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Scotts Bluff

National Monument - Nebraska

Scotts Bluff National Monument in western Nebraska includes an important 19th-century landmark on the Oregon Trail and Mormon Trail. The National Monument contains multiple bluffs (steep hills) located on the south side of the North Platte River. It is named for one prominent bluff called Scotts Bluff, which rises over 800 feet (240 m) above the plains at its highest point. The monument is composed of five rock formations named Crown Rock, Dome Rock, Eagle Rock, Saddle Rock, and Sentinel Rock.

maps

Official visitor map of Scotts Bluff National Monument (NM) in Nebraska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Scotts Bluff - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Scotts Bluff National Monument (NM) in Nebraska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/scbl/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotts_Bluff_National_Monument Scotts Bluff National Monument in western Nebraska includes an important 19th-century landmark on the Oregon Trail and Mormon Trail. The National Monument contains multiple bluffs (steep hills) located on the south side of the North Platte River. It is named for one prominent bluff called Scotts Bluff, which rises over 800 feet (240 m) above the plains at its highest point. The monument is composed of five rock formations named Crown Rock, Dome Rock, Eagle Rock, Saddle Rock, and Sentinel Rock. Towering 800 feet above the North Platte River, Scotts Bluff has served as a landmark for peoples from Native Americans to emigrants on the Oregon, California and Mormon Trails to modern travelers. Rich with geological and paleontological history as well as human history, there is much to discover while exploring the 3,000 acres of Scotts Bluff National Monument. Visitors traveling east-west on Interstate 80 can exit at Kimball, Nebraska and drive 45 miles north on Highway 71. Follow National Park Service signs three miles west of Gering, Nebraska on Old Oregon Trail (State Highway 92 West). Visitors following Old Oregon Trail along the North Platte River using State Highway 26 or 92, should follow the National Park Service signs. Scotts Bluff National Monument Visitor Center The Visitor Center at Scotts Bluff National Monument was built in 1935 but later additions took place in 1937, 1949, and 2019. Visitor Center hours are extended for the summer season, Memorial Day through Labor Day. From Gering, head west on M Street. The street name changes to Old Oregon Trail after crossing Five Rocks Road. From Scottsbluff, head south on Avenue I. The street name changes to Five Rocks Road after entering Gering. Turn right (west) on Old Oregon Trail. Eagle Rock with Conestoga Wagon Conestoga wagon in front of Eagle Rock Thousands of covered wagons rolled by Eagle Rock in the mid nineteenth century. Scotts Bluff from the North Platte RIver A pink sky and dramatic bluff are seen reflected in water. Scotts Bluff as seen from the north side of the North Platte River A Hot Air Balloon at the East Entrance to the Monument A colorful hot air balloon is seen in the distance with the Scotts Bluff entrance sign. A hot air balloon is seen at the east entrance to Scotts Bluff National Monument. Mitchell Pass bathed in Morning Light The distinctive rock formations of Mitchell Pass glow with early morning light. Early morning is a great time to explore Scotts Bluff National Monument. Saddle Rock rises above the Clouds A unique rock formation is seen above a layer of clouds. An inversion creates the feeling of walking on the clouds at the summit of Scotts Bluff. Listening to the Eclipse: National Park Service scientists join Smithsonian, NASA in nationwide project A solar eclipse is visually stunning, but what will it sound like? NPS scientists will find out by recording sounds in parks across the USA. An NPS scientist installs audio recording equipment in a lush valley at Valles Caldera NP. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Scotts Bluff National Monument, Nebraska Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] prominent rock outcrop or inselberg Plant Community Monitoring at Scotts Bluff National Monument The 3,003 acres of Scotts Bluff National Monument are dominated by mixed-grass prairie with smaller areas of juniper woodlands, badlands, and riparian forests, overlooked by the iconic bluffs themselves. Plant community monitoring helps us understand the current health of ecosystems and monitor their change over time. We have detected 35 rare plant species and 40 exotic species on the park. A low growing, very prickly cactus with strikingly delicate yellow flower Bat Acoustic Monitoring at Scotts Bluff National Monument The Northern Great Plains Inventory and Monitoring Network monitors bats at Scotts Bluff National Monument using acoustic recorders to detect trends in bat populations. Long-term monitoring is critical to understanding the bat communities that live here, and to help protect their habitat. a microphone on a tall pole in a grassy open space in front of a bluff Bat Projects in Parks: Northern Great Plains Inventory and Monitoring Across six Northern Great Plains parks, education and outreach for bats was conducted. View of Badlands National Parks unique rock formations in the distance Scotts Bluff National Monument Landscape Sandstone bluffs rise from the otherwise flat Great Plains of Nebraska at Scotts Bluff National Monument. The landscape provided resources for the area's inhabitants for thousands of years. The prominence served as a geographic way finder for westward travelers on the Oregon Trail and other routes in the mid-1800s. In the 1930s and 1940s, federally funded employment programs contributed to the park development, including the Summit Road and tunnels that are still used today. View of Scotts Bluff National Monument from a high point includes open plains and rock formations Northern Great Plains Annual Brome Adaptive Management Project Management and restoration of high quality, mixed-grass prairie to the NPS units has proved difficult and complex. The Annual Brome Adaptive Management project (ABAM) is attacking this problem through a cooperative effort. A firefighter uses a driptorch to ignite dried grasses while dark smoke billows behind. New Deal Programs at Scotts Bluff National Monument New Deal programs, like the Civilian Conservation Corps, have left a lasting legacy at Scotts Bluff National Monument and other state and national parks throughout the United States. A black and white images depicts men working to create a tunnel through rock. Mule Deer Learn more about mule deer, a common deer species of the western United States. Traveling the Emigrant Trails Learn a little bit about what life was like for the emigrants traveling west by covered wagon. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: Prairie Ecology of the Badlands Badlands National Park is home to the nation's largest expanse of mixed-grass prairie. Here, plant species from both short-grass and tall-grass prairies mingle to create a unique home, well suited to many animals which call the park home. roots of tall yellow grasses penetrate into light brown soil beneath a cloudy blue sky. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Plant Community Monitoring in Northern Great Plains Network Parks Plant communities are essential components of all major ecosystems. Plants are the ultimate source of food for other organisms and the main source of organic material in soil and water. They also influence climate and provide the scenery that park visitors enjoy. The NPS Northern Great Plains Network monitors the number, identity, and relative abundance of plant species, as well as their horizontal cover and vertical structure, to determine the health of park ecosystems. Two people sitting on the ground looking at plants Wagons on the Emigrant Trails Emigrants along the western trails had several options when it came to wagons. Three covered wagons are seen in front of a distinctive rock formation. Black-tailed Prairie Dogs Black-tailed prairie dogs play a significant role in prairie ecosytems. Death and Danger on the Emigrant Trails There were many life-threatening challenges for the emigrants who traveled the emigrant trails to California, Oregon, or Utah. A watercolor painting of wagon trains approaching Chimney Rock. Paleogene Period—66.0 to 23.0 MYA Colorful Paleogene rocks are exposed in the hoodoos of Bryce Canyon National Park and the badlands of Badlands and Theodore Roosevelt national parks. Extraordinary Paleogene fossils are found in Fossil Butte and John Day Fossil Beds national monuments, among other parks. fossil skull with teeth expsoed Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center Series: The Emigrant Experience Have you ever wondered what the experience was like for the emigrants who traveled west on the Great Platte River Road? A man dressed in period clothing leans on a covered wagon. Mammals of Scotts Bluff National Monument Mammals of Scotts Bluff National Monument. The Odd “Man” Out? Studies of NPS women’s uniforms often begin in 1918 with Clare Marie Hodges—and the statement (accepted as fact) that she didn’t wear a uniform. But which uniform are they referring to? While it’s true that Hodges didn’t wear the iconic green-and-gray uniform we know today, her clothes do reflect the accepted “riding uniform” worn by most early park rangers. Clare Marie Hodges, 1918. (Yosemite National Park photo) Winterfat Winterfat is a distinctive plant that is commonly seen in the western Great Plains. Early season growth of winterfat. Changing Clothes By the end of the 1930s, skirts were the common exemption to the standard uniform for women. As they ditched the breeches, they also lost their iconic Stetson hats. Women wanted more comfortable, better fitting, and more flattering uniforms. Many of the details of how changes came about are fuzzy, and it seems that the first separate women’s uniform adopted in 1941 was never implemented. Guide Olive Johnson at Carlsbad Caverns is wearing the WAC-style jacket at Carlsbad Caverns, Substitute Rangers As the 1940s dawned, the United States was still dealing with the economic woes of the Great Depression and trying not to get drawn in WWII. Even as it continued to manage New Deal Program work in national and state parks, the NPS remained understaffed as a government bureau. The emergency relief workers and about 15 percent of NPS staff enlisted or were drafted during the first couple of years of WWII. Winifred Tada, 1940. (Courtesy of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin) Rocky Mountain Juniper Rocky Mountain junipers can commonly be seen in the western Great Plains. The green foliage of the Rocky Mountain juniper. Soapweed Yucca Yucca can be seen throughout the northern Great Plains. Snow accumulates in a rosette of yucca leaves. Prairie Rattlesnakes Prairie Rattlesnake are some of the most misunderstood animals of the Prairie. Prairie Rattlesnake coiled up Ponderosa Pine Ponderosa pines are one of the most widely distributed tree species in the American west. Top Ten Tips for Visiting Scotts Bluff National Monument Make the most of your visit to Scotts Bluff National Monument with this helpful list of the top ten things you need to know about this famous landmark on the emigrant trails. The sun sets behind a distinctive pass between two sandstone bluffs. Plains Prickly Pear Plains prickly pear is well adapted to the western Great plains. The Coyote The Coyote - The Opportunistic Predator A coyote stands amongst dried vegetation. Soap Box Derby at Scotts Bluff Soapbox Derby was one of the most popular annual events at Scotts Bluff National Monument from 1939 through the mid-1940s. A man holds a trophy and speaks into a microphone while a crowd looks on. Mormon Odometer Learn about how emigrants on the Mormon Trail measured their progress. A piece of machinery constructed out of wood. The Road Through Scotts Bluff Many different groups of people have traveled past Scotts Bluff throughout the years. Learn a little bit about them and their methods of travel. A gap between two sandstone bluffs. Fort Laramie Treaty of 1851 (Horse Creek Treaty) Fort Laramie Treaty of 1851 (Horse Creek Treaty) Common Birds of Scotts Bluff National Monument Learn more about seven birds species that visitors are likely to see while visiting Scotts Bluff National Monument. A small birds stands on a grassy lawn.

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