Puʻukoholā Heiau

National Historic Site - Hawaiʻi

Puʻukoholā Heiau National Historic Site is located on the northwestern coast of the island of Hawaiʻi. The site preserves the ruins of the last major Ancient Hawaiian temple, and other historic sites. The temple was built entirely by hand with no mortar, in less than a year. The red stones were transported by a human chain about 14 miles long, from Pololū Valley to the East. Construction involved thousands of people.

maps

Official visitor map of Puʻukoholā Heiau National Historic Site (NHS) in Hawaiʻi. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Pu`ukoholā Heiau - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Puʻukoholā Heiau National Historic Site (NHS) in Hawaiʻi. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail (NHT) in Hawaiʻi. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Ala Kahakai - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail (NHT) in Hawaiʻi. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Driving Map of the Island of Hawaiʻi (Hawaii). Published by the Hawaii Tourism Authority.Hawaiʻi - Driving Map

Driving Map of the Island of Hawaiʻi (Hawaii). Published by the Hawaii Tourism Authority.

Vintage map of Hawaiian Islands - Hawaii North 1951. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Hawaiʻi - Vintage USGS Map - Hawaii North 1951

Vintage map of Hawaiian Islands - Hawaii North 1951. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

https://www.nps.gov/puhe/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pu%CA%BBukohol%C4%81_Heiau_National_Historic_Site Puʻukoholā Heiau National Historic Site is located on the northwestern coast of the island of Hawaiʻi. The site preserves the ruins of the last major Ancient Hawaiian temple, and other historic sites. The temple was built entirely by hand with no mortar, in less than a year. The red stones were transported by a human chain about 14 miles long, from Pololū Valley to the East. Construction involved thousands of people. How many places in America can you walk in the footsteps of a king? Where else has a stranded sailor risen up to become a great chief over an entire island? Where else can you experience the culminating event of a people, foretold from centuries past? Where else can you stand on a beach and watch as sharks pass over a submerged temple? Experience all this and much more – only at Pu'ukoholā Heiau! From Keahole (Kona) International Airport: Head east on Keahole Airport Rd. Turn left at traffic light onto HI-19. Follow HI-19 to Spencer Beach Park Rd. (26.1 mi) Turn left onto HI-270 (0.4 mi) Turn left onto Spencer Beach Park Rd. (0.3 mi) Destination will be second right on Spencer Beach Park Rd. (Approximately 32 minute drive 27.5 mi) Pu'ukoholā Heiau National Historic Site Our Visitor Center is ADA and offers wall exhibits with both English and Hawaiian Language interpretive information. We also offer a five and a half minute looping video with a 10 person limit within the covered open lanai area. FREE Audio tour available for Smart Phones (Data/Service Provider fees may apply). Portable toilets located in parking lot and drinking fountains located outside of Visitor Center. Museum exhibits and Park Store are open daily from 7:30am-5:00pm located in Visitor Center. Turn left on to Spencer Beach Park Road from HI-270. Turn 2nd Right in to visitor center parking lot. Pu'ukoholā Heiau National Historic Site Banner A Lele (offering tower) set below Pu'ukoholā Heiau NHS Pu'ukoholā Heiau on a clear hot and sunny day in the district of Kawaihae. Sunrise Sunrise over Pu'ukoholā Heiau in mid September. Sunrise with a bright orange red glow rising above Pu'ukoholā Heiau. War God Kū and His Warriors War god Kū and His Warriors Warriors dressed in traditional attire presenting war god Kū on top of Pu'ukoholā Heiau during Ho'oku'ikahi Ceremony. Ho'oku'ikahi Ceremony Ho'okupu offerings placed on Lele Ho'okupu offerings placed on top of the lele during Ho'oku'ikahi ceremony. Trail Paved half mile loop trail Paved half mile loop trail (starting from the visitor center) will takes you to the base of Pu'ukoholā Heiau, passing Mailekini Heiau to Pelekane Bay, and right a long the coastal trail back to the visitor center. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Pu'ukoholā Heiau National Historic Site, Hawaii Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] Pu‘ukoholā Heiau 2020 WORLDFEST FILM FESTIVAL WINNERS In 2020 Harpers Ferry Center (HFC) won eight awards at WorldFest Houston. Many of these can be viewed over the summer through our upcoming film festival in celebration of HFC’s 50th Anniversary. (Note: The Special Jury REMI Award is given for a ranking of A+ and recognizes the top films in each category.) Green trees grow in red dirt canyons unde a cloudy sky. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Quaternary Period—2.58 MYA to Today Massive ice sheets advanced and retreated across North America during much of the Quaternary, carving landscapes in many parks. Bering Land Bridge National Preserve contains geologic evidence of lower sea level during glacial periods, facilitating the prehistoric peopling of the Americas. The youngest rocks in the NPS include the lava of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and the travertine at Yellowstone National Park, which can be just a few hours old. fossil bone bed and murals of mammoths Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center

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