"Gaines' Mill Battlefield" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Richmond

National Battlefield Park - Virginia

The Richmond National Battlefield Park commemorates 13 American Civil War sites around Richmond, Virginia, which served as the capital of the Confederate States of America for most of the war. The park connects certain features within the city with defensive fortifications and battle sites around it.

maps

Official visitor map of Richmond National Battlefield Park (NBP) in Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Richmond - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Richmond National Battlefield Park (NBP) in Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Petersburg National Battlefield (NB) in Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Petersburg - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Petersburg National Battlefield (NB) in Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/rich/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richmond_National_Battlefield_Park The Richmond National Battlefield Park commemorates 13 American Civil War sites around Richmond, Virginia, which served as the capital of the Confederate States of America for most of the war. The park connects certain features within the city with defensive fortifications and battle sites around it. The center of Confederate manufacturing fueled a modern war, one of the South’s largest hospitals gave care to the sick and wounded, and armies battled on open fields and in miles of defensive earthworks. From 1861 to 1865, Richmond’s fate would determine America’s future. Richmond National Battlefield Park has three separate visitor centers. Please navigate to the "visitor centers" section to select an individual visitor center and find directions to its location. Chimborazo Medical Museum Visitor center focusing on Civil War medical practices. Exhibits and 17 minute orientation film. Located at 3215 E. Broad Street, Richmond VA 23223 Civil War Visitor Center at Tredegar Iron Works A centrally located visitor contact station in downtown Richmond for Richmond National Battlefield Park. The visitor center is accessible by both I-95 and I-64. See the park's website for more directions. Cold Harbor Battlefield Visitor Center Small visitor contact station with maps and interpretive displays about the 1862 Battle of Gaines's Mill and the 1864 Battle of Cold Harbor. Located at 5515 Anderson Wright Dr., Mechanicsville, VA 23111 Tredegar Iron Works Large glass doors and two flagpoles. Tredegar Iron Works is the starting point for your visit to Richmond National Battlefield Park Gaines' Mill Battlefield a landscape of Gaines' Mill Battlefield Gaines' Mill Battlefield Malvern Hill Battlefield Malvern Hill Battlefield Malvern Hill Battlefield is one of several battlefields from the Civil War preserved for the modern day. Ranger leading a tour at Cold Harbor Ranger leading a tour at Cold Harbor The park offers tours during the summer and throughout the year. Earthworks at Fort Harrison Earthworks at Fort Harrison Earthworks like these at Fort Harrison can be found throughout the park Bat Population Monitoring in Richmond National Battlefield Park Scientists are using special microphones and tiny radio-tracking devices to learn about bats at Richmond National Battlefield Park. White-nose syndrome has negatively affected several species in the park, and more information about what species are present and what areas are important for them, will help the park better conserve bats and their habitat. A northern long-eared bat being examined by a biologist. Women Amidst War The extreme demands of wartime industry and the loss of traditional family breadwinners to military service caused hardship, but also presented opportunities to women for employment, volunteerism, and activism that previously had been unavailable to them. While many of these gains would be temporary, the Civil War nonetheless represents an important step forward in American society's view of the role of women. Women were increasingly seen (and saw themselves) as the foundat Photo of women at a house on the Cedar Mountain battlefield African Americans at the Siege of Petersburg Petersburg, Virginia was a major supply hub for the Confederacy during the Civil War. Interestingly, half the population of this city, whose rail lines would prove so essential to the survival of Richmond, was comprised of both free African Americans and slaves. As the war closed in on this community, these individuals would play a critical role. Photo of United States Colored Troops at review in Washington, D.C. Veteran Story: Daniel Hodgson Daniel Hodgson retired as a master chief from the U.S. Navy after a career as a Seabee. Today he works at Richmond National Battlefield Park and Maggie Walker National Historic Park as a facility manager. Daniel Hodgson in Navy uniform Urban Archeology Corps Urban Archeology Corps teams work in urban national parks in cooperation with community-based partners. Urban Archeology Corps Death and Dying The somber aftermath of Civil War battles introduced Americans--North and South--to death on an unprecedented scale and of an unnatural kind, often ending in an unmarked grave far from home. Neither individuals, nor institutions, nor governments were prepared to deal with death on such a massive scale, for never before or since have we killed so many of our own. The Civil War revolutionized the American military's approach to caring for the dead, leading to our modern cult Photo of freshly buried marked and unmarked graves near Petersburg, Va. Emancipation and the Quest for Freedom Although the abolition of slavery emerged as a dominant objective of the Union war effort, most Northerners embraced abolition as a practical measure rather than a moral cause. The war resolved legally and constitutionally the single most important moral question that afflicted the nascent republic, an issue that prevented the country from coalescing around a shared vision of freedom, equality, morality, and nationhood. Slave family seated in front of their house NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Richmond National Battlefield Park, Virginia Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] cannon in field Urban Archeology Corps in Richmond VA The Urban Archeology Corps led students as they unearthed the history of a Richmond, Virginia community descended from enslaved people freed in the late 18th century. Two people excavating in a forest Chimborazo Hospital From 1861 to 1865 the surgeons and nurses of Chimborazo Hospital in the Confederate Capitol of Richmond, Virginia waged their own war against disease and infection while they cared for over 75,000 men. Photo of a model of the Chimborazo Hospital 2016 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients In 2016, six rangers were awarded a national or regional Freeman Tilden Award for excellence in interpretation. Learn more about their amazing programs! Lynette Weber The Military Experience The course of the war was the cumulative result of political, economic, and social policies that affected (and were affected by) military operations and battles waged across a front spanning 2,000 miles. The battles and campaigns of 1861-65 ultimately demonstrated that the simple application of massive military force, even with innovations in technologies and tactics, was insufficient to resolve a conflict between two sections mobilized against one another politically, socia Engraving of soldier warming himself by a fire Photo of U.S. Sanitary Commission office. Preserving Places of Captivity: Civil War Military Prisons in the National Parks During the Civil War, over 400,000 Union and Confederate soldiers were held prisoner at more than 150 diff erent prison sites. Approximately 56,000 of these died in captivity. Although Andersonville is the most famous Civil War prison, it is only one of many Civil War military prisons that are preserved by the National Park Service. Tredegar Iron Works - Ironmaker to the Confederacy At the outbreak of the war Tredegar Iron Works was one of the top cannon foundries in the United States. Over the course of the four years of the war the Iron Works pumped out cannon and munitions for the Confederate cause. Photo of cannon Industry and Economy during the Civil War Both North and South mobilized industry to an unprecedented degree. But the North, which already had a head start in nearly every realm of industrial and agricultural development, far outpaced the South during the war. Unhampered by the southern opposition in such areas as providing free land to farmers and subsidizing a transcontinental railroad before the war, Congress passed sweeping legislation to expand the economy. As the war dragged on, in part because many of the ba Lithograph showing industrial and technological advancements of the Civil War The Civilian Experience in the Civil War After being mere spectators at the war's early battles, civilians both near and far from the battlefields became unwilling participants and victims of the war as its toll of blood and treasure grew year after year. In response to the hardships imposed upon their fellow citizens by the war, civilians on both sides mobilized to provide comfort, encouragement, and material, and began to expect that their government should do the same. Painting of civilians under fire during the Siege of Vicksburg 2020 Weather In Review: Richmond National Battlefield Park In all, 2020 was extremely warm wet. The year ended as the 3rd warmest and 3rd wettest year at the park since 1895. Trees with fall foliage over a split-rail fence Veteran Story: Jessica Zanetta Zanetta served in airborne and air assault units in Operation Iraqi Freedom. She now works for Richmond National Battlefield Park. Jessica Zanetta The Changing War Begun as a purely military effort with the limited political objectives of reunification (North) or independence (South), the Civil War transformed into a social, economic and political revolution with unforeseen consequences. As the war progressed, the Union war effort steadily transformed from a limited to a hard war; it targeted not just Southern armies, but the heart of the Confederacy's economy, morale, and social order-the institution of slavery. Woodcut of spectators watching a train station set fire by Sherman's troops Pushing Forward The movements of General George McClellan's Union Army in the first half of 1862 affected the Confederate civilians that they were encountering but also the Confederate morale. Photogrpah of civilians fleeing a town Hancock's War Major General Winfield S. Hancock came out to the Southern Plains in the Spring of 1867 to quell a suspected Indian uprising. He was a distinguished U.S. Army officer with an impressive record, especially for service during the Civil War. However, dealing with an enemy so culturally dissimilar to him proved a difficult challenge. Instead of pacifying the Indians, his burning of a local Indian village incited a summer of violence known to history as "Hancock's War." Black and white head photo of Winfield Scott Hancock Series: The Vortex of Hell When the Peninsula Campaign began in 1862 Northern hopes were again raised for a quick victory, but the poor progress of George McClellan resulted in a restless northern public. In sharp contrast, Lee's success in stopping McClellan's advance cast him as the savior of Richmond and cloaked his army with a sense of invincibility. Even as Lee pushed McClellan away from Richmond, Union General John Pope led his army deeper into Virginia, introducing a policy of bringing the war directly to the south Lithograph of Kearny's chage at the Battle of Chantilly Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains All Hope is Not Lost – Parks plan strategically to treat invasive plants Managing invasive plant species can seem like an endless and insurmountable challenge, but parks are using a new strategic collaborative tool to protect their most valuable resources. Four photos show invasive plants spreading over an area during 12 years An introduction to the benthic macroinvertebrate community at Richmond National Battlefield Park Benthic macroinvertebrates are an important park of stream ecosystems in Richmond National Battlefield Park. NPS scientists are studying these organisms in order to better understand and protect park natural resources. NPS staff kneeling in a stream with a net Breeding bird monitoring at Richmond National Battlefield Park: 2019 status and trends To help inform natural resource management at Richmond National Battlefield Park, National Park Service scientists collect data about breeding bird populations. See what they learned from this data in 2019. A small bright blue bird perched on a limb. Series: African American History at Gettysburg Abraham Brian, Basil Biggs, James Warfield, and Mag Palm are just a few of the many individuals that were affected by the Civil War and the Battle of Gettysburg, and each has their own story to tell. We have collected their stories in one place so that you can learn more about their various trials during this tumultuous time in American history. A black and white photograph of a black family posing with a white man and his horse in a dirt road.

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