"Prairie Walks" by NPS Photo , public domain

San Juan Island

National Historical Park - Washington

San Juan Island National Historical Park is located San Juan Island in the state of Washington. The park is made up of the sites of the British and U.S. Army camps during the Pig War, a boundary dispute over the ownership of the island. Both of these camps were set up in 1859 as response to a border controversy triggered by the killing of a pig. The camps were occupied for 12 years, until the islands were awarded to the United States by Kaiser Wilhelm I in an arbitration agreed by the parties in the 1872 Treaty of Washington. The British abandoned their camp in November 1872, while the American camp was disbanded in July 1874.

maps

Map of Cattle Point in San Juan Islands National Monument (NM). Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).San Juan Islands - Cattle Point

Map of Cattle Point in San Juan Islands National Monument (NM). Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of Blind Island in San Juan Islands National Monument (NM). Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).San Juan Islands - Blind Island

Map of Blind Island in San Juan Islands National Monument (NM). Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of Turn Point in San Juan Islands National Monument (NM). Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).San Juan Islands - Turn Point

Map of Turn Point in San Juan Islands National Monument (NM). Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of Patos Island in San Juan Islands National Monument (NM). Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).San Juan Islands - Patos Island

Map of Patos Island in San Juan Islands National Monument (NM). Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of Recreation and Trails for Cattle Point Natural Resources Conservation Area (NRCA). Published by Washington State Department of Natural Resources (WSDNR).Cattle Point - Recreation and Trails Map

Map of Recreation and Trails for Cattle Point Natural Resources Conservation Area (NRCA). Published by Washington State Department of Natural Resources (WSDNR).

Map of Cypress Island Natural Areas Trail System. Published by Washington State Department of Natural Resources (WSDNR).Cypress Island - Trail System

Map of Cypress Island Natural Areas Trail System. Published by Washington State Department of Natural Resources (WSDNR).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of Washington State Highways / Tourist Map. Published by the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT).Washington State - Highway Map

Map of Washington State Highways / Tourist Map. Published by the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT).

https://www.nps.gov/sajh/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Juan_Island_National_Historical_Park San Juan Island National Historical Park is located San Juan Island in the state of Washington. The park is made up of the sites of the British and U.S. Army camps during the Pig War, a boundary dispute over the ownership of the island. Both of these camps were set up in 1859 as response to a border controversy triggered by the killing of a pig. The camps were occupied for 12 years, until the islands were awarded to the United States by Kaiser Wilhelm I in an arbitration agreed by the parties in the 1872 Treaty of Washington. The British abandoned their camp in November 1872, while the American camp was disbanded in July 1874. San Juan Island is well known for splendid vistas, saltwater shore, quiet woodlands, orca whales and one of the last remaining native prairies in the Puget Sound/Northern Straits region. But it was also here in 1859 that the United States and Great Britain nearly went to war over possession of the island, the crisis ignited by the death of a pig. San Juan Island is served by Washington State Ferries, several private cruise and shuttle craft and two air carriers (one of which has both land and seaplane service). The Washington State Ferries terminal is 85 miles north of Seattle and 90 miles south of Vancouver, BC in Anacortes, WA. American Camp Visitor Center The American Camp visitor center is located on Cattle Point Road on the island's southern peninsula. From Friday Harbor Ferry Terminal: Follow Spring Street up the hill, turn left onto Mullis St. Mullis becomes Cattle Point Rd, follow Cattle Point to American Camp. If arriving by cruise ship, most piers are within walking distance (10-15 minutes). Just walk north, up the hill, past the Plaza Colon to reach Calle Norzagaray. You will see Castillo San Cristóbal from the Plaza Colon and Castillo San Felipe del Morro is a 15 minute walk up Calle Norzagaray from San Cristóbal. The Pan-American pier is English Camp Visitor Center The heart of English Camp is situated on the shoreline located below the main parking area, accessible from West Valley Road. From Friday Harbor Ferry Terminal: follow Spring street up the hill, turn right onto 2nd street. 2nd St becomes Guard St, Guard St become Beaverton Valley Rd. Beaverton Valley Rd becomes West Valley Rd, follow West Valley Rd to English Camp. Sunset at American Camp a sun setting behind historic parade grounds The sun sets on the American Camp parade grounds English Camp Barracks people visiting a historic building Visitors come from all over the world to explore English Camp Encampment a historic cannon being fired Reenactors fire a cannon at Encampment English Camp Formal Garden flowers in bloom The formal garden in bloom Grandma's Cove a sandy beach and blue sky Grandma's Cove is a popular spot for park visitors NPS Geodiversity Atlas—San Juan Island National Historical Park, Washington Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] prairie landscape How to raise your endangered butterfly At San Juan Island National Historic Site, staff are hoping to hatch a survivor. Comparative Ecology of the Native Banana Slug and a Comparably-sized Invasive Slug in Washington State There are two very obvious, large slugs species on San Juan Island: the native banana slug and an invasive European slug. Dr. Erika Iyengar and her students from Muhlenberg College have been studying slugs in San Juan Island National Historical Park for the last four years. Their research is focused on food and habitat preferences for each species and how climate change may impact their future ecology. Invasive slug moving through the grass Butterflies of the North Coast & Cascades A comprehensive list of butterfly species found in Mount Rainier National Park, North Cascades National Park Complex, Olympic National Park, and San Juan Island National Historical Park. Brightly colored Milbert's tortoiseshell on the ground North Coast and Cascades Network Exotic Plant Management Team The North Coast and Cascades Network Exotic Plant Management Team (NCCN EPMT) manages a diverse array of exotic plants across the dramatic landscapes of the Pacific Northwest. The team works with partner parks and agencies to augment vegetation management across the network. People loading weed control equipment into the back of a vehicle Moths of the North Coast & Cascades Moths are insects and members of the taxonomic order of Lepidoptera. They and their larvae provide food for other insects, fish, and animals, and they are pollinators for many nocturnally flowering plants. Over the last five years, parks in the North Coast and Cascades Network have conducted Bioblitzes to begin developing species lists of moths in our parks. Scribe moth specimen Fire Communication and Education Grants Enhance Fire Interpretation and Outreach in the National Parks in 2015 and Beyond The 2015 National Park Service Fire Communication and Education Grant Program provided funding for projects, programs, or tasks in twelve parks around the country. A woman studies a small coniferous tree while a younger woman looks on. Bees of the North Coast & Cascades Bees are some of the most abundant and important pollinators in the world – especially in mountainous environments. Despite the importance of bees in our natural environments, many national parks do not know what species live within their boundaries. In 2016, to celebrate the Centennial of the National Park Service, North Coast and Cascades national parks focused on inventories of pollinators, including bees. Macro photo of the metallic blue head of a mason bee Silas Casey In 1859, Silas Casey went to the Washington Territory, where he was sent to reinforce George Pickett's Company D, Ninth Infantry on San Juan Island. Casey brought calm and common sense to the standoff with British forces on the island. Following his return to the east, he was promoted to major general, and he remained in active duty until his retirement in 1868. Grainy image of a collection of white buildings and long picket fence on an open landscape Wildland Fire in Douglas Fir: Western United States Douglas fir is widely distributed throughout the western United States, as well as southern British Columbia and northern Mexico. Douglas fir is able to survive without fire, its abundantly-produced seeds are lightweight and winged, allowing the wind to carry them to new locations where seedlings can be established. Close-up of Douglas fir bark and needles. Early Detection of European Green Crab in Washington’s Salish Sea Crab Team is a project of Washington Sea Grant at the University of Washington that aims to learn about Washington’s inland shorelines and monitor them for invasion by the European green crab. We partner with volunteers, tribes, and agencies to survey habitats that could be affected by the globally-invasive crab, with the goal of detecting it at the earliest possible stage of establishment, increasing our chances of controlling populations and reducing impacts. A brown, orange and red crab in the mud Uniforms for the Caribbean Did you know that employees from across the National Park Service stepped up to help their fellow employees after hurricanes hit the US Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico? In September of 2017, Hurricane Irma, one of the strongest known hurricanes in the Atlantic, lashed the Caribbean and Florida. It was followed within days by Hurricane Maria, another devastating hurricane that also hit Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands, among other places. Boxes line a hallway awaiting shipment to parks in the Caribbean. Photo by Kristine Brunsman 1997–1998 El Niño / 1998–1999 La Niña Wind-driven waves and abnormally high sea levels contributed to hundreds of millions of dollars in flood and storm damage in the San Francisco Bay region, including Point Reyes National Seashore, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, and Pinnacles National Monument. In addition to California, the 1997–1998 El Niño and the following 1998–1999 La Niña severely impacted the Pacific Northwest, including many National Park System units. colorful ocean surface mapping image Sandwith Homestead Cultural Landscape The Sandwith Homestead is a 5.2-acre historic site in the northwest of San Juan Island National Historical Park. The site is significant as the location of a late‑nineteenth‑century homestead farm and subsistence orchard, settled and farmed by Isaac Sandwith from 1875 to 1902. Situated on the lower slopes of Young Hill, the Sandwith Homestead consists of the core of the original homestead, including the home site and a remnant fruit orchard, as well as several stone features. Sandwith Homestead How are Landbird Populations Doing in the North Coast and Cascades Network? Landbirds are one of the vital signs monitored in five national parks of the North Coast and Cascades Network. Two recent studies show that for species with discernible trends, most populations are stable or even increasing. A greenish-yellow bird singing from a perch Bat Projects in Parks: North Coast Cascades Network Eleven bat species occur in North Coast Cascades Network Parks. Each species is unique, except that they're all facing threats of some kind in their environments. Learn more about how scientists study bats and what you can do to help. American Camp Cultural Landscape The American Camp cultural landscape is a site in the southeast corner of San Juan Island within the San Juan Island National Historical Park. The site is significant as the location of a United States Army camp during the joint occupation of the island by British and American Troops from 1859 to 1874. The cultural landscape also includes the sites of the Hudson’s Bay Company agricultural outpost, Bellevue Farm, and San Juan Town. American Camp Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Coastal Geomorphology—Storms of Record Storms can bring about significant coastal change as well as substantial economic damage and loss in the human environment. Read about a few storms of interest that have since made history due to their unique intensity, characteristics, or impacts. aerial view of a major storm along the northwest coast of the united states and canada Data Manager Profile: Kristen Bonebrake Meet Kristen Bonebrake, Data Manager for the North Coast and Cascades Network Inventory & Monitoring Network, and discover the important role that data managers play in protecting the natural resources of our parks! Explore Kristen's journey—from counting roadkill as an intern at Saguaro National Park, to collaborating with bright minds around the country to solve the complex challenges facing our nation's most special places. Kristen kneels on a rock in front of a dramatic snow-capped mountain scene.

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