by Alex Gugel , all rights reserved

Sequoia

National Park - California

Sequoia National Park is adjacent to Kings Canyon National Park in California's southern Sierra Nevada mountains. It's known for its huge sequoia trees, notably the General Sherman Tree dominating the Giant Forest. The underground Crystal Cave features streams and striking rock formations. Moro Rock is a granite dome offering sweeping park views. Nearby is the Tunnel Tree, a toppled tree cut to accommodate the road.

location

maps

Official visitor map of Sequoia National Park (NP) and Kings Canyon National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Sequoia and Kings Canyon - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Sequoia National Park (NP) and Kings Canyon National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail of the official visitor map of Sequoia National Park (NP) and Kings Canyon National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Sequoia and Kings Canyon - Visitor Map Detail

Detail of the official visitor map of Sequoia National Park (NP) and Kings Canyon National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Vintage 1948 USGS 1:250000 map of Fresno in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Vintage USGS - Fresno - 1948

Vintage 1948 USGS 1:250000 map of Fresno in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

Vintage 1947 USGS 1:250000 map of Mariposa in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Vintage USGS - Mariposa - 1947

Vintage 1947 USGS 1:250000 map of Mariposa in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

brochures

Summer Visitor Guide to Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Sequoia & Kings Canyon Guide - Summer 2022

Summer Visitor Guide to Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Spring Visitor Guide to Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Sequoia & Kings Canyon Guide - Spring 2022

Spring Visitor Guide to Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Winter Visitor Guide to Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Sequoia & Kings Canyon Guide - Winter 2021/2022

Winter Visitor Guide to Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Visitor Guide to Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Sequoia & Kings Canyon Guide - Fall 2019

Visitor Guide to Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/seki https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sequoia_National_Park Sequoia National Park is adjacent to Kings Canyon National Park in California's southern Sierra Nevada mountains. It's known for its huge sequoia trees, notably the General Sherman Tree dominating the Giant Forest. The underground Crystal Cave features streams and striking rock formations. Moro Rock is a granite dome offering sweeping park views. Nearby is the Tunnel Tree, a toppled tree cut to accommodate the road. Huge mountains, rugged foothills, deep canyons, vast caverns, and the world’s largest trees exemplify the diversity of landscapes, life, and beauty here. Explore these pages to learn about the plants and animals here and the threats they face. Our ancient giant sequoias may seem invincible, but they, too are vulnerable. Two highways enter the parks. Hwy 180 from Fresno leads east to Kings Canyon National Park, then continues 30 miles east to Cedar Grove. Hwy 198 from Visalia leads east to Sequoia National Park via Three Rivers. Inside the parks, Highway 198 becomes the Generals Highway, which connects 198 to 180. Vehicles over 22-feet long should enter the parks via Highway 180. In winter, the Generals Highway between the parks often closes. Chains may be required on park roads. No roads cross these parks east to west. Cedar Grove Visitor Center This visitor center is next to the South Fork of the Kings River in mixed conifer forest at an elevation of 4,600 feet (1,400 m). Learn about the natural and cultural history of the Cedar Grove area. Nearby services include accessible restrooms and a pay phone. On Highway 180, 30 miles (48 km) east of Grant Grove. Next to Sentinel Campground. Foothills Visitor Center This visitor center is one mile past the Ash Mountain entrance station along the Generals Highway. Stop here for information, maps, books, gifts, and restrooms. Browse exhibits about the ecology and human history of the foothills, and join a free ranger-led program. On the Generals Highway 1 mile (1.6 km) north of the Ash Mountain Entrance. Giant Forest Museum The museum is housed in a historic market in the Giant Forest sequoia grove at 6,500 feet (1,980 m) elevation. Explore exhibits about sequoias and learn why this landscape grows the biggest of big trees. Stop here before you explore the grove. During quota season, wilderness permits can be picked up from 7:00 am - 3:30 pm. On the Generals Highway 16 miles (26 km) north of the Ash Mountain Entrance. Kings Canyon Visitor Center This visitor center is in Grant Grove Village at an elevation of 6,500 feet (1,980 m). Learn about three regions in Kings Canyon National Park: giant sequoia groves, Kings Canyon, and the High Sierra. Watch a 15-minute movie (English/Spanish). A park store sells books, maps, and educational materials. On Highway 180 in Grant Grove Village, 3 miles (5 km) east of the Big Stump Entrance. Lodgepole Visitor Center The Lodgepole Visitor Center is closed until further notice for renovations. Located in the conifer zone at an elevation of 6,700 feet (2,040 m). Here, you can view exhibits, get a wilderness permit, or watch a park film. Explore the habitats of the parks and human history of the southern Sierra Nevada. The Lodgepole Visitor Center (along with Foothills Visitor Center) also sells Crystal Cave tickets at the Sequoia Park Conservancy Park Store. On the Generals Highway 21 miles (34 km) north of the Ash Mountain Entrance. 2 miles (3 km) north of the General Sherman Tree. Mineral King Ranger Station Located in a mixed-conifer forest at 7,600 feet (2,320 m), the Mineral King Ranger Station houses some exhibits on Mineral King's human and natural history. Books, maps, and educational items for sale. Food storage canisters are available. Obtain wilderness permits here. Planning to park overnight? Marmots may attempt to get in your car's undercarriage or damage wiring. Make sure that you wrap the underside of your vehicle in a tarp. On the Mineral King Road 24 miles (39 km) from the junction of Highway 198 in Three Rivers. Atwell Mill Campground The campground is situated along the East Fork of the Kaweah River in a once logged sequoia grove. There are limited services at Silver City Resort, 1.7 miles (3 km) east of the campground. More extensive services can be found in Three Rivers, 23 miles (37 km) west of Atwell Mill Campground (approximately 1.5 hours away). The Atwell-Hockett Trail begins here. Camping Fee 22.00 This fee covers up to six people at a single campsite per night. Camping with Access Pass or Senior Pass 11.00 This fee covers up to six people at a single campsite per night. Accessible Restroom A primitive restroom building The ground around the restroom is level and firm-packed. Campsites Picnic tables on level ground in a shady forest Atwell Mill's campsites are in a shady sequoia grove. Campground Entrance A sign reads "Atwell Mill Campground" near a narrow road The roads leading to the campground are extremely narrow and winding. Accessible Campsite A marker with an accessibility symbol near a forested campsite This accessible campsite features level, firm-packed surfaces. Azalea Campground Azalea Campground is 3.5 miles (5.6 km) from the Kings Canyon entrance in the Grant Grove area. The campground is under open stands of evergreen trees. Services can be found in Grant Grove Village. Seasonal site availability varies with snow cover and demand. Dates are approximate and may change without notice: -21 sites are open from early Nov until mid-April -40-88 sites are open from mid-April through early May -110 sites are open from mid-May through early November Camping Fee for Tent and RV Sites 22.00 This fee is charged for standard sites that accommodate up to 6 people, and is charged per night. Senior/Access Camping Fee-Tent and RVs 11.00 This fee is valid for up to six people at a campsite. Valid with America the Beautiful Senior or Access passes. Azalea Campground Sign An engraved wooden sign Azalea Campground is located in Grant Grove just off of Highway 180. Azalea Campground Campsite A tent in a campsite Azalea Campground is a popular destination for tent campers. Azalea Campground Campsites Two campsites beneath incense cedars Azalea Campground is located in the mixed conifer zone, which includes Incense Cedars. Buckeye Flat Campground Buckeye Flat Campground, just 7 miles (11 km) from the Ash Mountain Entrance, lies along the Middle Fork of the Kaweah River in an oak and California buckeye woodland. Campers can hear the rushing river from most sites, especially in spring and early summer. Due to high temperatures and dry conditions, fire restrictions are often in effect here. The Paradise Creek Trail departs from the campground, and the Middle Fork Trail is located nearby. Camping Fee 22.00 This fee covers up to six people at a single campsite per night. Senior/Access Camping Fee 11.00 This fee is valid for up to six people at a single site and is charged per night. Accessible Site at Buckeye Flat Campground A paved ramp leads to a picnic table among oaks and tents This site is designated as accessible for people in wheelchairs. It has a paved ramp to and extended picnic table and a firm, flat surface leading to a tent pad. Buckeye Flat Tent Site A campsite below small oak trees Tent sites at Buckeye Flat Campground have picnic tables, fire rings, and metal food-storage boxes. Buckeye Flat Campground Site A campsite on a sunny day Buckeye Flat Campground is named for the California buckeye trees that grow in and around the sites. They conserve water by shedding their leaves during the hottest summer months. Buckeye Flat Campground, Site 26 Four camping chairs next to a tent at a wooded campsite Buckeye Flat Campground is in the foothills, where temperatures can be warm in summer. Buckeye Flat Campground, Site 26 Four camping chairs next to a tent at a wooded campsite Buckeye Flat Campground is in the foothills, where temperatures can be warm in summer. Canyon View Campground Canyon View campground is located on Highway 180, 0.25 miles (400 m) from Cedar Grove Village. This group-only campground is situated on the floor of the canyon along the South Fork of the Kings River. It was named for it's excellent views of Kings Canyon's granite cliffs. This campground is for medium and large groups. Food and showers available at Cedar Grove Village. Mid-Sized Group Sites G1-G12 40.00 Mid-sized group sites at Canyon View Campground are for groups from 7 to 19 people. Large-Size Group Sites A, C & D 60.00 These sites accommodate from 20 to 40 people. This fee is charge per night. Large-Size Group Site B 50.00 This site accommodate from 20 to 30 people. This fee is charge per night. Canyon View Large-Size Group Site A A large-size group campsite Canyon View Campgrounds large-size group sites are popular during summer holidays. Canyon View Mid-Size Group Site G9 A mid-size group campsite Canyon View Campground contains mid-size group sites ideally suited for 7-19 people. Canyon View Group Site A group site at Canyon View Campground features several picnic tables in a circle. Canyon View group campsite Canyon View Group Campsite A shaded campsite is surrounded by fir trees and has two picnic tables. Canyon View group campsite Food Storage Boxes, Canyon View Campground Three large metal food storage boxes sit in a row in Canyon View Campground. These food storage boxes are large enough to hold all scented items, including stoves, coolers, toiletries, and even child car seats. Cold Springs Campground Nestled among amid aspen trees and conifers, the campground is located near the Mineral King Ranger Station, 26 miles (42 km) - 1.5 hours drive time - from the Highway 198 junction in Three Rivers. There are 31 regular sites and 9 walk-in sites (located approximately 100-200 yards walking distance from parking area, depending on site). There are limited services at Silver City Resort, 2.5 miles (4 km) west of the campground. Trails to alpine lakes and mountain passes begin nearby. Camping Fee 22.00 This fee is valid for up to six people at a campsite. Senior/Access Fee 11.00 This fee is valid for up to six people at a campsite. Valid with America the Beautiful Senior or Access passes. Cold Springs Campsite A picnic table and fire ring near trees A campsite along the wetter side of the campground Path to Walk-in Sites A rustic sign points to rocky steps A short walk from parking spots leads to the walk-in sites Accessible Restroom A sloping concrete path leads to a primitive toilet This vault toilet has a paved, wide path to its entrance. Crystal Springs Campground Crystal Springs campground is located 4 miles (6 km) from Kings Canyon Park entrance in the Grant Grove area. The campground is situated under open stands of evergreen trees at an elevation of 6,500 feet (1,980 m). Services can be found in Grant Grove Village. Camping Fee for Tent and RV Sites 22.00 This fee is charged for standard sites that accommodate up to 6 people, and is charged per night. Mid-Sized Group Sites (A-N) 40.00 Group sites at Crystal Springs Campground are for groups from 7 to 15 people. If you have a larger group, plan on getting more than one site, or choose a large group site at another campground. Senior/Access Fee-Tent and RVs 11.00 This fee is valid for up to six people at a campsite. Valid with America the Beautiful Senior or Access passes. Crystal Springs Campground Group Site C A large campsite surrounded by trees This mid-sized group site is for groups from 7 to 15 people. Crystal Springs Campground Campsite A picnic table and metal food-storage box next to a small meadow and trees Crystal Springs Campground is next to Grant Grove Village and near sequoia groves. Dorst Creek Campground Ten miles (16 km) from the Giant Forest, Dorst Creek Campground rests under open stands of evergreen trees at an elevation of 6,800 feet (2,073 m). This centrally-located campground is well situated for those exploring both parks. In the summer, catch the Sequoia Shuttle from the campground for easy travel to Lodgepole and Giant Forest. The trail to the Muir Grove of giant sequoias begins here. Tent or RV Site 22.00 This fee is valid for up to six people at a single tent or RV site per night. Group Sites A & B 50.00 These group sites accommodate from 12 to 25 people. The fee is charged per night. Groups Site C 70.00 This group site accommodates from 12 - 40 people. The fee is charged per night. Group Site D 60.00 This group site accommodates from 12-50 people. The fee is charged per night. Dorst Creek Campground Entrance An entrance sign reading "Dorst Creek Campground" beside a road Dorst Creek Campground is located amidst mixed conifers just off the General's Highway Dorst Creek Campground Site A campsite with a bear box and picnic bench Dorst Creek Campground is located beneath a mixed conifer forest. Dorst Creek Campground Campsite #8 A recreational vehicle parked in a campsite Dorst Creek Campground sites are well suited for recreational vehicles. Lodgepole Campground This large, popular campground is on the Marble Fork of the Kaweah River within easy walking distance of Lodgepole Village. Many campsites are surrounded by lodgepole pines. At an elevation of 6,700 ft (2,042 m), the campground can be snowy in spring and fall. Lodgepole Village offers a visitor center, market, shower, and laundry facilities. In summer, ride the free Sequoia Shuttle. Many nearby trails are located here. Camping Fee 22.00 This fee covers up to six people at a single campsite per night. Camping with Access Pass or Senior Pass 11.00 This fee covers up to six people at a single campsite per night. Lodgepole Campground Tent Site A tent in a flat area next to a vehicle Lodgepole Campground has over 200 sites. Lodgepole Campground Site A campsite with a picnic table, fire ring, and food-storage box Each site at Lodgepole Campground has a picnic table, fire ring, and metal food-storage box. Lodgepole Campground Entrance Vehicles near a kiosk in a forested canyon When you arrive at Lodgepole campground, check in at the entrance kiosk. Moraine Campground Just 0.75 miles ( 1.2 km) from Cedar Grove Village, Moraine Campground rests in the heart of King Canyon. It is located along the South Fork of the Kings River under stands of evergreen trees at an elevation of 4,600 feet (1,400 m). Visit Cedar Grove Village for services such as showers and food. Camping Fee for Tent and RV Sites 22.00 This fee is charged for standard sites that accommodate up to 6 people, and is charged per night. Senior/Access Camping Fee for Tent and RVs 11.00 This fee is valid for up to six people at a campsite. Valid with America the Beautiful Senior or Access passes. Views from Moraine Campground Rocky cliffs tower above a pine and cedar forest All campgrounds in Cedar Grove lie along the Kings River and are connected with a paved path. Moraine Campground A brown woodsided-restroomwith a green roof is nestled among fir trees. A restroom at Moraine Campground Moraine Campground A campsite features a picnic table, fire grate, and food storage container. A campsite in Moraine Campground Moraine Campground A paved road traverses a forested area. Moraine Campground road Moraine Campground A level dirt campsite, ringed with trees, includes a food storage box. Moraine Campground campsite Potwisha Campground Just 4 miles (6.4km) past Ash Entrance Station, the campground sits at 2,100 ft (640 m) elevation along the Middle Fork of the Kaweah River under an open stand of oaks. Hot and dry weather in the foothills often require fire restrictions in the summer. In the winter, the campground is usually snow-free. Marble Falls Trail, which begins at the back of the campground, is closed due to impacts from the KNP Complex Fire. Camping Fee 22.00 This fee is valid for up to six people at a single site and is charged per night. Senior/Access Camping Fee 11.00 This fee is valid for up to six people at a single site and is charged per night. Potwisha Campground Site #2 A campground site beneath oak trees Potwisha Campground is located amidst an open stand of oaks. Potwisha Campground Site #12 A tent set up beneath oak trees Potwisha Campground is well suited to tent camping. Potwisha Campground Site #35 Several vehicles parked at sites Potwisha Campground Potwisha Campground is popular among recreational vehicle users. Sentinel Campground This campground is located on Highway 180, is next to Cedar Grove Visitor Center, and is 0.25 miles (400 m) from Cedar Grove Village. The campground is situated in the canyon along the South Fork of the Kings River under open stands of evergreen trees. Services at Cedar Grove Village include food and showers. Camping Fee for Tent and RV Sites 22.00 This fee is charged for standard sites that accommodate up to 6 people, and is charged per night. Senior/Access Camping Fee for Tent and RVs 11.00 This fee is valid for up to six people at a campsite. Valid with America the Beautiful Senior or Access passes. Sentinel Campground A campsite in Sentinel Campground is nestled among fir trees. Sentinel Campground campsite with food storage box, picnic table, and fire grate. Sentinel Campground A forested campground area is covered in a layer of pine needles. Sentinel Campground area Sentinel Campground A campground containing pines and cedars, food storage boxes, and a picnic table. Sentinel Campground Sentinel Campground A campsite features a food storage box, picnic table, and a fire grate/grill. Campsite feature a food storage box, picnic table, and a fire grate/grill. Sheep Creek Campground Sheep Creek Campground is located on Highway 180, 0.25 miles (400 m) from Cedar Grove Village. The campground is situated on the floor of the canyon beside the confluence of the South Fork of the Kings River and Sheep Creek. Services can be found in Cedar Grove Village. Camping Fee for Tent and RV Sites 22.00 This fee is charged for standard sites that accommodate up to 6 people, and is charged per night. Senior/Access Fee for Tents and RVs 11.00 This fee is valid for up to six people at a campsite. Valid with America the Beautiful Senior or Access passes. Sheep Creek Campground A paved road through a campground forms a "Y," bordered by fir trees. Two signs can be seen. campground entrance Sheep Creek Campground A campsite that is heavily shaded by fir trees and contains a car-sized boulder. A campsites in Sheep Creek Campground Sheep Creek Campground A campsite contains a large tree, picnic table, grill, and food storage box. A campsites in Sheep Creek Campground Views from Sheep Creek Campground Views through pines of granite cliffs and blue skies Like all campgrounds in Cedar Grove, Sheep Creek lies along the canyon floor below grapnite cliffs. South Fork Campground This small, primitive campground is situated in a remote area of the foothills on the South Fork of the Kaweah River at the transition from oaks to evergreens. Two trails leave from a trailhead nearby: the Garfield Grove and Ladybug trails. Other park features are over an hour's drive away. There is no potable water here. Trailers and RVs are not permitted. Camping Fee 6.00 This fee is charged usually from middle to late May to mid-October when potable (drinking) water is available. South Fork Vault Toilets Vault toilets at South Fork Campground South Fork Campground has water available from Mid-May through Mid-October South Fork Campground campsite South Fork Campground campsite South Fork Campground campsite South Fork Road A rugged, one-lane section of the South Fork Road. A rugged, one-lane section of the South Fork Road. Sunset Campground Sunset Campground is located 3 miles (5 km) from Kings Canyon Park entrance. The campground is located near Grant Grove Village in an open stand of evergreens. Services can be found in Grant Grove Village. A park amphitheater is located here and occasionally offers park programs. Tent or RV Site 22.00 This fee is valid for up to six people at a single tent or RV site per night. Group Sites A & B 50.00 These group sites accommodate from 15 to 30 people. The fee is charged per night. Senior/Access Fee- Tent or RV Site 11.00 This fee is valid for up to six people at a campsite. Valid with America the Beautiful Senior or Access passes. Sunset Campground Campsite A tent beside granite rocks in a campsite Sunset Campground is located amidst Sugar Pines and granite. Sunset Campground Sign An engraved wooden sign Attending Ranger-led evening programs at the Sunset Campground amphitheater is a popular summer actvitiy Sunset Campground site Sunset Campground campsite Sunset Campground campsite Kings Canyon A deep canyon with a forested floor and steep granite cliffs The Glaciers carved the Kings Canyon's steep granite cliffs, leaving a wide U-shaped valley. The Tablelands A steep granite slope leads from forest to a bare alpine landscape Just above Lodgepole Valley, the trail to the Watchtower offers views above the treeline. Moro Rock A guardrail encircles people along a narrow walkway with wide views A historic stairway leads to the top of Moro Rock, offering views from foothills to peaks Giant Sequoia in Winter A giant sequoia's reddish bark contrasts with the snow around it For those who don't mind icy roads, winter offers stunning views of sequoias in snow. Giant Forest Museum A rustic building is surrounded by giant sequoias Giant Forest Museum offers exhibits, park information, and a bookstore. California Tortoiseshell Clouds of California Tortoiseshells sometimes appear in the park during populations burst or mass migrations. An orange and black Buffalo Soldiers Before the establishment of the National Park Service in 1916, the U.S. Army was responsible for protecting our first national parks. Soldiers from the Presidio of San Francisco spent the summer months in Yosemite and Sequoia. Their tasks included blazing trails, constructing roads, creating maps, evicting grazing livestock, extinguishing fires, monitoring tourists, and keeping poachers and loggers at bay. Buffalo Soldiers in Yosemite Clear Waters Story Map Sierra Nevada lakes provide habitat for wild plants and animals and supply fresh water to downstream farms and communities. Their rugged settings and clear blue water make them popular hiking destinations. But the condition of these lakes is affected by deposition of air pollutants, warming temperatures, and non-native species. In this story map, readers join Sierra Nevada Network field scientists as they travel to remote areas and study lake ecosystems. Two women scientists wearing backpacks and smiling, standing in front of a mountain lake. River Hydrology Monitoring The Sierra Nevada national parks contain the headwaters of seven major watersheds, and the gradual spring melt of the winter snowpack provides water to park ecosystems as well as rural and urban areas throughout California. Learn more about the Sierra Nevada Network river hydrology project, monitoring the quantity and timing of streamflow in a subset of major rivers. Two women wearing raincoats and waders in the middle of a river taking measurements of flow levels. 2009 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2009 Environmental Achievement Awards 2012 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2012 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Grant West Incident, Daniel Holmes Fatality Firefighter Daniel Holmes died on October 2, 2004 when the top of a burning snag fell, striking him on the head resulting in fatal injuries. The accident occurred on the Grant West Prescribed Burn located in the Grant Grove area of Kings Canyon National Park. Daniel was a member of the Arrowhead Interagency Hotshot Crew, based at Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. California Condor Species description of the California Condor (Gymnogyps californianus). An adult condor with the wing tag label number 80 stands over a juvenile condor. Wildland Fire: Park Ridge Lookout National Historic Lookout Register In August, 2013, thirty people gathered at Park Ridge Lookout in Kings Canyon National Park to honor the recent addition of the lookout to the National Historic Lookout Register. The lookout was established in 1916 as an open-air platform with lean-to. In 1934 a two-story wooden lookout was built, but it was replaced in 1964 by a steel tower, which remains in place. This lookout is a valuable fire detection, educational, and historic resource for the park. Structural Fire Awards Presented to Parks and Firefighters for Excellence in Service In 2013 the NPS Office of Structural Fire presented awards to those parks and individuals who have made a difference over the past year in furthering the structural fire program agencywide. Article identifies recipients of Superior Achievement Award, Compliance Achievement Award, Outstanding Fire Instructor of the Year award, and Leadership Awards. Monitoring Wetlands Ecological Integrity Wetlands occupy less than 10 percent of the Sierra Nevada, but they are habitat for a large diversity of plants and animals. They provide nesting and foraging habitat for birds, play an important role in the life cycle of many invertebrate and amphibian species, and are a rich source of food for small mammals and bears. They store nutrients and sediment and control flooding. Learn more about monitoring of plant communities, groundwater dynamics, and macroinvertebrates. Biologists examine a soil profile in a meadow to evaluate the type of wetland. National Park Service Visitor and Resource Protection Staff Focuses on Week of Leadership Staff from all levels of the National Park Service in law enforcement, United States Park Police, as well as fire and aviation spent a week learning leadership lessons from one another as well as from a diverse group of leaders during the last week of September 2019. A group of women and men on a rocky outcrop in high desert. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, California Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] hiker on backcountry trail Monitoring Birds in Sierra Nevada Network Parks More than 60 percent of the vertebrate species in Sierra Nevada Network parks are birds. These parks provide critical breeding, stopover, and wintering habitats for birds, but there are numerous stressors such as climate change and habitat loss that cause declines in some bird populations. Learn more about why birds are good indicators of ecosystem change and how they are being monitored. Western Tanager perched on a tree branch Monitoring Lakes in Sierra Nevada Network Parks Sequoia & Kings Canyon and Yosemite national parks protect over 1,200 lakes that have some of the highest water quality in the Sierra Nevada. High-elevation lakes are critical components of the parks’ ecosystems, popular visitor destinations, and habitat for aquatic and terrestrial organisms. However, these lakes are affected by air pollution, climate change, and non-native species. Learn more about these lakes and how the Sierra Nevada Network monitors their water quality. Lake monitoring crew member paddles out for a mid-lake sample Morale, Welfare and Recreation in WWII National Parks Wartime NPS Director Newton Drury wrote 'In wartime, the best function of these areas is to prove a place to which members of the armed forces and civilians may retire to restore shattered nerves and to recuperate physically and mentally for the war tasks still ahead of them.' During World War II, parks across the United States supported the morale of troops and sought to become places of healing for those returning from war. B&W; soldiers post in front of large tree Parks Celebrate 50 Safe Years of Helitack Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks Helitack Program celebrated 50 safe and successful years in 2010. The parks have one of the oldest programs in the National Park Service. Helitack operations in these parks have evolved to include initial fire response, wildland fire monitoring, search and rescue, wilderness support missions, and other backcountry services. A man stands to the left of a red helicopter staring at a column of smoke. Nature Trail Prescribed Fire: Successful Implementation through Adapting and Timing in Cedar Grove The Nature Trail prescribed fire, completed in late fall, 2011, occurred in Cedar Grove in Kings Canyon National Park. This project provided critical fuels reduction between two separate developed areas: National Park Service employee housing and the National Park Service stables. The burn was completed in late fall to minimize impacts on visitors and employees. Park staff worked collaboratively and flexibly to complete the burn when conditions were best. firefighter with a lit drip torch, flames from a prescribed fire put off dark smoke STARFire: Strategic budgeting and planning for wildland fire management The system addresses key policy concerns by integrating risk analysis, fuels treatment, preparedness, and program analysis using the performance metric of return on investment in a scalable application. Map of Sequoia and Kings Canyon showing wildfire risk assessment; NPS/Sequoia–Kings Canyon NPs Park Air Profiles - Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks Air quality profile for Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Sequoia & Kings Canyon NPs as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Sequoia & Kings Canyon NPs. Spring blooms and Moro Rock Fire Communication and Education Grants Enhance Fire Interpretation and Outreach in the National Parks in 2015 and Beyond The 2015 National Park Service Fire Communication and Education Grant Program provided funding for projects, programs, or tasks in twelve parks around the country. A woman studies a small coniferous tree while a younger woman looks on. Lodge Prescribed Fire: Continuing Efforts to Keep Grant Grove a Fire-Adapted Human Community In fall 2012, fire crews completed the Lodge prescribed fire in Sequoia and Kings Canyon NP. The project provided critical fuels reduction next to the lodge and in the Grant Grove area, as well as fire effects benefiting the ecosystem. This project was one in a series of steps taken in the past 15 years to reduce fuels in the area, where fire had been excluded for more than 100 years. About 60% of dead and downed fuels were burned. Wildland Fire History — Interpreting Fire at Sequoia and Kings Canyon In the wake of all the media attention to fires after the historic 1988 Yellowstone fires, an interpreter from Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks discusses fire interpretation methods there. Articles discusses 1987 California State University-Fresno research study demonstrating the great value of the parks’ newspaper for getting the message out, as well as various ways the newspaper communicates the parks’ messages on fire. 2011 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients Discover the innovative and exciting programs of the recipients of the national and regional 2011 Freeman Tilden Awards for excellence in interpretation. LIza Stearns World War II Plane Crashes in National Parks During WWII, more than 7,100 air crashes involved US Army Air Force (USAAF) aircraft occurred on American soil. Collectively these crashes resulted in the loss of more than 15,599 lives (Mireles 2006). Many of these military aircraft accidents occurred in remote, often mountainous, areas managed by the National Park Service. plane crash at base of grassy hill California Condor Reintroduction & Recovery A tagged California condor flies free. NPS Photo/ Don Sutherland A wing-tagged California condor flying in the blue sky. Whitaker Prescribed Fire: A Story in Partnerships The Whitaker prescribed fire occurred in Redwood Mountain Grove, which is partially owned by UC Center for Forestry and home to the largest giant sequoia grove in the world. By monitoring change following the prescribed fire, scientists will increase our understanding of the relationship between fire and giant sequoias. Fire managers worked closely with the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District to select the best air quality windows to reduce local smoke impacts. firefighter with a chainsaw in the forest clearing the way 2003 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2003 Environmental Achievement Awards 2002 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2002 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Wildland Fire in Chaparral: California and Southwestern United States Chaparral is a general term that applies to various types of brushland found in southern California and the southwestern U.S. This community contains the most flammable type of vegetation found in the United States. Chaparral on steep rocky slopes. Windy Peak Fire: Response Considers National Fire Situation Although the Windy Peak fire was in a remote wilderness location, Sequoia and Kings Canyon NPs staff chose to contain it due to drought conditions and the need for firefighting resources throughout the state and nation. However, the response was similar in several ways to managing the fire for forest health. Sam Zuckerman Sam Zuckerman worked on the Sierra Nevada Network forest monitoring crew in 2017, and while he enjoyed the field work, this experience helped him decide he wanted to get involved with all the steps of carrying out a research project. He is pursuing a PhD in Natural Resources at the University of New Hampshire, where his research focuses on tree responses to drought in northeastern forests. Click on the article title to learn more. Field biologist uses meter tape to set up a forest monitoring plot in foxtail pine stand. National Park Service Finds Success at Hiring Event The National Park Service Fire and Aviation Program participated in a hiring event sponsored by the Department of Interior. The special hiring event was held in Bakersfield, CA and was a collaboration of all four natural resource management bureaus to hire open wildland fire positions in 2020. Employees talk to potential job candidates in front of a large promotional panel. Cave Exploration in the National Parks Most Americans may not realize that their National Park caves lie at the forefront of on-going cave exploration. Some of the longest caves on Earth are managed and protected by the NPS. And all of these caves contain unexplored passages and rooms that cavers seek to find and document. These giant cave systems are the site of on-going work by cavers to explore, map, photograph and inventory the extent of National Park caves. delicate thin mineral formations in a cave Megan Mason Megan Mason worked in Sierra Nevada national parks monitoring lake water chemistry and stream hydrology for two summer seasons. Her work in the Sierra inspired her to go on to graduate school in Geophysics, studying snow science - especially annual and seasonal snow depth patterns and how this information can improve forecasting of streamflow and snowmelt patterns. Learn more about her work and why she decided to pursue graduate research. Woman standing in snow pit holding metal triangular scoop for sampling snow density. Wildland Fire in Ponderosa Pine: Western United States This forest community generally exists in areas with annual rainfall of 25 inches or less. Extensive pure stands of this forest type are found in the southwestern U.S., central Washington and Oregon, southern Idaho and the Black Hills of South Dakota. Recently burned ponderosa pine forest. Vladimir Kovalenko Vladimir (Vlad) Kovalenko worked on the Sierra Nevada Network forest monitoring crew in 2015 and 2016, and this work inspired him to go on to graduate school at the University of Montana in 2020. He is pursuing a Master's Degree in Systems Ecology, and his research will focus on Clark's Nutcracker ecology in the whitebark pine ecosystem in Glacier National Park. Click on the title of this article to learn more. Four scientists wearing backpacks with a scenic view of Sierra Nevada mountains in background. National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map White Pines in Decline - Research Highlights 20 Years of Change Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks are home to 5 species of white pine, but multiple stressors have led to sharp declines in two of these species. Scientists recently re-surveyed plots established in the 1990s for white pine blister rust (WPBR), a non-native pathogen. They found more than 50 percent of sugar pine had died, and 13 percent of western white pine – related to WPBR, mountain pine beetle, and fire. This work informs management of on-going threats to white pines. Looking up toward the tree tops from the base of two large dead sugar pines. Is the Fate of Whitebark Pine in the Beak of Clark's Nutcracker? Clark’s nutcrackers favor the seeds of whitebark pines, which they cache in great numbers. Whitebark pines are largely dependent on nutcrackers for seed dispersal; many cached seeds are not retrieved and go on to germinate. The tree is in decline due to native bark beetles, a non-native fungus, and climate change. Will the bird turn to other food sources? A recent study analyzes data on both species from the Cascades and Sierra to understand the risk to this mutualism. Gray and black bird with beak open perched in a conifer High-elevation Forest Monitoring Whitebark pine and foxtail pine occupy high-elevation Sierra Nevada treeline and subalpine habitats, environments often too harsh for other tree species to thrive. These forests can have a large influence on key ecosystem processes and dynamics, such as regulating snowmelt and streamflow and providing habitat and food for birds and mammals. Learn more about the threats these trees face and a monitoring program to track changes in their condition. Whitebark pine in Yosemite National Park with scenic granite peaks in background Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Mesozoic Era The Mesozoic Era (251.9 to 66 million years ago) was the "Age of Reptiles." During the Mesozoic, Pangaea began separating into the modern continents, and the modern Rocky Mountains rose. Dinosaurs, crocodiles, and pterosaurs ruled the land and air. As climate changed and rapid plate tectonics resulted in shallow ocean basins, sea levels rose world-wide and seas expanded across the center of North America. fossil dinosaur skull in rock face Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: Cave Week—Featured Articles More than 20 parks across the US are participating in Cave Week via social media posts, cave tours, exhibits, school events, web pages and much more. The theme for Cave Week 2020 is, “Why do we go into caves?” This articles shares a few stories about why people (and bats) enter caves. person standing by underground lake in a cave Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ Cretaceous Period—145.0 to 66.0 MYA Many now-arid western parks, including Chaco Culture National Historical Park and Mesa Verde National Park, were inundated by the Cretaceous Interior Seaway that bisected North America. Massive dinosaur and other reptile fossils are found in Cretaceous rocks of Big Bend National Park. dinosaur footprint in stone Mesozoic Era The Mesozoic Era (251.9 to 66 million years ago) was the "Age of Reptiles." During the Mesozoic, Pangaea began separating into the modern continents, and the modern Rocky Mountains rose. Dinosaurs, crocodiles, and pterosaurs ruled the land and air. As climate changed and rapid plate tectonics resulted in shallow ocean basins, sea levels rose world-wide and seas expanded across the center of North America. fossil dinosaur skull in rock face Wildland Fire in Lodgepole Pine The bark of lodgepoles is thin, which does not protect the trunks from scorching by fire. They die easily when a fire passes through. However, the serotinous cones give lodgepole pine a special advantage for spreading seeds for the next generation. Close-up of the needles of a lodgepole pine. More Than “Just” A Secretary If you’re only familiar with modern office practices, you may not recognize many of jobs necessary to run an office or national park over much of the past hundred years. Today, typewriters have given way to computers, photocopy machines have replaced typing pools, stenographers are rarely seen outside of courtrooms, and callers are largely expected to pick extensions from digital directories. Women skiing Two for the Price of One Companion, assistant, confidant, ambassador, host, nurse, cook, secretary, editor, field technician, wildlife wrangler, diplomat, and social director are some of the many roles that people who marry into the NPS perform in support of their spouses and the NPS mission. Although the wives and daughters of park rangers were some of the earliest women rangers in the NPS, many more women served as “park wives” in the 1920s–1940s. Three members of a family Blanket Cave National Youth Park—Activity Enjoy a fun activity and learn about caves even when you can't get out to a park. In this activity you will build your own cave and learn how to make it like a "real" natural cave. Find out about cave formations and wildlife, and how to be safe and care for caves. New "Blanket Cave National Youth Parks" are springing up all across America! Join the fun! cartoon drawing of a childs and a park ranger exploring a cave Mary Kwart: Wildland Fire Pioneer Throughout her life, Mary Kwart defied gender stereotypes to create new spaces for herself and for future generations of women in land management agencies. In the early 1980s she was among the first women to join the Arrowhead Interagency Hotshots, an elite National Park Service crew, stationed at Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks. Kwart combined a spiritual connection with nature and a respect for and fascination with fire in her career as a wildland firefighter. Mary Kwart sits on the ground wearing sunglasses, hardhat, bandana, and firefighting uniform. Top 10 Tips for Visiting Sequoia and Kings Canyon This summer, plan your trip in advance so you can make the most of your time when you get here! We're expecting a busy summer, and we have tips that can help you plan a safe visit and avoid the crowds. A group of sequoia trunks with reddish bark Giant Sequoias Face New Threats The hotter drought of 2012-2016 was a tipping point for giant sequoias and other Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer forests. This article highlights the following impacts to giant sequoias: higher severity wildfires resulting in the death of thousands of large giant sequoias, bark beetles as a newly observed cause of death, and acute foliage dieback as a short-term response to drought. Responses to these changes require coordination with many partners and more public outreach. Beetle-killed giant sequoias near still living trees Preliminary Estimates of Sequoia Mortality in the 2020 Castle Fire Although some giant sequoia trees have stood for thousands of years and are adapted to withstand frequent low and mixed severity fires, preliminary estimates suggest that the 2020 Castle Fire killed between 31 to 42% of large sequoias within the Castle Fire footprint, or 10 to 14% of all large sequoias across the tree’s natural range in the Sierra Nevada. This translates to an estimated loss of 7,500 to 10,600 large sequoias. These estimates may change as we acquire new data. Park scientist walks on a slope amongst giant sequoias killed in the Castle Fire. Geologic Type Section Inventory for Sierra Nevada Network Parks A recent NPS Geological Resources Division report for Sierra Nevada Network parks highlights geologic features (or “stratotypes”) of parks that serve as the standard for identifying geologic units. Stratotypes are important because they store knowledge, represent important comparative sites where past knowledge can be built up or re-examined, and can serve as teaching sites for students. Learn more about Sierra Nevada geology and the stratotypes that help characterize it. View of sheer cliffs on northeast side of Mount Whitney, Sequoia National Park. General Grant National Park In October 1890, one week after the establishment of Sequoia National Park occurred, General Grant National Park was created for the purpose of preserving the second tallest sequoia tree, which was named after General Ulysses S. Grant. The area that was once General Grant National Park became General Grant’s Grove in 1940 and is today found in Kings Canyon National Park. Man seated in front of a large tree. “Wandering” Through Park Skies: How Peregrine Falcons Connect National Parks Peregrine falcons live across the world and can be found throughout the United States. Learn how four national parks are connecting visitors to these remarkable birds. A brown falcon sits on a green metal spike over water with a boat Wildfires Kill Unprecedented Numbers of Large Sequoia Trees Giant sequoias have lived with fire for thousands of years. Their thick, spongy bark insulates most trees from heat injury, and the branches of large sequoias grow high enough to avoid the flames of most fires. Also, fire’s heat releases large numbers of seeds from cones, and seedlings take root in the open, sunny patches where fire clears away fuels and kills smaller trees. But starting in 2015, higher severity fires have killed unprecedented numbers of large giant sequoias. Aerial view of smoke and giant sequoias killed in the Castle Fire 2021 Fire Season Impacts to Giant Sequoias The 2021 fire season included two large wildfires (both started by the same lightning storm in early September) that burned into a large number of giant sequoia groves. Given the impacts of the 2020 Castle Fire to sequoia groves, where losses were estimated at 10-14% of the entire Sierra Nevada population of sequoia trees over 4 feet in diameter, there is significant concern by sequoia managers and the public regarding the impacts of these new fires. Firefighters stand on a trail near a burning forest stand 2021 Fire Season Impacts to Giant Sequoias - Executive Summary The 2021 fire season included two large wildfires (both started by the same lightning storm in early September) that burned into a large number of giant sequoia groves. This species has a limited distribution, covering just ~28,000 acres in ~70 groves on the western slopes of the Sierra Nevada mountains. Firefighters stand on a trail near a burning forest stand. Event Recap - The Future of Conservation: Engaging the Next Generation of Public Land Leaders During National Park Week and Earth Day, the National Park Service Youth Programs Division co-hosted a virtual event on April 22, 2021 with The Corps Network (TCN) and National Park Foundation (NPF), discussing “The Future of Conservation: Engaging the Next Generation of Public Land Leaders.” A panel of young leaders shared their passion and personal involvement with the conservation movement, and the impacts and benefits service corps provide to national parks and beyond. The event promotional flyer Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Caro Luevanos-Garcia Caro Luévanos-Garcia leads by example and social media to encourage hiking and other outdoor recreation among Latinx communities, especially middle-aged and senior populations. Woman smiles as she stands atop granite rock, spikey mountain ridge and blue skies in background. Ranger Roll Call, 1916-1929 Recent research demonstrates that there were more women rangers and ranger-naturalists in early National Park Service (NPS) history than previously thought. However, the number of women in uniformed positions was quite low in any given year. Ranger Frieda Nelson shows of the suspenders used to hold up her uniform breeches. Staff Spotlight: George McDonald Meet George McDonald, the Chief of Youth Programs and the Experienced Services Program Division. George oversees projects and programs that involve youth and young adults working at National Park Service sites across the country, primarily focusing on individuals 15 to 30 years old, and those 35 years old or under who are military veterans. These projects generally cover natural and cultural resource conservation. Learn more about him. George McDonald smiling at Grand Canyon National Park Battle of the Bark Trees shade us from the sun, provide homes for wildlife, stabilize Earth’s surface, and produce food for humans and animals alike. Some are massive, and others are miniscule by comparison, but what makes one better than the other—we’ll let you decide! Check out our iconic trees below and find your favorite! Five thick barked red-brown trees are backlit by the sunlight. Volcanic Necks and Plugs Volcanic necks are the remnants of a volcano’s conduit and plumbing system that remain after most of the rest of the volcano has been eroded away. photo of a riverside rocky spire with mountains in the distance Ranger Roll Call, 1930-1939 Few women worked in uniformed positions in the 1930s but those who did weren't only ranger-checkers or ranger-naturalists. Jobs as guides, historians, archeologists, and in museums opened to more women. Seven women in Park Service uniforms stand in line inside a cave.

nearby parks

also available

National Parks
USFS NW
Alaska
Arizona
California
Colorado
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Minnesota
Montana
Nevada
New Mexico
North Carolina
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Texas
Utah
Virginia
Washington
Wyoming
Yellowstone