument boundary, are maintained in their natural state for recreational use and as an open space preserve. The lands are part of Albuquerque’s 20,000 acres of designated and highly celebrated Major Public Open Space. The City of Albuquerque and the National Park Service continue to manage the lands cooperatively within the monument boundaries consistent with a Memorandum of Understanding. While the National Park Service manages the Atrisco Unit, the federally-owned portion of the Monument, the City of Albuquerque manages both the Boca Negra Unit and Piedras Marcadas Units. The logos of both the city Open Space and National Park Service are displayed on Monument signs and printed materials as a manifestation of the long standing cooperative relationship to manage this complex, dynamic and evolving national treasure. As an urban park, Petroglyph National Monument is located in the fastest growing area of Albuquerque. NPS photo

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