by Alex Gugel , all rights reserved

Rocky Mountain

National Park - Colorado

Rocky Mountain National Park in northern Colorado spans the Continental Divide and encompasses protected mountains, forests and alpine tundra. It's known for the Trail Ridge Road and the Old Fall River Road, drives that pass aspen trees and rivers. The Keyhole Route, a climb crossing vertical rock faces, leads up Longs Peak, the park’s tallest mountain. A trail surrounding Bear Lake offers views of the peaks.

maps

Official visitor map of Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Rocky Mountain - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the Summer Designated Bike Route System in White River National Forest (NF) in Colorado. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).,White River - Summer Bike Routes

Map of the Summer Designated Bike Route System in White River National Forest (NF) in Colorado. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).,

brochures

Brochure of Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Rocky Mountain - Brochure

Brochure of Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Visitor Guide to Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Visitor Guides - Summer/Fall 2021

Visitor Guide to Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Visitor Guide to Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Visitor Guides - Winter/Spring 2020/2021 - Pocket Ranger Insert

Visitor Guide to Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Visitor Guide to Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Visitor Guides - Winter/Spring 2020/2021

Visitor Guide to Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Visitor Guide to Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Visitor Guides - Spring 2019

Visitor Guide to Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Bear Lake Summer Trail Guide for Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Visitor Guides - Bear Lake Summer Trail Guide

Bear Lake Summer Trail Guide for Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Bear Lake Winter Trail Guide for Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Trail Guides - Bear Lake Winter Trail Guide

Bear Lake Winter Trail Guide for Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Fall River Trail Guide for Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Trail Guides - Fall River Trail Guide

Fall River Trail Guide for Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Kawuneeche Valley Trail Guide for Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Trail Guides - Kawuneeche Valley Trail Guide

Kawuneeche Valley Trail Guide for Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Longs Peak - Keyhole Route Trail Guide for Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Trail Guides - Longs Peak - Keyhole Route

Longs Peak - Keyhole Route Trail Guide for Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Longs Peak - Keyhole Route FAQ Guide for Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Trail Guides - Longs Peak - Keyhole Route FAQ

Longs Peak - Keyhole Route FAQ Guide for Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Longs Peak Trail Guide for Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Trail Guides - Longs Peak Trail Guide

Longs Peak Trail Guide for Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Lumpy Ridge Trail Guide for Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Trail Guides - Lumpy Ridge Trail Guide

Lumpy Ridge Trail Guide for Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Summer Wild Basin Trail Guide for Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Trail Guides - Wild Basin Trail Guide - Summer

Summer Wild Basin Trail Guide for Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Winter Wild Basin Trail Guide for Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Trail Guides - Wild Basin Trail Guide - Winter

Winter Wild Basin Trail Guide for Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Wilderness Campsite Map for Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Trail Guides - Wilderness Campsite Map

Wilderness Campsite Map for Rocky Mountain National Park (NP) in Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/romo https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocky_Mountain_National_Park Rocky Mountain National Park in northern Colorado spans the Continental Divide and encompasses protected mountains, forests and alpine tundra. It's known for the Trail Ridge Road and the Old Fall River Road, drives that pass aspen trees and rivers. The Keyhole Route, a climb crossing vertical rock faces, leads up Longs Peak, the park’s tallest mountain. A trail surrounding Bear Lake offers views of the peaks. Rocky Mountain National Park’s 415 square miles encompass and protect spectacular mountain environments. Enjoy Trail Ridge Road – which crests at over 12,000 feet including many overlooks to experience the subalpine and alpine worlds – along with over 300 miles of hiking trails, wildflowers, wildlife, starry nights, and fun times. In a world of superlatives, Rocky is on top! Driving from the east: from I-25, take US Hwy 34 or 36. Driving from the west: from I-70, take US Hwy 40 to Granby to US Hwy 34 to Grand Lake. From mid-October until late May, Trail Ridge Road between Estes Park and Grand Lake is closed to vehicles, so driving between the two takes ~4 hours. The closest airport is Denver International (DIA). There is no public transportation between nearby cities and the park. Alpine Visitor Center Located along Trail Ridge Road, this is the highest elevation visitor center in the National Park System at 11,796'. Typically open late-May through mid-October. Fall River Pass at the junction of Trail Ridge and Old Fall River roads. Check the status of Trail Ridge Road by calling 970-586-1222. Beaver Meadows Visitor Center Beaver Meadows Visitor Center is operating out of a temporary trailer located in front of the visitor center/headquarters building. Park Rangers are available to assist visitors and the Rocky Mountain Conservancy Nature Store is open. Due to COVID 19, the number of visitors will be limited inside. When entering the park through the main entrance on US Hwy 36, Beaver Meadows Visitor Center will be on your left. Fall River Visitor Center Rocky Mountain Conservancy Nature Store is open. Due to COVID 19, the number of visitors is limited inside the building. U.S. Highway 34, five miles west of the town of Estes Park. Shares building with Gateway Store. Holzwarth Historic Site Tour a 1920's-era dude ranch for a taste of early homesteading and tourism. Visitors may view the exteriors of the buildings and the grounds. On the west side of Trail Ridge Road/US Highway 34, about seven miles north of the Grand Lake Entrance Station. The lodge buildings are reached by a half mile walkway from the parking lot. A walking path connects the various buildings. Kawuneeche Visitor Center Located near the Grand Lake Entrance to the park. Information and The Rocky Mountain Conservancy Nature Store are available Wednesday - Sunday 9-4:30 (closed Mon-Tues). One mile north of the town of Grand Lake on the east side of Trail Ridge Road/ US Highway 34 at the entrance to the park Moraine Park Discovery Center Located in Moraine Park, this historic building is only open in the summer and fall. On Bear Lake Road, 1.5 miles from the Beaver Meadows Entrance. Sheep Lakes Information Station Good wildlife viewing, especially for bighorn sheep. In Horseshoe Park on US Hwy 34 west of Estes Park. Aspenglen Campground Near the Fall River Entrance. Douglas fir, lodgepole pine, ponderosa pine and the occasional Engelmann spruce forests the campground, offering equal amounts of sun and shade. Grasses, shrubs and seasonal wildflowers fill the open meadows. Aspenglen contains several drive-to family sites for tents and RVs. A few sites are more secluded, walk-to tent sites. Camping Fee 30.00 Per site per night Aspenglen Campground Road through pines with tent sites Aspenglen Campground is nestled in a pine forest near Fall River Campsite with popup camper and comfort station Popup camper at campsite with picnic table and comfort station A typical campsite at Aspenglen Campground. Aspenglen Comfort Station Comfort station set in trees A comfort station (restroom) at Aspenglen Campground. Food Storage Locker A visitor places food in a food storage locker Use food storage lockers to protect food from bears and other wildlife. Glacier Basin Campground A pleasant mix of Douglas fir, Lodgepole pine, Ponderosa pine, and the occasional Engelmann spruce forests the campground, offering equal amounts of sun and shade. Grasses, shrubs and seasonal wildflowers fill the open meadows. Camping Fee 30.00 Per site per night Camping Fee (Small Group) 40.00 Per site per night for groups of 9–15 people Camping Fee (Medium Group) 50.00 Per site per night for groups of 16–25 people Camping Fee (Large Group) 60.00 Per site per night for groups of 26–40 people Glacier Basin Campsite Tents in the foreground with snowy peaks behind Tents at Glacier Basin Campground Night Sky Program at Glacier Basin Stars shine in the night sky above Glacier Basin Glacier Basin is a great place to view the stars! Longs Peak Campground Longs Peak Campground is located about 20 minutes south of Estes Park on Hwy 7. This small, tents-only campground is forested and at a fairly high elevation of 9500 feet (3000 m). Camping Fee 30.00 Per site per night Longs Peak Campground Paved road with sign in background Longs Peak Campground has paved roads. Longs Peak Campground Large Site Two tents site in a large wooded campsite Longs Peak has a variety of campsite sizes. Longs Peak Campground Small Site Tent in the foreground with mountains behind Longs Peak Campground has beautiful small tent sites. Moraine Park Campground OPEN for Summer Season through the night of October 10. OPENS for Winter Season night of October 11. Availability is on a First Come/First Served basis in Loop B only. Potable water is available. The Dump Station is Closed. Moraine Park Campground (8,160 feet) is located in Colorado's awe-inspiring Rocky Mountain National Park, near the Beaver Meadows Entrance on Highway 36. It is situated on the north side of Moraine Park, offering beautiful views of the vast park and the surrounding mountains. Camping Fee 30.00 Per site per night Camping Fee (Winter) 20.00 Per site per night. Winter services are limited due to cold temperatures. Moraine Park Campground Site Dirt campsite shaded by pine trees An individual site at Moraine Park Campground. Moraine Park Campground Group Site A group site with multiple tents and extra space A group site at Moraine Park Campground. Moraine Park Campground Amphitheater Large amphitheater in foreground with snowy mountains behind Moraine Park has a beautiful amphitheater hosting ranger programs every summer evening. Moraine Park Campground Solar Showers Two stalls set up for solar showers Have a solar shower? Moraine Park has facilities to help you use it. Timber Creek Campground Timber Creek Campground is the only campground on the west side of the park. Located at 8900 feet (3000 m) along the Colorado River about eight miles north of the Grand Lake entrance to Rocky Mountain National Park. A mountain pine beetle infestation caused most of the trees to be removed, so there is no shade at campsites. Camping Fee 30.00 Per site per night Timber Creek Campground Overview A large campground with mountains behind Timber Creek Campground. Timber Creek Campground Sites Bare campsites with mountain behind Example sites at Timber Creek. Timber Creek Campground Water A stream flows with a meadow with mountains behind Timber Creek has great access to the Colorado River. Summer on the Tundra Yellow flowers bloom on tundra slopes with mountains in the background. Old Man of the Mountain bloom on Rocky's alpine tundra. Trail Ridge Road Road sweeps across open tundra with mountains in background. Trail Ridge Road, the highest continuous paved road in the United States, let's visitors experience Rocky's alpine tundra. Elk in Moraine Park A herd of elk stand in a meadow. In the fall, Rocky's elk gather together in groups for the mating season. Horseshoe Park The moon sets below mountain peaks at sunrise. While the moon sets, the sun rises at Horseshoe Park, one of Rocky's beautiful meadows. Longs Peak Longs Peak, covered in snow, against dark moody clouds. Longs Peak towers above Rocky Mountain National Park. Fuels Project at Rocky Mountain National Park Helps Protect Park and Local Community from Future Fires Piles created from the Wind-E-Portal Fuels Reduction Project Piles created from the Wind-E-Portal Fuels Reduction Project Planning for the Future of the Dragonfly Mercury Project Article on the 2019 Dragonfly Mercury Project steering committee meeting at Rocky Mountain National Park. People searching a pond with nets. Fern Lake Fire Offers Challenges and Opportunities in Rocky Mountain NP The Fern Lake fire in Rocky Mountain NP began in steep terrain with beetle-killed timber. Direct attack would put firefighters at unnecessary risk, so managers indirectly attacked the fire when the time was right, where success was likely. They scouted existing firelines away from beetle-killed trees and established action points that would trigger pre-evacuation. By mid-December, the Fern Lake fire was 3,498 acres. The fire destroyed one private cabin in the park. Factors Affecting the Wilderness Experience What sights and sounds influence a wilderness experience for backcountry visitors in Rocky Mountain National Park? Volunteers distributed a survey, camera, and journal to hikers at trailheads. Wildland Fire: Fuels Projects Help on Fern Lake Fire The Fern Lake fire in Rocky Mountain National Park (ROMO) quickly doubled in size on December 1, 2012, prompting the evacuation of more than 600 residents of Estes Park. The fire engulfed a cabin in the Kaley Cottage housing area, which started multiple spot fires. Firefighters were successful in saving the rest of the structures largely due to several years of hazard fuels and bark beetle mitigation projects. The fuels work helped create a fire-adapted community. Wildland Fire: Flexible Management Leads to Ecological Benefits Lightning ignited the Big Meadows fire in Rocky Mountain National Park in June 2013 and spread rapidly to 400 acres. The fire was managed with protection-based objectives, and managers leveraged strategies and tactics to maximize ecological benefits. The fire was stopped from moving south or west, towards values at risk, but was allowed to move to north and east into tundra, effectively containing the fire while benefitting the ecosystem. Students, Alpine Hotshots Form Bond through Rocky Mountain Fire Training Program The “Fire!” program links students from Eagle Rock School with Alpine Interagency Hotshot Crew members and ecologists from Rocky Mountain National Park and the NPS Continental Divide Research Learning Center. The course is based on experiential learning through a hands-on approach, including physical training standards. Students learn about succession and fire’s effects on ecosystems and work out scenarios to apply what they learned about fire suppression. NPS Structural Fire Program Highlights 2014 Intern Accomplishments NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] alpine landscape Cleaner Snow Reveals Cleaner Air in Rocky Mountain Network Parks Few things look more pristine than a fresh blanket of snow, yet each snowflake naturally carries small particles from the atmosphere. When snowflakes build around these particles, the resulting snowfall can bring pollutants from far away into our national parks. Long-term snow chemistry monitoring is showing some improvements in air quality at Glacier and Rocky Mountain National Parks, and Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve. Snowpack Sampling at Apgar Lookout in Glacier National Park Fire Effects Monitoring Rocky Mountain National Park's Fire Effects crew is busy all summer long monitoring plots and responding to fire. Learn more about a day in the life of a Fire Effects Monitor. Fire effect crew identify vegetation along a transect line Aspen Age Distribution How do recent patterns of aspen establishment in Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) compare to long-term trends? Elk browsing on aspen in Horseshoebend Park, 1931. Effects of Beaver Dams on Riparian Areas What is the role of beaver dams on hydrological processes in montane riparian areas? Beaver swimming Plant Response to Ozone Are high concentrations of ambient ozone damaging plant leaves in Rocky Mountain National Park? Dr. Kohut teaches park staff to recognize ozone injury. Wind Research What are the wind patterns in Rocky Mountain National Park? Bighorn Sheep Population What is the abundance and distribution of bighorn sheep in Rocky Mountain National Park? What are the survival rates of bighorn lambs? Bighorn ram Population Genetics of Bighorn Sheep Is the Mummy Range bighorn sheep population subject to negative effects from inbreeding after a recent pneumonia-induced population die-off ? A ram stands on a rock Moose Summer Diet What do moose eat during the summer in the park? Moose browsing on woody plant Fire History and Climate Change Using cores taken from the sediments of Bear Lake, scientists compared the fire and vegetative history of the area with radiocarbon dates of the various strata. Raise Awareness about Wildland Fires Raise your awareness about wildfires so you can be prepared! Wildfire season rotates around the country, but a wildfire could happen at any time if the conditions are right. Fire is a natural part of our world. People can take steps to help reduce their properties’ exposure to wildfire. Crystal Clear: Occurrence, Sources, and Potential for Biodegradation of Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals in Surface Water . A multi-year project was started to provide information to park managers about the ecological risks posed by endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC) introduced to park waters primarily through air transport (deposition). Previous studies have demonstrated that EDC deposition, accumulation within fish and other animals, and endocrine disruption (hormonal changes) are significant in remote surface-water ecosystems of the park. an otter on a snowy bank Park Air Profiles - Rocky Mountain National Park Air quality profile for Rocky Mountain National Park. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Rocky Mountain NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Rocky Mountain NP. Bighorn sheep in Rocky Mountain National Park Rocky Mountain National Park Wildland Fire Crew Honors Fallen Firefighters The wildland fire crew at Rocky Mountain National Park culminated “A Week to Remember” by completing the arduous “Hotshot 19” workout. The wildland fire community designated the week June 30–July 6, 2014, to mark the anniversaries of two tragic fire seasons, 1994 and 2013, and to pay respects to all wildland firefighters who have fallen in the line of duty. Firefighters also discussed lessons learned from these incidents in hopes of avoiding future tragedies. Local Relationships Limit Woodland Heights Fire Damage Rocky Mountain National Park’s excellent relationship with the Estes Park Fire Department allowed for rapid response, and collaboration limited damage during the Woodland Heights fire. One exact drop from a helitanker stopped a run up a saddle that had a high potential to continue into downtown Estes Park. NPS employees saved numerous homes by building direct line and extinguishing hot spots with the engine. The fire destroyed 22 homes and two outbuildings. Fire Communication and Education Grants Enhance Fire Interpretation and Outreach in the National Parks in 2015 and Beyond The 2015 National Park Service Fire Communication and Education Grant Program provided funding for projects, programs, or tasks in twelve parks around the country. A woman studies a small coniferous tree while a younger woman looks on. Wildland Fire: Pile Burning at Rocky Mountain NP During winter 2011-2012, crews in Rocky Mountain National Park burned 5,681 large debris piles containing hazardous fuels cleared from 497 acres of high-risk areas when conditions were wet and adequate smoke dispersal was expected. There were no lost-time injuries during this complex fuel reduction project. The highly experienced crew came up with new and additional methods, procedures, and mitigations to reduce the possibility of injuries occurring. Piles of wood and woody material stacked in tipi shapes in wilderness Glacial Meltwater Controls the Distribution of Benthic Invertebrate Communities in Alpine Lakes Is the meltwater emanating from glacial retreat changing the insect communities that live on the sediment bottom of high elevation lakes? How will this affect paleoclimatic studies that use these insects to reconstruct temperatures over millennial time scales? Post-fire Vegetation Response at Chickaree Lake Barrie Chileen, a recent graduate of Kansas State University, studied lake cores from Chickaree Lake in Rocky Mountain National Park to determine vegetation response following fire events. Chickaree Lake Surrounded by lodgepole pine forest Reducing Congestion in Rocky Mountain National Park's Bear Lake Corridor Learn about the use of dynamic message board signs by Rocky Mountain National Park and their local and federal partners to reduce congestion. dynamic message board sign along road, mountain in distance Nitrogen Deposition Correlated with Changes in Lake Organisms Is atmospheric deposition of nitrogen to park lakes changing algae communities? View of Sky Pond, one of the lakes in the study. Effects of Browsing and Fire on Shrublands What are the combined effects of ungulate browsing and prescribed fire on montane shrubland communitites? Firefighters and fire across the montane shrublands. Elk and Moose Exclusion Fence Can fences be designed that will exclude elk and moose from willow rehabilitation areas but allow passage of smaller mammals? Photo from a motion camera of a deer inside the fence. Black Bear Population and Stability Scientists work to discover population size and stability of black bears in Rocky Mountain National Park. Close-up of a black bear Climbing the Longs Peak Keyhole Route How many visitors hike on the East Longs Peak Trail and how many visitors summit via the Keyhole Route? View of Longs Peak Simulated Beaver Structures In September 2019, simulated beaver structures were constructed along two streams in Rocky Mountain National Park. This Frequently Asked Questions highlights the project, why it is being done, and how it came about. Water cascades over wooden structure across a small stream Student Citizen Scientists Explore Phenology Student citizen scientists from Eagle Rock School collected data on plant and animal activities and documented their observations during a 5-week course based around the Lily Lake Phenology walk at Rocky Mountain National Park. Students, wearing safety vests, gather around a shrub at the base of a tree. Uncovering Civilian Conservation Corps Camps in Rocky Mountain National Park Following the Great Depression, President Franklin Roosevelt created the Civilian Conservation Corps as a way to employ thousands of young men across the country. Many of these men worked on projects within national parks. Archeologists uncovered remains of six CCC camps in and around Rocky Mountain National Park. Camp NP-3-C Pikas in Peril The National Park Service stewards pika populations in more than a dozen parks and seeks to understand the vulnerability of pikas and other mountain species to climate change. Pikas in Peril, funded in 2010, was a collaborative research program directed by scientists from the National Park Service, Oregon State University, University of Idaho, and University of Colorado-Boulder. Profile of a pika on rough, dark red lava rock. © Michael Durham Preparing for What We Have Never Seen Before Aiming to learn from the Chimney Tops 2 fire, a workshop was organized of emergency responders from in and around the Estes Park area. The overarching objective was to understand how local, county, state, and federal agencies would work together during a catastrophic wildfire scenario. Emergency Responder Workshop Recipe for Mountain Lake Conservation After a long hike through the mountains, nothing compares to the inspiring beauty of a healthy, colorful mountain lake. But airborne nitrogen pollution threatens the health and function of these alpine oases. man sits by mountain lake Cleaning Up the Eugenia Mine Should the remains of the Eugenia Mine on the slopes of Longs Peak be cleaned up to reduce the runoff of heavy metals? A sign that remains on the miners cabin near Eugenia Mine Effects of the Grand Ditch What are the ecological effects of the Grand Ditch water diversion on riparian areas in the Kawuneeche Valley? View of the Grand Ditch alongside road with mountains in the background Effects of Elk Herbivory How is the large population of elk affecting the park’s vegetation and soils? Elk bugling Elk Body Condition Have elk reached ecological carrying capacity in Rocky? Is population growth limited by food availability? Dr. Willard’s Alpine Tundra Research Plots Could Beatrice Willard’s alpine tundra research plots be designated an historic site? Bettie Willard and fellow CEQ members provide Richard Nixon with an annual environmental report. Checking Rocky's Vital Signs In 2007, the Rocky Mountain Inventory and Monitoring Network—a small team of NPS scientists—began monitoring natural resources, called “vital signs,” in Rocky and nearby parks. Vital signs indicate park health and serve as red flags if conditions deteriorate. Results from monitoring these vital signs support park managers’ efforts to make science-based management decisions. Learn about the NPS Inventory and Monitoring Program and its work in Rocky Mountain National Park. two people in life jackets stand in a small, forested stream holding a measuring tape Subalpine Forest Fires and Climatic Variation How does fire occurrence relate to climate variability? Smoke from wildfire The Formation of the Never Summer Range What is the chemical composition of young volcanic rocks in the Never Summer Range? Diagram of volcanic rocks on Specimen Mountain Rock Glacier Response to Climate Change How will a change in temperature affect permafrost distribution? Scientist uses radar to measure permafrost. Prehistoric Human Migration What were prehistoric human migratory patterns within the park? Backcountry Users: Who? Why? What? Who is using the backcountry in Rocky Mountain National Park? Why are they here and what do they want? A large group hiking on a trail. Little Willows at Great Heights here are 17 documented species of willow in Rocky Mountain National Park, and four of them make a living on the alpine tundra. Willow plants provide habitat and food for a variety of species including the white-tailed ptarmigan, but research shows a decrease in their overall cover and size. Who might be to blame? Short willow with white seed fluff grow on the tundra amid wildflowers. McGraw Ranch Cultural Landscape The McGraw Ranch, located on the eastern side of Rocky Mountain National Park to the northeast of Estes Park, Colorado, was originally settled as a working cattle ranch. The McGraw family purchased the property in 1908, and in 1936 they transformed it into a guest ranch. Several of the buildings were transformed and guest cabins were added to accommodate visitors. The landscape helps preserve the history of cattle and dude ranching in the vicinity of Estes Park. A wooden fence frames the landscape, including grass, a row of buildings, a tree-covered hills. Moraine Park Museum and Amphitheater Cultural Landscape The Moraine Park Museum and Amphitheater sits in the northeast corner of Moraine Park, at the base of Eagle Cliff Mountain. In 1936, the CCC converted the Moraine Lodge's Assembly Hall into a National Park Service museum. Built in the same year, the amphitheater's naturalistic design reflected the conservation efforts of the National Park Service during the 1930s when hand labor was readily available from the CCC. Moraine Park Amphitheater, 2010 (C. Mardorf, NPS) Wildland Fire in Ponderosa Pine: Western United States This forest community generally exists in areas with annual rainfall of 25 inches or less. Extensive pure stands of this forest type are found in the southwestern U.S., central Washington and Oregon, southern Idaho and the Black Hills of South Dakota. Recently burned ponderosa pine forest. A tale of two sides of the mountain in Rocky Mountain National Park In 1997 a group of scientists led by Dr. Jill Baron, an ecologist at the US Geological Survey (USGS), designed a study in Rocky Mountain National Park, in Colorado. Baron and her colleagues wanted to understand how mountain ecosystems respond to air pollution. A mountain view with trees and a small alpine lake Butterfly Survey at Lava Cliffs Each summer, Stephanie Mason, a Senior Naturalist with the Audubon Naturalist Society, spends six weeks in Rocky Mountain National Park documenting butterfly species along 20 transects as part of the Rocky Mountain Butterfly Project. In August 2019, Science Communication Intern Vishva Nalamalapu joined Stephanie to experience a typical day of butterfly surveys. Grey butterfly siting wings open on grey and brown rocks. Honoring the past and celebrating the present: 100 years of research at Rocky Mountain National Park First in a series of five articles celebrating the Rocky Mountain National Park centennial that reviews aspects of science applied to park stewardship since the park’s founding in 1915. Portion of cyclic adaptive management framework illustration Pollinators - Hummingbirds Hummingbirds (family Trochilidae) are amazingly adapted pollinators, and they play an important role in pollination. A flying hummingbird hovers next to a red flower Parks, pikas, and physiological stress: Implications for long-term monitoring of an NPS climate-sensitive sentinel species Baseline values of physiological stress can be incorporated into monitoring plans for pikas, providing park managers with additional information related to the vulnerability of this climate-sensitive model species that occurs within a large number of western parks. American pika (Copyright Dick Orleans) Pollinators - Bumble bee Get the buzz on bumblebees! There are approximately 46 species of bumble bees (genus Bombus) native to North America and 250 species worldwide—all dependent on flowering plants. A bumblebee lands on a white flower Inspiring the future: The next 100 years of research and learning at Rocky Mountain National Park Fifth in a series of five articles celebrating the Rocky Mountain National Park centennial that reviews aspects of science applied to park stewardship since the park’s founding in 1915. The role of science through a century of elk and habitat management at Rocky Mountain National Park Second in a series of five articles celebrating the Rocky Mountain National Park centennial that reviews aspects of science applied to park stewardship since the park’s founding in 1915. Scientists collect biological samples and affix a radio-collar on an anesthetized elk Nature, history, and environmental history at Rocky Mountain National Park Fourth in a series of five articles celebrating the Rocky Mountain National Park centennial that reviews aspects of science applied to park stewardship since the park’s founding in 1915. Workshop participants gather in Moraine Park in 2014, Rocky Mountain National Park A Vast Moving Caravan: Roads and Tourism How have roads and road building shaped the history and landscape of the park? Advertisement from 1913 for the Union Pacific depicting roads in the region. National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map High elevations under threat from nitrogen deposition: Air quality monitoring, research, and management at Rocky Mountain National Park Third in a series of five articles celebrating the Rocky Mountain National Park centennial that reviews aspects of science applied to park stewardship since the park’s founding in 1915. Wet deposition monitoring collectors at Loch Vale watershed, Rocky Mountain National Park Planning for Wildfire Response in the Era of COVID-19: Alpine Hotshots, a Case Study The summer of 2020 presented a new set of challenges to firefighters as the global COVID-19 pandemic reshaped how people interact, gather, travel, and work. The National Park Service Alpine Hotshot Crew found innovative ways to mitigate the risk of exposure to firefighters, while continuing to provide their essential public service. Wood sign that says Alpine Hotshots Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Parks in Science History Parks in Science History is a series of articles and videos made in cooperation with graduate students from various universities. They highlight the roles that national parks have played in the history of science and, therefore, the world's intellectual heritage. A woman looking through binoculars Series: Crystal Clear: A Call to Action In 2016, the nation celebrates the centennial of the National Park Service (NPS) as the steward of special places that represent our natural and cultural heritage. Many national parks were founded on the beauty and value of water. Since the preservation of the Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park in 1872, the National Park System has grown to include significant examples within majestic rivers, the Great Lakes, oceans and coasts, and other spectacular water resources. bright blue lake green islands in between Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ Places of Katharine Lee Bates and “America the Beautiful” The opening lines of “America the Beautiful” first struck Katharine Lee Bates atop Pikes Peak in the Rocky Mountains. During the summer of 1893, she embarked on a journey across the United States. Originally written as a poem, many of the lines in Bates’ ode to the American landscape refer to geographical features she encountered during her travels. black and white portrait of Katharine Lee Bates The Precambrian The Precambrian was the "Age of Early Life." During the Precambrian, continents formed and our modern atmosphere developed, while early life evolved and flourished. Soft-bodied creatures like worms and jellyfish lived in the world's oceans, but the land remained barren. Common Precambrian fossils include stromatolites and similar structures, which are traces of mats of algae-like microorganisms, and microfossils of other microorganisms. fossil stromatolites in a cliff face Wildland Fire in Lodgepole Pine The bark of lodgepoles is thin, which does not protect the trunks from scorching by fire. They die easily when a fire passes through. However, the serotinous cones give lodgepole pine a special advantage for spreading seeds for the next generation. Close-up of the needles of a lodgepole pine. Connie Rudd: Defining a Career Path Connie Rudd's career with the National Park Service began as a seasonal ranger in 1979. Her continual desire to learn propelled her to various sites and positions in interpretation, planning, and management until 2014, when she retired as Park Superintendent. In this Spotlight article, Rudd reflects on her career path, changes in interpretation, and being in upper management as a woman. Part of "Women’s Voices: Women in the National Park Service Oral History Project." Connie Rudd smiles for a portrait in an outdoor setting, wearing a NPS uniform and flathat More Than “Just” A Secretary If you’re only familiar with modern office practices, you may not recognize many of jobs necessary to run an office or national park over much of the past hundred years. Today, typewriters have given way to computers, photocopy machines have replaced typing pools, stenographers are rarely seen outside of courtrooms, and callers are largely expected to pick extensions from digital directories. Women skiing The Women Naturalists Only two early women park rangers made the transition to park naturalists. Having resigned her permanent ranger position after her marriage, Marguerite Lindsley Arnold returned to Yellowstone National Park under the temporary park ranger (naturalist) title from 1929 to 1931. Yosemite rehired Ranger Enid Michael as temporary naturalist each summer from 1928 to 1942. A handful of other parks hired a few new women under the newly created ranger-naturalist designation. Ranger showing a plant to a visitor The Job is His, Not Yours In the early 1950s, park wives continued to function as they had from the 1920s to the 1940s. The NPS still got Two For the Price of One, relying on women to keep monuments in the Southwest running, to give freely of their time and talents, to build and maintain park communities, and to boost morale among park staffs. With the creation of the Mission 66 Program to improve park facilities, the NPS found new ways to put some park wives to (unpaid) work. Man and woman with telescope Substitute Rangers As the 1940s dawned, the United States was still dealing with the economic woes of the Great Depression and trying not to get drawn in WWII. Even as it continued to manage New Deal Program work in national and state parks, the NPS remained understaffed as a government bureau. The emergency relief workers and about 15 percent of NPS staff enlisted or were drafted during the first couple of years of WWII. Winifred Tada, 1940. (Courtesy of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin) Change in Holocene Treeline, Paleoclimate, and High Altitude Hunting Systems in Rocky Mountain NP More than eighty high altitude game drives are known along Colorado’s continental divide, but until recently there has been limited understanding of the interactive effect of cyclical climate and ecosystem change on Holocene alpine tundra hunting systems. UNC researchers produced a reconstruction of game drive use and elevation-specific environmental zone shifts. Series: Curiosity Kit: Curiosity Kits inspire exploration and learning of history through place. These multi-piece resources include articles that explore historic places and provide educational activities for life-long learners. This kit focuses on Katharine Lee Bates, author of what became the song “America the Beautiful.” Learn about some of the places associated with her life and work. You’ll also find activities and discussion questions for learners of all ages. Katharine Lee Bates Series: Curiosity Kit: Katharine Lee Bates Curiosity Kits inspire exploration and learning of history through place. These multi-piece resources include articles that explore historic places and provide educational activities for life-long learners. This kit focuses on Katharine Lee Bates, author of what became the song “America the Beautiful.” Learn about some of the places associated with her life and work. You’ll also find activities and discussion questions for learners of all ages. Katharine Lee Bates
Rocky Mountain Rocky Mountain National Park Colorado National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior 100th Anniversary 1915–2015 th g.’s western sidecool,also r Trapper Mountain Jim pocket gopher Nature’s Knife Edge C K Y R O To ascend Rocky Mountain National Park’s Trail Ridge Road is to leave this world and enter another. It carries you, breathless with wonder and altitude, toward a fragile alpine realm, the tundra. Most animals hibernate or migrate during the harsh winters. No trees can live here. M O U S A I N N T The Rocky Mountains form one of the world’s longest ranges, stretching almost unbroken from Alaska to below the nation’s southern border. The park preserves a small but important neighborhood within this range. Rocky Mountain National Park Above: Alpine sunflowers at the Continental Divide. NPS / ANN SCHONLAU Despite the brief, six-week growing season, plants survive. Most conserve energy by miniaturizing. Each July thousands of brilliant alpine sunflowers, Rydbergia grandiflora (above), burst from the thin blanket of soil that covers parts of the tundra. For decades these hardy plants have worked toward this moment. Many tundra flowers track the sun to maximize their intake of light, required for photosynthesis. Nature’s Guideposts Montane Subalpine The montane ecosystem is the park’s gateway whether you enter from Grand Lake, Estes Park, or Wild Basin. On warm, south-facing slopes the ponderosa pines will greet you with their sweet fragrance. The open, sunlight-dappled forest of tall (up to 150 feet) trees feeds and shelters the tassel-eared Abert’s squirrel. Snow that falls in the alpine zone blows down to the subalpine, creating a wet ecosystem with over 30 inches of precipitation annually. Sharp-tipped, pungent Engelmann spruce and flat-needled fir trees prevail, reaching 100 feet. The understory supports shrubs like blueberry, wax currant, huckleberry, and Wood’s rose. Wildflowers like arnica, fairy slipper, twinflower, and purple elephant’s head colonize open meadows. below 9,000 feet Chokecherry, currant, and serviceberry bushes sustain many animals, insects, and birds. Beavers and otters work and play in the montane’s streams. Elk, one of the park’s larger mammals, gather here to rut in fall. They eat the aspen trees’ soft inner bark and shoots, and leave a calling card of abraded aspen trunks. On cooler, north-facing slopes, forests are dense with Douglas-fir and lodgepole pine. Pika 9,000–11,400 feet On the park’s southern edge, the water ouzel, or American dipper, defies fast-running streams to dive for food. Downy and hairy woodpeckers, bold Steller’s jay, and the yellow-rumped warbler share the woods. Look for the pocket gopher and golden-mantled ground squirrel. Park your vehicle at the Alpine Visitor Center and behold 360-degree views of astonishing peaks, lakes, snowfields, canyons, forests, and meadows spread over 400 square miles. For a close look at the alpine ecosystem walk the Tundra Communities Trail to the east. To the west, the Rockies’ spine divides the continent into two watersheds. One flows west to the Pacific, the other east to the Atlantic. On the park’s drier east side, snow blows in from the wetter west, replenishing the few remaining glaciers. All rest in cool, dark valley cirques, or bowl-shaped depressions. Higher summer temperatures since the 1990s have caused the glaciers to melt back. On the park’s west side, in the Never Summer mountains, the Colorado River begins as a tiny stream fed by snowmelt. Downstream, it will provide water to 40 million humans. Thrust skyward by Earth’s forces between 40 and 70 million years ago, then sculpted by three glacial episodes, the Rockies are “new” in geologic terms. In 2009 Rocky Mountain National Park, a small neighborhood within this vast mountain range, became one of the nation’s “newest” designated wildernesses. Nature has always ruled this wild, fantastic place. But as human-triggered events outside park boundaries increasingly affect life within the park, how will nature respond? What is our role? Travel through Ecosystems along Trail Ridge Road Alpine above 11,400 feet Extremely thin soil, strong ultraviolet light, drying winds, and bitter cold define life on the tundra. Many plants hug the ground in dense mats (avens, below right), preserve moisture with waxen leaf surfaces, or trap warmth against stems and leaves with hairs. Animals also must adapt or die. Marmots store fat, then draw upon their reserves as they hibernate. Bighorn sheep graze here in summer, but migrate in fall, like many other species in the park, to lower elevations. The resilient white-tailed ptarmigan is an exception. This bird stays all winter in the alpine zone, warmed by feathered eyelids, nostrils, legs, and feet. ABOVE LEFT AND RIGHT: © SHATTIL / ROZINSKI PHOTOGRAPHY Ptarmigan Montane Alpine Subalpine Above: Aspen (Populous tremuloides) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta). Left: Common sulphur but
Timed-Entry Permits This visitor guide, combined with your park map, has the info you need for a fun, safe, and successful visit to Rocky Mountain National Park. Don’t have a timed-entry permit? It’s likely that entry Page 2: Things to Do Page 3: Pocket Ranger Page 5: Hiking Guide Page 8: Fall Guide Page 11: Driving Guide Back: Shuttles & Safety permits are sold out for the day. Visit recreation.gov to view availablity. Or, you can wait until after 3 pm to enter the park (excluding Bear Lake road). A limited amount of permits will be released daily at 5 pm for the following day. These are expected to sell out quickly and we encourage you to plan ahead when possible. Food, Water, and Restrooms Food services in the park are limited. Food is available at Trail Ridge Store and in the park’s gateway communities. Picnic areas are marked on your map. destination. Water from lakes and streams isn’t safe to drink unless you treat or filter it first. Trailhead and facility restrooms that meet public health guidance Safe-to-drink water is will be open. If you have available at some to go but aren’t near a facilities and trailheads. restroom, you must follow Don’t assume water Leave No Trace principles. will be available at your Can I leave at any time? There is no length-of-stay requirement, you may leave the park at any time. The only restriction is when you can enter the park. You must enter within your reserved 2-hour window. Once I’m in the park, can I exit and re-enter? Yes. Once you’ve entered the park during your 2-hour entry window, you can exit and re-enter the park as often as needed for the rest of the day. With a permit, am I guaranteed a parking place? No. Your reservation guarantees you access to the park during your reserved time window. It does not guarantee access to all locations within the park. If you have a Bear Lake Road Corridor permit, be flexible and/or use the shuttle to access trailheads. It’s the Year of the Tundra! This summer we are celebrating all things alpine tundra! Did you know that one-third of the park is made up of this unique ecosystem? Looking for activities to do while up on the tundra? Check page 3. For tundra closures, see page 11. You can help this area thrive by watching your step and sticking to the trails. DON’T TRAMPLE THE TUNDRA Weather and Altitude Keep a safe distance from wildlife—it’s the law. Lightning regularly strikes in Rocky. No outdoor place is safe when lightning strikes. Check the forecast before heading out. Plan activities so you can quickly return to your car if a storm begins. If hiking, plan to return to the trailhead before noon. Return to the trailhead immediately if you hear thunder. Altitude sickness affects many visitors every year. Symptoms include headache, nausea, fatigue, dizziness, vomiting, and even unconsciousness. Altitude can also aggravate pre-existing conditions like heart and lung disease. Take your time, drink water, eat, and rest. The only cure for altitude sickness is to go down to a lower altitude. 7 pm to 7 am Sunday nights through Friday mornings. Detailed info is available on our website. Moraine Park, be alert for: 25 yards 100 yards Never feed wildlife, including birds and chipmunks. It’s illegal and makes the animals unhealthy. You could be bitten, scratched, kicked, thrown, or trampled. If you see a bear or mountain lion, stop and calmly back away. Never turn your back or run away. Stand tall and raise your arms to look large. Pick up small children. Need to Know Visitor services are limited. Some facilities and events are closed or canceled. A reduced number of visitors will be allowed in facilities at a given time. All visitors must wear a face mask when riding the shuttle. For those who are not fully vaccinated, face masks are required indoors and in crowded outdoor spaces. This includes narrow or busy trails, parking lots, and overlooks. During the summer, road construction will occur between Bear Lake Road junction and Deer Ridge junction. This 3-mile section of road will be closed from Maintain social distancing of six feet whenever possible. Pets are prohibited on ALL park trails, tundra, and meadow areas. When in burned areas like Forest Canyon, Spruce Canyon, trails in the Fern Lake and Cub Lake area, the North Inlet Trail, and • falling trees and limbs, especially during periods of wind • unstable slopes and rolling material such as logs and rocks • burned out stump holes • bridges or structures that may be damaged Off-trail travel is not recommended in burned areas. Contact Us Trail Ridge Rd Status (970) 586-1222 Park Information (970) 586-1206 Emergencies Call or text 911 Website nps.gov/romo Social Media @RockyNPS Summer / Fall 2021 Never Approach Wildlife Rocky Mountain National Park WELCOME Things to Do Visitor Centers Park rangers may be available outside the following visitor centers: • Beaver Meadows • Alpine • Kawuneeche Rocky Mountain Conservancy nature stores are
Animals in Winter Whose Footprints? Life Beneath the Snow When the weather becomes cold, snowy, and windy during Rocky’s winter months animals need to adjust their behavior. Rocky’s winter tolerators leave clues for us by creating distinct patterns of footprints in the snow. Following these tracks can help us learn more about their behavior and daily activities. We can discover evidence of tolerators above the snow by finding their tracks or searching for caches of food. But some tolerators, like deer mice, retreat below for protection from harsh winds, bitter cold, and hungry predators. Some, like the elk, migrate. They move down to lower elevations where the weather is warmer and food is more abundant. Hopper Loper Walker The subnivean zone describes the area between the ground and the bottom of the snowpack. This area is well-insulated. The snow acts like a heavy blanket, keeping the creatures warm and hidden. Others, like black bears and marmots, hibernate. They spend the winter in a dormant state, remaining inactive to conserve energy. Animals like coyotes, deer mice, and snowshoe hares endure the winter. These critters are tolerators who adapt to survive harsh winter conditions. Think: would you rather be a migrator, hibernator, or tolerator? Why? Snowshoe Hare Mule Deer Coyote Hike a trail and see how many critters’ tracks you can find in the snow. Are they a walker, loper, or hopper? What kind of animal made these tracks? Snowy alpine Play in the snow! Do you feel warmer out in the open, or covered up under by a blanket of snow? Rocky Pocket Ranger Snowy Adventures! Changing Times Animals in Rocky are adapted to winter conditions. How might warming temperatures impact their lives? Have you been here before? What changes have you seen? Write your own predictions about how life in Rocky may change over the next 2050 years. Sagittarius The Sky Tells a Story Find the North Star The moon and stars have inspired humans for thousands of years. People told stories about the shapes they saw in the stars—stories about things that were important to them and lessons about how to behave and treat others. The North Star, also known as Polaris, is very near the celestial pole (if you were standing at the North Pole, it would appear directly overhead). Though you might expect it to be one of the brighter stars in the sky, it’s actually dim enough to be tricky to find. Luckily, if you can spot the Big Dipper, you can use it to navigate to the north star using the “pointer stars” at the bottom of the dipper. What do you wonder when you stare at a sky littered with thousands of stars? Scorpius If you could draw your own constellation, what story would you write in the night sky? The Big Dipper 3 Fun activities for all! Half the Park is After Dark Rocky Pocket Ranger Noticing Winter Find a quiet place to sit—beside your car, at a picnic table—during dawn or dusk. Take notice of your senses to get a whole new picture of the world around you. How does snow form? Snow forms when droplets of water in clouds freeze into ice crystals. This happens when clouds are colder than 15°F! As the ice crystals stick together, they become too heavy for the cloud and fall to the ground. As they fall, they may pass through warmer air causing a slight melting affect. If they melt too much, this causes sleet. If the air is cooler, the crystals will bond together forming large fluffy flakes. Temperature, air currents, and humidity influence the shape of the ice crystals, so each snowflake is unique. If you can, catch a snowflake or pick some up from the ground. • What does it look like? Can you see the different flakes? • Why do you think it looks that way? • Does it look like it will snow more today? What observations are making you determine that answer? • Does snow feel or act differently under trees and in meadows? Why do you think that is? Snow-covered Ponderosa pine tree Practice Intentional Curiosity Record your thoughts at right: “I notice...” Look closely. Are there animal tracks in the snow? Is steam coming off the nearby stream? What are the clouds doing? What patterns do you see in the trees? “It reminds me of...” What associations come to mind? An event? An object? A memory? Tying what you know with what you experience may help you retain this moment…and help you share it with others. “I wonder...” Ask questions about what you’ve noticed. Say them out loud to yourself or a friend. What do you want to know more about? Sensory Overload Vision Your eyes have two kinds of light receptors: rods and cones. Cones work best in strong light and pick up colors. Rods work better in dim light but don’t pick up colors. As the light changes in shadows, look at your clothing or the clothing of your friends. Can you tell what color it is? If you had to pick, would you want only rods or only cones for your eyes? What kind of sight would you want? Smell Smells are really just a combination of chemicals.
Safety Is Our Number One Priority This visitor guide, combined with your park map, has the essential info you need for a fun, safe, and successful visit to Rocky Mountain National Park. Rocky is modifying access and visitor services to help prevent the spread of infectious diseases. Some facilities and events will be closed or canceled. Page 2: Things to Do Page 3: Pocket Ranger Page 5: Activity Guide Page 8: Winter Guide Page 11: Spring Guide Back: Safety Check locally and on the park website for current information, and continue to follow CDC guidelines. Thank you for your patience and cooperation. Dress for Success With the right clothing and gear, the mountains are an incredible place for winter adventures. Without them, winter in the mountains is extremely dangerous. Hypothermia is a serious risk. Watch for sleepiness, impaired judgment, lots of shivering, and slurred speech. Get a grip! Traction devices are always recommended when walking on ice and packed snow. Come prepared. Visitor services are limited. A reduced number of visitors will be allowed in facilities at a given time. Face masks are required inside all visitor facilities, and when in areas where social distancing cannot be maintained. This includes narrow or busy trails, parking lots, pulloffs, and overlooks. Cold Maintain social distancing of six feet whenever possible, especially in busy areas. Follow current local, state, and national health guidance: • If you’re sick, don’t visit the park. • Wash your hands with soap and water or use hand sanitizer. • Avoid touching your face. • Sneeze or cough into a tissue or the inside of your elbow. Extreme Cold warm hat 2–3 layers gloves outer layer to keep out wind, wet snow warm hat face mask 3+ layers 1 insulating outer layer boots 1–2 layers waterproof to keep out wind gloves boots 2+ layers waterproof Weather and Altitude Keep a safe distance from wildlife—it’s the law. Winters at Rocky are extreme, with very cold temperatures, howling winds, feet of snow, and conditions that can change suddenly. 100 yards Never feed wildlife, including birds and chipmunks. It’s illegal. It makes the animals unhealthy. You could be bitten, scratched, kicked, thrown, or trampled. If you see a bear or mountain lion, stop, stay calm, and back away. Never turn your back or run away. Stand tall and raise your arms to look large. Pick up small children. Avalanches can be easily triggered when traveling in the wilderness. The park doesn’t do any avalanche control. For current conditions, check locally or visit colorado.gov/avalanche Food, Water, Restrooms, and Roads There are no food services in the park at this time of year. Food is available in the park’s gateway communities. Safe-to-drink water is available at some facilities. Don’t assume water will be available at your destination. Water from lakes and streams isn’t safe to drink unless you treat or filter it first. Limited trailhead and facility restrooms that meet public health guidance will be open. If you have to go but aren’t near a restroom, you must step well away from the trail and water sources, bury your waste at least six inches deep or pack it out in a bag, and carry out your toilet paper. Smaller park roads, Old Fall River Road, and most of Trail Ridge Road are closed. Winter driving conditions are possible at any time— be prepared. Bear Lake Road and other major paved roads remain open (weather permitting). Driving between Estes Park and Grand Lake requires a significant detour. Altitude sickness affects many visitors every year. Symptoms include headache, nausea, fatigue, dizziness, vomiting, and even unconsciousness. Altitude can also aggravate preexisting conditions like heart and lung disease. Take your time, drink water, eat, and rest. The only cure for altitude sickness is to go down to a lower altitude. CONTACT Hidden Valley Snowplay Status 970 586-1333 Park Information 970 586-1206 Emergencies Call or text 911 Website nps.gov/romo Social Media @RockyNPS Winter 2020 / Spring 2021 Never Approach Wildlife 75 yards Rocky Mountain National Park WELCOME Things to Do Visitor Centers Park rangers may be available at the following visitor centers: Rocky Mountain Conservancy nature stores are open at the following visitor centers: • Beaver Meadows • Kawuneeche • Beaver Meadows • Fall River • Kawuneeche A reduced number of visitors will be allowed in facilities at a given time. Call the Information Office for the latest info: 970586-1206 Rocky-themed merchandise can also be purchased online: rmconservancy.org. Great Horned Owlets Rocky Pocket Ranger Become a Junior Ranger No ranger-led programs are being offered this winter. Junior Rangers at Rocky have fun discovering the natural world and learning why we need to protect our national parks. We need the help of all our rangers to keep Rocky protected for many years to come! As an alternative, we’ve created a Rocky Pocket Ranger, a collection of fun
Rocky Mountain N AT I O N A L PA R K The Official Newspaper and Trip Planner of Rocky Mountain National Park 2019 Spring | March 17–June 15, 2019 Pasqueflowers, a sure sign of spring’s beginnings at Rocky. NPS PHOTO / RUSSEL SMITH VIP Help Us Protect Your Park Set aside more than 100 years ago, Rocky Mountain National Park has been entrusted to your care. Please take pride in your park and treat it with respect! Generations of future visitors will thank you. How can you help protect Rocky? • Read and follow important safety information on page 2, then take the Rocky Pledge. Our rules and regulations weren’t invented to ruin anyone’s fun—they were created to keep you safe and to keep your park beautiful. Read and take heed! Contact Us Trail Ridge Road Status 970 586-1222 • Be kind to fellow visitors and park staff. As Rocky continues to grow in popularity, crowded roads, packed parking lots, and lines at restrooms and visitor centers are becoming more common. This can be frustrating, but please be patient. We’re all here to enjoy Rocky’s splendor. • Plan ahead for your next visit, whether tomorrow or in a decade. Planning ahead can help you avoid the not-so-fun stuff so that you have more time and energy to enjoy the totally-fun stuff. For details, visit our website at nps.gov/romo/. Hidden Valley Snowplay Status 970 586-1333 Park Information 970 586-1206 TTY 970 586-1319 PLEDGE to PROTECT Rocky Mountain National Park #rockypledge Emergencies 911 website nps.gov/romo/ instagram @RockyNPS #RMNP facebook.com/RockyNPS twitter @RockyNPS youtube.com/user/RockyNPS Things to Do in a Day or Less Take a Scenic Drive Plan for Summer Watch Wildlife Hike a Trail See Visitor Centers Join a Ranger PAGE 4 PAGE 4 BOTTOM PAGE 9 PAGE 10 PROGRAM GUIDE PROGRAM GUIDE Driving Rocky’s roads is a great way to explore the park. Learn more about our roads and famous drives, including times of the year when some major roads are closed to motorized traffic. Thinking of returning to Rocky in summer? Due to high visitation (over 4.6 million visitors in 2018), planning ahead is a necessity. Learn more at go.nps.gov/ Rocky is home to many animals, big and small. While we’re unable to tell you exactly where wildlife will be (they are wild, after all!), we have a great guide inside to help you learn more. Rocky has trails for every age and ability. Find a trail, check your packing list against our recommended items, and learn where you can get even more in-depth info. Visitor centers are a great way to explore the park’s wonders. See your program guide for opening and closing dates and times and general descriptions. Year-round, Rocky offers ranger-led programs on a variety of awesome topics. Check out our program guide to find the perfect program for you and yours. RockyPlanAhead Safety It is your responsibility to be safe and to know and obey park rules. You can find park safety information, rules, and regulations at visitor centers, entrance stations, trailhead bulletin boards, and the park website at nps.gov/romo. The Rocky Pledge “To preserve unimpaired for this and future generations the beauty, history, and wildness therein, I pledge to protect Rocky Mountain National Park.” • To respect history, heritage, and natural processes, I pledge to remove nothing from the park except my own and others’ trash—not even a flower. I will leave no trace of my visit so that the next person can experience the same beauty as I did. • To prevent fire scars and human-caused fires, I pledge to never build a fire outside of a campground or picnic area fire ring. • To protect plants, meadows, and alpine tundra, I pledge to park and drive only on designated asphalt or gravel parking areas. • To keep my pet, wildlife, and other visitors safe, I pledge to keep my leashed pet only on roads, in campgrounds, and in picnic and parking areas. I will never take my dog on Rocky’s trails, meadows, or tundra areas. • To respect other visitors’ experiences, if I need to go but am not near a restroom, I pledge to leave no trace by stepping well away from the trail and water sources, burying my waste at least six inches deep or packing it out in a waste bag, and carrying out my toilet paper. PLEDGE to PROTECT • To respect Rocky’s wild creatures and to protect myself, I pledge to watch wildlife from a distance that doesn’t disturb them in any way. I will never feed an animal—doing so causes it harm. • To preserve them for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations, I pledge to honor, respect, and protect all our national parks and public lands. Rocky Mountain National Park #rockypledge Altitude Sickness affects many visitors every year. Symptoms include headaches, nausea, fatigue, dizziness, vomiting, and in acute situations, even uncon‑ Falling Trees are an ever-present hazard and can fall without warning. Be extra careful around dead trees when it’s windy or following a snowstorm. sciousness. Altitu
Rocky Mountain National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Rocky Mountain National Park Bear Lake Summer Trail Guide Welcome to a wilderness of lakes, waterfalls, and magnificent peaks. Use this map and guide to plan a safe, enjoyable trip. RIDE THE Shuttle The Bear Lake area is very busy, especially in summer and on fall weekends. Parking often fills by early morning. Roads are congested. The park’s free shuttle bus is here to help! You can ride the shuttle to stunning destinations and popular trailheads, all while avoiding the Tips for a Great Hike Never Feed or Approach Wildlife Keep yourself and Rocky’s wildlife safe: • Obey wildlife closures. • Keep a safe distance. If you cause an animal to move or change behavior, you are too close! Approaching an animal puts you at risk and may cause it stress, leading to disease and illness. • Never feed wildlife, including birds and chipmunks. Pay Attention to Altitude High elevations can cause altitude sickness and may aggravate existing health conditions. Use caution. Take time to acclimatize to the park’s high altitude before attempting strenuous hikes. Rest, drink lots of fluids, eat salty snacks, and start with easy hikes. Even on cloudy days, ultraviolet radiation can be intense at altitude. Protect yourself by wearing a hat, sunglasses with UV protection, and sunscreen. Watch the Weather: It changes quickly! Thunderstorms are common in summer and are dangerous. Plan your day to be below treeline by early afternoon. If you see building storm clouds, head back to the trailhead. If caught in a lightning storm, get below treeline. It might be summer, but expect snow, gusty winds, and cold temperatures at any time. Always carry storm gear, even if the sky is clear when you start your hike. Carry layers of windproof clothing. If the weather turns, you’ll be glad to have them. For More Information hassle of dealing with traffic and searching for parking. Detailed schedules and maps are available in the park newspaper, park visitor centers, at park bus stops, and at go.nps.gov/RockyShuttle. Bring the Right Gear 33Bring waterproof outer layers and extra layers for warmth. 33Wear a hat, sunglasses, and sunscreen. Sunlight can damage your eyes and skin, even on cloudy days. 33Pack extra water and snacks. Don’t drink from streams or lakes without treating the water. 33Carry a map and compass or GPS. Know how to use them. 33Wear sturdy footwear with good ankle support and a treaded sole. 33Don’t rely on cell phones. Many areas have no service. Stay Safe and Practice Good Etiquette • Pets are prohibited on all Rocky Mountain National Park trails, tundra, and meadows areas. There are petfriendly hikes outside the park, and nearby communities have boarding facilities and veterinary clinics. To learn more, visit go.nps.gov/RockyPets. • Stay together! Keep everyone, including children, with the group. • Stay on the trail. Shortcutting causes erosion. • In the Bear Lake Corridor, strollers are allowed only on the nature trails around Sprague and Bear lakes. Park Information...................................................... (970) 586-1206 or www.nps.gov/romo Trail Ridge Road Status............................................ (970) 586-1222 Emergencies ............................................................ 911. Tell the dispatcher you are in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado BL-S 05-2017 0.5mi 0.8km Bear Lake Loop 0.5mi 0.8km 9475ft 2888m 0.2 0.3mi 0.5km 0.4mi 0.6km Spruce Lake 0.9mi 1.4km 2.2mi 3.5km 0.7mi 1.1km Fern Lake 1.1mi 1.8km Two Rivers Lake 3.5mi 5.6km ny on Emerald Lake a s C dall Gorge Flattop Mtn Ty n ao Hallett Peak 12713ft 3875m Ch Otis Peak Fern Falls The Pool 1.0mi 1.6km 1.7mi 2.7km 0.2mi 0.3km Fern Lake 2.0mi 3.2km GLA CIER 2.2mi 3.5km Fern Lake 0.8mi 1.3km Hollowell Park 2.0mi 3.2km 1.4mi 2.3km To Longs Peak Ranger Station North 36 66 Moraine Park Discovery Center To Estes Park Beaver Meadows Visitor Center Beaver Meadows Entrance Station Trail Ridge Road to Alpine VC and Grand Lake, CO 0.4mi 0.6km Tuxedo Park 1 Mile 1 Kilometer East Portal 0.5 0.4mi 0.6km 1.9mi 3.1km 0 0 0.5 Glacier Basin Campground e Road Lak ar Be MORAINE PARK Moraine Park Campground Upper Beaver Meadows Cub Lake 0.3mi 0.5km Steep Mountain 9538ft 2907m 1.7mi 2.7km Park & Ride 1.5mi 2.4km Sprague Lake To Longs Peak Ranger Station 2.3mi 3.7km Bierstadt Lake Bierstadt Lake 1.5mi 2.4km Lake Half Mtn GORGE To Black 11482ft 3500m 3.0mi 4.8km 1.9mi 3.1km 1.3mi 2.1km 1.1mi 1.8km 1.5mi 2.4km Cub Lake 0.7mi 1.1km 0.4mi 0.6km Alberta Falls 0.5mi 0.8km See detail upper left 0.9mi 1.4km 0.5mi 0.8km 0.6mi 1.0km Shelf Lake Jewel Lake Mills Lake 0.5mi 0.8km 0.5mi 0.8km 0.6mi 1.0km 2.1mi 3.4km 0.9mi 1.4km Solitude Lake Thatchtop 12668ft 3861m The Loch Timberline Falls Lake of Glass Sky Pond BEAR LAKE AREA Mount Wuh 10761ft 3280m 2.0mi 3.2km Dream Lake 0.7mi 1.1k
Rocky Mountain National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Rocky Mountain National Park Bear Lake Winter Trail Guide Exploring the outdoors in winter is undeniably magical. It is also challenging. Use this map and guide to plan a safe, enjoyable trip. Tips for a Great Hike Navigating in Winter Can Be Hard Park trails are not marked or maintained for winter use. You can’t rely on others’ tracks— they may have been headed somewhere else or made a wrong turn. To find your way in winter: • Have and know how to use a topographic map and compass. When used correctly, GPS units can also be helpful. Watch for Hypothermia When your body loses heat faster than it can produce it, your body temperature begins to drop. This is an emergency medical condition called hypothermia. It is serious and can be fatal. • Discuss your plans with park staff at visitor centers and trailhead kiosks. Symptoms include shivering, drowsiness, exhaustion, loss of coordination, impaired judgment, and slurred or incoherent speech. Be Avalanche Aware Avalanches can be easily triggered by backcountry travelers. • Visit avalanche.state.co.us/ for the latest avalanche forecast. If danger is high, consider staying home. Wear warm, quick-drying layers of clothes. Stay dry. Take frequent stops to warm up. If symptoms occur, warm the chilled person with dry clothing and warm, non-alcoholic liquids. Get back to your car, and promptly seek medical attention. • Avoid traveling in steep gullies and on ridge tops. Open slopes of 30 to 45 degrees can be loaded with dangerous masses of snow. • If you choose to travel in these areas, carry an avalanche beacon, probe, and shovel. However, don’t take extra risks just because you are carrying this equipment. • If caught in an avalanche, make swimming motions and try to stay on top of the snow. Pay Attention to Weather and Conditions Expect snow, gusty winds, and cold temperatures at any time. Winter days are short—start early and plan conservatively. Streams and lakes can have thin ice and be very dangerous. If you choose to cross, first test your steps with a pole. Only travel off-trail if you are extremely familiar with the area. Snow-covered landscapes look very different than in summer. Snow can be deep once you are off-trail. Bring the Right Gear 33Wear layers of synthetic or wool clothing that wick moisture. 33Take extra layers of clothing (socks included). 33Bring windproof outer layers, a warm hat, and warm gloves or mittens. 33Wear sunglasses and sunscreen. Sunlight can damage your eyes and skin even on cold days. 33Drink lots of water and eat highenergy snacks. Follow the Rules, Practice Good Etiquette Sledding is not allowed at Bear Lake. Please go to the Hidden Valley Snowplay Area, the only place in Rocky where sledding is permitted. Don’t walk or snowshoe in ski tracks: it creates dangerous conditions for skiers. You must be in control at all times and let others know when you’re approaching them. Yield to those traveling faster than you. Pass with care. For More Information Park Information...................................................... (970) 586-1206 or www.nps.gov/romo Trail Ridge Road Status............................................ (970) 586-1222 Emergencies ............................................................ 911. Tell the dispatcher you are in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado BL-W 10-2017 0.3mi 0.5km 0.4mi 0.6km Spruce Lake Rocky can be busy on winter weekends. 2.2mi 3.5km e c h a n a l A v D a n Andrews Tarn The Pool 1.0mi 1.6km 1.7mi 2.7km 0.2mi 0.3km 0.5mi 0.8km 0.3mi 0.5km 0.5mi 0.8km 0.9mi 1.4km 0.9mi 1.4km 0.6mi 1.0km The Loch 0.4mi 0.6km 2.0mi 3.2km Half Mtn 11482ft 3500m 0.8mi 1.3km Cub Lake Hollowell Park No vehicles beyond gate 2.0mi 3.2km 1.4mi 2.3km To Longs Peak Ranger Station g e r GLA North Closed in winter 36 66 Moraine Park Discovery Center To Estes Park Beaver Meadows Visitor Center Beaver Meadows Entrance Station Trail Ridge Road to Hidden Valley Snowplay Area 0.4mi 0.6km Tuxedo Park CIER 1 Mile 1 Kilometer East Portal 0.5 0.4mi 0.6km 1.9mi 3.1km 0 0 0.5 Closed to camping Glacier Basin Campground e Road Lak ar Be MORAINE PARK Moraine Park Campground Upper Beaver Meadows No vehicles beyond gate 0.3mi 0.5km Steep Mountain 9538ft 2907m 1.7mi 2.7km Park & Ride 1.5mi 2.4km Sprague Lake To Longs Peak Ranger Station Bierstadt Lake Bierstadt Lake 1.5mi 2.4km 1.9mi 3.1km 1.3mi 2.1km 1.1mi 1.8km 1.5mi 2.4km Cub Lake 0.7mi 1.1km 0.5mi 0.8km Mills Lake Jewel Lake Shelf Lake GORGE To Black Lake Thatchtop 12668ft 3861m Solitude Lake 0.5mi 0.8km il Tra Alberta 0.9mi Falls 1.4km See detail upper left BEAR LAKE AREA Mount Wuh 10761ft 3280m 2.0mi 3.2km 0.7mi 1.1km Lake Haiyaha Sky Pond Lake of Glass Timberline Falls LE Dream Lake Fern Falls Congestion on roads, in parking areas, and along popular trails is possible. Parking areas can fill by mid
Rocky Mountain National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Rocky Mountain National Park Fall River Area Trail Guide Deep valleys and towering alpine mountaintops, beautiful lakes and rushing rivers, historic roads, rocky trails, and stunning wilderness: all are part of the Fall River Area of Rocky Mountain National Park. Bighorn Sheep and Elk are Frequently Seen in This Area Horseshoe Park including the Sheep Lakes area can have abundant wildlife. When viewing any wildlife: • Obey wildlife closure areas and “no stopping” traffic zones. • Use parking areas along the road. If not available, pull your vehicle completely off the road and do not park on vegetation. Tips for a Great Hike Pay Attention to Altitude High elevations can cause altitude sickness and may aggravate existing health conditions. Use caution. Take time to acclimatize to the park’s high altitude before attempting strenuous hikes. Rest, drink lots of fluids, eat salty snacks, and start with easy hikes. Even on cloudy days, ultraviolet radiation can be intense at altitude. Protect yourself by wearing a hat, sunglasses with UV protection, and sunscreen. Watch the Weather: It changes quickly! Thunderstorms are common in summer and are dangerous. Plan your day to be below treeline by early afternoon. If you see building storm clouds, head back to the trailhead. If caught in a lightning storm, get below treeline. It might be summer, but expect snow, gusty winds, and cold temperatures at any time. Always carry storm gear, even if the sky is clear when you start your hike. Carry layers of windproof clothing. If the weather turns, you’ll be glad to have them. • Do not approach wildlife. Wildlife are unpredictable and can hurt you, and approaching them can cause them stress, leading to disease or illness. If an animal changes its behavior because of you: you are too close! Enjoy and photograph them from a distance. • Never feed wildlife, including birds and chipmunks. Bring the Right Gear 33Bring waterproof outer layers and extra layers for warmth. 33Wear a hat, sunglasses, and sunscreen. Sunlight can damage your eyes and skin, even on cloudy days. 33Pack extra water and snacks. Don’t drink from streams or lakes without treating the water. 33Carry a map and compass or GPS. Know how to use them. 33Wear sturdy footwear with good ankle support and a treaded sole. 33Don’t rely on cell phones. Many areas have no service. Stay Safe and Practice Good Etiquette • Pets are prohibited on all Rocky Mountain National Park trails, tundra, and meadows areas. There are petfriendly hikes outside the park, and nearby communities have boarding facilities and veterinary clinics. To learn more, visit go.nps.gov/RockyPets. • Stay together! Keep everyone, including children, with the group. • Stay on the trail. Shortcutting causes erosion. • In the Fall River Corridor, strollers are allowed only on the nature trails around Hidden Valley. For More Information Park Information...................................................... (970) 586-1206 or www.nps.gov/romo Trail Ridge Road Status............................................ (970) 586-1222 Emergencies ............................................................ 911. Tell the dispatcher you are in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado BL-S 05-2017 Fall River Area Trails 13502ft 4115m 1.4mi 2.3km 0.6mi 1.0km Lawn Lake G E Crystal Lake North Ypsilon Mountain 0 R Expect congestion on roads, in parking areas, and along popular trails. Tour and hike early and late in the day. Parking areas often fill by midmorning. Carpool or use the free summer shuttle buses. 2 Kilometers 0 A N Rocky is very busy in summer and on fall weekends. Fairchild Mountain 2 Miles Ri ve r 13514ft 4119m Spectacle Lakes M M Y Alpine Visitor Center g Mount Chapin 4.5mi 7.2km ar 12454ft 3796m 1.5mi 2.4km Ro Old Fall River Road 9.0m Na ne-wa i / 14 rro w d y up o .5 km nly. R irt r o oad a d op e with n early no gua July–S rdrails, ept. tight s witch back s Chasm Alluvial Fan Beaver Mountain Loop Mount Chapin Chasm Falls (from winter gate) Mount Chiquita (no trail) Crystal Lake Deer Mountain Deer Mountain Loop Gem Lake Lawn Lake Ypsilon Lake Ypsilon Mountain (no trail) DISTANCE mi km 0.3 0.5 4.7 7.6 1.5 2.4 2.2 3.5 2.4 3.9 7.7 12.4 3.0 4.8 10.3 16.6 1.7 2.7 6.3 10.1 4.5 7.2 3.5 5.6 All distances are one way from nearest trailhead. 10859ft 3310m 11463ft 3494m 4.2mi 6.8km Old Fall River Roa d • Closed in winter • Open to bicyclists and dogs on leash from April 1 to November 15, except during road maintenance operations and emergency closures as posted. • Bicycles can go downhill only when road is closed to vehicles. When open to vehicles, bicycles must go uphill. • Vehicles over 25 feet long and trailers are prohibited. DESTINATION Dark Mountain Bighorn Mountain 3.1mi 5.0km O 11254ft 3430m in Chapin Creek Trailhead 4.3mi 6.9km Chiquita Lake M Fall River Pass Mount Tileston Ypsil
Rocky Mountain National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Rocky Mountain National Park Kawuneeche Valley Trail Guide Colorado River Hiking Trails NPS PHOTO / ANN SCHONLAU Adams Falls (East Inlet Trailhead) This easy one-third mile hike leads to a small, pleasant waterfall. If you go past the falls, you’ll soon come to a large, glaciated valley with a river and great views where moose are sometimes seen. You can find many types of wildflowers in this area. (79 ft gain) Cascade Falls (North Inlet Trailhead) Photogenic Cascade Falls is 3.4 miles into the North Inlet Trail. This easy hike passes through an open meadow where marmots are often found and by a river that winds through a lodgepole pine forest. Fishing is good for small brook trout and an occasional brown trout. Allow 3–4 hours. (300 ft gain) Continental Divide Trail The Continental Divide National Scenic Trail was established by Congress in 1978 and stretches 3,100 miles from Canada to Mexico. Part of this trail crosses through some remote areas of Rocky. For an easy, short hike, traverse the section that crosses Onahu Creek and parallels a beautiful meadow in mixed forest. Coyote Valley Trail (Coyote Valley Trailhead) This 1 mile round trip, level trail is wheelchair and stroller accessible and has many benches for resting. Follow along the Colorado River in Kawuneeche Valley. Elk can often be seen grazing on various sedges and grasses. Picnic at the tables at one end of the trail, or fish along the trail. Allow 45 minutes to 1 hour for an enjoyable stroll. (level trail) Green Mountain Loop (Green Mountain or Onahu Trailhead) This trail passes along the lush, marshy Big Meadow, and through forests of lodgepole pine, quaking aspen, subalpine fir, and Engelmann spruce. Watch for moose and elk foraging in the meadow and explore the cabin ruins of early settlers. This hike is 7.6 miles long and should take 3.5–4 hours. (1100 ft gain) Holzwarth Historic Site This is a one-half mile flat walk across the Kawuneeche Valley to the Holzwarth Trout Lodge and Historic Site, a rustic guest ranch created in the 1920s. (level trail, strollers okay) Lake Irene Along Trail Ridge Road just south of the Continental Divide at Milner Pass, this lovely subalpine lake is surrounded by tall pines, firs, and summer wildflowers, and is easily accessed from the picnic area. Strollers are welcome. Lulu City (Colorado River Trailhead) A flowered field is all that remains of this once booming mining town. Pass by the remains of log cabins and look for tailings from the Shipler Mine about 2 miles into the trail. The trail parallels the Colorado River and passes meadows on this easy to moderate 7.4-mile round trip hike. (350 ft gain) Lulu City/Yellowstone Loop (Colorado River Trailhead) After passing Shipler’s cabins, you’ll come to a sign saying Lulu City to the left and Little Yellowstone to the right. Stay right at the Y. Follow the trail all the way to the Grand Ditch. Formed of stark gray volcanic rock, Little Yellowstone is a miniature version of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. At the Grand Ditch take a left and follow the ditch for two miles until you see a sign that says, “Stage Road, Lulu City.” Take the left and follow the trail down. At the bottom of the trail, take a right and head toward Lulu City. The hike is 13.8 miles in length and is a moderate to strenuous hike. (990 ft gain) Shadow Mountain Lookout Trail (East Shore Trailhead) Visit an early fire lookout resting near the summit of Shadow Mountain and see a fantastic view of Shadow Mountain Lake, Grand Lake, and Lake Granby. This hike can be accessed from either the Grand Lake or Shadow Mountain Dam trailheads for the East Shore Trail. A small fee is required for parking in the Arapaho National Recreation Area. Allow a minimum of 4–5 hours for this hike. (1,533 ft gain) Timber Lake (Timber Lake Trailhead) This is a 4.8 mile hike to picturesque Timber Lake, which sits at treeline at the foot of the Continental Divide and Mount Ida. There was a landslide two miles beyond the trailhead. Be careful around the slide area. Hike above the point of release, not through the landslide. The hike around the landslide is arduous and exceptionally difficult, as it is steep, muddy, and slippery. It is not recommended for those who have difficulty with off-trail wilderness travel. Allow a minimum of 6–7 hours round-trip for this steep hike. (2060 ft gain) Tonahutu Start from either West Portal Road in Grand Lake or the Kawuneeche Visitor Center. Leaving from the visitor center, the trailhead is at the south end of the parking lot. The trail parallels the Tonahutu Creek uphill to Big Meadows, 4.2 miles from the trailhead. If you leave from West Portal Road, it is 5.4 miles from the trailhead. (680 ft gain) KV-S 05-2017 Kawuneeche Valley Trails Michigan Lakes Lake Agnes Mummy Pass and Corral Creek Trailhead Lulu Mountain 12228ft 3727m La Poudre Pass Ditc h ow Ri ve r 12489ft 3807m Site of Lulu Ci
Be Smart: for Your Survival and to Enjoy Your Climb • • • For more information and latest conditions report, visit nps.gov/romo/ planyourvisit/ longspeak.htm • • • • • • • • • • Essentials to Wear and Carry • • • • • • The summit of Longs Peak is 14,259 feet and the highest point heading north between central Colorado and the Arctic Circle. It takes several days to adjust to the altitude. Condition yourself with progressively longer and more strenuous hikes. Begin your climb no later than 3 a.m. to be off the summit early in the day. Time for the 15-mile round-trip averages 10 to 15 hours. Good choices are critical! Know your limits: if you are tired, it’s okay to turn around. If you don’t feel well or the weather changes, turn around. The toughest part of the climb up Longs Peak is the last 1½ miles from The Keyhole to the summit. Don’t climb alone and stay together. Tell someone where you are going and when you expect to return. Stay on the marked route; straying from it can be perilous. Take and drink plenty of fluids such as water or sports drinks. You will not find water sources along the Keyhole Route. There are water sources lower down on the mountain, but this water must be treated properly. A minimum 3-4 quarts should be planned. Food is your fuel: pack high-energy snacks. Eat before, during and after your climb to help maintain your energy level. Salty snacks can help maintain electrolyte levels. High elevations can cause altitude sickness and may aggravate existing medical conditions; use caution and consider descending to a lower elevation. Only wear sturdy foot gear with good ankle support and a treaded sole. Ice and snow can be present at any time. Be aware of conditions and make decisions wisely. Always take storm gear; thunderstorms often develop quickly. In the event of a developing storm, descend quickly. The most important part of your climb is to prepare for your safe return. Lots of water High-energy food Layers of clothing (jackets & pants), including insulating, windproof clothing like synthetic or wool Sturdy footwear & extra socks Storm gear Hat and gloves • • • • • • • • • Sunglasses with UV protection Sunscreen First aid kit Topographic map & compass/GPS Flashlight or headlamp Waterproof matches Pocket knife Whistle Common sense! The National Park Service cares for special places saved by the American people so that all may experience C-LPKR-6/11- 6K our heritage. EXPERIENCE YOUR AMERICA Rocky Mountain National Park Service U.S. Department of Interior Rocky Mountain National Park Longs Peak - Keyhole Route The Narrows on Longs Peak in August The Peak The Keyhole Route to the summit of Longs Peak (14,259 feet), one of the most popular routes in Colorado, is an extraordinary climbing experience. The route circumnavigates the upper mountain on the way to the summit, providing stunning views. In general, the most snow-free and ice-free time of year to climb Longs Peak is mid-July through mid-September. However, weather and conditions vary so it’s best to check with a ranger or online for current conditions, 970-586-1206 or nps.gov/romo/planyourvisit/longspeak.htm. The Keyhole Route is NOT a hike! It is a climb that crosses enormous sheer vertical rock faces, often with falling rocks, requiring scrambling, where an unroped fall would likely be fatal. The route has narrow ledges, loose rock, and steep cliffs. The terrain requires good route-finding and scrambling skills. Use caution, as injuries requiring rescue are very dangerous and take many hours, if not days, to evacuate. The best route follows red and yellow bull’s-eyes. If you lose the bull’s-eyes you are likely off-route and will encounter more difficult climbing with more severe consequences. It is important to retrace your steps back to the bull’seyes before continuing, rather than shortcutting. There is no way to predict weather on Longs Peak. The Keyhole Route can experience winter-like conditions at any time, requiring greater skill and judgment. Be prepared to turn back during sudden, drastic weather changes. The high elevation may affect your condition and judgment. Careful descent is the best treatment. Don’t have summit fever: Enjoy the experience, but be willing to turn around at any time. 1. The Keyhole from 2. The Ledges 3. Looking Down on The Trough 4. The Narrows The Boulder Field Upon reaching the Boulder Field, the hiking trail ends. From here you will cross boulder field terrain to reach The Keyhole. The Keyhole is where the climbing route to the summit begins. 5. The Homestretch The Homestretch is a polished granite slab that guards the summit. This section requires scrambling with your hand and feet. This section can have ice and snow throughout the summer. Although many options exist, the bull’s-eyes will generally provide you with the best route to the summit. From The Keyhole, locate the first of a series of red and yellow ‘bull’s eyes’ markings indicating the best route t
Rocky Mountain National Park (970) 586-1206 http://www.nps.gov/romo Longs Peak Keyhole Route Frequently Asked Questions 1) Is the Keyhole Route a hike or a climb? This is not a “walk in the park.” This is much more than a hike. This is a climb, a classic mountaineering route that should not be underestimated. The Keyhole Route crosses enormous vertical rock faces, is exposed to falling rock, and requires scrambling on all fours. The route has narrow ledges, loose rock, and steep cliffs. Depending upon conditions, you might encounter snow and ice any time of the year. The terrain requires route finding skills and the ability to assess and adjust to unexpected or changing weather conditions. A slip, trip or fall could be fatal. 2) Would you describe the Keyhole Route as dangerous? Summiting Longs Peak is an incredible experience and most people who do so do it safely. However, the difficulty of this route is often underestimated. As with any high altitude mountaineering route you will encounter hazards along the way. Be sure to adequately plan, prepare for, and manage your climb – don’t take it lightly. 3) Are you still providing “technical” and “non-technical” ratings concerning the Keyhole Route? Park employees no longer provide a rating of the Keyhole Route. Ratings are subjective and influenced by rapidly changing conditions that should be anticipated in the high alpine terrain of Longs Peak. The decision is yours to make. Our goal is to provide the best available information that will assist in determining if, when and how you may choose to climb this mountain. In the past, some visitors have mistakenly assumed that a “non-technical” rating meant “safe.” Exposure and other risks along the route exist all the time. Weather and conditions can change in a matter of minutes. Check the “Longs Peak conditions” page on the park’s website at http://www.nps.gov/romo/planyourvisit/longspeak.htm or call the park Information Office at (970) 586-1206 to find out the most recent available conditions along the Keyhole Route. 4) How have people been injured or killed on the Keyhole Route? Many accidents on the Keyhole Route occur on the way down from the summit when fatigue or the false assumption that “I’ve done the hardest part” can lead to inattention and poor decision making. Be just as focused and alert, or even more so, on the way down! Summit fever is dangerous. The Keyhole rock formation, 6 miles from the Longs Peak Trailhead, is an ideal spot to stop and assess how you and other members of your group are feeling. Is the weather changing or likely to change? Take the time to fairly assess your physical condition and the ever-changing conditions on the mountain before you tackle the most difficult part of the climb ahead. While you are at it, snacks and water will provide energy for the trip beyond or your return back to the trailhead. 1 Longs Peak Keyhole Route Frequently Asked Questions 4 continued) Along the Keyhole route there are numerous areas where an un-roped fall can be fatal. If you find yourself off route and wondering which way to go – don’t shortcut – retrace your steps to your last known position. Many people have fallen while shortcutting or continuing ahead after losing the route. Attempting the summit in the afternoon greatly increases your risk – the round-trip from the Longs Peak Trailhead averages 10 to 15 hours. Increased risk factors include: weather, eventual darkness, and a decline in the ability to see others on the route or to successfully navigate in the late afternoon light. Solo travel is never recommended particularly on a high risk activity such as the Keyhole Route. Some have died or sustained serious injury because they were travelling alone or chose to separate from the rest of their group. Travelling with others provides an added margin of safety with decision making, shared observations of changing conditions, and the ability to assist or go for help in the event of an accident. Although you may encounter other people along the route, this in no way substitutes for travelling with others who can share in the assessment and decision making responsibilities. No one plans to get hurt or killed on Longs Peak. Safety is your responsibility and our concern. The most important part of your climb is to plan for a safe return. Remember to enjoy the experience along the way. Too much focus on the summit can lead to poor decisions! 5) Do I really need to start at the trailhead before sunrise? Yes. Time for the 15 mile round- trip averages 10 to 15 hours. Much of this route is above tree-line so give yourself plenty of time to be back below tree-line before afternoon thunderstorms and lightning develop. Of course, thunderstorms have been known to appear early in the day as well! At these elevations storms often produce snow, sleet and hail. 6) What are the symptoms of high altitude sickness? High altitude sickness (also called acute mountain sickness) occurs when you cannot
MAP KEY #1 MAP KEY #2 A. To Andrews Glacier Emergency Telephone B. To Timberline Falls Grp. Stoves Only Site C. To Haiyaha & Other Lakes Indiv. Stoves Only Site D. To Nymph & Other Lakes Keyhole Route E. Storm Pass TH Point of Interest F. Sprague Lake & TH River/Creek G. Shuttle Bus Area & TH Road H. Glacier Basin Campground Trail I. Hollowell Park & TH Trailhead (TH) J. Moraine Park Visitor Center K. Entrance Station L. Beaver Meadows Visitor Center E. Bierstadt Lake TH Bear Lake & TH F. K. L. Hwy 7 to Estes Park J. Marys Lake Road Marys Lake I. Big Thompson River Lily Mtn. TH Hwy 66 G. H. East Portal TH Wind River Bluff Site Lily Lake & Twin Sisters TH’s Over the Hill Site Upper Wind River Site Glacier Gorge TH N Estes Cone D. Alberta Falls The Loch B. Icy Brook Glacier Gorge Site Wind River Boulder Brook Bear Lake Trailhead C. Andrews Bear Lake Trailhead Creek Site A. Hwy 36 to Estes Park Bear Lake Road Glacier Falls Mills Lake Black Lake Battle Mountain Group Site Boulder Brook Sites Glacier Creek Moore Park Sites Longs Peak TH & Ranger Station Alpine Brook Patrol Cabin Longs Peak Roaring Fork Creek Hwy 7 to Wild Basin & Allenspark (Not Routinely Staffed) Chasm Lake LONGS PEAK AREA MAP 04/11 Inn Brook Goblins Forest Sites Boulderfield Sites Longs Peak Campground Map scale is approximate only. NOT for navigational purposes.
Rocky Mountain National Park Lumpy Ridge Trails US Department of the Interior National Park Service
Rocky Mountain National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Rocky Mountain National Park Wild Basin Area Summer Trail Guide Welcome to Wild Basin. Rich in wildlife and scenery, this deep valley has flowing rivers, roaring waterfalls, and sparkling lakes rimmed by remote, jagged peaks. Tips for a Great Hike Narrow Road, Limited Parking Wild Basin Road is gravel and often narrows to one lane. It isn’t suitable for large vehicles like RVs. Park only in designated areas. Don’t park in wide spots in the road, which let oncoming cars pass each other. Violators may be ticketed or towed. You Must Properly Store Food Items at Trailheads and Wilderness Campsites Improperly stored food items attract wildlife, including black bears, which can visit any time of day. Food items are food, drinks, toiletries, cosmetics, pet food and bowls, and odiferous attractants. Garbage, including empty cans and food wrappers, must be stored or put in trash or recycling bins. Always carry storm gear, even if the sky is clear when you start your hike. It might be summer, but expect snow, gusty winds, and cold temperatures at any time. Carry layers of windproof clothing. If the weather turns, you’ll be glad to have them. Bring the Right Gear 33Bring waterproof outer layers and extra layers for warmth. Day Use Visitors • You must store all food items and garbage inside vehicle trunks. 33Wear a hat, sunglasses, and sunscreen. Sunlight can damage your eyes and skin, even on cloudy days. • In vehicles without trunks, put items as low in the vehicle as possible and covered from sight, with windows and doors closed and locked. 33Pack extra water and snacks. Don’t drink from streams or lakes without treating the water. Overnight Visitors • You must store all food items in food storage lockers. Leaving food items or garbage in a vehicle is not allowed. 33Wear sturdy footwear with good ankle support and a treaded sole. There are food storage lockers at Wild Basin, Finch Lake, and Sandbeach Lake trailheads. Pay Attention to Altitude High elevations can cause altitude sickness and may aggravate existing health conditions. Use caution. Take time to acclimatize to the park’s high altitude before attempting strenuous hikes. Rest, drink lots of fluids, eat salty snacks, and start with easy hikes. Even on cloudy days, ultraviolet radiation can be intense at altitude. Protect yourself by wearing a hat, sunglasses with UV protection, and sunscreen. For More Information Watch the Weather: It Changes Quickly! Thunderstorms are common in summer and are dangerous. Plan your day to be below treeline by early afternoon. If you see building storm clouds, head back to the trailhead. If caught in a lightning storm, get below treeline. 33Carry a map and compass or GPS. Know how to use them. 33Don’t rely on cell phones. Many areas have no service. Stay Safe and Practice Good Etiquette • Pets are prohibited on all Rocky Mountain National Park trails, tundra, and meadows areas. To learn more, visit go.nps.gov/RockyPets. • Stay together! Keep everyone, including children, with the group. • Stay on the trail. Shortcutting causes erosion. • Strollers aren’t permitted on any trails in the Wild Basin area. Park Information...................................................... (970) 586-1206 or www.nps.gov/romo Trail Ridge Road Status............................................ (970) 586-1222 Emergencies ............................................................ 911. Tell the dispatcher you are in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado WB-S 5-2017 Wild Basin Area Trails To Estes Park Rocky is very busy in summer and on fall weekends. Mount Meeker 13911ft 4240m Expect congestion on roads, in parking areas, and along popular trails. Tour and hike early and late in the day. Parking areas often fill by midmorning. Consider carpooling to the trailhead. Keplinger Lake 7 Snowbank Lake 0.7mi 1.1km Meeker Park h r t Trio Falls id Falcon Lake g Thunder Falls e 1.3mi 2.1km Sandbeach Lake N o rth St. Vra in Isolation Peak 0.4mi 0.6km 1.8mi 2.9km 12632ft 3850m Sandbeach Lake Trailhead Cr ee k 1 Kilometer 0.5 1 Mile Wild Basin Entrance Station Copeland Lake 2.9mi 4.7km Wild Basin Trailhead Eagle Lake Mahana Peak 0.5 Lyric Falls ek Cre 1.3mi 2.1km 0.4mi 0.6km 1.4mi 2.3km Creek 1.2mi 1.9km in Vra St. h Nort 0.9mi 1.4km 0.3mi 0.5km Finch Lake Trailhead Copeland Falls 0.9mi 1.4mi 2.3km 1.4km 0.9mi 1.4km 1.3mi 2.1km ek Cre Winter Gate 0.3mi 0.5km 1.3mi 2.1km Ouzel Falls B el Ouz dbea ch 0.4mi 0.6km Ouzel Lake 7 0.3mi 0.5km 0.8mi 1.3km Calypso Cascades Allenspark A Bluebird Lake San Twin Lakes Cree k 13118ft 3998m Restrooms 10715ft 3266m 11724ft 3573m Mertensia Falls Frigid Lake Trail distances 1.8mi 2.9km Box Lake Moomaw Glacier Fifth Lake 2.2mi 3.5km Thunder Lake 12420ft 3786m Picnic area Lookout Mountain L D W I Lake of Many Winds Tanima Peak Trail (hiker only) 0 Hunters
Pay Attention to Weather and Conditions Expect snow, gusty winds, and cold temperatures at any time. Winter days are short—start early and plan conservatively. Streams and lakes can have thin ice and be very dangerous. If you choose to Watch for Hypothermia When your body loses heat faster than it can produce it, your body temperature begins to drop. This is an emergency medical condition called hypothermia. It is serious and can be fatal. Symptoms include shivering, drowsiness, exhaustion, loss of coordination, impaired judgment, and slurred or incoherent speech. Bring the Right Gear 33Wear layers of synthetic or wool clothing that wick moisture. cross, first test your steps with a pole. Only travel off-trail if you are extremely familiar with the area. Snow-covered landscapes look very different than in summer. Snow can be deep once you are off-trail. Emergencies Wild Basin Area Winter Trail Guide Sunlight can damage your eyes and skin even on cold days. 33Drink lots of water and eat highenergy snacks. 33Bring windproof outer layers, a warm hat, and warm gloves or mittens. 33Carry a map and compass or GPS. Know how to use them. Don’t walk or snowshoe in ski tracks: it Rocky Mountain National Park If symptoms occur, warm the chilled person with dry clothing and warm, non-alcoholic liquids. Get back to your car, and promptly seek medical attention. 33Take extra layers of clothing (socks included). Sledding is not allowed in Wild Basin. Please go to the Hidden Valley Snowplay Area, the only place in Rocky where sledding is permitted. National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Wear warm, quick-drying layers of clothes. Stay dry. Take frequent stops to warm up. 33Wear sunglasses and sunscreen. Follow the Rules and Practice Good Etiquette Rocky Mountain Exploring the outdoors in winter is truly magical. It’s also challenging. Use this map and guide to plan a safe, fun trip. Be prepared, stay safe, and have fun! Narrow Road, Limited Parking Wild Basin Road is gravel and often narrows to one lane. It isn’t suitable for large vehicles like RVs. Park only in the winter parking lot or other designated areas. Don’t park in wide spots in the road, which let oncoming cars pass each other. Violators may be ticketed or towed. Be Avalanche Aware Avalanches can be easily triggered by backcountry travelers. • If you choose to travel in these areas, carry an avalanche beacon, probe, and shovel. However, don’t take extra risks just because you are carrying this equipment. creates dangerous conditions for skiers. You must be in control at all times and let others know when you’re approaching them. Yield to those traveling faster than you. Pass with care. Park Information........................................ (970) 586-1206 or www.nps.gov/romo Emergencies .............................................. 911. Tell the dispatcher you are in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado EXPERIENCE YOUR AMERICA™ WB-W 11-2016 • Visit avalanche.state.co.us/ for the latest avalanche forecast. If danger is high, consider staying home. • Avoid traveling in steep gullies and on • If caught in an avalanche, make swimming motions and try to stay on top ridge tops. Open slopes of 30 to 45 of the snow. degrees can be loaded with dangerous masses of snow. Wild Basin Area Trails To Estes Park Rocky can be busy on winter weekends. Mount Meeker 13911ft 4240m Congestion on roads, in parking areas, and along popular trails is possible. Parking areas can fill by mid-morning. Consider carpooling to the trailhead. Keplinger Lake Closed road 0 o Meeker Park h r t Trio Falls Trail distances North N Lion Lake No. 2 13310ft 4057m 0.7mi 1.1km Trail 7 Snowbank Lake Mount Alice Trailhead Unpaved road 0.5 0 1 Kilometer 0.5 1 Mile Horsetooth Peak Fan Falls Falcon Lake 10344ft 3153m id Lion Lake No. 1 R Pilot Mountain g Thunder Falls Hunters e Lookout Mountain 10715ft 3266m Mount Orton Lake of Many Winds Tanima Peak Thunder Lake 12420ft 3786m N o rth Eagle Lake St. Vra in Isolation Peak Mahana Peak 0.4mi 0.6km 1.8mi 2.9km 12632ft 3850m 1.3mi 2.1km Sandbeach Lake 1.3mi 2.1km ek Cre 0.4mi 0.6km 1.4mi 2.3km dbea ch Creek 0.3mi 0.5km 1.2mi 1.9km 1.3mi 2.1km Ouzel Falls B el Ouz Copeland Lake in Vra St. h Nort 0.9mi 1.4km 0.3mi 0.5km Wild Basin Winter Trailhead 0.6mi 1.0km 0.2mi 0.3km ek Cre Finch Lake Trailhead 1.4mi 2.3km Copeland Falls 0.9mi 1.4km 0.9mi 1.4km 1.3mi 2.1km Gate 7 0.3mi 0.5km 0.8mi 1.3km Calypso Cascades Allenspark A Bluebird Lake Wild Basin Trailhead 0.4mi 0.6km Ouzel Lake Wild Basin Entrance Station 2.9mi 4.7km San Twin Lakes Cree k 13118ft 3998m Sandbeach Lake Trailhead Cr ee k Mertensia Falls Frigid Lake Lyric Falls 1.8mi 2.9km Box Lake Moomaw Glacier Fifth Lake 2.2mi 3.5km L D W I Boulder-Grand Pass 11724ft 3573m 2.2mi 3.5km S Pipit Lake To Lyons and Nederland I N Ouzel Peak 12716ft 3876m DESTINATIO
To Fort Collins To 00 Comanche Peak 12702 ft 3872 m Koenig (stock) Aspenglen Fal e Tr a MP Gem Lake RIDGE The Twin Owls Y De C O N S E RVAT I O N E A S E M E N T v il s To Loveland Lumpy Ridge Trailhead 34 36 Beaver Meadows Entrance Station il Moraine Park 1mi 2km n p so L A KE ESTES 36 Open all year Park Headquarters 7840 ft / 2390 m Ri v er om as s Beaver Meadows Visitor Center Mar n yo an tC 25 Ute Meadow (llama) MacGregor Avenue 34 B y -P Deer Mtn 10013 ft 3052 m 3mi 5km a d LU ON l Deer Ridge Junction Upper Beaver Meadows Trailhead Ut NY Ro ch ng N Fall River Visitor Center Deer Mtn Trailhead 34 Road closed from here west to Colorado River Trailhead mid-October to Memorial Day CA G ul M M E 15 McGregor Mt. Prospect Mountain 8900 ft 2713 m Th La LEY k 13 Rabbit Ears 2mi 3km PA R Cre e Co w ch Y W D IC M RI V Ut U O Sheep Lakes West K Horseshoe Park Many Parks Curve es LO 4D e yd Ha Y VA L EN HOE Beaver Ponds Rainbow Curve ad Entrance Station 8240 ft / 2511 m Cow Creek Trailhead 14 Peregrine K Lawn Lake Trailhead Fall River Alluvial Fan Endovalley H ORS ES r Fo ge or N AC Dr y ER ) er av Be rg A BL Dark Mountain 10859 ft 3310 m The Needles 10068 ft 3069 m 2mi 3km Chasm Falls HIDD G Bighorn Mountain 11463 ft 3494 m er ID ke k Rid g e R La n Sheep Mountain Bridal Veil Falls Gu l C o lo r a d o r i aw Glen Haven R iv Go I H A L 19mi 31km r nG Julian Lake 1K Onahu Creek R AN nt e 16 Bighorn Mt. (group/stock) ree r 3D we Lo GR ta C Ro s Mount Julian 12928 ft 3940 m Highest Lake 98 Timber Creek ve Doughnut Lake Terra Tomah Mountain Inkwell 12718 ft Lake 3876 m Azure Lake Mount Ida 12880 ft 3926 m Forest Lake Trail C il Timber Lake Ri n yo an tC a Tr 101 Snowbird ke on es er e ps Forest Canyon r Fo ST om D iv i d e TC l DI ta D AN ve r Tr a il ILD LI T OW TLE ST ON E LL YE Trail er Ri v PARK SHIPLER n t in e n t a l rR ar West Creek Falls EST E S Bi g PARK k k ee Cr w i ll o W 36 M EA pe Rock 26 Arch The l W S Rd Stones Peak 12922 ft 3939 m DO y s La ke NG 5mi Moraine Park 8km Cub Lake Trailhead Visitor Center Fern Lake i Seasonal a r M O R A I N E PA R K T Trailhead Pool e k La 7 Haynach Lonesome llama) Haynach (1 Lake ON Lake To Gianttrack Fern Hollowell Park Trailhead e Rd Coyote Valley Trailhead Creek CANY 27 Marys La k Lyons and Mountain Falls 66 r a n E Lake 29 e Rainbow Lake r Old Forest InnCub C Boulder B 9091 ft e Spruce U F Nakai Peak Lake Lake Sprague SPR 2771 m 12216 ft 6mi 93 Renegade Marguerite Glacier 32 Cub Creek Spruce l YMCA 97 Onahu Bridge 3723 m HOLLOWELL Falls ne 9km Lake Conference PARK 92 un 28 T Fern Lake Fern Center l i k Tra Lake rn Cre e 1L Tonahutu Meadows Upper Onahu 96 Sc e BI Ho Rams Horn Creek n94 Park & Ride ic Timberline Group GH WILDERNESS s Mountain Nakai Peak m u O 33 a Mill Creek Basin Glacier R RN 30 Odessa Lake Bierstadt 9553 ft ll Odessa l East Portal Trailhead i Lake 2912 m a FL M Sunrise n 91 Basin Lake Onahu Creek 95 o 8mi A i 90 Tra t TS 34 a i Upper Mill Creek Lily l 13km N Grace 31 Bear Lake Bierstadt Mtn Sourdough ent a l 86 Contin87 Falls 9786 ft 89 e Granite Falls 2983 m Lake Trailhead 35 Sunset ahutu Creek D iv i d Wind River Bluff Tonahutu Group (stock) (WF) 36 Lake Trailhead Ton Trail 4mi ek Mtn Tra Granite Helene Lily il re 6km t op Storm Onahu Trailhead Falls Sprague Lake Trailhead Mountain A1 la t 84 F Flattop Mtn Trailhead 88 Lower Granite Falls Pass Over The Hill 12324 ft Lily Lake Trailhead Emerald Nymph Lake Mounta 37 Ptarmigan Trailhead 85 South Meadows in Tr Big Meadows Group 3756 m en Lake Snowdrift Peak ai l Lake Gre St 12274 ft Dream Tyndall Lily 2L 3741 m Lake Glacier Green Mountain Glacier Sprague Lake Lake Mount Patterson Twin Sisters TrailheadPIERSON 2M Hallett Peak Gorge Alberta 11424 ft Mt. Patterson Trailhead Falls PARK 82 Lake 12713 ft No 3482 m Upper Wind River Trailhead Camp r Ptarmigan Creek Haiyaha 3875 m Estes Cone 1100 6ft Green Mountain 3355 m Tr Green Mtn ai Grouseberry l 10313 ft Ptarmigan 40 Andrews Creek 34 Otis Twin Sisters Peaks 3143 m 83 Storm Peak The 11428 ft k Bench Pass 3mi Loch ea 3483 m Inl76 Mills P et Lake 491 81 41 5km Moore Park July Paintbrush Lake Site of 73 38 Boulder Brook Eugenia Mine Andrews Tr Timberline ai Harbison Glacier l Falls Longs Meadows North Inlet (group/stock WF) 74 (WF) Peak No Porcupine Lake Of 492 39 Thatchtop Glacier Gorge rt h Tents only Glass 1M 12668 ft 77 Taylor Peak 8720 ft / 2658 m 3861 m Sky 13153 ft Open all year North Inlet Granite Pass Grand North Inlet Junction Pond 72 k 78 Big Pool 4009 m Lake ea Battle Mountain Group Kawuneeche Taylor Entrance inPettingell 491 Cascade Falls 71 Cascade 4M Mounta Lake 79 Visitor Center Glacier Longs Peak Storm Peak Station n 43 Ribbon a ig McHenrys Falls Ptarm 13326 ft Falls Mount Peak 80 Pine Marten Trailhead 4062 m Lady 13327ft Black

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