"waa in front of hok hi res" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau

National Historical Park - Hawaiʻi

Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park is located on the west coast of the island of Hawaiʻi. The historical park preserves the site where, up until the early 19th century, Hawaiians who broke a kapu (one of the ancient laws) could avoid certain death by fleeing to this place of refuge or puʻuhonua. The offender would be absolved by a priest and freed to leave. Defeated warriors and non-combatants could also find refuge here during times of battle. The grounds just outside the Great Wall that encloses the puʻuhonua were home to several generations of powerful chiefs.

maps

Official visitor map of Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park (NHP) in Hawaiʻi. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Pu`uhonua O Hōnaunau - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park (NHP) in Hawaiʻi. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail (NHT) in Hawaiʻi. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Ala Kahakai - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail (NHT) in Hawaiʻi. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Driving Map of the Island of Hawaiʻi (Hawaii). Published by the Hawaii Tourism Authority.Hawaiʻi - Driving Map

Driving Map of the Island of Hawaiʻi (Hawaii). Published by the Hawaii Tourism Authority.

Vintage map of Hawaiian Islands - Hawaii South 1951. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Hawaiʻi - Vintage USGS Map - Hawaii South 1951

Vintage map of Hawaiian Islands - Hawaii South 1951. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

Vintage map of Hawaiian Islands - Hawaii North 1951. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Hawaiʻi - Vintage USGS Map - Hawaii North 1951

Vintage map of Hawaiian Islands - Hawaii North 1951. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

https://www.nps.gov/puho/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pu%CA%BBuhonua_o_H%C5%8Dnaunau_National_Historical_Park Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park is located on the west coast of the island of Hawaiʻi. The historical park preserves the site where, up until the early 19th century, Hawaiians who broke a kapu (one of the ancient laws) could avoid certain death by fleeing to this place of refuge or puʻuhonua. The offender would be absolved by a priest and freed to leave. Defeated warriors and non-combatants could also find refuge here during times of battle. The grounds just outside the Great Wall that encloses the puʻuhonua were home to several generations of powerful chiefs. Imagine you had just broken the sacred laws, the kapu, and the only punishment was death. Your only chance of survival is to elude your pursuers and reach the Puʻuhonua, a place of refuge. The Puʻuhonua protected the kapu breaker, defeated warriors, as well as civilians during the time of battle. No physical harm could come to those who reached the boundaries of the Puʻuhonua. From Kailua-Kona: Take Highway 11 south, approximately 20 miles. Between mileposts 103 and 104, at the Hōnaunau Post Office, turn right towards the ocean onto Hwy 160. Travel 3.5 miles and turn left at the Pu'uhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park sign. Travel times will vary due to traffic conditions in North Kona. Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park Visitor Center The Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau Historical Park Visitor Center is open year-round. From Kailua-Kona: Take Highway 11 south, approximately 20 miles. Between mileposts 103 and 104, at the Honaunau Post Office, turn right towards the ocean onto Hwy 160. Travel 3.5 miles and turn left at the Pu'uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park sign. Travel times will vary due to ongoing construction in North Kona. Kōnane in the Royal Grounds A stone papamū (Kōnane playing surface) with Hale o Keawe and Hōnaunau Bay in the background. Explore the picturesque Royal Grounds and catch a game of Kōnane on the shores of Hōnaunau Bay. Hale o Keawe & Keoneʻele Cove A double-hulled canoe sits in Keoneʻele Cove with Hale o Keawe in the background. Hale o Keawe (the royal mausoleum) brings visitors and current cultural practitioners to Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau. The Great Wall and Puʻuhonua Close up image looking along the stones of the Great Wall in the Puʻuhonua with coconut trees The Great Wall separates the Royal Grounds from the Puʻuhonua and demonstrates the impressive Hawaiian dry stacked masonry technique. Hula Demonstration in the Royal Grounds Hula dancers raise their arms to the sky in the sandy Royal Grounds. Hula dancers perform at the annual Cultural Festival. Canoe Hale in the Royal Grounds An a-frame canoe hale (house) in the Royal Grounds Visitors from around the world visit Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau NHP every year to learn more about Hawaiian history and culture Sunset in the Tide Pools A glowing sunset reflects in the calm waters of a tide pool. The Picnic Area is a fantastic place to catch a beautiful Hawaiian sunset. NPS Structural Fire Program Highlights 2014 Intern Accomplishments NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Pu'uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park, Hawaii Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] coast and temple Sea Level Rise & Anchialine Pools Anchialine pools are brackish coastal ecosystems without a surface connection to the ocean, where groundwater and ocean water (from underground) mix. In Hawai‘i, groundwater flows through these pools and out to wetlands and coral reefs making them valuable indicators of broad-scale groundwater recharge and contamination. An anchialine pool in Pu‘uhonua O Hōnaunau National Park Pu'uhonua O Hōnaunau The Pu'uhonua o Hōnaunau is an important Hawaiian ceremonial site bounded on its southern and eastern sides by a massive L-shaped wall, known as the Great Wall, and on its northern and western sides by the ocean. Within the Pu'uhonua there are several other important ceremonial structures including the Hale o Keawe, 'Āle'ale'a Heiau, and the Ancient Heiau. The Great Wall and the Ocean at Pu'uhonua O Honaunau National Historical Park Bird Beak Buffet Learn about birds, the importance of beak shape and size, and what type of food they eat with the fun, interactive activity! A Hawaiian Stilt and a Coot forage for food in ʻAimakapa Fishpond Ho‘onā‘ū - Prolonging an Ancestral Breath: Wahi Pana The first article in the Hoʻonāʻū - Prolonging an Ancestral Breath series by Kahakaʻio Ravenscraft offers perspective on Oceanic cosmology and describes the concept of wahi pana, a place with a pulse, a legendary place. An orange sunset with the sun breaking through the clouds How to Read a Photo Historic photographs can tell a complex story, if you know how to read them! This activity will take you through the simple steps to discover how to read a photograph. (Suggested ages: 9 and up) A historic photograph of a female park ranger in a thatched NPS contact station circa 1960s Ho‘onā‘ū - Prolonging an Ancestral Breath: Kālaimoku The fourth article in the Hoʻonāʻū - Prolonging an Ancestral Breath series by Kahakaʻio Ravenscraft is titled "Kālaimoku" and it speaks to the depth of symbolism in Oceanic traditions. Featuring excerpts from a prayer uttered by the kālai ki‘i over the hafting of a stone-adze. Close up image of koʻi (stone adz) bound with coconut sennit Ho‘onā‘ū - Prolonging an Ancestral Breath: Kū'auhau The third article in the Hoʻonāʻū - Prolonging an Ancestral Breath series by Kahakaʻio Ravenscraft is titled "Ku'auhau" and it speaks to the importance of genealogy in Oceanic traditions. The article features excerpts from Kumulipo, a cosmology preserved from ka wā kahiko. Two men in traditional clothing sit in a canoe house preparing stone adze Ho‘onā‘ū - Prolonging an Ancestral Breath: Moʻoʻōlelo The second article in the Hoʻonāʻū - Prolonging an Ancestral Breath series by Kahakaʻio Ravenscraft offers perspective on mo‘o‘ōlelo, the tradition in spoken word and stories of origin. Featuring excerpts from Kumulipo, a cosmology preserved from ka wā kahiko. A woman wearing a head lei points to wana (sea urchin) in a wooden bowl full of water. National Park Getaway: Pu‘uhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park Step into the past at Pu‘uhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park—the Place of Refuge. For hundreds of years, powerful chiefs and sacred laws ruled Hawai’i under the kapu system. Kapu maintained the balance of life on the islands and preserved traditional values. a wood fence and wood structure Conserving pinnipeds in Pacific Ocean parks in response to climate change The evolutionary record from previous climate perturbations indicates that marine mammals are highly vulnerable but also remarkably adaptable to climatic change in coastal ecosystems. Consequently, national parks in the Pacific, from Alaska to Hawaii, are faced with potentially dramatic changes in their marine mammal fauna, especially pinnipeds (seals and sea lions). black harbor seal National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Hawaiian Values: Aloha ʻĀina What if Earth Day was everyday? Learn more about the Hawaiian concept of aloha ʻāina, a value deeply rooted in Hawaiian culture. A small fishpond surrounded by stacked lava rock walls. Hawaiian Values: Hōʻihi Learn more about the Hawaiian value of hōʻihi. Cultural Practitioners present offerings at Hale o Keawe during the annual Makahiki ceremony. Hawaiian Values: Hoʻolaʻa Learn more about the Hawaiian value of Hoʻolaʻa. Thatched Hale o Keawe sits behind a wooden palisade with carved kiʻi and lele (offering platform). Polynesian Heritage Plants: Ipu Native to tropical Africa and Asia, ipu (bottle gourds) came to the Hawaiian Islands aboard Polynesian voyaging canoes. Learn about the traditional uses and cultural significance of this important Polynesian heritage plant. Ipu (bottle gourds) hang from leafy vines on a slanted trellis Hawaiian Values: Hialele Learn more about the traditional Hawaiian value of hialele or the value of discernment. A semicircle carved kii images with arrow above 2nd image with text "Lono-maka-hialele" Polynesian Heritage Plants: Niu Perhaps one of the most useful plant in ancient Hawaiʻi, the niu or coconut tree was brought to the islands by Polynesian voyagers. As almost every part of this plant is used in a variety of different ways it is sometimes referred to as the Polynesian "Tree of Life". A coconut tree grove with blue sky above and black lava rock below. Plan Like A Park Ranger - Top 10 Tips for Visiting Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau Visiting Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau this summer? Plan like a park ranger and check out these top ten tips for visiting. Half of a a-frame canoe hale (house) with sunset and coconut trees in the background. Hawaiian Values: Pono Learn more about the traditional Hawaiian value of pono: to achieve excellence, prosperity, and a state of equity. A portrait of King Kamehameha III A Place of Freedom: Black History in 19th Century Hawaiʻi For over 200 years, the Black community in Hawaiʻi has influenced some of Hawaii's most vital institutions-- from founding schools to advising Hawaiian Royalty. Learn more about three important Black Americans that help shape the Hawaiʻi. A portrait of Anthony Allen Pu’ukohola Heiau National Historic Site Earthquake Stabilization Project NPS staff repaired damage to the heiau’s traditional masonry caused by a 2006 earthquake. The project included archeological fieldwork, innovative recordation and mapping technology, and public participation. Geographers, archeologists, historical architects, structural engineers and traditional Hawaiian masons restored dry wall masonry. The project documented and stabilized archeological sites and coordinated transference of traditional knowledge and skills.

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