"B. Rainbow Bridge With Navajo Mountain" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Rainbow Bridge

National Monument - Utah

Rainbow Bridge National Monument is administered by Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, southern Utah, United States. Rainbow Bridge is often described as the world's highest natural bridge.

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Official visitor map of Grand Canyon National Park (NP) in Arizona. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Grand Canyon - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Grand Canyon National Park (NP) in Arizona. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (NRA) in Arizona and Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Glen Canyon - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (NRA) in Arizona and Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/rabr/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rainbow_Bridge_National_Monument Rainbow Bridge National Monument is administered by Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, southern Utah, United States. Rainbow Bridge is often described as the world's highest natural bridge. Rainbow Bridge is one of the world's largest known natural bridges. The span has undoubtedly inspired people throughout time--from the neighboring American Indian tribes who consider Rainbow Bridge sacred, to the 85,000 people from around the world who visit it each year. Please visit Rainbow Bridge in a spirit that honors and respects the cultures to whom it is sacred. Rainbow Bridge National Monument is located between Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and the Navajo Nation. There are no roads in the vicinity of the monument. Rainbow Bridge can be reached by boat on Lake Powell or by hiking one of two trails around Navajo Mountain on the Navajo Nation, by permit only. Boat tours are available. The entrance to Forbidding Canyon is located at buoy 49 on Lake Powell. Boaters should be familiar with the Aids to Navigation (buoy) system and use a navigational map. There are no visitor centers at Rainbow Bridge National Monument There are no visitor centers at Rainbow Bridge National Monument There are no campgrounds at Rainbow Bridge National Monument Camping is not permitted at Rainbow Bridge National Monument Rainbow Bridge A large sandstone arch - a natural bridge. Stand here and take in the majesty of Rainbow Bridge - the largest natural bridge in the National Park Service. Aerial View of Rainbow Bridge A view of Rainbow Bridge from the air. Seen from the air, Rainbow Bridge is a graceful curve over the dry stream bed. A Crowd Views Rainbow Bridge From Its Shadow A large crowd faces away from the camera at the scenery. In the desert heat after the rough walk up to Rainbow Bridge from the docks, you take shade where you can get it. Rainbow Bridge Docks Boats and personal watercraft sidle up to docks. The only way to access Rainbow Bridge is by a two-day hike across the Navajo Nation, or a fifty-mile boat trip up Lake Powell. Jim Mike Returns to Rainbow Bridge An elderly Native American man sits in a lawn chair under Rainbow Bridge In 1974, Ute Mountain Ute Jim Mike, one of the guides who led the original expedition to Rainbow Bridge, returned to see how he had led the way for many more visitors. Park Ranger at Second Observation Area Park Ranger standing in front of perfectly curved sandstone arch During the summer season, Park Rangers will be at the observation areas to answer your questions. Anthropogenic Sources Amplify Vibration of Iconic Rainbow Bridge On August 4, 2008, Wall Arch in Arches National Park collapsed. While the forces of gravity and erosion may contribute to the collapse of natural rock formations like Wall Arch, are there other forces that may hasten the collapse of magnificent natural rock structures? The Rainbow Bridge arch on a bright, sunny day Arches National Park’s Free-Flowing Waters Visitors to Arches National Park experience natural free-flowing waters and have water to quench their thirst, thanks to an agreement between the National Park Service and the State of Utah. The sun sits just below the horizon behind Delicate Arch. The Colorado Plateau The Colorado Plateau is centered on the four corners area of the Southwest, and includes much of Arizona, Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico. Hazy Fajada Butte, Chaco Culture National Monument NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Rainbow Bridge National Monument, Utah Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] trail and natural stone bridge Monitoring Night Skies and Natural Soundscapes on the Southern Colorado Plateau Many national parks in the Southern Colorado Plateau region contain large areas of wilderness, where dark night skies and natural soundscapes are important human values. Dark night skies, which depend upon the visibility of stars and other natural components, are diminishing resources in several park units because of anthropogenic activities. Natural soundscapes—that is, the natural sounds of wildlands—are degraded by sounds caused by humans or human technology. Clouds and sky turning red and orange over Navajo National Monument at sunset Veteran Story: John Pflaumer John Pflaumer is the Education and Outreach Coordinator at Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. Ranger holding child scissors Volunteer Story: Brent and Dawn Davis Brent and Dawn Davis have been volunteer photographers for Glen Canyon and Rainbow Bridge since 2018. Night photo of round sandstone arch and starry sky Coloring Glen Canyon Glen Canyon coloring pages. Image is a page like the ones in the coloring book. Download all ten in pdf format for coloring activities. Line drawn image intended for coloring Southwest River Environments In the arid Southwest, water means life, and prehistorically, rivers were the lifelines of the people. The Colorado River flowing through a canyon Climate Change on the Southern Colorado Plateau The combination of high. elevation and a semi-arid climate makes the Colorado Plateau particularly vulnerable to climate change. Climate models predict that over the next 100 years, the Southwest will become warmer and even more arid, with more extreme droughts than the region has experienced in the recent past. One result of climate change may be more, larger floods, like this flash flood in Glen Canyon NRA Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Mesozoic Era The Mesozoic Era (251.9 to 66 million years ago) was the "Age of Reptiles." During the Mesozoic, Pangaea began separating into the modern continents, and the modern Rocky Mountains rose. Dinosaurs, crocodiles, and pterosaurs ruled the land and air. As climate changed and rapid plate tectonics resulted in shallow ocean basins, sea levels rose world-wide and seas expanded across the center of North America. fossil dinosaur skull in rock face Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Defining the Southwest The Southwest has a special place in the American imagination – one filled with canyon lands, cacti, roadrunners, perpetual desert heat, a glaring sun, and the unfolding of history in places like Tombstone and Santa Fe. In the American mind, the Southwest is a place without boundaries – a land with its own style and its own pace – a land that ultimately defies a single definition. Maize agriculture is one component of a general cultural definition of the Southwest. Jurassic Period—201.3 to 145.0 MYA Dinosaur National Monument is home to thousands of dinosaur fossils making it a true “Jurassic Park.” A vast desert covered Southwest North America in the Jurassic, and ancient sand dunes now form tall cliffs in many parks including Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. dinosaur skull in rock face Mesozoic Era The Mesozoic Era (251.9 to 66 million years ago) was the "Age of Reptiles." During the Mesozoic, Pangaea began separating into the modern continents, and the modern Rocky Mountains rose. Dinosaurs, crocodiles, and pterosaurs ruled the land and air. As climate changed and rapid plate tectonics resulted in shallow ocean basins, sea levels rose world-wide and seas expanded across the center of North America. fossil dinosaur skull in rock face Ranger Edmonia-Making Your Own History For Black History Month 2021, Ranger Edmonia shares her experience of trying to find her place in the history of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. Park Ranger drives a boat with the sun at her back Rainbow Bridge: a Traditional Cultural Property The National Park Service has designated Rainbow Bridge a Traditional Cultural Property and International Dark Sky Sanctuary, recognizing the site's historic and ongoing cultural significance to at least six American Indian tribes, and establishing its listing in the National Register of Historic Places. Rainbow Bridge is the first site in Utah to gain a TCP designation, and the first site in the National Park Service to become a dark sky sanctuary. A group of people stand in front of sandstone wall with two aged bronze plaques embedded. Plan Like a Park Ranger: Top 10 Tips for Visiting Glen Canyon National Recreation Area Plan like a Park Ranger with these top 10 tips for visiting Glen Canyon and Rainbow Bridge. Hiker treks along the rocky trail
Glen Canyon National Recreation Area Rainbow Bridge National Monument National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Vol. 13, No. 1, 2017 The official newspaper PHOTO: NPS Trash Trackers Visitor Guide 2017 Glen Canyon Continues The Party Into The Next Century One hundred and one. That’s how old the National Park Service will be turning in 2017. It doesn’t quite measure up to the excitement of turning 100, does it? In 2016, we rolled out the red carpet to celebrate 100 years since the creation of the National Park Service, the agency that takes care of places like Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. Now that it’s 2017, the party hats have been put away and the guests have all gone home. site, where preservation and enjoyment are one and the same. Perhaps your visit will include taking a power boat out on Lake Powell or paddling a kayak down the Colorado River to get a taste for what Glen Canyon was like before the dam was built, creating Lake Powell. Maybe you would prefer to explore Glen Canyon by foot on one of several hiking trails, taking in the sights and sounds of the desert around you. Or have they? Regardless of how you choose to experience Glen Canyon, you are sure to come in contact with the unique resources that make this place so special; stunning rock formations millions of years in the making, cliff dwellings left behind by ancient peoples, the footprints of a coyote hunting for its supper under some of the darkest skies on earth. The National Park Service continues to protect these things and more so that they will be here for the next 100 years, and that is certainly something worth celebrating year after year! The reality is, you don’t make it to be 100 years old if you’re not doing something right. And with over 300 million visitors every year it seems like the public would agree. The National Parks are truly the pride of our nation, where citizens and visitors alike can experience the best that this country has to offer. Glen Canyon National Recreation Area is no exception. Over 3 million visitors per year come here to recreate within this unique National Park Service Park Info Park Map ....................2 Fees ............................2 Weather ......................3 Ranger Programs .........3 Safety .........................4 Volunteer ....................4 Districts South....................... 6-7 Page, Wahweap, Antelope Canyon North........................8-9 Bullfrog, Halls Crossing Escalante....................10 Lees Ferry....................11 Rainbow Bridge ..........12 Highlight Horseshoe Bend..............5 Welcome to Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Rainbow Bridge National Monument, home to Lake Powell and so much more! You may already know about the water-based activities like boating and fishing you can enjoy in your 1.25 million-acre national park, but that’s only a small part of our story. We have seemingly endless trails, routes, roads and canyons to explore by foot, bike or vehicle, which will impart a sense of discovery as you share in the rich history of this national treasure. Throughout the park, you’ll find evidence of our region’s past as a seabed, dinosaur habitat, sacred land of American Indian tribes, and home to Mormon pioneers. Our cultural, geological, paleontological and historical resources are only rivaled by our beautiful views. Take some time to speak with our rangers and plan a Glen Canyon trip you’ll remember forever! William Shott Superintendent Glen Canyon Overview Glen Canyon’s 1.25 million acres were set aside for the National Park Service by Congress in 1972. Its vast landscape is filled with rugged canyon lands, sandstone mesas, rivers, and a 186-mile-long reservoir called Lake Powell. Getting from the one end of the park to the other requires many hours by boat or by car. Most visitors find it impractical to visit more than one district in a single trip. For some people, it takes a lifetime to even begin to know all of the wonders Glen Canyon and Rainbow Bridge have to offer. Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Rainbow Bridge National Monument During Major John Wesley Powell’s famous 1869 expedition on the Colorado River, he noted, “So we have a curious ensemble of wonderful features - carved walls, royal arches, glens, alcove gulches, mounds, and monuments. From which of these features shall we select a name? We decide to call it Glen Canyon.” National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior CANYONLANDS NATIONAL PARK Superintendent William Shott Orange Cliffs Park Address P.O. Box 1507 691 Scenic View Rd Page AZ 86040 Website Information nps.gov/glca nps.gov/rabr Email: glca_carl_hayden@nps.gov facebook.com/glencanyonnra youtube.com/glencanyonnra GLEN CANYON NATIONAL RECREATION AREA Park Headquarters Open weekdays 7am-4pm 928-608-6200 928-608-6259 fax The National Park Service cares for the special places saved by the American people so that all may experience our heritage. Hite CAP
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE • U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Foundation Document Overview Glen Canyon National Recreation Area Rainbow Bridge National Monument Arizona and Utah Contact Information For more information about the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Rainbow Bridge National Monument Foundation Document, contact: glca_superintendent@nps.gov or 928-608-6205 or write to: Superintendent, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Rainbow Bridge National Monument P.O. Box 1507, Page, AZ 86040-1507 Purpose Significance Significance statements express why Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Rainbow Bridge National Monument resources and values are important enough to merit national park unit designation. Statements of significance describe why an area is important within a global, national, regional, and systemwide context. These statements are linked to the purpose of the park unit, and are supported by data, research, and consensus. Significance statements describe the distinctive nature of the park and inform management decisions, focusing efforts on preserving and protecting the most important resources and values of the park unit. Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, located at the center of the Colorado Plateau, provides for public enjoyment through diverse land- and waterbased recreational opportunities, and protects scenic, scientific, natural, and cultural resources on Lake Powell, the Colorado River, its tributaries, and surrounding lands. Rainbow Bridge National Monument protects an extraordinary natural bridge that captures public and scientific interest with its rainbow form and appearance. • The Colorado River and its many tributaries, including the Dirty Devil, Paria, Escalante, and San Juan rivers, carve through the Colorado Plateau to form a landscape of dynamic and complex desert and water environments. • The vast, rugged landscapes of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area provide an unparalleled spectrum of diverse land- and water-based recreational opportunities for visitors of wide-ranging interests and abilities. • Glen Canyon National Recreation Area preserves a record of more than 10,000 years of human presence, adaptation, and exploration. This place remains significant for many descendant communities, providing opportunities for people to connect with cultural values and associations that are both ancient and contemporary. • The deep, 15-mile-long, narrow gorge below the dam provides a glimpse of the high canyon walls, ancient rock art, and a vestige of the riparian and beach terrace environments that were seen by John Wesley Powell’s Colorado River expedition in 1869, providing a stark contrast to the impounded canyons of Lake Powell. • Rainbow Bridge is one of the world’s largest natural bridges and is a premier example of eccentric stream erosion in a remote area of the Colorado Plateau. • For many indigenous peoples in the Four Corners region, Rainbow Bridge is a spiritually occupied landscape that is inseparable from their cultural identities and traditional beliefs. Fundamental Resources and Values Fundamental resources and values are those features, systems, processes, experiences, stories, scenes, sounds, smells, or other attributes determined to merit primary consideration during planning and management processes because they are essential to achieving the purpose of the park and maintaining its significance. Below are the fundamental resources and values of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Rainbow Bridge National Monument. • Heritage Resources: Glen Canyon National Recreation Area is the steward of heritage resources exemplified by the archeological and historic sites, cultural landscapes, and traditional cultural properties that illustrate the connection of people with the landscape of the Glen Canyon region. • • • • • • • • • • • Photo by Gary Ladd • Lake Powell: Lake Powell, set dramatically against a backdrop of eroded red rock canyons and mesas, is the largest man-made lake in North America and is widely recognized by boating enthusiasts as one of the premier water-based recreation destinations in the world. • Landscape: The vast landscape of Glen Canyon contains rugged water- and wind-carved canyons, buttes, mesas, rivers, seeps, springs, and hanging gardens where diverse habitats sustain an array of endemic, rare, and relict plant and animal communities. • Paleontology: Glen Canyon National Recreation Area preserves one of the most complete sections of Mesozoic strata in the world; new discoveries continuously add to our scientific understanding of the past. • Water: Water quality and quantity is essential for public outdoor recreational use and enjoyment and for sustaining terrestrial and aquatic life in the high desert. • Rainbow Bridge: The bridge itself is a fundamental resource. • Traditional Cultural Property and Values: Rainbow Bridge and the immediately surrounding landscape are considered sacred by, and are vitally linked with
Rainbow Bridge National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Rainbow Bridge National Monument Glen Canyon National Recreation Area A Century of Preservation Rainbow Bridge National Monument was established May 30, 1910 by President William Howard Taft as a scientific example of “eccentric stream erosion”. The 1906 Antiquities Act, signed into law by President Theodore Roosevelt, provided himself and future presidents the “power of the pen”, the authority to set aside sites of cultural or natural significance as national monuments. In 1906, the southwestern United States was still a frontier and the existence of Rainbow Bridge was yet unknown to the outside world. The Discovery Party It was in 1909, that Anglos discovered Rainbow Bridge, the same year that Commodore Perry reached the North Pole. A dozen men from two different groups - one faction from University of Utah led by Professor Byron Cummings and another with the federal surveyor William Douglass – decided to join forces. Departing from the Oljato Trading Post in Utah, they persevered through 4 ½ days in the vast, carved, canyon wilderness of southern Utah/northern Arizona. The expedition was guided A Natural Wonder by two Paiutes, Jim Mike and Nasja Begay, and also included John Wetherill, who operated the trading post at Oljato. It was Wetherill who was first to arrive under the bridge, on his horse, about noon on August 14, 1909. But discovery - actually proving the bridge’s existence - was not the only goal of the 1909 expedition group. They also wanted to survey the bridge and have it set aside as a national monument. One-hundred years later, we reap the rewards of their efforts. Eight and a half months after the discovery and survey, President Taft proclaimed Rainbow Bridge a National Monument. Today’s visitor may boat to within a mile of the bridge via Lake Powell, a much easier trip than that of the discovery party. Despite its increased accessibility, it still sits in one of the most remote locales in the lower 48 states. The visitor who takes a moment to soak in their surroundings can still feel that they have found the middle of nowhere. A Park Ranger welcomes visitors to the Rainbow Bridge docks EXPERIENCE YOUR AMERICA™ Back in Time Rainbow Bridge Spanning Cultures in a Sacred Landscape In 1910, Taft preserved more than the physically impressive bridge (290 feet tall x 275 feet wide), he also preserved an earlier human connection to the bridge that likely dates back thousands of years. The Douglass/Cummings Party found a 3x5 foot oval fire pit made of rocks near the base of the bridge. Recently, charred wood fragments were carbon dated to about AD 540. Standing before the bridge, it’s easy to ponder when that first indigenous visitor arrived at the bridge, and what his/her thoughts were. Preservation of an ancient paleo environment was assured with that stroke of a pen in 1910 as well. One approaches the bridge on a sandstone surface that was deposited in the early Jurassic Age, roughly 200 million years ago when dinosaurs roamed the area. The bridge itself is sculpted from the hardened sediments of an enormous, harsh desert that was near sea level and much closer to the equator - the Sahara Desert of the Jurassic Age. Remains of ancient rock hearth found near the base of Rainbow Bridge Fossilized footprint of a Dilophosaurus, found at the viewing area Rainbow Bridge appears much as it did the moment of its discovery by the earliest human visitor. Today’s visitor to Rainbow Bridge National Monument benefits from the wisdom, now 100 years in duration, to protect precious sites such as Rainbow Bridge, for many centuries to come. Rainbow Bridge from the sky EXPERIENCE YOUR AMERICA™
Rainbow Bridge National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Rainbow Bridge National Monument Rainbow Bridge Timeline The land that comprises Rainbow Bridge National Monument was traditionally used by Navajo, Paiute, Ute, and Hopi Peoples. Prior to these tribes or nations, Ancestral Puebloans and earlier indigenous people lived in and used the area. 1848 Mexico ceded much of the Southwest to the U.S. All unappropriated lands become public domain. The U.S. recognized the validity of any earlier claims by Mexico or Spain. Aboriginal titles were extinguished by conquest by either Spain, Mexico, or the U.S.; in the case of the Navajo, by all three. 1884 The Navajo Reservation was created by Executive Order in what was then Utah Territory. 1892 Previously set aside reservation lands west of the 110th Meridian (west of Mexican Hat, UT) were removed from the reservation and restored to public domain, including Rainbow Bridge 1906 June 8, 1906, the Antiquities Act was passed into law. This authorized the President to establish a site or area of cultural or natural significance or of scientific interest as a national monument. 1906 President Theodore Roosevelt established the nation’s first national monument, Devil’s Tower National Monument in Wyoming. 1909 On August 14, 1909, The Douglas/Cummings party, guided by two Native Americans, Jim Mike and Nasja Begay reached Rainbow Bridge after 4 ½ days journey in the wilderness. This was the first official Anglo sighting of Rainbow Bridge. 1910 On May 30, 1910, President William Howard Taft proclaimed Rainbow Bridge National Monument, the nations 25th. Rainbow Bridge was set aside as a scientific example of “Eccentric Stream Erosion.” 1913 Former President Theodore Roosevelt and author Zane Grey both visited Rainbow Bridge in separate parties. Accounts of their expeditions were published in Harpers Weekly and National Geographic. 1916 The National Park Service was created with the signing of the Organic Act by President William McKinley. The administration of Rainbow Bridge National Monument was transferred to the National Park Service and John Wetherill became its first Custodian at a salary of $1.00 per year. EXPERIENCE YOUR AMERICA™ 1924 The Richardson Brothers completed construction of Rainbow Lodge and began packing visitors into Rainbow Bridge at a cost of $20.00 per night. 1933 Public law restored back to the Navajo reservation “all vacant, unreserved, and undisposed of public lands...” within the area encompassed by the 1892 legislation. (Rainbow Bridge was reserved; so it wasnot included in lands given back.) 1951 Rainbow Lodge burnt to the ground. Co-owner Barry Goldwater blamed it on “a cowboy smoking in the back room.” 1956 The Colorado River Storage Project Act was passed. Amongst other things, it provided for the construction of Glen Canyon Dam. The Glen Canyon Dam project would begin the next year. 1957 Construction of the Glen Canyon Dam began. 1964 Diversion tunnels of Glen Canyon Dam were closed and Lake Powell began to fill. 1972 Glen Canyon National Recreation Area was established. 1978 American Indian Religious Freedom Act was passed into law. This legislation stipulated that, in addition to other National Park Service Units, Rainbow Bridge National Monument would be afforded protection on behalf of the five tribes that claim it as a sacred site. 1980 Lake Powell rose to full pool (3,700 feet) for the first time, impounding 46 feet of water below Rainbow Bridge. 1993 Rainbow Bridge General Management Plan was approved via consultation with the 5 tribes or nations that claim cultural affiliations with Rainbow Bridge (Navajo, Hopi, San Juan Southern Paiute, Kaibab Paiute, and White Mesa Ute.) 1996 An Executive Order was passed which would reinforce or strengthen the administrative rights of the tribes or nations mandated as participants under the American Indian Religious Freedom Act. 2009 August 14, 2009 marks 100 years since the Anglo first discovery of Rainbow Bridge. 2010 May 30, 1910; The 100th anniversary of Rainbow Bridge National Monument. EXPERIENCE YOUR AMERICA™
Glen Canyon National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Glen Canyon National Recreation Area Rainbow Bridge National Monument Rainbow Bridge North Trail Guide Permits are required from the Navajo Nation for hiking and camping along this trail. Please note: there is no camping permitted within the boundaries of Rainbow Bridge National Monument. Make sure you know your location when you camp. Prior to making your plans please call the LeChee Chapter House (928-698-2800) south of Page, AZ or the Navajo Nation Parks and Recreation Department in Window Rock, AZ (928-871-6647) for permits. For additional information go to the following web site: http://www.navajonationparks.org/permits.htm Hiking this trail is not recommended during the cold and wet conditions of the winter months nor during the heat and flash flooding of the summer months. Typically the best months to complete this hike are March through Mid-May, and October and November. To reach the North (Navajo Mountain Trading Post) Trailhead from Page, AZ Driving Instructions • At the intersection of Hwy 98 and Coppermine Rd (Big Lake Trading Post), take Hwy 98 East 51.1 miles to the Inscription House Trading Post turnoff (Indian Rd 16). • Take Indian Rd 16 25.1 miles on pavement and 5.4 miles on dirt to the Navajo Mountain Trading Post fork - bear right and drive about 8.5 miles past the Navajo Mountain Trading Post. • Along the main road, it is 3.7 miles past the trading post to a 4-way intersection with several structures including a stone warehouse. • Go straight through the intersection for 2.8 miles, road forks here. • Take the straight fork (across earthen dam), road forks again after 0.4 miles. • Take left fork 1.6 miles until road ends at Cha Canyon. • Fork right by corral and park at base of cliff. Trailhead (no sign) starts at end of road. Trail Description The following information has been compiled from an archival NPS trail guide and hikes completed in October, 2003, May, 2004, and April 2008. This is considered by some to be the more scenic of the two trails to Rainbow Bridge. The trail follows the north slope of Navajo Mountain and exhibits extremes in temperature. Water is generally available, but drought can dry these sources. The trail is not marked, and in some places is difficult to follow. The first half of the trail is criss-crossed with various livestock and wildlife trails and paths to summer hogans, and can confuse the unwary hiker – be alert. This is a minimum two day round trip – three days recommended. Mileages are approximate Mile 0 1 3.5 5 6.5 10 11.5 15 17.5 Trail Notes The road to the Trailhead is rough and rocky, high center or 4W drive vehicles are recommended. Know where you are going prior to driving out there. Trailhead - No water available, good camping areas. Beware – no trailhead sign. Trail enters canyon and continues on the other side. Close gate behind you as you start down Cha Canyon. Cha Canyon - Creek is usually running. Bald Rock Canyon – Deep, good campsite, water (intermittent as in all following streams). Interesting trail construction. Nice scenic view from the top. Cave on right wall ¼ mile below stream crossing. Pass an old hogan, go up sandy hill behind small Navajo sweat house. Hill is crisscrossed with many small animal trails. The main trail becomes more apparent on top of hill. As you go down into the canyon, notice the bedrock was notched out like stairs. This was done so that pack mules and horses wouldn’t slip and fall on the slick rock. N’asja Creek – Good campsite, picnic table, water available – You will pass an old sweat lodge ½ mile further, then you’ll see Owl Bridge on your left side. Do not climb or walk on top of the bridge. Awesome views as you climb out of the canyon. You’ll pass another old hogan on the left on the way to Oak Canyon. 10 Oak Canyon – Water is available. Poor campsites except further downstream. Take the trail heading up the hill, south, “not downstream”. No water available for approx. 3 miles from Oak Canyon. 11.5 Trail enters Bridge Canyon, via long, narrow, downhill trek. Water & campsites available further down the canyon. Can become VERY HOT with the heat reflecting off canyon walls. Bridge Creek joins Redbud Creek. This is where the North Trail meets the South Trail. Go to your right, downstream to Rainbow Bridge. Water and campsites are available. Echo Camp – Nearest campsite to Rainbow Bridge National Monument. Please close the last gate behind you. Rainbow Bridge – Please avoid re-vegetation areas. EXPERIENCE YOUR AMERICA™
Glen Canyon National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Glen Canyon National Recreation Area Rainbow Bridge National Monument Rainbow Bridge South Trail Guide Permits are required from the Navajo Nation for hiking and camping along this trail. Please note: there is no camping permitted within the boundaries of Rainbow Bridge National Monument. Make sure you know your location when you camp. Prior to making your plans please call the LeChee Chapter House (928-698-2800) south of Page, AZ or the Navajo Nation Parks and Recreation Department in Window Rock, AZ (928-871-6647) for permits. For additional information go to the following web site: http://www.navajonationparks.org/permits.htm Hiking this trail is not recommended during the cold and wet conditions of the winter months nor during the heat and flash flooding of the summer months. Typically the best months to complete this hike are March through Mid-May, and October and November. To reach the South (Rainbow Lodge) Trailhead from Page, AZ Driving Instructions • At the intersection of Hwy 98 and Coppermine Rd (Big Lake Trading Post), take Hwy 98 East 51.1 miles to the Inscription House Trading Post turnoff (Navajo Rt 16). • Take Navajo Rt 16 25.1 miles on pavement and 5.4 miles on dirt to the Navajo Mountain Trading Post fork - bear left and drive 4.6 miles to another fork. • At the fork, which has a Pinon pine post with IL license plate nailed to it, bear right, drive 0.7 miles to the Navajo Mountain water tank filling area - keep going straight - the track no longer resembles a road and you will need to engage your 4WD. From here it is 1.4 miles to the ruins of the Rainbow Lodge and the Rainbow Bridge Trailhead. Trail Description The following information has been compiled from an archival NPS trail guide and hikes completed in October, 2003, May, 2004, and April 2008. Mileages are approximated via usage of archival trail guides and through accounts of trail hikes. Hiking times will vary, between nine and twelve hours. In this guide miles and hiking times have been modified and may not reflect posted mileages along trail. Hiking times assuming a nine hour hike are included with the exception of the section of trail through Redbud Pass. There has been significant spalling or rock falls in Redbud Pass since 2004. There are more boulders and drop-offs to maneuver over, thus hiking times through that section will likely be slower than previously recorded. It is recommended that this hike be planned as a two-day trip for all but the most experienced hikers. The South trail, beginning at the Rainbow Lodge ruins, is not maintained. It is the steeper, rougher trail of the North and South trails. The trail is marked mainly with stone cairns and iron pipe mile-posts. Water is not available for the first eight to nine miles of this hike. The only route signs are at Redbud Canyon, Redbud Pass and Echo Camp. Mile Time Trail Notes (hr:min) 0.5 -Rainbow Lodge Ruins – trail begins at a rock cairn beyond cabin sites elevation 6300 feet. Trail follows southwest side of Navajo Mountain – goes into and out of 3 canyons – several side trails, with main trail keeping to the right. No water – pinon, juniper cover. 2.5 1:10 Horse Canyon, second of three to be crossed 3.5 2:45 Mile-post 3:20 High Camp - no water 3:30 Mile-post 6 3:35 Yabut Pass ("Sunset Pass" inscribed in rock) – spectacular view into Cliff Canyon – 1600 foot drop in first 2 miles – hikers should keep a wary eye on the trail throughout this steep descent from Yabut Pass and healthy knees should be considered a requisite to hiking this section of trail. 4:15 Mile-post 8 4:45 Cliff Canyon – elevation 4800 feet 4:55 Mile-post 5:30 Mile-post 9 5:35 First Water Campsite – pit toilet and garbage pit are full. Usually water here – some shade, good bedding, no firewood. 11 6:05 You have followed the stream to this junction with Redbud Canyon – Cliff Canyon turns slightly left. Confusing confluence of canyons; if you don’t find the cairns, navigate toward a very large arch-shaped alcove high on a canyon wall to the left ahead. Redbud Pass is marked by a rock cairn on the right and route sign. 6:30 Mile-post 11.4 6:40 Redbud Pass blasted by Wetherill/Bernheimer in 1922 and named by them – see inscriptions. Trail improvements by NPS, May 1957. Significant rock falls in last four years have obstructed the trail. 12.4 Redbud Creek comes in from your right, you tend left. 13.3 Intersection with the North (Navajo Mountain Trading Post) Trail – Bridge Creek, continue downstream. 7:15 Mile-post 7:30 Second Water Campsite – shade, usually water here. 15.1 9:00 Gate – please close. 15.2 9:05 Echo Camp – spring at campsite – nearest campsite to Rainbow Bridge National Monument. 16.0 9:15 Rainbow Bridge – please avoid re-vegetation areas. 17.2 Rainbow Bridge Docks, toilets but no running water, accessible by boat only. Trail Notes compiled by NPS Interpreter Chuck Smith with revision of trail notes from Kirk Robinson

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