"A cluster of cabins" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Prince William Forest

Park - Virginia

Prince William Forest Park was established as Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area in 1936 and is located in southeastern Prince William County, Virginia, adjacent to the Marine Corps Base Quantico. The park is the largest protected natural area in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan region.. Today, the park is a window into the past and serves as an example of what much of the East Coast once looked like centuries ago.

maps

Official visitor map of Prince William Forest Park in Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Prince William Forest - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Prince William Forest Park in Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/prwi/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_William_Forest_Park Prince William Forest Park was established as Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area in 1936 and is located in southeastern Prince William County, Virginia, adjacent to the Marine Corps Base Quantico. The park is the largest protected natural area in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan region.. Today, the park is a window into the past and serves as an example of what much of the East Coast once looked like centuries ago. Prince William Forest Park is an oasis, a respite of quiet and calm. In 1936, Chopawamsic Recreation Area opened its gates to house children's 'relief' camps during the Great Depression. Renamed Prince William Forest Park in 1948, these fragrant woods and trickling streams have welcomed generations of campers, hikers, bikers and nature lovers. Discover Northern Virginia's best kept secret! From Washington, D.C. and points north: Take I-95 south to exit 150-B (VA Route 619/Joplin Road). The park entrance is the second right. From Fredericksburg and points south: Take I-95 north to exit 150 (VA Route 619/Joplin Road). Turn left at the bottom of the exit ramp and continue on VA Route 619 West approximately 1/4 mile to the park entrance. Prince William Forest Park Visitor Center The visitor center is half a mile from the park entrance. The visitor center has seasonal hours: March 13th - November 3, 9:00 am - 5:00 pm and November 4 - March 11, 8:00 am - 4:00 pm. The visitor center is closed Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's Day. From Washington, D.C. and points north: Take I-95 south to exit 150-B (VA Route 619/Joplin Road). Park entrance is the second right. From Fredericksburg and points south:Take I-95 north to exit 150 (VA Route 619/Joplin Road). Turn left at the bottom of the exit ramp. Continue on VA Route 619 West approximately 1/4 mile to the park entrance. From Manassas, VA and points west: Take Route 234 east to I-95 south. Travel one exit to exit 150-B (VA Route 619/Joplin Road). Park entrance is the second right. Cabin Camping Cabin Camps 1 through 5 host groups of 70 to 200 people for group camping. Cabin Camp 3 allows individuals and families to rent single cabins. It also contains a group component that may be rented. Four of our five cabin camps are on the National Register of Historic Places. Cabin Camp 3 Four-Person Cabin 50.00 Individual cabin in Cabin Camp 3 that sleeps 4 people. Each cabin includes individual beds and mattresses, a picnic table and a cooking grill. Cabins have electric lights and ceiling fans, but do not have electrical outlets. Cabins are not equipped with kitchens or individual bathrooms. Please note that pets are not allowed in any cabin camp. Cabin Camp 3 - Six-Person Cabin 60.00 Individual cabin in Cabin Camp 3 that sleeps 6 people. Each cabin includes individual beds and mattresses, a picnic table and a cooking grill. Cabins have electric lights and ceiling fans, but do not have electrical outlets. Cabins are not equipped with kitchens or individual bathrooms. Please note that pets are not allowed in any cabin camp. Cabin Camp 3 Ten-Person Cabin 70.00 Individual cabin in Cabin Camp 3 that sleeps 10 people. Each cabin includes individual beds and mattresses, a picnic table and a cooking grill. Cabins have electric lights and ceiling fans, but do not have electrical outlets. Cabins are not equipped with kitchens or individual bathrooms. Please note that pets are not allowed in any cabin camp. Individual Cabin in Cabin Camp 3 A cabin in the park during spring time. Cabin Camp 3 during the spring. Cabin Camp 3 Small individual cabin in the summer time Rent a cabin and share with family and friends. Chopawamsic Backcountry Area Chopawamsic Backcountry Area (tents only) is an 8-site, hike-in/hike-out, backcountry campground. No pets, no alcohol, no open campfires, no live bait in the reservoir allowed. Four campers per site only. Campers must pitch tents within 30 feet of the site marker. No reservations are possible. Campers receive a permit on a first-come, first-serve basis. There is no charge for the back-country permit, but campers must pay the park entrance fee or possess a valid park pass. Vehicles must be parked in lot. Chopawamsic Backcountry Permit 0.00 A permit is required to gain admittance and can be obtained by completing a permit application at the visitor center between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. daily except Christmas Day, New Year's day and Thanksgiving. This permit must be returned to the visitor center after leaving the backcountry area. The backcountry permit is free of charge. Entrance to Chopawamsic a park sign marks the entrance to the backcountry area This is the entrance to Chopawamsic Backcountry Area Campsite #2 Marker a wooden post with the number 2 marks the entrance to a campsite A trailside marker notes the entrance to campsite #2 Chopawamsic Creek in the backcountry area A tree overhangs the Chopawamsic Creek in the backcountry area The Chopawamsic Creek lies off-trail in the backcountry area. Oak Ridge Campground Oak Ridge Campground is a 100-site campground with bathrooms, grills and picnic tables, and drive-up campsites. Leashed pets are welcome. Both tents and RVs are welcome, though there are no hook-ups for RVs and maximum RV length is 32". Reservations are required for B and C Loop campsites in Oak Ridge Campground from late April - October 31. Make a reservation on www.Recreation.gov. A-Loop is first come, first serve March through November. The campground is closed December 1 and re-opens on March 1. Campsite Fee 26.00 Fee per campsite. Each site has a picnic table, a fire pit, a lantern hook, and space to park at least one automobile. Senior/Access Interagency Pass Fee 13.00 Fee per campsite. Each site has a picnic table, a fire pit, a lantern hook, and space to park at least one automobile. Oak Ridge Campground Map Graphic map of Oak Ridge Camp Ground. Map of Oak Ridge Campground Prince William Forest RV Campground The Prince William Forest Park RV Campground is a concessionaire-operated campground with full hook-ups. The campground boasts pull through sites, a pool and laundry facility. It is Virginia's closest RV camping to Washington, D.C. There are several tents-only sites. Open year-round. Full Hookup, 50 amp 65.00 Daily fee Full Hookup, 30 amp 55.00 Daily fee Electric and Water, 30 amp 42.00 Electric & Water rates are for up to 4 people. For additional people 6 years and up, add $5.00. Dump Station (non-guest) 20.00 Non-guest fee. Site Guarantee 10.00 Site Guarantee RV Campground A park sign that reads 'Prince William Forest RV Campground' with NPS arrowhead. The Prince William Forest RV campground offers camping areas and amenities for RV campers. Turkey Run Ridge Group Campground Turkey Run Ridge Group Campground (tents only) is designed for groups of people. Families and individuals are encouraged to use Oak Ridge Campground instead. Turkey Run is a 9-site campground with restrooms (no showers), grated fire pits, and picnic tables. Three sites hold a maximum of 40 people. Six sites hold a maximum of 25 people. Parking is available. Alcohol and pets prohibited at Turkey Run Ridge Group Campground. You can reserve your spot at on www.recreation.gov or call 877-444-6777. $65 Fee for 25-person Campsite 65.00 Each campground fee is per site, per night. The Interagency Senior/Access Pass does NOT discount camping fees at Turkey Run Group Campground. The 25-person capacity campsites are A, B, D, G, H, and I. Campers must also purchase an entrance fee per vehicle unless they already possess a valid park pass. $80 Fee for 40-person campsite 80.00 Each campground fee is per site, per night. The Interagency Senior/Access Pass does NOT discount camping fees at Turkey Run Group Campground. Campers must also purchase an entrance fee per vehicle unless they already possess a valid park pass. These sites hold a maximum of 40 people and include C, E, and F. No pets, no alcohol, no RVs allowed. No electric is available. Group Tent Camping Four tents sitting between trees in the forest Sites at Turkey Run can accommodate larger groups than single site camps at Oak Ridge Campground. Carter Pond Carter Pond on a sunny day in summer Carter Pond is a great place to fish. Farms to Forest Trail Farms to Forest Trail surrounded by ferns The Farms to Forest Trail is a favorite among visitors. Mountain Laurel Mountain Laurel blooming near Parking Lot I. Mountain Laurel can be spotted throughout the park. Fall Foliage A tree with orange leaves against the blue sky Fall is a beautiful time of year in the park. Near Parking Lot H Fall colors come alive near Parking Lot H Many people visit the park to see the brilliant fall colors Tree on South Valley Trail Tuliptrees grow tall with blue sky above them Tuliptrees are a mid-secession tree in the forest. Historic Park Sign for Chopawamsic RDA An original 1930's sign for Chopawamsic National Recreational Demonstration Area A sign on Joplin Road marks the park entrance in the mid-1930s. Pawpaw: Small Tree, Big Impact Pawpaw are small trees that don't grow past 100 feet. Yet they have a big influence-- they're the most commonly observed sapling in our National Capital Region forests. Pawpaw trees are virtually immune to deer browse and also produce the largest edible fruit native to North America! A hand holds a lumpy green pawpaw fruit Lichens and Air Quality Lichens are durable enough to grow on tree bark and bare rock, yet are sensitive to pollution and air quality. One species in particular was used to track levels of air-borne lead over a 100 year period! Pale green lichen growing on rock. Instructing for Dangerous Missions Creating the training process was a big challenge. To prepare spies, saboteurs, guerrilla leaders, radio operators, psychological warfare specialists and commando teams for their clandestine missions, the Office of Strategic Services had to obtain instructors, prepare a curriculum, develop courses, and devise practical exercises. Daily Life in Camp Park and Town During the recruiting process, the Office of Strategic Services was looking for a combination of intelligence, imagination, courage and, if necessary, ruthlessness. Most of the young recruits, that volunteered for possible hazardous duty, craved the excitement and challenge of a special overseas assignment. NPS Structural Fire Program Highlights 2014 Intern Accomplishments A Wartime Organization for Unconventional Warfare With the onset of World War II, the OSS's secret operations—espionage, counter-intelligence, disinformation, and guerrilla leadership—expanded. Forest Regeneration 2018 In 2018, tree seedlings and small saplings are in short supply in the parks of the National Capital Region. Without these trees of tomorrow, what will our forests look like? A forest plot in Rock Creek Park showing some vegetation recovery. Burning for learning - New wildland firefighters train in Prince William Forest Park New trainees learn about wildland fire at Prince William Forest Park Three wildland fire trainees in front of a fire engine Catoctin and Prince William Parks Join the War Effort The decision to establish its first U.S. training camps at Catoctin Mountain Park, Maryland, and Prince William Forest Park, Virginia, had been based on their’ rural, isolated location yet comparative proximity to the nation’s capital. Sustainability in Action: Reducing Prince William Forest Park's Carbon Footprint NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Prince William Forest Park, Virginia Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] historic cabin camp site Field School at Prince William Forest Park: Documenting Cabin Camps Starting in summer of 2018, University of Mary Washington and NPS partnered for a field school at Prince William Forest Park. Students gained hands-on experience while helping to document two cultural landscapes, Cabin Camp 4 and Cabin Camp 2. The cabin camps were developed in the 1930s as part of the Recreational Demonstration Area program. This documentation will be used to complete CLI reports for the two camps, and the methods helped shape subsequent field schools. Two field school participants look at a drawing board as they document a forested landscape. American Eels in the Potomac Watershed American eels are found everywhere along the Atlantic Coast, but many aspects of these fish remain poorly understood. They are perhaps one of the most mysterious fish in the Potomac watershed. Hands hold a 2 to 3 foot long eel over a red container. National Capital Region Energy Savings Performance Contract The National Park Service is investing $29 million in 81 individual energy efficiency and water conservation projects at national parks throughout the greater Washington region. Cherry Blossoms at the National Mall OSS in Action The Mediterranean and European Theaters In war it is the results that count, and the saboteurs and guerrilla leaders in Special Operations and the Operational Groups, the spies in Secret Intelligence, and the radio operators in Communications did produce some impressive results. Field Notes: Archeology at Prince William Forest Park Why do we need archeologists in the National Park Service? Learn what a day's work looks like for archeologists helping to preserve ancient history at Prince William Forest Park in Triangle, VA. A hand holding a stone tool Forest Regeneration 2017 Tree seedlings and small saplings are in short supply in the parks of the National Capital Region. Without these trees of tomorrow, what will our forests look like? A forest plot showing tree seedling and low-growing plant recovery. Go green for the National Park Service’s birthday! We're adding energy- and water-saving improvements to save money! How can you do the same in your home? National Mall and Memorial Parks Yearly Savings 50.9 M gallons of water, $1 M, 2.7M kwh. Summer in the Parks (1968-1976) What began as a summer transportation program to send DC urban youth to Catoctin and Prince William Forest Parks in 1966 grew to a city-wide summer-long festival attracting residents to parks in every quadrant of the city. After the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., the program took on an additional role to help save a city from destroying itself. A group of boys smiles for the camera Transforming Prince William Forest Park into Military Camps In 1942, the hilly, forested lands of Prince William Forest Park near Quantico, Virginia, became the site of training camps for the OSS Special Operations and the Communications Branches. Postwar Period: End of the OSS and Return to the Park Service The OSS may have won its battles in the field, but it lost its final campaign—in Washington. It was better prepared to fight armed enemies overseas than bureaucratic enemies in the nation’s capital. Summary and Conclusion The OSS training camps closed in 1945. The valuable contributions to the Allied victory made by those facilities and by Donovan’s organization itself are an important part of the history of World War II. OSS in Action The Pacific and the Far East Although the most publicized achievements of the OSS occurred in Europe and North Africa, Donovan’s organization also contributed to the war against Japan in the Far East. "Wild Bill" Donovan and the Origins of the OSS When World War II broke out in Europe in 1939, U.S. intelligence operations were splintered among nearly a dozen federal agencies. Stream Restoration Dreams: Stage Zero Learn “stage zero” stream restoration basics and how they could be applied in Mid-Atlantic streams. Water spreads across the ground around standing and fallen trees Ash Tree Update 2017 The state of ash trees in 2017 in the National Capital Region after more than 10 years of harm from the invasive emerald ash borer. A white ash leaf Forest Regeneration 2019 In 2019 tree seedlings and small saplings are in short supply in National Capital Area parks. Without these trees of tomorrow, what will our forests look like? A brown bird with a white breast and dark spots on its chest stands on the leaf-littered ground. Eastern Hemlocks in the National Capital Region Many evergreen, Eastern hemlock trees, typically found growing alongside forest streams, have succumbed to two insect pests. In the National Capital Region, we looked for surviving trees, and what other tree species are poised to replace hemlocks. An evergreen branch with white fuzzy nubs along the stems. Oak Decline Learn more about oak decline where a host of stressors interact to weaken trees over time, leading to what becomes "death by a thousand cuts." Looking up into the canopy of a mature oak showing symptoms of oak decline. Spring Amphibian Timeline Learn how the progression of amphibian appearances unfurls every spring. A gray tree frog clings to a small tree branch. Amphibian Diversity & Habitat Connectivity Habitat fragmentation is a major threat to amphibian communities, especially in National Capital Area parks at risk due to the region's growing urbanization. A small frog crouches on a lichen-covered rock. Office of Strategic Services The Office of Strategic Services (OSS) was an intelligence gathering service from 1942-1945. Its espionage and sabotage operations were pioneered by an eclectic team that combined some of America's brightest minds with burglars and con men. Their work in World War II contributed to Allied victory. When the OSS was disbanded after the war in 1945, the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) rose from its ashes. OSS spear logo Amphibian Disease Risk in the National Capital Area Looking for disease, including ranaviruses and chytrid fungi, is an important part of amphibian monitoring done by the National Capital Region Inventory & Monitoring Network. Learn more about the risks posed by these diseases and the biosecurity protocols field crews use to reduce the risk of accidental spread. Red-spotted newt on brown forest floor leaves. Black spots and eyes contrast with vivid orange skin. Forest Soils Highlights from a 2007-2017 study of soils in National Capital Region Network I&M-monitored parks. Includes discussion of parent materials, heavy metal soil pollutants like lead, and how past land use effects O horizons. Collage of 6 color photos of soil profiles showing colors from orange-y reds to browns and grays. American Chestnuts in the Capital Region In 1904, a deadly fungus began killing American chestnut trees, once one of the most dominant trees of the eastern U.S. Despite overwhelming odds, some American chestnut trees survive today in parks of the National Capital Region Green American chestnut tree leaves on a slender branch. Freshwater Sponges Freshwater sponges are found in lakes and streams growing on firm substrates like rocks and branches. They feed by filtering small particles from the water. Though little is known about these sponges in the Mid-Atlantic, they are usually a sign of good water quality. A freshwater sponges attached to a streambed rock. Stiltgrass and Tree Seedling Recovery Recent analysis at Maryland's Catoctin Mountain Park shows Japanese stiltgrass does not limit the growth of tree seedlings in a forest recovering from deer overpopulation. Invasive Japanese stiltgrass blankets the sides of a shady forest road. Cabin Camp 1 Cultural Landscape Cabin Camp 1(CC1) is an approximately 13 acre planned organized camp site near the northwest border of Prince William Forest Park (PRWI) which is located nearly 35 miles south of Washington, D.C. in Prince William County near Triangle, Virginia. A rustic cabin of stone and wood paneling at Cabin Camp 1 Spotted Lanternfly 101 What you need to know about spotted lanternfly: a new, invasive, insect pest approaching the National Parks of the Mid-Atlantic. A spotted lanternfly with wings spread showing namesake spots Natural Science, History, & Culture in the National Capital Area Learn more about your National Capital Area park through this guide to natural and cultural resource information. Cultural resource staff clean the Theodore Roosevelt memorial statue at Theodore Roosevelt Island. Series: OSS Training in the National Parks and Service Abroad in World War II Before there was the CIA, there was the OSS. The places where they trained for their dangerous mission are now national parks. William Donovan Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Ordovician Period—485.4 to 443.8 MYA Shenandoah and Great Smoky Mountains national parks, along with the Blue Ridge Parkway that connects them, pass through rocks from the core of the Appalachian Mountains. The mountains began forming during the Ordovician and eventually attained elevations similar to those of the Himalayas. rock with fossil brachiopod shells Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Spotted Lanternfly in Perspective While spotted lanternfly and emerald ash borer are both invasive insect pests, introduced from Asia, that feed on trees (primarily), they have few other similarities. Learn how they differ in host preferences, feeding mode, and life cycle. A spotted lanternfly with black wingspots on a tree branch Brood X Periodical Cicadas FAQ Learn about the Brood X periodical cicadas that will emerge in 2021 throughout the Mid-Atlantic U.S. A perched periodical cicada with red eyes and orange wings Forest Regeneration 2020 What is the future of our forests? A look at forest regeneration capacity in National Capital Area national parks based on 2020 monitoring data. hand holding a leaflet on a white ash seedling Park Recreation and Climate Change Recreation in the National Parks will be negatively affected by climate change. Here's how parks in the National Capital Area are adapting. Three children sit next to a lake and fish

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