"Rock Creek Park" by NPS Photo/Thomas Paradis , public domain

Rock Creek

Park - District of Columbia

Rock Creek Park is a large urban park that bisects the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C. The park was created by an Act of Congress in 1890 and today is administered by the National Park Service. The main section of the park is along the Rock Creek Valley. The parklands follow the course of Rock Creek across the D.C-Maryland border to connect with Rock Creek Stream Valley Park and Rock Creek Regional Park in Montgomery County.

maps

Official visitor map of Rock Creek Park in District of Columbia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Rock Creek Park - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Rock Creek Park in District of Columbia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of George Washington Memorial Parkway (MEMPKWY) in Virginia and District of Columbia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).George Washington - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of George Washington Memorial Parkway (MEMPKWY) in Virginia and District of Columbia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of National Mall and Memorial Parks in Washington D.C. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Mall and Memorial Parks - National Heritage Areas

Official visitor map of National Mall and Memorial Parks in Washington D.C. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Chesapeake & Ohio Canal - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/rocr/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rock_Creek_Park Rock Creek Park is a large urban park that bisects the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C. The park was created by an Act of Congress in 1890 and today is administered by the National Park Service. The main section of the park is along the Rock Creek Valley. The parklands follow the course of Rock Creek across the D.C-Maryland border to connect with Rock Creek Stream Valley Park and Rock Creek Regional Park in Montgomery County. Rock Creek Park is truly a gem in our nation's capital. This 1,754 acre city park was officially authorized in 1890, making it the third national park to be designated by the federal government. It offers visitors the opportunity to escape the bustle of the city and find a peaceful refuge, recreation, fresh air, majestic trees, wild animals, and thousands of years of human history. Ample parking for hiking, biking and visiting the Nature Center is located at 5200 Glover Rd, NW. Rock Creek Park is a large urban park stretching from the Maryland - DC border to the Potomac River. Rock Creek Park also administers 99 separate neighborhood small sites. A large network of public roads provide access to all points administered by Rock Creek Park. Nature Center The Nature Center is home to our Planetarium and nature exhibit area which features displays of plants and animals that can be found in the park. Most of Rock Creek park's public and educational programs begin at the Nature Center. From the beltway: • Take exit 31B and head south on Georgia Avenue. • Take Georgia Avenue to 16th Street and veer right (you are continuing south). • Turn right (west) at Miliatary Road. • At Glover Road turn left (south) and veer to the left when the road forks. • Turn into the first driveway on your left. The second parking lot is for the Nature Center. Old Stone House Built circa 1766, Old Stone House is the oldest structure on its original foundation in Washington, DC. Old Stone House is open for visitors at the hours listed below. The grounds are open according to general park hours (sunrise to sunset). The Old Stone House is on M Street NW between 30th and 31st Streets NW and at the intersection with Thomas Jefferson Street NW. Peirce Mill Peirce Mill, built in the 1820s, is the last operational grist mill on Rock Creek Park. The grounds are open according to general park hours. The mill is open for visitors at the hours listed below. • Take the Beltway north into Maryland; exit at Connecticut Ave. and proceed southbound toward Chevy Chase. • Continue down Connecticut past the University of the District of Columbia. One block past the university turn left onto Tilden Street. •Follow Tilden to the bottom of the hill and turn left into the parking lot at Peirce Mill. Rock Creek Park Campgrounds There are no campgrounds in Rock Creek Park. Overnight camping is not allowed Rock Creek Park's Boulder Bridge Stone bridge and fall leaves Boulder Bridge in Rock Creek Park Rocks in the Creek Water swirls around large boulders in a creek. Trees in autumn colors line the bank Rock Creek in Autumn Nature Center a one story building nestled among green leafy trees Rock Creek Park Nature Center and Planetarium Rocks in Rock Creek Dark boulders scattered through a narrow creek. Green trees rise up on either bank. Rock Creek Peirce Mill A stone mill house Peirce Mill 2011 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2011 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Pawpaw: Small Tree, Big Impact Pawpaw are small trees that don't grow past 100 feet. Yet they have a big influence-- they're the most commonly observed sapling in our National Capital Region forests. Pawpaw trees are virtually immune to deer browse and also produce the largest edible fruit native to North America! A hand holds a lumpy green pawpaw fruit Lichens and Air Quality Lichens are durable enough to grow on tree bark and bare rock, yet are sensitive to pollution and air quality. One species in particular was used to track levels of air-borne lead over a 100 year period! Pale green lichen growing on rock. NPS Structural Fire Program Highlights 2014 Intern Accomplishments Archeology and History in Rock Creek Park A four-year archeological survey and inventory of Rock Creek Park in Washington, DC, found a series of Native American camp sites used repeatedly between 2500 BC and AD 1400, colonial tenancies, 19th-century dwellings, and Civil War military artifacts from the Battle of Fort Stevens in 1864. Many of the archeological sites can be associated with historical characters from John Carroll of Annapolis to African-American tenants of the 1890s. Officers and men of Company F, 3rd Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, in Rock Creek Park's Fort Stevens. Soldiers, Veterans, and Horses Connect National parks are places people seek out for physical recreation but also mental relaxation. One group that needs to get away from the city hustle are military and veterans, specifically those recovering from traumatic brain injuries and PTSD. Rock Creek Park provides a perfect getaway. five men on horseback ride a wooded trail Unsung Heroes of the Night Eerie chirps erupted from an acoustic detector placed near the creek bank at Rock Creek Park on a full moon night in spring. Bat songs! Visual frequencies of their echolocation calls, called spectrograms, danced across the monitors. The BioBlitz2016 bat inventory at Rock Creek Park had begun, and the bats were flying near. Biologist wears latex gloves while holding a big brown bat, BioBlitz 2016, Rock Creek Park. African Americans and the Civil War Forts of DC The 28th Regiment of U.S. Colored Troops was one of the troops attached to the Defenses of Washington. This regiment of infantry was established on November 30, 1863 by Indiana Governor Oliver P. Morton. Reverend Willis Revels of the African American Episcopal Church was the chief recruiting officer. The recruits trained for three months and on April 25 1863, six companies of the 28th left Indianapolis for Washington, D.C. where they were attached to the capital’s defenses. african american civil war soldiers stand in front of white building Native Peoples of Washington, DC The village of Nacotchtank (from which the name Anacostia is derived) was the largest of the three American Indian villages located in the Washington area and is believed to have been a major trading center. three native americans seated, black and white photo Death and Dying The somber aftermath of Civil War battles introduced Americans--North and South--to death on an unprecedented scale and of an unnatural kind, often ending in an unmarked grave far from home. Neither individuals, nor institutions, nor governments were prepared to deal with death on such a massive scale, for never before or since have we killed so many of our own. The Civil War revolutionized the American military's approach to caring for the dead, leading to our modern cult Photo of freshly buried marked and unmarked graves near Petersburg, Va. Forest Regeneration 2018 In 2018, tree seedlings and small saplings are in short supply in the parks of the National Capital Region. Without these trees of tomorrow, what will our forests look like? A forest plot in Rock Creek Park showing some vegetation recovery. Elizabeth Proctor Thomas Elizabeth Proctor Thomas grew up in the early 1880s in a small community of free African-Americans in northwest Washington, D.C. During the Civil War, Union troops took possession of her land for construction of a fort. After the war, Elizabeth continued to reside near Fort Stevens. She sold some of her property to an influential Washingtonian who planned to preserve the remaining earthworks and establish a park. A woman with a long, dark dress stands beside a door in a wooden structure NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Rock Creek Park, District of Columbia Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] hikers on park trail American Eels in the Potomac Watershed American eels are found everywhere along the Atlantic Coast, but many aspects of these fish remain poorly understood. They are perhaps one of the most mysterious fish in the Potomac watershed. Hands hold a 2 to 3 foot long eel over a red container. National Capital Region Energy Savings Performance Contract The National Park Service is investing $29 million in 81 individual energy efficiency and water conservation projects at national parks throughout the greater Washington region. Cherry Blossoms at the National Mall Forest Regeneration 2017 Tree seedlings and small saplings are in short supply in the parks of the National Capital Region. Without these trees of tomorrow, what will our forests look like? A forest plot showing tree seedling and low-growing plant recovery. Go green for the National Park Service’s birthday! We're adding energy- and water-saving improvements to save money! How can you do the same in your home? National Mall and Memorial Parks Yearly Savings 50.9 M gallons of water, $1 M, 2.7M kwh. 2002 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2002 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Summer in the Parks (1968-1976) What began as a summer transportation program to send DC urban youth to Catoctin and Prince William Forest Parks in 1966 grew to a city-wide summer-long festival attracting residents to parks in every quadrant of the city. After the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., the program took on an additional role to help save a city from destroying itself. A group of boys smiles for the camera Joan of Arc Has a New Sword! In March 2018, thanks to support from A+E Networks, the Joan of Arc statue in Meridian Hill Park in Washington, DC, was re-outfitted for battle and revealed to the public as part of the National Park Service’s commemoration of Women’s History Month. bronze statue of a young woman on a statue with her sword Improving Water Quality at Rock Creek Park and Other Parks in the DC Area Learn how DC Water and the Department of Energy and Environment work together to restore the streams in the District of Columbia. (October 2019) DC's Restoration Approaches and outline map of the District of Columbia Stream Restoration Dreams: Stage Zero Learn “stage zero” stream restoration basics and how they could be applied in Mid-Atlantic streams. Water spreads across the ground around standing and fallen trees African-American History in Washington Excavations of the Whitby house cellar, and documentary research done as part of the same project, have opened a window into Washington's African-American past. Black and White photograph of James Wormley's five-story hotel Native Americans in Rock Creek Park: Introduction Native Americans have roamed the hills around Rock Creek and the falls of the Potomac for at least the past 10,000 years. However, for much of that time they do not seem to have stayed long. Finds of spearpoints, arrowheads, grinding stones, potsherd left by Native Americans The Palisades When professional archeologists first worked around Washington, in the 1870s and 1880s, the city was rich with ancient Native American remains. Large sites lined both banks of the Anacostia River, and they stretched for miles along the Potomac from Rock Creek to above Little Falls. Archeologists accidently find the Location of the Little Falls Sites. The Quarries The stones found near Rock Creek and its streams don't look like much, but they are the remnants of a prehistoric industry where ancient Indians once made hundreds of thousands of stone tools. Three Rough Stone “Bifaces” Quarried from the Banks of Rock Creek around 2200 BC Links to the Past In the summer of 2016 the National Park Service began a study on the history and design of the National Park Service golf courses at East Potomac Park, Rock Creek Park, and Langston. The study will provides historical information and will be used as a planning tool for the ongoing management and public use of these golf courses. A man instructs boys in golf Coastal Plain Oak Forest in Rock Creek Park You’ll come across this natural community in the parts of Rock Creek Park that are in the Coastal Plain, usually in areas that were cleared during the Civil War era. Willow oak, southern red oak, and white oak form the canopy of the Coastal Plain Oak Forest, and vines (native and non-native) are common in the understory. Two eastern gray squirrels on a tree branch The Fortifications of Washington On July 11 and 12, 1864, the nation's capital came under attack. Guns boomed in the northern suburbs as Confederate troops under Jubal Early probed Union defenses. Photograph of Confederate Lt. Gen. Jubal Early The Charles and Jane Dickson Site The Charles and Jane Dickson properties caught the eye of historians because they represent the type of provision some slave owners made for freed slaves, and it was thought that they might represent old slave quarter sites. Antique mule cart toy with an iron figurine of an African American driver The Sarah Whitby Site Among the many African-American families that moved to Washington were the Whitbys. In 1895 the Whitbys rented a house on a small parcel of land that had belonged to Isaac Shoemaker. Artist's Reconstruction of the Sarah Whitby House. Cultural Landscapes and Community Well-Being: An Interview with ParkRx's Anne O'Neill The idea that spending time in green spaces can improve our health is not new. What if doctors prescribed activities in parks as a path to wellness? The Park Cultural Landscapes Program recently talked with Anne O'Neill, an Outdoor Recreation Planner for the NPS, about her work with the National ParkRx Initiative in Washington, DC. A group of individuals of varying ages do Zumba on a paved area of Meridian Hill Park. Ash Tree Update 2017 The state of ash trees in 2017 in the National Capital Region after more than 10 years of harm from the invasive emerald ash borer. A white ash leaf Forest Regeneration 2019 In 2019 tree seedlings and small saplings are in short supply in National Capital Area parks. Without these trees of tomorrow, what will our forests look like? A brown bird with a white breast and dark spots on its chest stands on the leaf-littered ground. Prehistoric Landscapes of the Nation's Capital In 1996 and 1997, Parsons Engineering Science conducted archeological excavations of the Whitehurst Freeway Corridor for the DC Department of Public Works. Excavations at the eastern end of the roadway, near the location where Rock Creek drains into the Potomac River, yielded both prehistoric and historical archeological resources. Teeth and More Oak Decline Learn more about oak decline where a host of stressors interact to weaken trees over time, leading to what becomes "death by a thousand cuts." Looking up into the canopy of a mature oak showing symptoms of oak decline. Spring Amphibian Timeline Learn how the progression of amphibian appearances unfurls every spring. A gray tree frog clings to a small tree branch. Battleground National Cemetery Cultural Landscape Battleground National Cemetery is located at 6625 Georgia Avenue in Washington, DC. On July 11th and 12th, 1864, fighting broke out between Union and Confederate troops at Fort Stevens, the only battle to take place within Washington during the war. Battleground National Cemetery was established shortly after the battle for the burial of Union soldiers. Rostrum at Battleground National Cemetery (NPS) Amphibian Diversity & Habitat Connectivity Habitat fragmentation is a major threat to amphibian communities, especially in National Capital Area parks at risk due to the region's growing urbanization. A small frog crouches on a lichen-covered rock. Early's Raid The defenses of Washington had been built during the early part of the war, when a Union defeat seemed a real possibility, but they saw no fighting until July 1864, when victory seemed close at hand A Civil War Map Showing Fort DeRussy and the Other Defenses around Rock Creek. Remains of the Battle In 2002 to 2006, the National Park Service undertook an archeological survey of Rock Creek Park. Until that time, most historians thought that little remained from the battle except part of Fort Stevens Painting of President Lincoln at Fort Stevens. Soldiers are loading cannons, The Whitehurst Freeway Sites At the mouth of Rock Creek, the Whitehurst Freeway ends in a tangle of ramps and embankments. This does not seem like a likely place to find a Native American camp site- but it is. Antler Comb, Sharks’ Teeth, and a Stone Phallus found at the Whitehurst Freeway Site Memorials for the Future Memorials for the Future, is a competition that aims to rethink the way we develop and experience memorials in Washington, D.C. Memorials for the Future Logo President Lincoln Under Fire at Fort Stevens On July 12, 1864, President Lincoln stood atop the parapet of the fort to witness the battle and came under direct fire of Confederate sharpshooters. It is the only time in American history in which a sitting president came under direct fire from an enemy combatant. A demonstration of the battle at Fort Stevens Explore DC’s national parks with a new, free app Navigate to popular destinations, get up-to-date information and discover lesser-known parks. With nearly 800 points of interest, the app includes the National Mall, President's Park, Rock Creek Park, Anacostia Park, Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, Wolf Trap, Arlington House, Theodore Roosevelt Island, Frederick Douglass NHS, Mary McLeod Bethune Council House NHS, Carter G. Woodson NHS, and hundreds more. National Park Service logo with Washington Monument and other memorials. Rock Creek Park Vines Native vines are an important part of the Rock Creek Park forests, but they sometimes get tangled up in the fight against non-native invasive plants. Here’s why we should even “embrace” poison ivy, while being wary of the sweet-smelling Japanese honeysuckle vine. A cluster of red-orange tube-shaped flowers. American Chestnuts in the Capital Region In 1904, a deadly fungus began killing American chestnut trees, once one of the most dominant trees of the eastern U.S. Despite overwhelming odds, some American chestnut trees survive today in parks of the National Capital Region Green American chestnut tree leaves on a slender branch. American Chestnuts in Rock Creek In 1904, a deadly fungus began killing American chestnut trees, once one of the most dominant trees of the eastern U.S. Despite overwhelming odds, some American chestnut trees survive today in Rock Creek Park. Sun shines down through green American chestnut leaves Freshwater Sponges Freshwater sponges are found in lakes and streams growing on firm substrates like rocks and branches. They feed by filtering small particles from the water. Though little is known about these sponges in the Mid-Atlantic, they are usually a sign of good water quality. A freshwater sponges attached to a streambed rock. Asbury Memorial Cultural Landscape The triangular US Reservation 309 B is bordered to the north by the Kennesaw Apartments property, to the east by 16th Street, NW, and to the west by Mt. Pleasant Street. The 0.28-acre reservation is part of the Rock Creek Park administrative unit. An overhead view of the Asbury Memorial during a patriotic gathering Marconi Memorial Cultural Landscape Introduction to the history and features of Marconi Memorial, US Reservation 309 A at Rock Creek Park. Marconi Memorial: A gilded bronze form of a woman with her left arm extended. Gibbons Memorial Cultural Landscape The triangular US Reservation 309 G is bordered to the north by Park Road, to the east by Pine Street, NW, and to the west by 16th Street. The reservation is 0.22 acre. It is administratively part of Rock Creek Park. View east of US Reservation 309 G from 16th Street, NW toward Sacred Heart Church Montrose Park Cultural Landscape Montrose Park, a landscape within Rock Creek Park in Washington, D.C., was first developed as a private estate between 1804 and 1911. The property was purchased by the U.S. Government for the creation of a public park (1911-1919), and landscape architects with the Office of Public Buildings and Grounds prepared designs that integrated the character of the estate into elements for public use. Today, the neighborhood park is used for both passive and active recreation. A long, straight pathway is bordered by arching trees on one side and boxwoods on the other. Stiltgrass and Tree Seedling Recovery Recent analysis at Maryland's Catoctin Mountain Park shows Japanese stiltgrass does not limit the growth of tree seedlings in a forest recovering from deer overpopulation. Invasive Japanese stiltgrass blankets the sides of a shady forest road. Chestnut Oak / Mountain Laurel Forest in Rock Creek Park This natural community at Rock Creek Park is easy to spot because of the abundance of chestnut oak and near absence of American beech. You’ll find the Chestnut Oak / Mountain Laurel Forest on or near ridgetops and hilltops where the soil is dry, acidic, and infertile. Mountain laurel with flower buds. Beautification: A Legacy of Lady Bird Johnson As a champion of conservation efforts and environmental causes, Lady Bird Johnson initiated the Beautification Project to improve the quality of life for residents of Washington, D.C. through the renewal and improvement of public spaces. The environmental and aesthetic improvements of Beautification included tree-lined avenues, floral displays, design guidelines, improvements to pedestrian circulation, renovation of historic buildings, and litter clean up. A man in a tie and a woman in a yellow dress sit between an expanse of daffodils and a wide river Spotted Lanternfly 101 What you need to know about spotted lanternfly: a new, invasive, insect pest approaching the National Parks of the Mid-Atlantic. A spotted lanternfly with wings spread showing namesake spots Natural Science, History, & Culture in the National Capital Area Learn more about your National Capital Area park through this guide to natural and cultural resource information. Cultural resource staff clean the Theodore Roosevelt memorial statue at Theodore Roosevelt Island. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: The Sarah Whitby Site and African-American History Sarah Whitby was an African-American woman whose family lived in Rock Creek Park between 1870 and 1900. The remains of her house were discovered by archeologists in 2005. Excavations of the Whitby house cellar and documentary research done as part of the same project, have opened a window into Washington's African-American past. Color illustration of the Sarah Whitby House with African Americans going about their day. Series: Ancient Native Americans in Rock Creek Park Native Americans have roamed the hills around Rock Creek and the falls of the Potomac for at least the past 10,000 years. However, for much of that time they do not seem to have stayed long. Archeologists Digging a Test Pit Beside the Fallen Tree that Revealed Location of Little Falls Sites Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: The Battle of Fort Stevens On July 11 and 12, 1864, the nation's capital came under attack. Guns boomed in the northern suburbs as Confederate troops under Jubal Early probed Union defenses. Painting of President Lincoln at Fort Stevens observing the fight from a smoky elevation. Ordovician Period—485.4 to 443.8 MYA Shenandoah and Great Smoky Mountains national parks, along with the Blue Ridge Parkway that connects them, pass through rocks from the core of the Appalachian Mountains. The mountains began forming during the Ordovician and eventually attained elevations similar to those of the Himalayas. rock with fossil brachiopod shells Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Spotted Lanternfly in Perspective While spotted lanternfly and emerald ash borer are both invasive insect pests, introduced from Asia, that feed on trees (primarily), they have few other similarities. Learn how they differ in host preferences, feeding mode, and life cycle. A spotted lanternfly with black wingspots on a tree branch Amphibian Disease Risk in the National Capital Area Looking for disease, including ranaviruses and chytrid fungi, is an important part of amphibian monitoring done by the National Capital Region Inventory & Monitoring Network. Learn more about the risks posed by these diseases and the biosecurity protocols field crews use to reduce the risk of accidental spread. Red-spotted newt on brown forest floor leaves. Black spots and eyes contrast with vivid orange skin. DC's Civil War Earthworks Civil War fortifications were based on the European model of the 17th and 18th centuries. Professor Dennis Hart Mahan of the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, was the leading authority of fortification engineering. Brood X Periodical Cicadas FAQ Learn about the Brood X periodical cicadas that will emerge in 2021 throughout the Mid-Atlantic U.S. A perched periodical cicada with red eyes and orange wings Forest Regeneration 2020 What is the future of our forests? A look at forest regeneration capacity in National Capital Area national parks based on 2020 monitoring data. hand holding a leaflet on a white ash seedling National Capital Region PRISM and Invasive Species Since invasive species don’t recognize park boundaries, we need to work together with our partners, neighbors, and other federal and state entities to manage across borders. We can’t do it alone! a hand holds a rosette of green leaves over the water Plan Like a Park Ranger: Ten Tips for Visiting Rock Creek Park Plan like a Park Ranger and learn ten insider tips to make your next trip to Rock Creek Park in Washington, DC out of this world! A boulder covered bridge traverses a small creek. Green trees grow in the background Woodpeckers in Washington, DC? Not only are woodpeckers living in Washington, DC but there are several varieties of them that make their home in Rock Creek Park. Have you seen any? A pileated woodpecker looks for bugs in the bark of a tree Series: African American History at Gettysburg Abraham Brian, Basil Biggs, James Warfield, and Mag Palm are just a few of the many individuals that were affected by the Civil War and the Battle of Gettysburg, and each has their own story to tell. We have collected their stories in one place so that you can learn more about their various trials during this tumultuous time in American history. A black and white photograph of a black family posing with a white man and his horse in a dirt road. Capital pathways: Roads in Rock Creek Park Since its formal establishment as a park in 1897, the trails and roads of Rock Creek Park have been used both for recreation and to get around the national capital area. Read this article to learn about how their use has evolved over time. Bicyclists and drivers stand near Peirce Mill in Rock Creek Park sometime between 1918 and 1920 Valuing Trees and Forests in the National Capital Area Understanding that trees have value opens our eyes to their important roles across the planet as well as in parks of the National Capital Area. This StoryMap series examines the values that trees bring to the National Parks of the National Capital Area. It focuses on three parks: the National Mall and Memorial Parks, Rock Creek Park, and Monocacy National Battlefield, each of which is home to notable trees within its urban forest. The MLK Jr Memorial stands by the Tidal Basin, surrounded by cherry blossom trees. Wildlife and Climate Change Climate change has produced a number of threats to wildlife throughout our parks. Rising temperatures lower many species survival rates due to changes that lead to less food, less successful reproduction, and interfering with the environment for native wildlife. These detrimental changes are already apparent in our National Capital Area parks. Great blue heron in a wetlands pond Sea Level Rise in the DC Area Learn about current and projected rates of sea level rise in the greater DC area, based on local water level data collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) A tall white cylinder attached to a wooden pier with Hains Point in the background.

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