by Alex Gugel , all rights reserved

Redwood

National and State Parks - California

Redwood National and State Parks are a string of protected forests, beaches and grasslands along Northern California’s coast. Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park has trails through dense old-growth woods. Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park is home to Fern Canyon, with its high, plant-covered walls. Roosevelt elk frequent nearby Elk Prairie. Giant redwood clusters include Redwood National Park’s Lady Bird Johnson Grove.

maps

Official visitor map of Redwood National and State Parks (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Redwood - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Redwood National and State Parks (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Redwood National and State Parks (NP) in California with descriptions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Redwood - Visitor Map with description

Official visitor map of Redwood National and State Parks (NP) in California with descriptions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Recreation Map of Lacks Creek Management Area (MA) in the BLM Arcata Field Office area in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Lacks Creek - Recreation Map

Recreation Map of Lacks Creek Management Area (MA) in the BLM Arcata Field Office area in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

brochures

Visitor Guide to Redwood National and State Parks (NP & SP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Redwood National and State Parks - Visitor Guide 2021

Visitor Guide to Redwood National and State Parks (NP & SP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/redw https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redwood_National_and_State_Parks Redwood National and State Parks are a string of protected forests, beaches and grasslands along Northern California’s coast. Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park has trails through dense old-growth woods. Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park is home to Fern Canyon, with its high, plant-covered walls. Roosevelt elk frequent nearby Elk Prairie. Giant redwood clusters include Redwood National Park’s Lady Bird Johnson Grove. Most people know Redwood as home to the tallest trees on Earth. But the Parks also protect vast prairies, oak woodlands, wild rivers, and 40 miles of rugged coastline. People have lived in this verdant landscape since time immemorial. Together, the National Park Service and California State Parks are managing and restoring these lands for the inspiration, enjoyment, and education of all. Redwood National and State Parks is located in northernmost coastal California - almost on the Oregon border. The parks are about 60-miles long, with four visitor centers from north to south. We are a six to seven-hour drive (325 miles) north of San Francisco, a six-hour drive (330 miles) south of Portland, OR and a four-hour drive (170 miles) west of Redding, CA. Crescent City Information Center Located in the bottom floor of park headquarters. Information, picnic area, junior ranger program and retail sales. Corner of 2nd and K Streets in downtown Crescent City. Hiouchi Visitor Center Northern-most park visitor center located 9-miles east of Crescent City on Hwy 199. Exhibits about Tolowa culture and art, redwood ecology, park information, orientation film, junior ranger program, bookstore and retail sales. Jedediah Smith Visitor Center Located in the Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park campground. Seasonal operation dependent on staffing. Information, exhibits, junior ranger programs, bookstore and retail sales. 9 miles northeast of Crescent City. Located inside the Jedediah Smith Redwoods Campground. Prairie Creek Visitor Center Located just off the Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway - in the heart of Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park. Exhibits about the Civilian Conservation Corps and redwood ecology, park information, junior ranger program, bookstore and retail sales. Located in the southern end of the Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway - in the heart of Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park. 6.5 miles north of Orick. Thomas H. Kuchel Visitor Center Southern-most visitor center in the parks and located on a beach. Exhibits about Yurok culture, art and history, redwood ecology, park information, junior ranger program, orientation film, bookstore and retail sales. 1-mile south of Orick, located on Freshwater Beach. Look for the brown highway signs for Kuchel Visitor Center / Park Information. Do not rely on online maps to give accurate directions: this visitor center is NOT in the town of Orick. Elk Prairie Campgound Located in the heart of Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park. Elk Prairie Campground fee 35.00 Per site. Elk Prairie Campground Sign Brown and yellow park sign. This developed campground is located on the edge of a large meadow. Elk Prairie Campground entrance kiosk Two vehicles next to a brown building. Redwood trees in the background. Reservations are essential for this popular campground. Elk Prairie Cabin Brown and green building with ADA ramp. Four ADA accessible rustic cabins can be reserved. Restrooms at Elk Prairie Campground Brown building in front of redwood trees. Basic facilities are located at this campground. Example of site at Elk Prairie Campground A trailer, picnic table and bear-proof storage box. Several sites have little shade or privacy. Example of camp site at Elk Prairie Campground A tent and picnic table in the shade. Most sites are located under trees and offer some privacy. Campers at Elk Prairie Campground A park ranger chats with a family sitting at a picnic table. Two tents are nearby. Camping under the redwoods is enjoyed by many here. Gold Bluffs Beach Campground Located on the coast within Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park - in the southern part of the parks. Access is on with a narrow, dirt road. Recreational vehicles and trailers are not advised. Gold Bluff Beach camping fee 35.00 Per drive up site Tents at Gold Bluffs Beach campground Two tents sit in sand dunes and at a grassy site Gold Bluffs Beach campsites are all exposed to fog and strong winds. Gold Bluffs Beach restrooms. A small building and a tent are seen in front of a steep bluff. Basic facilities are located at this cliff-side campground. GBB food lockers Metal food storage locker, campfire ring and picnic table. Proper storing of food will keep bears away from the campground. Campsite Picnic table, fire ring and food locker Each campsite has a picnic table, food locker and fire pit. Hike and bike site Sandy trail leads to a signed "hike and bike" site. A backcountry hike and bike site is for those that arrived without a vehicle. Jedediah Smith Campground Located 9 miles east of Crescent City. The northernmost of the four campgrounds in the parks. $35 fee. Discounts with different national and state passes. 86 sites. Flush toilets and showers. No electric, no water or sewer hookups. Dump station available. Jedediah Smith Camping Fee $35 per site, per night. $17.50 with federal Senior , or Access pass. $17.50 with California Parks Disabled pass. Free with California Park Veterans pass. Site fee 35.00 Per site Jedediah Smith Campground Entrance Kiosk A pickup pulls upto the campground Jedediah Smith Campground ampitheater Wooden seats in front of a slideshow screen Ranger-led evening programs are offered in the summer. Jedediah Smith tent camping Tent camping in the redwoods. Campground sign A brown and yellow campground sign. Wooden campground sign. Cabin in Jedediah Smith Campground A brown cabin with accessible ramp and stairs Some bare cabins are available in this campground. Campground site A typical sized site at this campground. Jedediah Smith campground site A picnic able and food storage lockers surrounded by vegetation. Small campsites are common in this campground. Mill Creek Campground Located in Del Norte Coast Redwoods State Park. This is 6.7 miles south of Crescent City. Campsites are surrounded by maple, alder and second-growth redwood trees. Mill Creek Campground fee 35.00 Per site Mill Creek Campsite Picnic table, fire ring and food locker Second-growth forests surround this campground. Facilities at Mill Creek Campground Wooden building underneath trees Basic facilities are located at this campground. Mill Creek Amphitheater Wooden benches in front of a an outdoor screen Ranger-led programs are offered here. Mill Creek Amphitheater seating Large redwood stump behind wooden seats Stumps from old-growth redwoods are common at this campground. Campsite at Mill Creek Campground Picnic table, fire ring and food locker Leave No Trace means leaving no food out for bears. Mill Creek Campground Entrance Kiosk A small brown building bisects a road. A car is on the right. The entrance kiosk is staffed. Fish-eye view of Redwood canopy View from forest floor looking straight up. Ferns as seen close up and redwood trunks meet. The redwood forest is a complicated and beautiful series of habitats. Visitors Plan Their Redwood Trip Five young women read the park map. A great redwood trip starts with good trip planning. Howland Hill Road Redwood trees line a narrow dirt road. With a small car, you can expericne close-up Redwoods along a century old, narrow road. Tide pooling at Enderts Beach Two visitors looking at tidepools. We have forty miles of coastline to explore. Ranger Program at Klamath River Overlook Visitors chatting with a ranger above a river mouth. Coastal overlooks provide amazing places to whale watch.. and more. Visitors on walkway to Lady Bird Johnson Grove Three people stand on a walkway in the trees. It is foggy. Visitors to the Lady Bird Johnson Grove cross a road using a walkway. Family Enjoys the Redwoods Two adults and child look upwards into a forest Millions of people visit the park to enjoy the forests. A New Junior Ranger A ranger helps a father and son learn about being a junior ranger. Becoming a junior ranger at Redwoods is a fun and educational for the whole family. "Big Tree" wayside. Visitors pose with one of the widest Redwood trees. For those short of time, the "Big Tree" offers easy access for all to a very photogenic tree. Incoming Tide at Redwood National Park Rocks, rockpools and waves 40 miles of coastline are part of Redwood National Park Nurse log on the side of a trail. A tree stump is covered with plants. A fallen redwood tree will be on the forest floor for centuries providing habitat for a new generation of plants and animals. Ranger and Visitors in the Redwoods Two adults talk with a park ranger under foggy trees Park rangers help visitor learn about and safely enjoy the Redwoods. Trillium Falls A small waterfall cascades past different trees The Trillium Falls Trail is a popular, easy and family friendly walk. How Tall is that Redwood? Three adults stand and look curiously toward the tree tops From the forest floor we can only see about a third of any old redwood tree. How wide is that Redwood? Two adults and a child stand next to a tree while a ranger nearby opens his arms wide. The height and size of redwood trees can be hard to measure. Having fun under the redwoods Four adults stand on a trail surrounded by redwood trees Taking a walk on the trail through redwood groves is great fun Redwood Ranger in the mist Fog surrounds tall redwoods on a trail. A park ranger stands in the distance. Park Rangers help tell the stories and meanings of the park to visitors. Tall Trees Grove from the creek Gray cobbles on the foreground and 300foot redwoods behind. 300 foot redwood redwoods next to Redwood Creek. Footbridge to Lady Bird Johnson Grove A footbridge with people crosses a road on a foggy day Summer fog is frequent in the redwoods A family walks in Stout Grove A trail meanders into a grove of tall trees. A family is seen at the far end of the trail. Redwood forests are wonderful places to walk, relax and look up. Coastline at Redwood National Park Waves run-up on a beach, and sea stack rocks are seen in the distance. 40 miles of protected coastline are part of Redwood National and State Parks Fern Canyon Green ferns cover two natural walls cut by a creek. A calm creek is covered with grey cobbles. Fern Canyon is a popular - and busy - summer desination. A Redwood Grove Reddy-brown colored redwoods Over a hundred miles of trails lead you to places like this. Autumn Colors in the redwood parks A trail underneath trees with orange and yellow leaves Big leaf maples in the autumn. Fire scarred giants A circle of redwood trees with black fire scars. Fire has always been a part of a redwood tree's history. Redwoods Resprouting Young redwood sprouts grow off a horizontal redwood log New shoots grow off a fallen redwood tree. Trillium Falls Trail A trail and bridge crosses a tree-line gully. A short walk leads visitors to a series of small cascades. Surrounded by old-growth redwoods. A visitor stands next to a forest of enormous red and brown colored trees. Walking though redwood forests is a beautiful experience. Autumn leaves in the redwood parks Orange and red leaves on maple trees. Maples and oak trees show fall colors in the redwood parks. Enderts Beach Rugged coastal cliffs drop to blue ocean and waves. Pink flowers in the foreground. The park protects forty miles of rugged coastline and marine protected areas.. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Redwood National Park and State Parks, California Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] sunlight through trees California Groundcone Curious about the California groundcone in Oregon and California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Purple groundcone standing next to similar looking Douglas-fir cone. 2010 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2010 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards California Condor Species description of the California Condor (Gymnogyps californianus). An adult condor with the wing tag label number 80 stands over a juvenile condor. NPS Structural Fire Program Highlights 2014 Intern Accomplishments Carpenter Ant Curious about carpenter ants? Explore their natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. close up photo of carpenter ant Come for the Redwoods, Stay for the River In honor of the 2018 50th Anniversary of the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act, the National Park Foundation funded new gear for Redwood National and State Parks’ free ranger-led kayak program on the Smith Wild and Scenic River. Kayakers float down the calm green river with yellow safety gear on. Park Air Profiles - Redwood National and State Parks Air quality profile for Redwood National and State Parks. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Redwood NSP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Redwood NSP. Candlelight walk in redwood forest Gold Bluffs Beach Dune Restoration Youth and crew leader discuss dune restoration Redwood Creek Winter Birding In spring 2018, local bird watchers (commonly called “birders”) have been a twitter over several unusual or rare birds sighted near the Redwood Creek estuary. A Tundra Swan is flanked by two Common Mergansers Riverbank Lupine Curious about riverbank lupine (Lupinus rivularis) in northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. tall stems bearing purple and white flowers, with green grassland and mountains in the background California Condor Reintroduction & Recovery A tagged California condor flies free. NPS Photo/ Don Sutherland A wing-tagged California condor flying in the blue sky. Pileated Woodpecker Curious about the pileated woodpecker in Oregon and California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Face and front of a woodpecker, with black body, red crest, and small blue berry in its beak. Wildland Fire in Douglas Fir: Western United States Douglas fir is widely distributed throughout the western United States, as well as southern British Columbia and northern Mexico. Douglas fir is able to survive without fire, its abundantly-produced seeds are lightweight and winged, allowing the wind to carry them to new locations where seedlings can be established. Close-up of Douglas fir bark and needles. Rough-legged Hawk Curious about our wintering visitor to Oregon and California, the rough-legged hawk? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Large hawk in flight with dark and light coloring underneath. Vascular plant hyperdiversity in high-elevation riparian communities of National Park Service units in the Klamath Network Monitoring data provide evidence of high vascular plant diversity in riparian environments. This surprising pattern indicates a high conservation significance of these park environments. Stream and forest scene at Lassen Volcanic National Park (Credit: NPS Photo) Pacific Poison Oak Curious about Pacific poison oak in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. A dense thicket of wavy edged, green leaves with some smaller, shiny, reddish leaves in the center. Short-eared Owl Curious about the short-eared owl in Oregon and California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Owl with short feather tufts above eyes, buffy, streaked breast, and brownish body. Giant Water Bug Curious about giant water bugs in Oregon and California? Explore their natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network.” Brown, flattened but with many whitish, columnar eggs attached to its back. Coast Redwoods v. Climate Change Climate change caused by human greenhouse gas emissions has already begun to take a toll on trees in California. In fact, it is tied to a doubling of tree mortality in the Western US from 1955 to 2007 via increasing droughts, wildfires, and insect infestations. But what might climate change mean for California's iconic coast redwood trees? Grove of coast redwoods. Ladybug Curious about ladybugs in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore their natural history in this edition of our monthly "Featured Creature," brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Cluster of small orange ladybug beetles with black spots on their backs, on vegetation. Redwood National Park - Managing a Landscape with Prescribed Fire in an Era of Increasing Wildland Fire Complexity Early FY19 was a challenging time for Redwood National and State Parks to complete its fuels management program of work due to an especially destructive wildfire season in northern California, including the Carr fire and the Camp fire. Despite these factors, the park was able to complete six prescribed fires for a total of 840 acres. A firefighter in a forest holds a driptorch, while small flames climb the nearby wooded hillside. Anna's Hummingbird Curious about the Anna's hummingbird in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Small, green hummingbird with narrow bill and iridescent rose-colored feathers on throat and crown. White Alder Curious about the white alder in Oregon and California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Oval, dark green and ridged leaves of a white alder, with small, round, cone-like female catkins. World CA Condor Update – 2019 An update on the world California Condor population for 2019. A close-up of the pink bald head of a California condor with a ruffle of black feathers. Preserving Historic Orchards at Redwood National and State Parks In August of 2019, the NPS held a training program at the Boyes Prairie Orchard, part of Redwood National and State Parks. Participants learned how to maintain historic orchards, including pruning tools and techniques, and then practiced their skills as they helped to maintain and preserve the Boyes Prairie Orchard. The remaining trees in this orchard, which was started about 1884, are a bridge to the historic character of the landscape. NPS employee in a hardhat prunes a fruit tree from an orchard ladder. Pacific Border Province The Pacific Border straddles the boundaries between several of Earth's moving plates on the western margin of North America. This region is one of the most geologically young and tectonically active in North America. The generally rugged, mountainous landscape of this province provides evidence of ongoing mountain-building. Drakes Estero in Point Reyes National Seashore. NPS photo/Sarah Codde Orange Sulphur Curious about the orange sulphur butterfly in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly "Featured Creature," brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Yellowish-orange butterfly with dark band along the wing edges perches with wings open. Celebrating soils across the National Park System First in a series of three "In Focus" articles that share insights into the near-universal and far-reaching effects of soils on the ecology, management, and enjoyment of our national parks. Fossil soils at Cabrillo National Monument reveal marine deposits Conserving pinnipeds in Pacific Ocean parks in response to climate change The evolutionary record from previous climate perturbations indicates that marine mammals are highly vulnerable but also remarkably adaptable to climatic change in coastal ecosystems. Consequently, national parks in the Pacific, from Alaska to Hawaii, are faced with potentially dramatic changes in their marine mammal fauna, especially pinnipeds (seals and sea lions). black harbor seal Checking the Vitals of Diseased Trees in Redwood National Park Redwood National Park in northern California is best known for its namesake conifer – the world’s tallest tree species. But beneath these towering giants, and at a more human scale, is a woody plant community of hardwood trees and shrubs. It is here, in the cool damp understory, that a recently arrived species is wreaking havoc and drawing the attention of scientists. a path leading through s forest of tall trees and understory plants Great Gray Owl Curious about the great gray owl in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Large gray-checkered owl with outspread wings comes to land on a post. National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Ruffed Grouse Curious about the ruffed grouse in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Grouse with reddish brown and white mottling and streaking, a head crest and a dark tail band. Soon Condors Will Soar Over Redwoods California condors may soon be released in Redwood National Park. Adult male condor incubates his egg in a redwood tree nest on the Big Sur coast. Grand Canyon National Park Centennial Briefings: California Condor Management During the summer of Grand Canyon National Park’s 2019 centennial, scientists and resource managers briefed fellow staff and the public about how they are helping to enable future generations to enjoy what is special about Grand Canyon. This article is from a transcript of a June 5, 2019 briefing about California condor management in Grand Canyon. Its conversational quality reflects the passion and personalities of the people behind the park. A black bird with its wings out sits perched on a tan rock, with a numbered tag visible on its wing. Series: Grand Canyon National Park Centennial Briefings During the summer of Grand Canyon National Park’s 2019 centennial, scientists and resource managers briefed fellow staff and the public about how they are helping to enable future generations to enjoy what is special about Grand Canyon. Black winged California Condor with a red head sits with its wings spread out. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: Physiographic Provinces Descriptions of the physiographic provinces of the United States, including maps, educational material, and listings of Parks for each. George B. Dorr, founder of Acadia National Park Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ Whiteleaf Manzanita Curious about whiteleaf manzanita (Arctostaphylos viscida) in southern Oregon and central to northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. cluster of oval, gray-green leaves on branches, with reddish, berries that look like little apples Electrified Cat's Tail Moss Curious about electrified cat's tail moss in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Electrified cat’s tail moss in its dominant, gametophyte form. Douglas's Squirrel Curious about the Douglas's squirrel in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Medium-sized squirrel with tawny belly, gray back, whitish eye ring, and tufts on ears, in a tree. Scientist Profile: Alice Chung-MacCoubrey, Biologist and I&M Program Manager Meet Alice Chung-MacCoubrey, ecologist and program manager for the Klamath Inventory & Monitoring Network! Discover how Alice followed her passion for wildlife and the outdoors to the National Park Service Inventory & Monitoring Program, and learn about her work studying bats. Biologist holds bat with gloved hands. Sculpins Curious about sculpins in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore their natural history in this edition of our monthly "Featured Creature," brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Fish with large head, large pectoral fins, and mottled, brown, orange, and pale green colors. Listening for Owls: A Multi-agency Collaboration to Preserve Spotted Owl Habitat Across the West For over 25 years, biologists from the National Park Service and several other agencies have collected spotted owl monitoring data to inform forest management that is guided by the multi-agency Northwest Forest Plan. Yet traditional field surveys for spotted owls have become less effective as their numbers have dwindled. Thus in 2021, the Northwest Forest Plan’s spotted owl monitoring design is transitioning to remote acoustic monitoring (also known as passive monitoring). Audio recording unit, with microphones on either side, mounted on a tree trunk. Dragon Cladonia Curious about dragon cladonia lichen in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Pale green cluster of secondary vegetative growth with brown round discs on top of moss. World CA Condor Update – 2020 An update on the world California Condor population for 2020, compiled by our partners at the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service as of December 31, 2020. A close-up of the pink bald head of a California condor with a ruffle of black feathers. Bigleaf Maple Curious about the bigleaf maple in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Lush ferns and mosses grow on the trunk of a large maple tree. Plan Like a Park Ranger: Redwood Top Ten Tips Planning ahead for a Redwood trip is easy, and it will make your time here even more enjoyable. Five women gather a Redwood brochure. Behind them are ferns and other vegetation. Vaux's Swift Curious about the Vaux's swift in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. A small, pale brown, cigar-shaped bird with narrow, pointed wings, in flight. Coast Redwood Curious about coast redwood in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly "Featured Creature", brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. View looking up at redwood canopy Coast Douglas-fir Curious about Douglas-fir in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly "Featured Creature," brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Six people in front of a very large Douglas-fir at Oregon Caves National Monument and Preserve. Pacific Madrone Curious about Pacific madrone in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly "Featured Creature," brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Close up Pacific madrone bark Oregon Grape Curious about Oregon grape in southern Oregon? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly "Featured Creature," brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Bright green, shiny leaves of a tall Oregon grape with a cluster of round blue-black berries. Tree Lungwort Curious about tree lungwort in northern California and southern Oregon? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly "Featured Creature," brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Close of of tree lungwort's upper and lower surfaces Brandt's Cormorant Curious about the Brandt's cormorant in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. A colony of black seabirds with bright blue chins sitting on a guano-covered rock near their nests. West Coast National Parks Work with NOAA to Better Understand Ocean Acidification in the Rocky Intertidal and Beyond Ocean acidification (OA) is a huge threat to marine life. But it is hard to track remotely on a large scale. So this summer, seven West Coast national parks are teaming up with the 2021 NOAA West Coast Ocean Acidification Cruise. They’ll collect water samples in-person to check several OA indicators. Their data will help paint the most detailed picture yet of OA conditions up and down the coast, from parks’ rocky intertidal zones to dozens of miles offshore. Collage of different rocky intertidal creatures photographed against a white background. American Black Bear Curious about the American black bear in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Black-colored black bear with a dandelion in its mouth. Roosevelt Elk Curious about the Roosevelt elk in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Two bull elk with antlers just beginning to grow face each other. POET Newsletter September 2014 Pacific Ocean Education Team (POET) newsletter from September 2014. Articles include: Sea Star Wasting Disease; Corallivore: Crown of Thorns Starfish Wreak Havoc in American Samoa — The NPS Responds; Seafloor in 3D; and Coral Bleaching Monitoring on Guam. A large, red-colored sunflower sea star that appears to be melting or disintegrating. Series: Pacific Ocean Education Team (POET) Newsletters From 2009 to 2015, the Pacific Ocean Education Team published a series of short newsletters about the health of the ocean at various National Park Service sites in and around the Pacific Ocean. Topics covered included the 2010 tsunami, marine debris, sea star wasting disease, ocean acidification, and more. Ocean waves wash in from the right onto a forested and rocky shoreline.
Redwood National and State Parks Redwood National Park Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park Del Norte Coast Redwoods State Park Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park Visitor Guide PHOTO / STEVE OLSON The offcial 2021 visitor guide of Redwood National and State Parks Park Map Big Trees Scenic Drives Discover the best way to navigate Redwood’s mosaic of habitats…pages 6-7 Learn about the three kinds of redwood trees and the best places to see them…page 5 The type of vehicle you drive will determine which roads are suitable for you…page 7 Da il Tra ad iri D P Cree k Road To Bald Hills Road 101 Tr a os tM il L n vi s o Da k ee Cr e ra a Ro Elk Meadow Day Use Area L ost M a n so n vi s on vi Berry Glen Trail an Creek Tr ail ll s Fa m Parking area Restrooms ow 101 Be rr to LB JG ro ve j Lady Bird Johnson Grove Trail yG len T ct. ½ Be rry l rai nT Gle The Superintendents of Redwood National and State Parks welcome you to relax and enjoy one of the most peaceful places on earth. These forests provide sanctuary from the stresses of fast-paced modern life, steadfast and appearing unchanged over eons. But no place is untouched by change and Redwood National and State Parks is no exception. jc t Hi Bald lls R oad . ai Trip Ideas Lady Bird Johnson Grove Trailhead o ile t m il ra Coastal Trail: Skunk Cabbage Section Picnic area Elk M a d e lli u Tri 3 mi les f r om Tr a il Other trails Change No matter how short or long your visit is, check out our recommendations…page 6 Camping Pets Find out which of the parks’ four developed campgrounds is best for you…page 10 Several designated, pet-friendly adventures should suit the whole family…page 3 Despite these challenges, Redwood National and State Parks will see positive change in 2021. The Grove of Titans will be accessible through a new trail and boardwalk, protecting it for generations to come. Thousands of acres of previously harvested timberlands will be put on a path of recovery through the public/ private efforts of the Redwoods Rising collaborative. Working with our Yurok tribal partners, condors may soon soar over the towering redwoods once again. Condors Will Soar Overhead CA L IF O RNI A C ON D OR S ONCE ROAM ED THE S K IES ALON G T HE entire California coast and into the Pacifc Northwest. With a nine and a half foot wingspan—the largest of any North American land bird—condors can travel over a hundred miles each day in search of food. These prehistoric-looking scavengers can easily tear into carcasses too large for others, but will gladly consume any carrion they come across. Despite their impressive size, condors are not hunters, and cannot kill prey themselves. Condors began disappearing as Westward Expansion—beginning in the 1800s—altered their habitat, replacing wide-open spaces with increased disturbance. As new settlers killed bears and mountain lions, it reduced the number of large predators that provided condors with prey to scavenge. The carcasses that homesteaders left behind were often flled with toxic lead fragments from bullets, and poisoning campaigns killed condors who came to clean up the dead “nuisance” wildlife. Within a century, condors had declined to a tiny population in Southern California, and by 1987 they were extinct in the wild. Condors are poised to come back to their home in the redwoods. Only 27 condors remained in the world— all living in zoos —when a captive breeding program began. In the span of three decades, it has dramatically increased condor numbers, and they have now been successfully reintroduced to the wild in California’s Central Coast, as well as to the Arizona/Utah border and Baja California, Mexico —which are all part of the condors’ original range. Now after years of work by dedicated conservationists, in the next year Redwood National and State Parks will be the release site for another condor reintroduction. This efort has been led by the Yurok Tribe working with numerous partners—including the National Park Service, California State Parks, Oregon Zoo, US Fish and Wildlife Service, US Forest Service, Ventana Wildlife Society, and Pacifc Gas and Electric—to prepare for this historic step in condor recovery. Recent times witnessed the parks adapt to a global pandemic. Park staff and our partners worked hard to ensure the Redwoods were available as a respite for a weary America during these tough times. Limited in what could be accomplished in-person, our rangers reached out to classrooms through virtual education programs and moved our permit system on-line. While safety is always frst and foremost, we modifed our visitor center, campground, and offce building operations to stay open during the pandemic whenever possible. NPS / GAVIN EMMONS Indigenous peoples along the Pacifc Coast had lived with condors since time immemorial. For many, like the Yurok, the condor is a fundamental part of their culture and traditions. Yurok wildlife biologists have

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