"Sunset over foggy mountains, Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, 2015." by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Santa Monica Mountains

National Recreation Area - California

The Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area is a United States National Recreation Area containing many individual parks and open space preserves, located primarily in the Santa Monica Mountains of Southern California.

location

maps

Official visitor map of Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Santa Monica Mountains - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Vintage 1949 USGS 1:250000 map of Long Beach in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Vintage USGS - Long Beach - 1949

Vintage 1949 USGS 1:250000 map of Long Beach in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

Vintage 1949 USGS 1:250000 map of Los Angeles in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Vintage USGS - Los Angeles - 1949

Vintage 1949 USGS 1:250000 map of Los Angeles in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

brochures

Brochure for the King Gillette Ranch in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park Service Sites - Anthony C. Beilenson Interagency Visitor Center

Brochure for the King Gillette Ranch in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the Arroyo Sequit Site in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park Service Sites - Arroyo Sequit

Map of the Arroyo Sequit Site in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure for Cheeseboro & Palo Comado Canyons in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park Service Sites - Cheeseboro and Palo Comado Canyons

Brochure for Cheeseboro & Palo Comado Canyons in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure for the Circle X Ranch in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park Service Sites - Circle X Ranch

Brochure for the Circle X Ranch in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure for the Paramount Ranch in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park Service Sites - Paramount Ranch

Brochure for the Paramount Ranch in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure for the Peter Strauss Ranch in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park Service Sites - Peter Strauss Ranch

Brochure for the Peter Strauss Ranch in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure for Rancho Sierra Vista/Satwiwa in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park Service Sites - Rancho Sierra Vista and Satwiwa

Brochure for Rancho Sierra Vista/Satwiwa in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure for Rocky Oaks in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park Service Sites - Rocky Oaks

Brochure for Rocky Oaks in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure for Solstice Canyon in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park Service Sites - Solstice Canyon

Brochure for Solstice Canyon in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure for Zuma & Trancas Canyons in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park Service Sites - Zuma and Trancas Canyons

Brochure for Zuma & Trancas Canyons in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure about Mountain Biking in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Santa Monica Mountains - Biking

Brochure about Mountain Biking in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

List of Camping Facilities & Fees for Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Santa Monica Mountains - Camping

List of Camping Facilities & Fees for Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Invasive Weed Field Guide for Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Guidebooks - Invasive Weed Field Guide

Invasive Weed Field Guide for Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

The Complete Butterfly Field Guide of the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Guidebooks - Butterfly Field Guide

The Complete Butterfly Field Guide of the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/samo/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_Monica_Mountains_National_Recreation_Area The Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area is a United States National Recreation Area containing many individual parks and open space preserves, located primarily in the Santa Monica Mountains of Southern California. The Santa Monica Mountains offer easy access to surprisingly wild places. Experience the famous beaches of Malibu or explore more than 500 miles of trails. The park abounds with historical and cultural sites, from old movie ranches to Native American centers. What will you and your family discover? There are multiple trailheads around the park, so there is not one main entrance. You can begin your visit at the visitor center, located off Mulholland Highway in Calabasas. The Santa Monica Mountains are traversed by the 405 Freeway on the east side; crowned by the 101 Freeway on the north and west side; and Highway 1, the Pacific Coast Highway (PCH), on the southern ocean border. Santa Monica Mountains Anthony C. Beilenson Interagency Visitor Center The Anthony C. Beilenson Interagency Visitor Center features a bookstore managed by Western National Parks Association. You can purchase memorabilia, guidebooks, puppets and more. It also features interactive exhibits and has a small theater where a park film is shown. Ventura Freeway (U.S. 101) to Las Virgenes Road (Co. Hwy N1) exit. Go 3 miles south on Las Virgenes Road to Mulholland Highway intersection (traffic light). Turn left on Mulholland Highway. Park entrance is 0.1 mile on right. Satwiwa Native American Indian Culture Center Located at the southern end of the community of Newbury Park, this site reflects the heritage of both Native Americans and local ranching. The Satwiwa Native American Indian Culture Center is open on weekends from 9am to 5pm. Native American workshops and programs occur throughout the year. Main entrance - cross street is Via Goleta and Potrero Road, Newbury Park, CA, 91320. From Ventura Freeway (U.S. 101) exit Lynn Road. Turn south on Lynn Road for 5.25 miles to Via Goleta. Park Entrance is on the left. Walk 0.3 mile up gravel road from the last parking area to the Culture Center. Note: The driveway off Potrero Rd is a service road and access to handicap parking only. Circle X Ranch Campground - CLOSED Circle X Ranch Group Campground is the only campground the National Park Service operates in the Santa Monica Mountains. Visit recreation.gov to make reservations for this 10 person minimum group camp. Reservation Fee 9.00 Fee may be charged 10-25 People/ Night 35.00 Group of 10-25 people per night 26-50 People/ Night 75.00 Group of 26-50 people per night 51-75 People/ Night 125.00 Group of 51-75 people per night Ranger Station at Circle X Ranch Campground Ranger Station at Circle-X Ranch The Ranger Station stands as the first greeting when you arrive at Circle-X Ranch. Circle X Ranch Campground tents and picnic tables are nestled among the trees in the Circle X Campground Camping set-up Zuma Canyon in Spring Trail view with yellow flowers in the foreground that lead to green mountains against a blue sky. Zuma Canyon in spring. Point Mugu Sunset Sunbeams reaching from glowing sun over the ocean. Point Mugu Sunset Mountains Mountain silhouettes at sunrise. View from Sandstone Peak at Sunrise Malibu Creek Overlook Wispy cloud covered sky over chaparral covered mountains. Malibu Creek Overlook Equestrians on Trail People riding horses into the sunset on a mountain trail. Equestrians on Trail Leo Carrillo Beach Rocks emerging from ocean. Leo Carrillo Beach Sunset Views Two individuals sitting atop a rocky outcrop while watching the sun set. Sunset Views Paramount Ranch Night Sky Milky way shines in night sky over a mountain and oak tree. Paramount Ranch Night Sky No Houses Destroyed: Springs Fire Burns 24,000 Acres in the Southern California Wildland Urban Interface On May 2, 2013, the Springs fire started during conditions that Southern California usually experiences only in late summer or fall. Although the Springs fire burned approximately 24,000 acres--largely public open space--the successful outcome of no homes being destroyed is a testament to the solid working relationships between cooperating agencies in this complex environment. A large plume of smoke towers over the suburban skyline. NPS Structural Fire Program Highlights 2014 Intern Accomplishments NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, California Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] valley fog On Location: An Introduction to Film in National Parks National parks have provided the backdrop for many iconic American films, including the original "Star Wars" trilogy at Death Valley National Park, "Thelma and Louise" at Canyonlands National Park, and many more. Filmmakers have been recording at National Park Service sites since the early years of motion picture history. While the location might not be the first thing in the credits, these films and television shows shine a spotlight on park landscapes. A uniformed ranger shakes hands with C3PO, a Star Wars character, in a bare and hilly landscape. Hope for California Red-legged Frogs After Woolsey Fire Devastation In November 2018, the Woolsey Fire burned a whopping 42% of the natural area in the Santa Monica Mountains, including 88% of National Park Service lands. No species escaped unscathed. One or more mountain lions perished in the fire or its aftermath. Entire bobcat territories were reduced to ash. And federally threatened California red-legged frogs lost years of hard-won habitat and population gains. Frog partially covered in aquatic vegetation, sitting on a burnt, ashy slope. Can Higher Densities Help Native Plants Gain a Disturbed Area Advantage? Several years ago, in his former role as a field monitor, restoration ecologist Joey Algiers started noticing dense clumps of native plants in Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area fuels reduction areas. They stood out because these areas had otherwise become oceans of invasive species due to annual mowing. That got him wondering: could higher densities of native plants help keep invasive species at bay in fuels reduction areas? Person on hands and knees planting a native seedling in an experimental plot in Zuma Canyon A Need to Breed: California Toads in the Santa Monica Mountains <em>March 15, 2017</em> - What is a toad to do if it needs to breed but can’t find a pond? California toads in Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area recently faced this dilemma. They typically breed every spring, finding ponds or pools by scent after hunting insects on land for most of the year. As the recent drought wore on, such pools became scarce. Mating California toads Mountain Lions Face Loss of Genetic Diversity <em>November 28, 2016</em> - On the surface, mountain lions in the Santa Monica Mountains are doing well, surviving, and reproducing at healthy rates. However, recently published research predicts that there could be serious challenges to this population’s long-term survival. Profile view of a young female mountain lion Using Cameras to Study Wildlife After the Springs Fire Around 14,000 acres of park land in the Santa Monica Mountains were left scorched after the 24,000-acre Springs Fire in May 2013. In the ashes, Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area biologists saw an opportunity. They had long wondered how wildlife handle burned landscapes. With wildlife cameras available from the conclusion of another project, they began the Springs Fire Wildlife Project that fall to find out. Wildlife camera trap image of a coyote looking into the camera Preparation for Southern California Fire Season Demonstrates Complexities and Importance of Cooperation On June 12, 2012, the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area hosted the “opening of fire season” media event. Resources from Ventura County Fire Department, Los Padres National Forest, Cal Fire, and Oxnard City Fire Department came together to demonstrate preparing a structure from wildfire in the wildland urban interface. Officials stressed the importance of good communications between cooperating resources when engaging in suppression efforts. A helicopter demonstrates a wildland fire water drop. 2017 Recipients: George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service Meet the recipients of the 2017 George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service. These award recipients are recognized for their exceptional dedication and service to parks and programs. Boy outside holding a tool onto a wooden post. Wildland Fire in Chaparral: California and Southwestern United States Chaparral is a general term that applies to various types of brushland found in southern California and the southwestern U.S. This community contains the most flammable type of vegetation found in the United States. Chaparral on steep rocky slopes. Volunteers Take On Invasive Plant to Restore Zuma Canyon Populations of an aggressive and toxic invasive plant have been exploding in Southern California over the last decade. Known as carnation spurge, it was first recorded in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area in Solstice Canyon in 1987. There, biologists learned that restoring native plants helps keep carnation spurge at bay. Now, volunteers are helping the park step up native plant restoration efforts to fight carnation spurge in Zuma Canyon. Carnation spurge and a volunteer weeding Researchers Investigate Link Between Rodenticides and Mange in Bobcats In 2002, when bobcats in Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area began dying of mange, a disease that is typically considered benign, biologists began investigating. They found that 100% of the bobcats that died of the disease also had rat poisons known as anticoagulant rodenticides in their systems. Now, two researchers are closing in on an explanation. Bobcat being examined by biologists Microplastics on National Park Beaches Every beachgoer has probably noticed plastic trash littering their favorite beaches, however remote. A new study of microplastic distribution on national park beaches indicates that whichever one you visit, there is probably also some amount of plastic that is harder to see, mixed in with the sand between your toes. Microplastic piece and organic matter Rare Frogs Breed in New Home In 2014, National Park Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologists hoped for the best as they released hundreds of California red-legged frog tadpoles from protective rearing pens into two streams in the Santa Monica Mountains. The streams had been chosen carefully, but there was still no way to be sure that the tadpoles would survive on their own. California red-legged frog in a biologist's hand Field Season Beginning for Mediterranean Coast Plant Monitoring Teams <em>March 15, 2017</em> - Even for drought tolerant southern California plant communities, four dry years in a row was a lot to handle. Annual vegetation monitoring at each of the three parks in the Mediterranean Coast Inventory and Monitoring Network recorded significant dieback in some places. This year, however, rainfall has been well above average throughout the region. Monitoring teams are excited to survey in a much more brightly colored landscape. Shooting stars decorated in water droplets Corridos: Stories Told Through Song The corrido is a traditional Mexican song style that has evolved over the past 200 years in northern Mexico and the southwestern United States. Corridos are all about storytelling. They tell of battle victories (and loses), individuals taking on the establishment, the lives of great or notorious people, and – perhaps the most ancient type of story in human history – the epic journey. Learn about this enduring tradition and listen to a corrido about the Anza Expedition of 1776 A woodcut illustration of four people singing and a man playing guitar Night Sky Darkness in Coastal Southern California National Parks The velvet black of a dark night sky offers many values. People seek darkness for stargazing. Birds navigate by starlight. Prey hides from predator in the dark. But light pollution from human development—streetlights, buildings and other sources of artificial light—is spilling over into natural areas and taking an ecological toll. In Southern California, the National Park Service monitors the night sky of its parks and applies best practices to improve night sky darkness. Portion of the Milky Way visible over mountaintops in the Santa Monica Mountains. Scientist Profile: Katy Delaney, Wildlife Ecologist "So even though I worked on birds my whole early career, I would know a ton about island scrub-jays, but I didn't really go birding. Now I really enjoy going out and hearing songs and trying to identify the birds. And I collect the data on eBird so that every time I go out, I have a list of how many and what birds I saw. It's just like doing science, even though I'm not at work. I realize what a nerd I am." Dr. Katy Delaney, waist-deep in a stream. Pacific Border Province The Pacific Border straddles the boundaries between several of Earth's moving plates on the western margin of North America. This region is one of the most geologically young and tectonically active in North America. The generally rugged, mountainous landscape of this province provides evidence of ongoing mountain-building. Drakes Estero in Point Reyes National Seashore. NPS photo/Sarah Codde Conserving pinnipeds in Pacific Ocean parks in response to climate change The evolutionary record from previous climate perturbations indicates that marine mammals are highly vulnerable but also remarkably adaptable to climatic change in coastal ecosystems. Consequently, national parks in the Pacific, from Alaska to Hawaii, are faced with potentially dramatic changes in their marine mammal fauna, especially pinnipeds (seals and sea lions). black harbor seal National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Physiographic Provinces Descriptions of the physiographic provinces of the United States, including maps, educational material, and listings of Parks for each. George B. Dorr, founder of Acadia National Park Paleogene Period—66.0 to 23.0 MYA Colorful Paleogene rocks are exposed in the hoodoos of Bryce Canyon National Park and the badlands of Badlands and Theodore Roosevelt national parks. Extraordinary Paleogene fossils are found in Fossil Butte and John Day Fossil Beds national monuments, among other parks. fossil skull with teeth expsoed Neogene Period—23.0 to 2.58 MYA Some of the finest Neogene fossils on the planet are found in the rocks of Agate Fossil Beds and Hagerman Fossil Beds national monuments. fossils on display in a visitor center Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center Community Collaboration to Reduce Wildfire Losses in the Santa Monica Mountains Extensive home losses due to wildfires have become a common feature in the state of California, especially in the Santa Monica Mountains. Fortunately, years of fire research in the Santa Monica Mountains has improved our understanding of how home hardening and defensible space can prevent structure losses from wildfires. The park partnered with the Resource Conservation District of the Santa Monica Mountains to develop a new website: Defensiblespace.org. Screenshot of Sustainable Defensible Space website homepage. Staff Spotlight: Vanessa Torres Meet Vanessa Torres, Program Manager of Interpretation, Education, and Community Engagement for Lyndon B Johnson National Historical Park and Waco Mammoth National Monument. Hear her story and advice she has for youth and young adults. Vanessa Torres enjoying a break in the Texas Bluebonnets 2020 George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service Each year nearly 300,000 volunteers across the National Park Service (NPS) donate more than 6.5 million hours of service, for a value of more than $185 million. Through their extraordinary work and dedication, these volunteers make an exceptional contribution to their parks and communities. We are pleased to congratulate the national recipients of the 2020 George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service. Photo of Tom and Karen Hartley dressed in period clothing standing and smiling outdoors. Puma Profiles: P-025 This female was only studied for less than two months. First discovered by a remote camera in 2012 south of Westlake Village, she and her brother P-026 were captured in August of that year at an estimated age of 10 months. Mountain Lion among grass and brush. Puma Profiles: P-024 Born in the same litter as P-023 in 2010, this male dispersed from his mother and was known to mostly roam the eastern end of the Santa Monica Mountains, up to the 405 freeway. Kitten close up. Puma Profiles: P-028 One of four in a litter birthed by P-013 to P-012, biologists were able to track her until after she dispersed from her mother at 16 months of age. Soon after dispersal we lost track of her because the batteries failed in her tracking device. Mountain lion looking into camera at night. Puma Profiles: P-027 This male was first captured in April 2013 around the age of six years old and was found to be the son of P-001 and P-006. Mountain lion looking into camera at night. Puma Profiles: P-026 The littermate of P-025, this male dispersed from his mother in January 2013, only to get into a fight two months later with P-019. He lost his expandable VHF collar during the fight and has not been tracked since. Mountain Lion looking into camera. Puma Profiles: P-019 P-019, captured and collared in early 2012, represents the second case of first-order inbreeding in our study (the first being when P-001 mated with his daughter P-006). Mountain lion looking into camera at night. Puma Profiles: P-017 This young kitten was abandoned by her mother, P-103, after three months. Although anticoagulants were found in her system, the official cause of death was ruled as starvation. Kitten among wood chips and brush. Puma Profiles: P-020 Researchers were trying to recapture P-012 in Malibu Creek State Park to replace his collar. Instead, they were surprised to find an unknown male lion on that October day in 2010. Mountain lion among grass and brush. Puma Profiles: P-022 P-022 is our most famous mountain lion and known as our “Hollywood Cat”. He is a resident of Griffith Park in the city of Los Angeles and, at the time of his last recapture, he weighed 123 lbs. At about 11 years old, he is the oldest cat in our study. For a cat in the wild, that is a very old cat! Mountain Lion walking down a mountain with the Hollywood sign in the background. Puma Profiles: P-021 Although captured in the summer of 2011 at the healthy age of six, this male from the Santa Susana Mountains was later found to be the father of P-012, the lion who crossed the 101 Freeway and became the dominant male of the Santa Monica Mountains. Mountain lion among grass and brush. Puma Profiles: P-014 A son of P-001 and an unknown female, it was discovered upon his death that he ingested multiple types of rodenticide (rat poison). Mountain lion in a tree. Puma Profiles: P-016 This large dominant male was last known to roam the area around Lake Piru in Los Padres National Forest to the north. He was first captured in the spring of 2011 in the Santa Susana Mountains around the age of two or three. Mountain lion in grass framed by ranger legs. Puma Profiles: P-010 First captured in the winter of 2008 at around a year and a half old, this male exemplifies why this species has earned the “ghost cat” moniker. Mountain lion among sticks and brush. Puma Profiles: P-011 Very little is known about P-011. First captured in the winter of 2008 (a few days after P-010, actually), the collar on this young male stopped working several months later. He was never found again, nor his presence detected. It’s presumed that he died. Puma Profiles: P-071 Researchers discovered this litter of four-week old mountain lion kittens, including P-071, in July 2018, while the mother, P-019, was away from the den. The two males and two females (known as P-070, P-071, P-072, and P-073), were found in a remote area of the western Santa Monica Mountains. P-070 and P-072 are the males. P-071 and P-073 are the females. Kitten being held up by hands. Puma Profiles: P-077 When first captured, P-077 was around two years old and she appeared to be in good health. She was initially captured, radio-collared and released where she was found in the Simi Hills in November 2019. In November 2020, she was re-captured in the Simi Hills so her radio collar could be replaced. She weighs about 75 lbs. and, according to biologists, she is a bit on the thin side. She is now estimated to be between three to 3 1/2 years old. Mountain lion looking into camera at night. Puma Profiles: P-075 This young female mountain lion was captured in late June 2019. She was discovered in a tree at a Pacific Palisades mobile home park. A resident called 911 and the Los Angeles Police Department secured the scene. The young cat was safely tranquilized and removed by California Department of Fish & Wildlife officers and NPS biologists. The lion was outfitted with a GPS radio collar and ID tag in each ear. Mountain Lion looking into camera. Puma Profiles: P-078 P-078 was a male mountain lion initially captured by NPS biologists as a subadult in the central Santa Monica Mountains in December 2019. He traveled west and crossed the 101 Freeway at the Conejo Grade in Camarillo. He spent some time in Wildwood, then crossed Highway 23 followed by Highway 118 in the Rocky Peak area. Mountain lion looking into camera at night. Puma Profiles: P-073 Researchers discovered this litter of four-week old mountain lion kittens, including P-073, in July 2018. The two males and two females (known as P-070, P-071, P-072, and P-073), were found in a remote area of the western Santa Monica Mountains. P-070 and P-072 are the males. P-071 and P-073 are the females. Kittens being held by gloved hands. Puma Profiles: P-072 Researchers discovered this litter of four-week old mountain lion kittens, including P-072, in July 2018. The two males and two females (known as P-070, P-071, P-072, and P-073), were found in a remote area of the western Santa Monica Mountains. P-070 and P-072 are the males. P-071 and P-073 are the females. Kitten among brush and grass. Puma Profiles: P-076 This young male was safely captured and radio-collared by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife officers in early November 2019 when he was spotted in the backyard of a house in Northridge. He appeared to be healthy and was released in the nearby Santa Susana Mountains where we continue to track him with his GPS collar. Puma Profiles: P-070 Researchers discovered this litter of four-week old mountain lion kittens, including P-070, in July 2018 while the mother, P-019, was away from the den. The two males and two females (known as P-070, P-071, P-072, and P-073), were found in a remote area of the western Santa Monica Mountains. P-070 and P-072 are the males. P-071 and P-073 are the females. Kitten among brush and grass. Puma Profiles: P-068 Researchers discovered a litter of four-week old mountain lion kittens in Simi Hills in June 2018. All four kittens are female and are known as P-066, P-067, P-068 and P-069. The mother is P-062 who researchers have been tracking since January 2018. Kittens among brush and rocks. Puma Profiles: P-069 Researchers discovered a litter of four-week old mountain lion kittens in Simi Hills in June 2018. All four kittens are female and are known as P-066, P-067, P-068 and P-069. The mother is P-062 who researchers have been tracking since January 2018. Kitten being held up by hands. Puma Profiles: P-066 Researchers discovered a litter of four-week old mountain lion kittens in Simi Hills in June 2018. All four kittens are female and are known as P-066, P-067, P-068 and P-069. The mother is P-062 who researchers have been tracking since January 2018. Kitten among brush and rocks. Puma Profiles: P-062 In July 2019, our biologist recaptured P-062 to replace her GPS collar and also captured and collared one of her four offspring, who is now 14 months old (either P-066 or P-067). Puma Profiles: P-051 and P-052 Along with P-050, these two kittens, a female (P-051) and male (P-052), were born to P-039 in her second known litter. When examined by researchers, the kittens were found in a cave-like area beneath large boulders. As with P-035, another female in the same mountain range, P-038 is suspected to be the father based on GPS locations of him traveling and spending multiple days with P-039 months before the kittens were born. Kittens among brush and rocks. Puma Profiles: P-057 and P-058 This litter was abandoned by their mother and subsequently starved to death within a couple months of their birth. They are believed to be the first kittens of P-042; the father is currently unknown. Like all wild animals, many young do not survive until adulthood. Kittens among grass and brush. Puma Profiles: P-054 P-054 was born in January 2017. In late February of 2017, NPS researchers marked her while her mother, P-023, was away from the den. P-054 was thought to be the only known kitten from P-023's third litter. However, we later discovered (through remote camera photos and videos) that there was another kitten. We have not confirmed who that kitten was. Mountain lion looking into camera at night. Puma Profiles: P-059 These two kittens are the first litter for P-053, a young female mountain lion that the National Park Service has been tracking since July 2016. At 21 months of age, P-053 is the youngest mother during the study, but still within the normal range. Kittens among rocks and brush. Puma Profiles: P-060 These two kittens are the first litter for P-053, a young female mountain lion that the National Park Service has been tracking since July 2016. At 21 months of age, P-053 is the youngest mother during the study, but still within the normal range. Kittens among brush and rocks. Puma Profiles: P-043 This young female kitten was first found in or near a den near Malibu Creek State Park in July 2015, within about a month of her birth. Her mother is P-023. She was found dead, along with a sibling unknown to the study, a couple months later. Like P-036 and P-037 before her, it is suspected that she was killed and eaten by another lion. DNA analysis showed that P-012 is the father. Kitten among brush and grass. Puma Profiles: P-044 This young kitten was first found in July 2015 in the Santa Susana Mountains. She became a national celebrity of sorts when the crew of "60 Minutes" tagged along with researchers to her den. Watch the segment “Mountain Lions of L.A.” P-035 was her mother and P-038 her father. Kitten among brush and grass. Puma Profiles: P-050 This male is the surviving sibling of a litter of at least three kittens born to P-039 in the Santa Susana Mountains. It was her second known litter. P-038 is suspected to be the father based on GPS locations of him traveling and spending multiple days with P-039 months before they were born. Kitten among brush and grass. Puma Profiles: P-049 P-049 was born in the Santa Susana Mountains to P-035, who gave birth to another kitten, P-044. It is suspected that P-044 did not survive. Kittens among brush and grass. Puma Profiles: P-046 The third known litter of P-019 produced at least two kittens, a brother (P-047) and sister (P-046). P-045 is the father. Researchers marked the kittens at around four weeks of age at the den with tracking devices. P-046 has not been outfitted with a GPS collar, but P-047 has. Kittens among brush and rocks. Puma Profiles: P-042 This lion was found in the central Santa Monicas and outfitted with a GPS collar in July 2015. At the time, she was thought to be a little over a year old. Her father is P-012, although her mother’s identify is unknown. She roams the eastern end of the Santa Monica Mountains. Mountain Lion among rocks and brush. Puma Profiles: P-048 P-048 and sister P-049 were born in the Santa Susana Mountains to P-035, who gave birth to another kitten, P-044. It is suspected that P-044 did not survive. Kitten among brush and grass. Puma Profiles: P-036 and P-037 As soon as we got to know this female and her sister, they were gone. As mother P-023 was away from the den, P-027 entered it and ate them both. Why exactly is unknown. To put P-023 into estrus? Their father, P-012, is P-027’s main male competitor in the Santa Monica Mountains. That’s just one theory, though. Truly understanding why may take some time. Kittens being held by gloved hands. Puma Profiles: P-039 This female who roamed the Santa Susana Mountains is thought to have been born in 2011 or 2012. She entered the study in April 2015 and, along with her daughter P-040, were the focus of some amazing photos that captured them feeding on a deer. P-038 was the father. Mountain Lion among rocks and brush. Puma Profiles: P-035 One of a handful of lions studied in the Santa Susana Mountains, this female was first captured in April 2014 near Oat Mountain, the highest point in that range. She’s given birth to at least three litters, two which were visited by researchers. Kittens from those dens were P-044, who is suspected of not surviving into adulthood, and later on, P-048, and P-049. Mountain lion looking into camera at night. Puma Profiles: P-033 Before her brother, P-032, made headlines for crossing the 101, this female littermate made her own. She trailblazed the way for him, becoming the first known mountain lion to cross the 101 Freeway northward into the Simi Hills in March of 2015. Mountain lion looking into camera at night. Puma Profiles: P-040 The daughter of P-039, captured with her mother in April 2015, is thought to have been born in the late fall of 2014. She was ear tagged when caught and will have to be recaptured and collared to continue a more in-depth study of her. She has at least one sibling, based on remote camera images showing P-040 and another kitten traveling with P-039. Mountain lion at night among grass and brush. Puma Profiles: P-029 Along with her sister P-031, she died after her mother, P-013, abandoned them. It’s unknown why she abandoned half of this litter. Kitten among brush and rocks. Puma Profiles: P-031 Along with her sister, P-029, she died after her mother, P-013, abandoned them. It's unknown why she abandoned half of this litter. Kitten close up. Puma Profiles: P-094 On August 6, 2020, biologists found female kittens P-093 and P-094 in the central portion of the Santa Monica Mountains. P-080, their mother, was away from the den. At the time, the kittens were estimated to be 32 days old and they appeared to be in good health. P-080 had her kittens within the Woolsey Fire burn perimeter, but in an area in the southwest corner that still supports healthy mature chaparral. Two mountain lion kittens among rocks and sticks. Puma Profiles: P-088 Biologists found P-065's den on July 6, 2020 during the "Summer of Kittens." Three kittens were tagged - female P-088 and males P-089 and P-090. P-063 is the likely father since both cats traveled together for three days in March. This may also be P-065's first litter. Kittens among brush and rocks. Puma Profiles: P-089 Biologists found P-065's den on July 6, 2020 during the "Summer of Kittens." Three kittens were tagged - female P-088 and males P-089 and P-090. P-063 is the likely father since both cats traveled together for three days in March. This may also be P-065's first litter. Kittens among brush and rocks. Puma Profiles: P-093 On August 6, 2020, biologists found female kittens P-093 and P-094 in the central portion of the Santa Monica Mountains. P-080, their mother, was away from the den. At the time, the kittens were estimated to be 32 days old and they appeared to be in good health. P-080 had her kittens within the Woolsey Fire burn perimeter, but in an area in the southwest corner that still supports healthy mature chaparral. Kitten among brush and rocks. Puma Profiles: P-090 Biologists found P-065's den on July 6, 2020 during the "Summer of Kittens." Three kittens were tagged - female P-088 and males P-089 and P-090. P-063 is the likely father since both cats traveled together for three days in March. This may also be P-065's first litter. Kittens among brush and rocks. Puma Profiles: P-096 This female mountain lion was captured by NPS biologists in the Simi Hills and is the 96th cat to be included in our study. She appeared to be in good condition and, at the time of capture, was estimated to be about a year-old. Mountain lion on green tarp with GPS collar. Puma Profiles: P-092 On July 7, P-067’s kittens – female P-091 and male P-092 – were found in a den in the Simi Hills. This is only the second time we have found a litter of kittens in this area. On the same day, P-067 was found deceased. Kittens among grass and brush. Puma Profiles: P-091 On July 7, P-067’s kittens – female P-091 and male P-092 – were found in a den in the Simi Hills. This is only the second time we have found a litter of kittens in this area. On the same day, P-067 was found deceased. Kittens among grass and brush. Puma Profiles: P-095 This male mountain lion was captured in the central Santa Monica Mountains and found to be in good condition. At the time of his capture, he was estimated to be about a year-and-a-half old and weighed 90 lbs. Close up of mountain lion. Puma Profiles: P-080 P-080 was captured in the central Santa Monica Mountains in the Woolsey Fire burn area on January 10, 2020. Soon after her capture, she left the burn perimeter. It will be interesting to learn where her home range is and who she may be related to. At her capture, she was estimated to be 5-6 years old and weighed 82 lbs. She was in good condition and appeared to have lactated in the past meaning she likely has had a previous litter. Mountain lion looking into camera at night. Puma Profiles: P-079 P-079 was captured in the Santa Susana Mountains just hours after P-078 was collared in the central Santa Monica Mountains on December 12, 2019. California Department of Fish & Wildlife officials in Simi Hills darted the young male mountain lion in the backyard of a home. He weighed about 100lbs and is estimated to be about two years old. He was outfitted with a GPS radio collar and moved to nearby open space in the Santa Susana Mountains. Mountain lion in low brush. Puma Profiles: P-086 On June 19, biologists found P-019's fifth den, which included all female kittens P-085, P-086 and P-087. P-019 is the oldest mountain lion mother in the long-term study. Biologists are not sure who the father is yet. Kitten being held up by hands. Puma Profiles: P-087 On June 19, biologists found P-019's fifth den, which included all female kittens P-085, P-086 and P-087. P-019 is the oldest mountain lion mother in the long-term study. Biologists are not sure who the father is yet. Kittens among brush and rocks. Puma Profiles: P-085 On June 19, biologists found P-19's fifth den, which included all female kittens P-085, P-086 and P-087. P-019 is the oldest mountain lion mother in the long-term study. Biologists are not sure who the father is yet. Kittens among brush and rocks. Puma Profiles: P-084 P-082, P-083 and P-084 kicked off the summer of kittens in 2020. They are a part of the first of five kitten dens found in a three-month period. Kittens among grass and brush. Puma Profiles: P-083 P-082, P-083 and P-084 kicked off the summer of kittens in 2020. They are a part of the first of five kitten dens found in a three-month period. Kittens among grass and brush. Puma Profiles: P-082 P-082, P-083 and P-084 kicked off the summer of kittens in 2020. They are a part of the first of five kitten dens found in a three-month period. Kittens among brush and grass. Puma Profiles: P-056 P-056, a 4 to 5-year-old male mountain lion that was living in the western Santa Monica Mountains south of the 101 Freeway, was killed under state depredation law on January 26. This marks the first time that a radio-collared mountain lion has been killed under a California Department of Fish & Wildlife (CDFW) depredation permit in the Santa Monica Mountains. Read press release here. Mountain lion in a cage. Puma Profiles: P-061 At around 4 a.m. on September 7, 2019, P-061 was struck and killed on the 405 Freeway in the Sepulveda Pass area. His final GPS point indicates that he was between Bel Air Crest Road and the Sepulveda Boulevard underpass. Mountain lion looking into camera at night. Puma Profiles: P-074 P-074, a young mountain lion that we captured as part of our mountain lion study in mid-September 2018, likely did not survive the Woolsey Fire. Mountain Lion looking into camera. Puma Profiles: P-015 This male mountain lion was the first (and hopefully the last) case of poaching researchers have documented in the Santa Monica Mountains. Mountain lion walking next to a creek. Puma Profiles: P-053 P-053 was found dead in the Santa Monica Mountains in summer 2019. Researchers did not find a cause of death for the four-year-old cat. Her carcass was too decomposed by the time biologists reached her in Malibu. Testing, however, did identify four different compounds of anticoagulant rodenticide in her liver. Mountain lion looking into camera at night. Puma Profiles: P-034 Unlike her litter siblings, P-032 and P-033, this female remained in the Santa Monica Mountains. She still did make the news, though, in her own way when she was caught in a stunning photo and later that day found under a mobile home park trailer in December 2014. Again, she made headlines for a more unfortunate reason when a jogger in Point Mugu State Park found her body on the trail. Mountain lion looking into camera at night. Puma Profiles: P-047 P-047's remains were discovered on March 21, 2019 after his GPS collar sent out a mortality signal and NPS biologists hiked in to find him in the central portion of the mountain range. He did not have any visible wounds. Lab results indicate he may have succumbed to poisoning from anticoagulant rodenticide, commonly known as rat poison. Mountain Lion with collar walking. Puma Profiles: P-018 He lived to be old enough to disperse, but died trying to define his own territory. P-018, along with his sisters, P-017 and P-019, were born in the Santa Monica Mountains in the spring of 2010 to male P-012 and female P-013. Mountain lion standing next to a creek. Puma Profiles: P-030 The only male in the 2013 litter of four birthed by P-013 to P-012. P-030 was last captured in February 2018 and researchers placed a new GPS collar on him at that time. The interesting thing about P-030 is that he is the first male lion kitten we have marked at the den to have survived long enough in the Santa Monica's to reach adulthood and establish a home range. Mountain lion looking into camera at night. Puma Profiles: P-081 P-081, a young male mountain lion discovered in the Santa Monica Mountains in March 2020, has several physical abnormalities - a kinked tail where the end is shaped like an "L" and only one descended testicle. Mountain lion looking into camera at night. Puma Profiles: P-045 It’s rare to see more than two adult male mountain lions in the Santa Monica Mountains, but so it is. In November 2015, this large male -- in fact, the largest since P-001-- was captured and outfitted with a GPS collar in the central region of the range. Was he born in the Santa Monicas undetected by researchers? Did he crossover from the 101 Freeway? Genetic testing revealed he was born north of the 101 Freeway. Mountain Lion at night. Puma Profiles: P-038 First caught in March 2015, this large male was killed when he was illegally shot in the head in June 2019. Mountain lion among grass and brush. Puma Profiles: P-064 In December 2018, biologists discovered the remains of P-064, known as the "Culvert Cat," an approximately four-year-old male mountain lion who survived the Woolsey Fire, but died a few weeks later. His cause of death is not known, but his paws were visibly burned. Mountain Lion walking through culvert at night. Puma Profiles: P-063 When the Woolsey Fire broke out on November 9, 2018, P-063, a young male mountain lion, was actually a little bit north of the flames in the Simi Hills. In the period that we've been following him, he's actually moved between the Simi Hills and the Santa Monica Mountains, though we don't know how he is managing to get across (or under) the 101 Freeway. Mountain lion looking into camera at night. Puma Profiles: P-067 On July 7, 2020, P-067's den of kittens - female P-091 and male P-092 - were found in the Simi Hills, south of Simi Valley. On the same day, P-067 was found deceased. Puma Profiles: P-065 P-065 is a young female that is one of the 11 mountain lions we were tracking that were in or around the fire perimeter when the Woolsey Fire broke out on November 9, 2018. She managed to survive the fire, but her entire home range is within the burn area. Mountain Lion at night. Puma Profiles: P-023 This female born in 2012 was a product of first-order inbreeding. Her father, P-012, mated with P-019, his daughter. Years later, P-023 mated and gave birth to a litter (P-036 and P-037). Mountain Lion among rocks and brush. Puma Profiles: P-055 At an estimated age of only three years old, he had already managed to cross the 101 Freeway twice (he actually headed north and then came back to south of the freeway again!). His cause of death is unknown because unfortunately the collar he was wearing failed to emit a mortality signal and by the time our biologist found him his remains were already too decomposed to determine the cause of death. Mountain lion in a cage. Puma Profiles: P-041 The capture of P-041 in May 2015 was a major step in our study of mountain lions in the region. This male, estimated at the time to be eight years old, was the first lion tracked in the Verdugo Mountains, a small range between the Santa Monica and San Gabriel mountains. Mountain Lion at night. Puma Profiles: P-032 Like the litter of P-023 and P-024, this male and his two litter siblings, P-033 and P-034, is the product of first-order inbreeding between father (and grandfather!) P-012, and mother (and sister!), P-019. Mountain lion looking into camera at night. Puma Profiles: P-012 This male is significant in a couple of major ways. First captured in late fall of 2008 in the Simi Hills, he crossed south of the 101 Freeway in 2009 near Liberty Canyon (it’s not clear whether he crossed over the surface of the freeway or used the existing road underpass). Mountain lion among sticks and brush. Puma Profiles: P-013 Like P-010, she’s the product of first-order inbreeding by P-001, her father and grandfather, and P-006. Mountain lion looking into camera at night. Puma Profiles: P-009 The first evidence of P-009’s existence came when his DNA was sampled off the body of P-008, who he killed in the summer of 2006. But the genetics revealed something else: they were brothers, both results of P-001 and P-002 in an earlier litter. Mountain lion looking into camera at night. Puma Profiles: P-004 The mother of P-003, she was the second lion to be studied north of the 101 Freeway. Just like her son P-003, she crossed the 118 Freeway a number of times (at least nine crossings), also in the Rocky Peak/Corriganville Tunnel area. Mountain Lion among rocks and brush. Puma Profiles: P-006 One of the female kittens in the litter by P-001 and P-002, she also dispersed during the fatal intraspecific encounter that left her mother dead. She was last captured in the summer of 2006 and outfitted with a new collar that, unfortunately, failed prematurely. Mountain Lion among rocks and brush. Puma Profiles: P-005 This guy is one of the male kittens who was forced to disperse when P-001 killed his mom, P-002. He ended up making his range in the western Santa Monica Mountains before seeing his father, P-001, again and fatally losing a fight in the summer of 2006. He was two years old. Kitten close up. Puma Profiles: P-003 This male was the first lion to be studied outside the Santa Monica Mountains. Captured in the summer of 2003 at around the age of one or more, he roamed the Simi Hills and Santa Susana Mountains. Mountain lion among sticks and brush. Puma Profiles: P-007 Like her mother (P-002) and brother (P-005), she also died at the claws of P-001. She dispersed along with her three siblings in the summer of 2005 when P-001 killed her mother. Uniformed ranger holding kitten with gloved hands. Puma Profiles: P-008 Biologically speaking, P-008 was the fittest of the litter of four between P-001 and P-002. After he dispersed when his mother was killed by his father he took to the eastern end of the Santa Monicas (his brother, P-005, went westward). Mountain lion among grass and brush. Puma Profiles: P-001 Perhaps it was fortuitous that the first mountain lion to be captured for the study happened to be the dominant male of the mountains at the time. Mountain lion walking at night. Puma Profiles: P-002 The first mother studied in the Santa Monicas, she was known to have mated with P-001 at least twice, maybe thrice. Mountain lion among grass and brush. Puma Profiles: P-097 Male P-097 was first discovered in the Santa Monica Mountains in the winter of 2020 from trail cameras. At the time, he was about three months old, and he was with his mother, P-054, and his brother, P-098. Mountain lion at night. Puma Profiles: P-098 P-098 was a young male mountain lion discovered in the Santa Monica Mountains in the winter of 2020 from trail cameras. At the time, he was about three months old, and he was with his mother, P-054, and his brother, P-097. Mountain lion at night. Puma Profiles: P-099 Our 99th study mountain lion was captured on September 8, 2021. P-099 is a female cat estimated to be around 2-3 years old. She was found in the western portion of the Santa Monica Mountains. Mountain lion looking into camera at night. Find Your Park on Route 66 Route 66 and the National Park Service have always had an important historical connection. Route 66 was known as the great road west and after World War II families on vacation took to the road in great numbers to visit the many National Park Service sites in the Southwest and beyond. That connection remains very alive and present today. Take a trip down Route 66 and Find Your Park today! A paved road with fields in the distance. On the road is a white Oklahoma Route 66 emblem. Puma Profiles: P-100 P-100 was part of a litter of four female kittens, She and her siblings were discovered under a picnic table of an office building that abuts open space in Thousand Oaks. Close up of mountain lion kitten. Puma Profiles: P-101 P-101 is part of a litter of four female kittens, She and her siblings were discovered under a picnic table of an office building that abuts open space in Thousand Oaks. Close up of mountain lion kitten wrapped in blanket. Puma Profiles: P-103 P-103 is part of a litter of four female kittens, She and her siblings were discovered under a picnic table of an office building that abuts open space in Thousand Oaks. Close up of mountain lion kitten. Puma Profiles: P-102 P-102 was part of a litter of four female kittens, She and her siblings were discovered under a picnic table of an office building that abuts open space in Thousand Oaks. Close up of mountain lion kitten wrapped in blanket. Event Recap - Stories of Service: Empowering Youth and Young Adults to Be the Future Face of Volunteering in National Parks The National Park Service Youth Programs Division co-hosted a virtual event, “Stories of Service: Empowering Youth and Young Adults to Be the Future Face of Volunteering in National Parks” on November 10, 2021 with the National Park Service Volunteers-In-Parks Program (VIP) in partnership with the National Park Foundation (NPF). A diverse panel shared their stories of volunteering in parks and the impacts these experiences have had on them. Screenshot of speakers and panelists from Nov. 10 Volunteers Event Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Challenging The Ranger Image In spite of programs to encourage hiring of individuals with disabilities, it was often others’ misconceptions or discomfort that prevented women with disabilities from getting National Park Service (NPS) jobs. Those hired in the 1970s and early 1980s brought diverse skillsets and new perspectives to the workforce. Like the earliest women rangers in the 1910s and 1920s, they often only had short-term positions. They all challenged ideas of what it takes to be a park ranger. Ranger Vicky White in a wheelchair with a visitor and man in military dress. Alice Ballard Alice Ballard was the youngest of seven children born to John and Amanda Ballard, the first African Americans to own a home above the Malibu coastline. She was born in 1870 in Agoura Hills and raised in the nearby Santa Monica Mountains. Detail of an 1898 US Surveyor General’s Office map showing the location of Alice Ballard’s house. Regina P. Jones Underwood Brake Regina Jones-Brake's career with the National Park Service (NPS) began in 1976 with the bicentennial of the Declaration of Independence. Over the next 33 years, her love of American history compelled her to share untold stories as she advanced from park ranger to management assistant. Regina Jones-Underwood pictured outdoors in her NPS uniform. Shield Volcanoes Shield volcanoes are typically very large volcanoes with very gentle slopes made up of basaltic lava flows. Mauna Loa and Kilauea in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park are shield volcanoes. diagram of a shield volcano with lava features Series: Volcano Types Volcanoes vary in size from small cinder cones that stand only a few hundred feet tall to the most massive mountains on earth. photo of a volcanic mountain with snow and ice Pillow Basalts Pillow basalts are named for the rounded shapes that form when lava cools rapidly underwater. photo of golden gate bridge Pollinators in peril? A multipark approach to evaluating bee communities in habitats vulnerable to effects from climate change Can you name five bees in your park? Ten? Twenty? Will they all be there 50 years from now? We know that pollinators are key to maintaining healthy ecosystems—from managed almond orchards to wild mountain meadows. We have heard about dramatic population declines of the agricultural workhorse, the honey bee. Yet what do we really know about the remarkable diversity and resilience of native bees in our national parks? Southeastern polyester bee, Colletes titusensis. Puma Profiles: P-104 P-104 was a subadult male mountain lion who was hit and killed by a vehicle going northbound on the 33100 block of Pacific Coast Highway (PCH) on the morning of March 23, 2022. Mountain lion up close and looking at the camera at night. Conservation Diaries: Leiann De Vera, Educator and Promoter of Community Engagement Meet Leiann (Lei) De Vera, a park ranger at Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area in California. She started as an intern and then a Community Volunteer Ambassador before becoming a full-time employee at the park. Find out more about her journey and her love for working with young kids. person smiling at camera with lake, mountains and trees in the background

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