"Views at Pinnacles National Monument, California" by National Park Service , public domain

Pinnacles

National Park - California

Pinnacles National Park is a U.S. National Park protecting a mountainous area located east of the Salinas Valley in Central California, about 5 miles east of Soledad and 80 miles southeast of San Jose.

maps

Official visitor map of Pinnacles National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Pinnacles - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Pinnacles National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of Williams Hill Recreation Area (RA) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Williams Hill - Recreation Map

Map of Williams Hill Recreation Area (RA) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/pinn https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pinnacles_National_Park Pinnacles National Park is a U.S. National Park protecting a mountainous area located east of the Salinas Valley in Central California, about 5 miles east of Soledad and 80 miles southeast of San Jose. Some 23 million years ago multiple volcanoes erupted, flowed, and slid to form what would become Pinnacles National Park. What remains is a unique landscape. Travelers journey through chaparral, oak woodlands, and canyon bottoms. Hikers enter rare talus caves and emerge to towering rock spires teeming with life: prairie and peregrine falcons, golden eagles, and the inspiring California condor. Pinnacles National Park is accessible through highway 101 for the West entrance, and highway 25 for the East entrance. From highway 101 you must pass through the City of Soledad to find highway 146 which will lead to West side of Pinnacles. To enter East Pinnacles you must find highway 25 through the City of Hollister coming from the North, and King City through Bitter Water Road (G-13) when coming from the South. NOTE: There is no through road between the east and west entrance. Bear Gulch Nature Center Hey ranger, what plant is this? Hey ranger, what do condors look like? Ask questions, get information and view our park film inside the Bear Gulch Nature Center. Pinnacles Park Store Ask questions, get your passport stamped and buy the official park souvenirs, all at the park store! Located in the Pinnacles campground, the store is open Thursday though Monday, from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM, including holidays. Pinnacles Park Store is located off of Highway 25, thirty miles south of Hollister, California. Head two miles down the park road (HWY 146) and you will find the store on your left hand side, in the campground. West Pinnacles Visitor Contact Station Get your park souvenirs and plan your visit all in one place! Please note that this visitor center may be closed seasonally due to low staff. The west entrance does not have a physical address. It is located just outside the town of Soledad; follow Hwy 146 for 14 miles into Pinnacles National Park. The contact station is on your left hand side when you enter the park. Pinnacles Campground Pinnacles Campground is run by Pinnacles Recreation Company. The campground offers tent and group camping, tent cabins, and RV sites. Each tent and group site has a picnic table and fire ring. Most RV sites have electrical hookups and share community tables and barbecue pits. Some tent cabins have electricity. Each tent cabin sleeps up to four people. To make reservations please visit recreation.gov. For questions and concerns call (831) 200-1722. Tent Site 23.00 A site specifically designed for tents. The site can accommodate up to 6 people and two vehicles. Recreational Vehicle (RV) 36.00 RV sites have 60A, 30A (240v) and 7.5A (110v) outlets. 1-10 Group Site 65.00 This site will accommodate a maximum of 10 people properly. And it can be reserved 6 to 12 months in advance. 11-20 Group Site 110.00 This site will accommodate a maximum of 20 people properly. And it can be reserved 6 to 12 months in advance. Pinnacles Campground The campground entrance sign reads "Pinnacles Campground: privately operated" Pinnacles National Park has one campground located on the east side of the park and is run by the Pinnacles Recreation Co. Balconies Caves Boulders in the Balconies Cave. Balconies Cliffs as seen from the inside of the Balconies Caves Tree Light falling on tree Light illuminates a tree on a rainy day, seen from the Resurrection Wall. Tarantula A Tarantula walking A Tarantula crawls in the wild. High Peaks with Condors Above A massive rock spire with California condors flying above the peak. The best views of Pinnacles' rocks can be enjoyed from the west side with almost no effort required. California Tortoiseshell Clouds of California Tortoiseshells sometimes appear in the park during populations burst or mass migrations. An orange and black California Hunters Continue Wildlife Conservation Tradition With Switch to Non-Lead Bullets As the body of knowledge and scientific studies linking lead based ammunition and lead toxicity in scavenging wildlife has grown, many hunters have made the switch to non-lead based bullets. Hunters who have switched play a critical role in the health of species such as turkey vultures, ravens, golden eagles, and bald eagles. They are also the lynchpin in the recovery of the endangered California condor. Comparison of spent and unspent lead and non-lead bullets. Record Year for Peregrine Falcons at Pinnacles National Park Right now, many young falcons are taking their first flights. Others that hatched later in the season have yet to leave their nests. While two pairs of peregrine falcons have been park residents for several years now, two additional pairs established territories this year, and three of the pairs nested! It has been more than 50 years since the park was last home to three pairs of nesting peregrines. Meanwhile, prairie falcon nesting numbers were a bit lower than usual. Four fluffy white nestlings huddled together in their cliff nest Park Air Profiles - Pinnacles National Park Air quality profile for Pinnacles National Park. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Pinnacles NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Pinnacles NP. Condor flying over Condor Gulch 2018 Pinnacles Raptor Nesting Season Getting Underway Both prairie and peregrine falcon pairs are currently incubating eggs at Pinnacles National Park. Ten prairie falcon pairs have been confirmed, nine of which are nesting. Two peregrine falcon pairs are also currently incubating eggs. Other raptor species are also nesting right now. Long-eared owl sitting on a nest Bat Monitoring Effort Continues at Pinnacles As part of a nationwide effort to monitor white nose syndrome in bats, Pinnacles National Park and the U.S. Geological Survey have continued bat monitoring in the park this spring. Last year’s sampling included 13 bats from seven different species, all of which tested negative for the disease. A bat being held in purple, gloved fingers Bat Surveys at Pinnacles National Park Part of Nationwide Monitoring Effort This year, Pinnacles biologists began a program to track bat presence, species diversity, and white nose syndrome at the park. In coordination with USGS researcher Gabe Reyes, park staff mist-netted for bats over four nights in early spring, again in August, and yet again in September. They also conducted acoustic surveys in late July. Western long-eared myotis in the gloved hands of a biologist 2012 Recipients: George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service Every year, the National Park Service benefits from the extraordinary contributions of dedicated volunteers. Meet the six recipients of the 2012 Hartzog Awards honoring that service. Two volunteers assisting a visitor California Condor Species description of the California Condor (Gymnogyps californianus). An adult condor with the wing tag label number 80 stands over a juvenile condor. National Parks Pitch In to Help Save Monarch Butterflies As scientists and citizen scientists have noted, insect populations are plummeting across the globe. Monarch butterfly populations are no exception. Recent counts show that the western population has experienced a precipitous drop. As of 2018, the population of monarchs overwintering along the California coast stands at just 0.6% of what it was in the 1980s. Monarch butterflies among eucalyptus leaves, viewed through a scope Early Detection News – Spring 2018 Invasive Species Early Detection (ISED) team surveys began in April. They will be concentrated at Point Reyes National Seashore this year, with some additional work at Pinnacles National Park and John Muir National Historic Site. Barbed goatgrass How will Climate Change Affect Bay Area National Park Birds? The National Audubon Society has created research summaries for 274 national park units that describe how projected changes in climate under different emissions scenarios are likely to affect local bird populations. Hummingbird and house finch on the same branch Raptor Odd Couple Spotted at Pinnacles Regular raptor surveys in April revealed something very unusual indeed: a red-shouldered hawk nestling in a great horned owl nest! Park biologists watched the resident great horned owl nestling and its new foster sibling preen each other, check out their surroundings, doze together, and otherwise behave very much like normal nestmates. Great horned owl nestling sharing a nest with a red-shouldered hawk nestling 2019 Early Detection Newsletter Now Available The 2019 issue of Early Detection News is now available. Brought to you by the Invasive Species Early Detection (ISED) Program, this newsletter has the latest on invasive plants in the Bay Area. In 2019, surveys took place between March and October at Golden Gate National Recreation Area, Point Reyes National Seashore, John Muir National Historic Site, and Pinnacles National Park. Patch of tall grass next to a bear bin and fire pit at a campground. Southwest National Parks Climate Roundtable Webinar Recording Now Available Following the publication of the Fourth National Climate Assessment Volume II: Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in the United States (NCA4), the National Park Service began hosting a series of roundtable webinars to convey relevant findings to national parks. Each roundtable covers one of the 10 geographic regions defined in the report. This month, they hosted their seventh regional installment, the Southwest Parks NCA4 Roundtable. Fourth National Climate Assessment: What Does it Mean for National Parks in the Southwest Region? Landbirds of Pinnacles National Park The protected status of Pinnacles and the quantity, quality, and variety of its habitats offer a unique opportunity for bird studies in California’s central coast. In 1996, the National Park Service identified birds as a major component of ecosystems to be inventoried and monitored. Soon after, they repeated an older bird inventory, and inventoried new park lands for the first time. These inventories helped establish a baseline for current landbird monitoring at the park. Oak Titmouse Inventory of Riparian Areas at Pinnacles National Park Although riparian areas do not represent a large proportion of Pinnacles National Park, they are extremely important to the species that live within and around them. An inventory of the species that occur in the riparian areas of Pinnacles was conducted in 2001- 2004. The completed inventory revealed a moderate change to the vertebrate species composition since the last inventory, and included some other interesting findings. Western toad documented through inventory of riparian areas at Pinnacles. Prairie & Peregrine Falcon Monitoring at Pinnacles National Park Both prairie falcons and peregrine falcons nest on the cliffs at Pinnacles and eat small mammals, birds and reptiles from surrounding habitats. The National Park Service began monitoring prairie falcons in cliff-nesting areas near rock climbing routes in 1987 to protect the birds from disturbances while still allowing climbers to scale as many routes as possible. By 2003, the NPS had expanded monitoring to all suitable cliff-nesting sites in the park. Prairie falcon fledgling spreads its wings Fire Communication and Education Grants Enhance Fire Interpretation and Outreach in the National Parks in 2015 and Beyond The 2015 National Park Service Fire Communication and Education Grant Program provided funding for projects, programs, or tasks in twelve parks around the country. A woman studies a small coniferous tree while a younger woman looks on. Water Quality Monitoring in the San Francisco Bay Area Freshwater quality affects people’s enjoyment of San Francisco Bay Area national park resources, and plays a direct role in the health of aquatic habitats. In 2006, the National Park Service began monitoring freshwater quality under a long-term monitoring plan developed for Golden Gate National Recreation Area, John Muir National Historic Site, Muir Woods National Monument, Pinnacles National Park, and Point Reyes National Seashore. Rocky creek with flowing water. Wild Condor Chick Fledges at Pinnacles National Park For the second year in a row, an endangered California condor chick has successfully fledged from within Pinnacles National Park! Young California condor in a spacious cliff cavity SW CA Condor Update - 2013-01 (January) From January 2013: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. Wildland Fire: Condor Program Defensible Space at Pinnacles San Francisco Bay Area hazardous fuels crew completed a defensible space project at Pinnacles National Monument. Vegetation was cut around the flight pen and observation station of the California Condor Recovery Program. Additional clearing improved a helicopter landing zone. The objective of fuel reduction was to ensure that if a fire started in the park while employees were at this site, they would be able to shelter in place until it was safe to leave. A condor spreads it's wings in the sunshine. Bat Inventory of Pinnacles National Park Bats are economically and ecologically important animals, providing ecosystem services such as pollination and predation of insects. Since Pinnacles National Park provides important and unique habitat for bats, baseline information on populations is critical to management needs. To characterize the diversity of bat species at Pinnacles National Park, researchers used multiple survey techniques, including acoustic sampling, mist-nets, and roost sampling from 2004-2005. Photo of a Townsend's big-eared bat. The Buzz on Long-Term Bee Monitoring Pinnacles National Park's hot, dry summers and cool, wet winters combined with its variety of native vegetation rank it among the most valuable habitats for bee biodiversity worldwide. Despite years of inventories, including an extensive study published fifteen years ago that put Pinnacles on the map as a bee diversity hotspot, new species are still being found with each survey. A green metallic sweat bee visiting a yellow flower Spring 2018 Early Detection Newsletter Available A new edition of Early Detection News, covering the beginning of the 2018 field season, is now available. Brought to you by the Invasive Species Early Detection (ISED) Program, this newsletter has the latest on invasive plants in the Bay Area. Malfurada flowers and broad leaves Check Out the New San Francisco Bay Area Inventory and Monitoring Network Website The San Francisco Bay Area Inventory and Monitoring Network website is now fully updated! The new website features a modern look and feel, is fully accessible, mobile friendly, and makes it easier to find and share information. Partial screenshot of a new webpage on the new San Francisco Bay Area Network website Bats and Bear Gulch Cave Bear Gulch Cave at Pinnacles National Park is currently home to a large colony of Townsend's big-eared bats. Because the bats are sensitive to human disturbance, park management and scientists have developed a plan to allow both people and bats to use the cave. Learn what times of year the cave will likely be open and find answers to bat FAQs. Small colony of Townsend big-eared bats hang on wall inside cave. Hurry Up and Wait: A Strategy for Survival in Intermittent Streams It’s fairly easy to imagine the basic life cycle of an aquatic insect living in a stream that flows year round: the adult insect lays eggs in the stream, the eggs hatch, the immature stages eat and grow, and then the adults emerge and continue the cycle. But how do insects carry out their life cycle in a stream that dries up for most of the year? Stonefly on a human hand, showing its size to be much smaller than a fingernail. Pinnacles Condor Chick Explores; Two More Young Condors Released California condor 878, who took her first short flight last month in Pinnacles National Park, is continuing to explore the world outside her nest cavity. The Pinnacles condor crew also just released two young birds that were raised in captivity. Two condors sitting on a rock. One of the birds has a tag with the number 78 on her wing. California Condor Reintroduction & Recovery A tagged California condor flies free. NPS Photo/ Don Sutherland A wing-tagged California condor flying in the blue sky. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Pinnacles National Monument, California Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] trail leading toward rocks and cliffs Invasive Plant Species Priority Lists Read about how the Early Detection Team prioritizes removal of different invasive plants. Malfurada. New Condor Behavior Caught on Camera California condor nesting season is well underway in Pinnacles National Park. This year, three separate pairs are nesting in the park, and biologists have a video camera on one of the nests. This camera is proving to be an incredible tool. It is also recording condor behavior that has never been observed before. Male condor tilting his head towards the camera as the female stands behind him over their egg 2018 Pinnacles Raptor Breeding Season Ends The 2018 raptor breeding season is coming to an end at Pinnacles National Park, and preliminary monitoring results are in. Pairs of prairie falcons, peregrine falcons, and many other species have successfully fledged young. Peregrine falcon fledgling begging for food from a rocky outcrop Early Detection News - August 2017 The Invasive Plant Species Early Detection Monitoring team completed surveys for the 2017 field season in the San Francisco Bay Area. Several noteworthy species were detected this month including the spiny plumeless thistle, poroporo, black locust, common cocklebur, and stinkwort. Red flower of the red amaranth Monitoring Riparian Habitat and Wetlands at Pinnacles National Park Healthy wetlands perform a variety of key functions wherever they are found. California has already lost more than 90% of certain types of wetlands, including stream-side wetlands, the most prevalent wetland type in Pinnacles National Park. The San Francisco Bay Area Network Inventory and Monitoring Program collected pilot monitoring data on a small number of stream sections at Pinnacles National Park in 2009 and completed its first full year of wetlands monitoring in 2012. Typical stream-side wetlands habitat at PINN: a rocky stream lined with shrubs and grasses. Plant Community Monitoring in the San Francisco Bay Area Plant communities create essential habitat for plants and animals. While several National Park Service projects have included limited forms of vegetation sampling for some time, a recently updated protocol guides comprehensive, long-term plant community monitoring. Coastal dune vegetation on a hillside at Point Reyes National Seashore Invasive Plant Early Detection in the San Francisco Bay Area Invasive plants can dramatically alter ecosystems and reduce the amount of habitat available for native plant and animal species. The San Francisco Bay Area Inventory and Monitoring Network has developed an invasive plant early detection protocol to prioritize, find, and map invasive plants at Golden Gate National Recreation Area, Point Reyes National Seashore, Pinnacles National Park, and John Muir National Historic Site. The yellow flowers of invasive creeping capeweed in the Marin Headlands Streamflow Monitoring in the San Francisco Bay Area The amount of water flowing in a stream, or streamflow, is among the most useful factors available for understanding watershed and stream health. The San Francisco Bay Area Network Inventory and Monitoring Program and its partners monitor streamflow in selected streams at Golden Gate National Recreation Area, Pinnacles National Park, Point Reyes National Seashore, and the Presidio of San Francisco. Brisk winter flows in Redwood Creek Golden Eagles Return to Pinnacles It’s raptor breeding season in Pinnacles National Park! So far, raptor monitoring staff and volunteers have observed eight pairs of prairie falcons, and one single prairie falcon, occupying nesting territories and actively inspecting cliff cavities for potential nesting sites. Three peregrine pairs have also been found occupying territories. Adding to this season’s excitement, staff have confirmed that a golden eagle pair is nesting and incubating eggs at North Chalone Peak! Golden eagle sitting on a nest as another golden eagle brings nest material Wildland Fire in Chaparral: California and Southwestern United States Chaparral is a general term that applies to various types of brushland found in southern California and the southwestern U.S. This community contains the most flammable type of vegetation found in the United States. Chaparral on steep rocky slopes. SW CA Condor Update - 2017-01 (January) From January 2017: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2015-11 (November) From November 2015: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2015-02 (February) From February 2015: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2014-11 (November) From November 2014: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2015-07 (July) From July 2015: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2016-04 (April) From April 2016: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2014-07 (July) From July 2014 : An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. Scientist Profile: Lizzy Edson, Data Coordinator Data Coordinator Lizzy Edson is one of the many amazing women doing science in our National Parks! Her elegant handiwork is behind some of the San Francisco Bay Area parks’ most exciting Natural Resource projects: BioBlitzes, bat monitoring, the One Tam Health of the Mountain Project, and more. Read Lizzy's story to get inspired and learn how data helps us uncover hidden stories of the natural world. Portrait of Lizzy beside Rodeo Lagoon. 1997–1998 El Niño / 1998–1999 La Niña Wind-driven waves and abnormally high sea levels contributed to hundreds of millions of dollars in flood and storm damage in the San Francisco Bay region, including Point Reyes National Seashore, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, and Pinnacles National Monument. In addition to California, the 1997–1998 El Niño and the following 1998–1999 La Niña severely impacted the Pacific Northwest, including many National Park System units. colorful ocean surface mapping image 1982–1983 El Niño As a result of this El Niño, heavy surf and rains severely eroded beaches and fragile sea cliffs in coastal California. National Park System units in California affected by the 1982–1983 El Niño event were Point Reyes National Seashore, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, and Pinnacles National Monument. map of lower 48 united states with color ramp to show temperature USGS National Wildlife Health Center Bulletin Addresses Coronaviruses in Wildlife Coronaviruses exist in many mammals and birds all across the globe. At the USGS National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC), wildlife scientists are doing their part to tackle questions about COVID-19 and wildlife. For example, could North American wildlife become reservoirs of SARS-CoV-2, the virus behind COVID-19? What species are most susceptible? What can we do to reduce the risk of spreading the virus to wildlife? A California myotis bat with a temporary radio transmitter attached to its back. SW CA Condor Update - 2012-10 (October) From October 2010: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. Pinnacles & Point Reyes Conduct Annual Butterfly Counts The 18th annual North American Butterfly Count at Pinnacles National Park was held on June 4, and Point Reyes held its 14th annual count on June 30, 2017. Counters record every butterfly they find within a 15-mile diameter circle. Species diversity was average this year, and Pinnacles saw its highest count for individual butterflies since 2010. Western pygmy-blue butterfly on a plant. Photo by Paul G. Johnson. World CA Condor Update - 2018 An update on the world California Condor population for 2018. A close-up of the pink bald head of a California condor with a ruffle of black feathers. World CA Condor Update - 2016 Population Status An update on the world California Condor population for 2016. A close up of the pink bald head of a California condor with a ruffle of black feathers. World CA Condor Update - 2017 An update on the world California Condor population for 2017. A close-up of the pink bald head of a California condor with a ruffle of black feathers. SW CA Condor Update - 2014-03 (March) From March 2014: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2013-10 (October) From October 2013: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW Ca Condor Update - 2013-04 (April) From April 2013: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2013-07 (July) From July 2013: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. Peregrine Falcons Having Another Record Year at Pinnacles National Park The breeding raptor season is in full swing at Pinnacles National Park. Right now, prairie and peregrine falcon pairs are actively raising nestlings in cliff cavities throughout the park. This year, the raptor monitoring team has been able to continue most of its work in spite of COVID-19. And as raptor monitoring seasons go, it has already been an exciting one! Falcon flying close to a vertical cliff face. 2020 Falcon Monitoring Season Begins The breeding raptor season is starting up again at Pinnacles National Park! Prairie falcons and peregrine falcons have returned to nesting territories and are actively inspecting potential cliff cavity sites for nesting. Raptor advisories are in effect to help visitors avoid disturbing the birds during this sensitive time. Red-shouldered hawk holding a legless lizard in its beak. Researchers Analyze Prairie Falcon Genetics In Pinnacles National Park, prairie and peregrine falcons’ outward similarities are on full display. Both species nest in the park’s cliff cavities and eat small mammals, birds and reptiles from the surrounding area. But how similar are they genetically? In addition, the same prairie falcons tend to return to the same places to nest in Pinnacles year after year. Are these birds part of a genetically distinct local population? Adult female prairie falcon in flight facing the camera. Gary Fellers Leaves Legacy of Scientific Inquiry in California National Parks Few individuals have shaped our understanding of terrestrial species in the San Francisco Bay Area and California national parks like Dr. Gary Fellers, who passed away in November. Gary worked at Point Reyes National Seashore from 1983 until his retirement in 2013, first as a National Park Service scientist, and later as a researcher for the USGS Western Ecological Research Center. Dr. Gary Fellers World CA Condor Update – 2019 An update on the world California Condor population for 2019. A close-up of the pink bald head of a California condor with a ruffle of black feathers. SW CA Condor Update - 2012-06 (June) From June 2016: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2012-04 (April) From April 2012: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2012-07 (July) From July 2012: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2011-03 (March) From March 2011: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. Read more A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2011-12 (December) From Decmeber 2011: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2010-12 (December) From December 2010: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2011-11 (November) From November 2011: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2011-07 (July) From July 2011: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. Read more A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2011-01 (January) From January 2011: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. Scientist Profile: Angie Pincetich, Hydrologic Technician As part of the International Day of Women & Girls in Science, the San Francisco Bay Area National Parks are highlighting the contributions and accomplishments of several dynamic women who do science in the parks by sharing their personal stories. First up is Angie Pincetech, Hydrologic Technician for the San Francisco Bay Area Network. Learn about what inspires Angie most, and what her path has been in the sciences and with the parks. Angie Pincetech, NPS Hydrologic Technician, smiles by a creek at Muir Beach Pacific Border Province The Pacific Border straddles the boundaries between several of Earth's moving plates on the western margin of North America. This region is one of the most geologically young and tectonically active in North America. The generally rugged, mountainous landscape of this province provides evidence of ongoing mountain-building. Drakes Estero in Point Reyes National Seashore. NPS photo/Sarah Codde SW CA Condor Update - 2009-11 (November) From November 2009: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2010-03 (March) From March 2010: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2010-05 (May) From May 2010: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2010-10 (October) From October 2010: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. Mixed Success for Breeding Falcons as 2020 Season Ends at Pinnacles National Park Prairie and peregrine falcons have finished nesting at Pinnacles National Park. Raptor biologist Gavin Emmons and a team of volunteers kept track as a combined total of 22 young falcons fledged from cliff cavity nest sites across the park. For prairie falcons, it was a below-average year, while for peregrines, it was their best year yet. The monitoring team also tracked 34 nests from nine other raptor species. Prairie falcon male flying just above a fledgling, gripping a small bird in it's beak and talons. Monitoring in the Context of Climate Change Global climate change may be altering ecosystems in the San Francisco Bay Area - changing fundamental processes such as temperature regimes and streamflow patterns. The National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) Program conducts monitoring to track changes in plant and animal communities that will help illuminate the effects of climate change on our parks. Researcher monitors pinnipeds at PORE from a coastal overlook. Bat Conservation in the San Francisco Bay Area What is the NPS doing about bat conservation and preventing the spread of White nose syndrome in the San Francisco Bay Area region? California myotis gets measured and overall health assessed during a mist netting study. Acoustic Bat Monitoring Starts Yielding Results at Pinnacles National Park In 2017, biologists at Pinnacles National Park began to systematically track resident bats via mist netting and acoustic monitoring. Mist netting was a no-go this year due to the coronavirus. However from July 13-17, biologists did deploy acoustic bat detectors at four sites throughout the park for a fourth year in a row. Visual representation of a small-footed myotis echolocation call. Soon Condors Will Soar Over Redwoods California condors may soon be released in Redwood National Park. Adult male condor incubates his egg in a redwood tree nest on the Big Sur coast. Pinnacles National Park Biologist Shares Non-lead Ammunition Expertise with Olympic National Park Volunteers Sometimes, national parks are faced with a daunting challenge: removing ecologically disruptive, non-native mammals. Pinnacles National Park knows what it’s like. They have worked hard to successfully remove feral pigs. So when Olympic National Park needed to remove introduced mountain goats using non-lead ammunition, they sought the expertise of Pinnacles Invasive-Wildlife Biologist and Non-lead Ammunition Specialist Daniel Ryan. Dan holding a radio tracker high up in a snowy mountain range. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Coastal Geomorphology—Storms of Record Storms can bring about significant coastal change as well as substantial economic damage and loss in the human environment. Read about a few storms of interest that have since made history due to their unique intensity, characteristics, or impacts. aerial view of a major storm along the northwest coast of the united states and canada Series: Physiographic Provinces Descriptions of the physiographic provinces of the United States, including maps, educational material, and listings of Parks for each. George B. Dorr, founder of Acadia National Park Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ Scientist Profile: Gavin Emmons, Wildlife Biologist What’s it like to make a living by monitoring birds of prey as they nest, raise their young, and live their lives among the cliffs of Pinnacles National Park? Read Gavin’s story to find out! Pinnacles wildlife biologist Gavin Emmons photographs raptors with a telephoto lens. Scientist Profile: Alacia Welch, Condor Crew Leader As part of a larger effort to highlight the amazing women scientists that work for the parks, we are featuring Pinnacles Condor Crew Leader Alacia Welch. Learn more about how Alacia got involved with the condor program, and how she stays inspired working with an endangered species. Condor crew leader Alacia Welch smiles under some trees. Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center Early Detection News - 2019 The Invasive Species Early Detection Team (ISED) conducted surveys in 2019 at Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GOGA), Point Reyes National Seashore(PORE), John Muir National Historic Site (JOMU), and Pinnacles National Park (PINN). Noteworthy detections this year included yellow star thistle and purple star thistle at GOGA, poroporo and Jimson weed at PORE, cheat grass and smilo grass at PINN, and stinkwort at JOMU. A clump of green grass (cheat grass) laying on the ground Scientist Profile: Alex Iwaki, Hydrology Monitor "While I was in college, I didn't want to go back home for the summer to work at the local grocery. I applied for a bunch of environmental internships and got a fisheries internship in Colorado. I had no prior experience or any interest in fish, but I thought 'why not?' I went out there, learned a lot, and had an amazing time. After the fisheries internship, I knew I wanted to continue to work in natural sciences." Alex Iwaki Pinnacles Builds on Earlier Bee Studies with New Surveys in 2020-2021 Pinnacles National Park is one of the only natural areas with large bee surveys conducted regularly across decades, with studies conducted in 1997, 1998, 2002, 2011, and 2012. With each new survey, scientists can do ever more valuable comparisons with historical data. So last year, researchers from Utah State University initiated a new round of surveys. Two researchers using nets to collect bees from around newly blooming willows. Substitute Rangers As the 1940s dawned, the United States was still dealing with the economic woes of the Great Depression and trying not to get drawn in WWII. Even as it continued to manage New Deal Program work in national and state parks, the NPS remained understaffed as a government bureau. The emergency relief workers and about 15 percent of NPS staff enlisted or were drafted during the first couple of years of WWII. Winifred Tada, 1940. (Courtesy of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin) World CA Condor Update – 2020 An update on the world California Condor population for 2020, compiled by our partners at the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service as of December 31, 2020. A close-up of the pink bald head of a California condor with a ruffle of black feathers. 2021 Falcon Nesting Season Underway at Pinnacles National Park Spring has brought nesting prairie and peregrine falcons back to the cliffs of Pinnacles National Park! Many pairs are already incubating eggs in their chosen cliff cavities. The park’s annual raptor advisories, which help climbers and hikers avoid disturbing these key park predators while they are most vulnerable, are in effect. As of late-April, staff and volunteers confirmed nine prairie falcon pairs and four peregrine falcon pairs nesting in the park. Prairie falcon perched on a lichen-covered rock, it's beak open as it loudly claims its territory. 2021 a Fantastic Year for Falcons at Pinnacles National Park For the last six years, raptor monitoring staff and volunteers at Pinnacles National Park often celebrated new milestones for the park’s returning peregrine falcons. But at the same time, they were recording below-average numbers of falcon fledglings overall. Last year, they found a total of 22 fledglings, up from 21 in 2019. So this year, with the breeding season concluded, the monitoring team is especially thrilled to report a total of 40 falcon fledglings! Five fuzzy white and brown-streaked nestlings huddled together in the back of a cliff cavity. San Francisco Bay Area Network 2019 Long-term Monitoring Updates The San Francisco Bay Area Inventory & Monitoring Network has created a new product for sharing our science with the Bay Area parks community: an immersive, multimedia StoryMap! Discover key highlights from the 2019 monitoring season along with striking photos, interactive maps, annotated graphs, audio recordings, and more. Person sitting among ferns beside an enormous tree, recording owl data. Top 10 Summer Visitation Tips Plan Like a Park Ranger and check out these top ten summer tips for a safe and enjoyable visit to Pinnacles National Park. The West side's Prewett Point Trail offering one of the best sunset views.

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