"Construction of river channel closing structure in the Mississippi NRRA" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Saint Croix

National Scenic Riverway - WI, MN

The Saint Croix National Scenic Riverway is a federally protected system of riverways located in eastern Minnesota and northwestern Wisconsin. It protects 252 miles (406 km) of river, including the St. Croix River (on the Wisconsin/Minnesota border), and the Namekagon River (in Wisconsin), as well as adjacent land along the rivers. The largest scenic riverway east of the Mississippi River, it lies within parts of eight counties in Wisconsin: Bayfield, Burnett, Douglas, Pierce, Polk, St. Croix, Sawyer, and Washburn; and three in Minnesota: Chisago, Pine, and Washington.

maps

Official visitor map of Saint Croix National Scenic Riverway (NSR) in Wisconsin and Minnesota. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Saint Croix - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Saint Croix National Scenic Riverway (NSR) in Wisconsin and Minnesota. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Mississippi National River & Recreation Area (NR & NRA) in Minnesota. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Mississippi - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Mississippi National River & Recreation Area (NR & NRA) in Minnesota. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/sacn/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Croix_National_Scenic_Riverway The Saint Croix National Scenic Riverway is a federally protected system of riverways located in eastern Minnesota and northwestern Wisconsin. It protects 252 miles (406 km) of river, including the St. Croix River (on the Wisconsin/Minnesota border), and the Namekagon River (in Wisconsin), as well as adjacent land along the rivers. The largest scenic riverway east of the Mississippi River, it lies within parts of eight counties in Wisconsin: Bayfield, Burnett, Douglas, Pierce, Polk, St. Croix, Sawyer, and Washburn; and three in Minnesota: Chisago, Pine, and Washington. Grab your paddle and your longing for adventure and head to the St. Croix and Namekagon rivers! Together they form the St. Croix National Scenic Riverway, offering over 200 miles of clean water that glides and rushes through a forested landscape. Paddle, boat, fish, and camp among this wild and scenic beauty. Hiking and historic towns also beckon. The St. Croix National Scenic Riverway stretches for over 200 miles in northwest Wisconsin and east-central Minnesota. The Namekagon River flows entirely in Wisconsin while the St. Croix River serves as a border between the two states for much of its length. With many different access points there are numerous opportunities for day trips as well as multi-day paddling adventures. Visitor centers are located on the Namekagon River in Trego, Wisconsin, and on the St. Croix River in St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin. Namekagon River Visitor Center The National Park Service operates this seasonal visitor center where people can view exhibits, pick up park publications, Junior Ranger booklets, and maps, and watch the park movie. Park rangers staff an information counter and offer trip planning assistance for the Namekagon and upper St. Croix rivers. The visitor center is located near the Namekagon River off Highway 63 in Trego, Wisconsin with picnic tables and a demonstration garden surrounding the building. From U.S. Highway 53, turn east onto U.S. Highway 63. Drive approximately one-half mile to the visitor center which is on the right. From U.S. Highway 63 coming west, drive approximately 4 miles past Earl, Wisconsin. The Namekagon River Visitor Center is on the left. St. Croix River Visitor Center The National Park Service operates this seasonal visitor center where visitors can view exhibits, pick up park publications, Junior Ranger booklets, and maps, and view the park film. Park rangers offer trip planning assistance for the St. Croix and Namekagon rivers. The park headquarters offices are also located in this building along the St. Croix River. From U.S. Highway 8, turn north on Wisconsin Highway 87 (Washington Street). Drive through downtown St. Croix Falls to Massachusetts Street. Turn west (left) to the corner of Massachusetts and Hamilton Streets. From Wisconsin Highway 87, drive south past Lion's Park. Turn west (right) on Massachusetts Street to the corner of Massachusetts and Hamilton Streets. Lower St. Croix District 19, primitive, Leave No Trace campsites are located on this reach from below Highway 8 down to the Boom Site Landing near Stillwater, Minnesota. An annual camping permit is required to camp. The District also consists of Minnesota and Wisconsin state park properties with campgrounds. Campsite Fees 0.00 No fees but an annual camping permit is required. Eagles Nest Campsite A picnic table and a fire ring in an open grass space surrounded by trees and shrubs. An annual camping permit is required in this District. Middle St. Croix 57, primitive, Leave No Trace campsites are located on the St. Croix River from Riverside Landing to Highway 8 at St. Croix Falls - Taylors Falls. All sites are free. No permit required. Camp only in designated sites marked with brown camping sign and metal fire ring. Sites are available first-come, first-served. Campsite Fees 0.00 No fees. Campsites are first come, first served. Riverside Campground A picnic table and a fire ring in an open grass space surrounded by trees and shrubs. Campsites include a picnic table, fire ring, and a pit toilet. Namekagon District 67, primitive, Leave No Trace camp sites are located on the Namekagon River from Namekagon Dam to the confluence of the St Croix River and on the St. Croix River from Gordon Dam to Riverside Landing. All sites are free. No permit required. Camp only in designated sites marked with brown camping sign and metal fire ring. Sites are available first-come, first-served. Campsite Fees 0.00 Camping is first come, first serve and free. Campsite N82.3 A picnic table and fire ring sit under the shade of pine trees next to a river. Campsite N82.3 near Pacqawong. Campsite N63 A shallow river winds through a narrow channel of green vegetation. Campsite N63 offers quiet views of the Namekagon River. Kayaking on the St. Croix River A woman paddles a kayak past cliffs on a forested river. Paddling is an excellent way to experience the St. Croix National Scenic Riverway. The St. Croix Dalles Kayakers pass impressive cliffs. The scenic Dalles of the St. Croix River provide dramatic backdrops for paddlers. Fast Water on the St. Croix River. A fast river flows over large rocks in a forested landscape. There are opportunities to paddle stretches of fast and slow water on the Riverway. Fishing the St. Croix River A man holds a large fish while sitting in a boat near a forested shore. The fishing is spectacular on the St. Croix and Namekagon rivers. Evening on the St. Croix River. A man stands next to a river watching a sunset. Watch scenic sunsets from shoreline campsites. Lead Contamination in Bald Eagle Nestlings Bald eagles can tell us a lot about contamination in aquatic systems because they are on top of the food web and fish are their primary prey—a food source they share with humans. From 2006 through 2015, the Great Lakes Inventory and Monitoring Network collected blood and feather samples from bald eagle nestlings to monitor contaminants in three upper Midwest national park units. This resource brief describes the results for just one of those contaminants: lead. Two eaglets in a nest with the remains of a fish. A Legacy of Contamination Production of DDT and PCBs was banned in the United States in the 1970s, but they continue to be found in the blood and feathers of bald eagles. What does our monitoring of eagles in three Great Lakes Network parks tell us about these "legacy contaminants"? A bald eagle nestling stands on sand with sun at his back. People can be seen in the background. Vets On The River Public lands bring opportunities for healing and reflection, physical and mental challenges, and rest and recuperation to millions of veterans, active duty service members, and their families. Veterans from all branches of the military have participated in river trips. The Vets on the River program continues to evolve and include more types of experiences like these. Veterans prepare to launch boats on river. Crystal Clear: Occurrence and Effects of Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals in the St. Croix River The Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968 includes protection of the “outstandingly remarkable values” of the St. Croix and Namekagon rivers, which are included in the first eight designated wild and scenic rivers. The National Park Service (NPS) supports efforts to ensure these high-quality waters are not degraded by endocrine-disrupting or pharmaceutically active chemicals. motor boat riding down a rippling river Invasive Rusty Crayfish Rusty crayfish are invasive in Minnesota and Wisconsin. They are aggressiveness and resilience to more extreme conditions tend to be the key traits that give the rusty crayfish an advantage in its non-native range. Prevention is the best method of control. At the St. Croix National Scenic Riverway the use of crayfish as live bait is prohibited. Microplastics Are Everywhere! Plastics are used to make everything from children’s toys to car parts and athletic wear to exfoliants. Plastics are lightweight and inexpensive to produce, qualities that can also make plastics a throw-away item. That disposability could present a threat to aquatic life in Midwestern lakes and streams. First page of resource brief Metamorphosis in the Midwest Region: the pollinator pledge takes flight #FindYourWay down a Wild and Scenic Riverway like St. Croix and you’ll find the park’s pollinator corridor, what Chris Stein hopes will be just the beginning of a national movement for pollinators! A employee of Motorcities NHA speaking to children about pollinators Paleontology of St. Croix National Scenic Riverway St. Croix National Scenic Riverway contains some of the most notable Cambrian fossil localities in the National Park System. Geological explorations beginning in the 1840s have revealed a fauna of brachiopods, snails and snail-like mollusks, trilobites, graptolites, burrowing animals, and others. These organisms populated the region between approximately 500 and 490 million years ago, when it was a shallow tropical sea. small piece of brown rock peppered with small round red shells. Migrating Birds Bring Two Parks Together Migratory birds have brought together parks in Costa Rica and the upper Midwest. Spearheaded by Saint Croix National Scenic Riverway, the collaborative efforts focus on researching and protecting migratory bird species. A Cerulean Warbler, found in both Costa Rica and the northern Midwest region of the United States. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: Crystal Clear: A Call to Action In 2016, the nation celebrates the centennial of the National Park Service (NPS) as the steward of special places that represent our natural and cultural heritage. Many national parks were founded on the beauty and value of water. Since the preservation of the Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park in 1872, the National Park System has grown to include significant examples within majestic rivers, the Great Lakes, oceans and coasts, and other spectacular water resources. bright blue lake green islands in between Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 10, No. 1, Spring 2018 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology News</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> a piece of rock with small reddish shells embedded in it with black and white rule in foreground Cambrian Period—541 to 485.4 MYA The flat layers of rock exposed in Grand Canyon National Park encompass much of the Paleozoic, beginning in the Cambrian where they record an ancient shoreline. rock with fossil burrow tracks Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Saint Croix National Scenic Riverway, Wisconsin and Minnesota Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] park entrance

also available

National Parks
USFS NW