"Entrance of Russell Cave." by NPS Photo , public domain

Russell Cave

National Monument - Alabama

Russell Cave National Monument is in northeastern Alabama, close to the town of Bridgeport. Russell Cave has an exceptionally large main entrance, which was used for thousands of years as a shelter by cultures of prehistoric Indians, from approximately 6500 BCE, the period of earliest-known human settlement in the southeastern United States, to 1650 CE and the period of European colonization. With a mapped length of 7.2 miles (11.6 km), Russell Cave is the third-longest mapped cave in Alabama. Caving is no longer allowed inside the cave. The grounds offer trails for walking, and the area is a station on the North Alabama Birding Trail.

maps

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/ruca/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russell_Cave_National_Monument Russell Cave National Monument is in northeastern Alabama, close to the town of Bridgeport. Russell Cave has an exceptionally large main entrance, which was used for thousands of years as a shelter by cultures of prehistoric Indians, from approximately 6500 BCE, the period of earliest-known human settlement in the southeastern United States, to 1650 CE and the period of European colonization. With a mapped length of 7.2 miles (11.6 km), Russell Cave is the third-longest mapped cave in Alabama. Caving is no longer allowed inside the cave. The grounds offer trails for walking, and the area is a station on the North Alabama Birding Trail. Russell Cave is an archeological site with one of the most complete records of prehistoric cultures in the Southeast. In the 1950s, archeologists uncovered a large quantity of artifacts representing over 10,000 years of use in a single place. Today, Russell Cave National Monument helps bring to light many cultural developments of phenomenal human journeys. Russell Cave National Monument is located at 3729 County Road 98 in Bridgeport, Alabama. It is situated in the northeast corner of Alabama, just south of the Tennessee state line. Gilbert Grosvenor Visitor Center Begin your exploration of the park in the visitor center. Pick up a park brochure for more information about the cave shelter and hiking trails. Watch a 7 minute film about the early inhabitants of Russell Cave and view the artifacts that were excavated from the cave shelter. Check out the Eastern National bookstore that has an assortment of books and souvenirs for adults and children. From US-72, turn left onto Co Rd 75 and follow for 1 mile. Turn right onto Co Rd 98 and follow for 3.7 miles. The entrance to Russell Cave National Monument will be on the left. Russell Cave in Spring Russell Cave in Spring Prehistoric people continuously used Russell Cave for over 10,000 years Winter flood in December 2015 Winter flood in December 2015 14,000 acres drain into Russell Cave Looking out of the cave shelter Looking out of the cave shelter Looking out of the cave shelter in the fall Northern Cardinal Northern Cardinal Russell Cave is site 44 on the Alabama birding Trail. Deer behind visitor center Deer behind visitor center For a park of its size, Russell Cave National Monument has a diverse landscape that provides a remarkable habitat for wildlife observation. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Russell Cave National Monument, Alabama Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] board walk to cave entrance Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Mississippian Period—358.9 to 323.2 MYA The extensive caves of Mammoth Cave and Wind Cave national parks developed in limestone deposited during the Mississippian. Warm, shallow seas covered much of North America, which was close to the equator. fossil crinoid Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Blanket Cave National Youth Park—Activity Enjoy a fun activity and learn about caves even when you can't get out to a park. In this activity you will build your own cave and learn how to make it like a "real" natural cave. Find out about cave formations and wildlife, and how to be safe and care for caves. New "Blanket Cave National Youth Parks" are springing up all across America! Join the fun! cartoon drawing of a childs and a park ranger exploring a cave Top Ten Tips for Visiting Russell Cave Plan Like a Park Ranger with these Top 10 Tips for visiting Russell Cave National Monument! Visitors listen as a ranger speaks Mississippian Period - 500 to 1,000 Years Ago During this time people lived in small towns based on shared political, agricultural, and spiritual belief systems. They also built larger mounds, traded items, farmed corn extensively, and performed spiritual rituals. Mississippian natives around a village Paleo-Indian Period - 10,000 to 14,500 Years Ago The first inhabitants of Russell Cave arrived during this period. People lived in small group following a nomadic lifestyle, hunted Ice Age megafaunas, fished, and foraged berries and nuts. Paleo-Indian native inside cave shelter

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