Selma To Montgomery

National Historic Trail - Alabama

‏‏‎Established by Congress in 1996, the Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail commemorates the people, events, and route of the 1965 Voting Rights March in Alabama. Led by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Black and White non-violent supporters fought for the right to vote in Central Alabama. Today, you can connect with this history and trace the events of these marches along the 54-mile trail. ‏

maps

Official visitor map of Natchez Trace Parkway (PKWY) in Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Natchez Trace - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Natchez Trace Parkway (PKWY) in Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/semo/index.htm ‏‏‎Established by Congress in 1996, the Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail commemorates the people, events, and route of the 1965 Voting Rights March in Alabama. Led by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Black and White non-violent supporters fought for the right to vote in Central Alabama. Today, you can connect with this history and trace the events of these marches along the 54-mile trail. ‏ March Route - The National Historic Trail follows the actual march route which began at Brown Chapel, A.M.E. Church in Selma, AL, located on Martin Luther King, Jr. Street. Follow the Trail markers to U.S. Hwy. 80 through Lowndes County, AL. Continue on U.S. Hwy. 80 to Montgomery concluding at the Alabama State Capitol in Montgomery, AL, located on Dexter Avenue. Montgomery Interpretive Center The Montgomery Interpretive Center is one of three interpretive centers for the Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail. The center offers exhibits on the student marches and the Stars for Freedom Rally which was held on March 24, 1965 at the fourth and final campsite, City of St. Jude. From Atlanta, Georgia Get on I-75 S/I-85 S from Washington St SW and Pulliam St SW. Follow I-85 S to Mulberry St in Montgomery. Take exit 2 from I-85 S. Take Glenn Palmer Ave to Harris Way From Birmingham, Al Get on I-65 S. Follow I-65 S to Forest Ave in Montgomery. Take exit 2 from I-85 N. Then take Glenn Palmer Ave to Harris Way. From Selma, follow U.S. 80 E. to I-65. Get on I-65 N. Follow I-65 N. to Forest Ave in Montgomery. Take exit 2 from I-85 N. Then take Glenn Palmer Ave to Harris Way. Selma Interpretive Center The Selma Interpretive Center offers exhibits that explore the compelling story of the Selma to Montgomery marches through multiple perspectives of those who participated or supported the march, as well as those who opposed it, allowing visitors to be fully immersed in the climate of the times. The center works to provide a necessary background for visitors touring the many other sites in the Selma area that are associated with the 1965 Selma Voting Rights Movement. Traveling from Montgomery, AL, follow I-65 South to Exit 167, Highway 80 West to Selma. From Mobile, follow I-65 North to Exit 167, Highway 80 West to Selma. Follow Highway 80 West to the Edmund Pettus Bridge. Cross the bridge and the Selma Interpretive Center is on the right corner - Broad St./Hwy. 80 W and Water Ave. Traveling from Mississippi on Highway 80 West, follow Highway 80 West to Water Ave. The center will be on the left corner at the base of the Edmund Pettus Bridge. The Lowndes Interpretive Center The Lowndes Interpretive Center is located in White Hall, Alabama and is one of three centers for the Selma to Montgomery March. The site sits on the original location of one of many tent cities that were created by African Americans who were kicked off of land owned by whites for attempting to register to vote. The center explores the story of the march and what happened after the march ended. From Birmingham, AL follow I-65 S. to Montgomery, AL. Take exit 167 to U.S. Hwy. 80 W. and travel 25 miles to White Hall, AL. The Lowndes Interpretive Center is located at 7002 U.S. Hwy. 80 W., in White Hall, AL. From Atlanta, GA take I-85 S. to Montgomery. Merge onto I-65 S. to exit onto U.S. Hwy. 80 W. and travel 25 miles to White Hall, AL. The Lowndes Interpretive Center is located at 7002 U.S. Hwy. 80 West, in White Hall, AL. Gunter Hill Campground Campground near Montgomery, Al Paul Grist State Park https://www.alapark.com/parks/paul-grist-state-park Prairie Creek Alabama River Lakes Corp of Engineers 50th Anniversary Walking Classroom 50th Anniversary Walking Classroom Participants. During the 50th Anniversary Walking Classroom event participants marched nearly 54-miles from Selma to Montgomery. A Tribute to The Civil Rights Martys A tribute to remember. A tribute program to the martyrs of the movement near the Viola Liuzzo Memorial in Lowndes County. Marching Towards The State Alabama Capitol Marching with a purpose. Hundreds March Through The Streets of Montgomery. Interpretive Talk on Highway 80 Interpretive Programs are available all year round. Hundreds of Visitors Pause for An Interpretive Program along Highway 80 Words from The Heart A Park Ranger speaks from the heart. Hundreds of visitors take a moment to listen a Park Ranger speak from the heart. Voting Rights Act of 1965 On August 5, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson passed the Voting Rights Act. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 expanded the 14th and 15th amendments by banning racial discrimination in voting practices. The act was a response to the barriers that prevented African Americans from voting for nearly a century. President Lyndon Johnson signs the Voting Rights Act of 1965 Selma to Montgomery Walking Classroom The Selma to Montgomery Walking Classroom commemorated the 50th anniversary of the march that was key to the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. A group of people gather at the Edmund Pettus Bridge. The Montgomery Bus Boycott Montgomery City Lines lost between 30,000 and 40,000 bus fares each day during the pivotal 1955-56 Montgomery Bus Boycott. The company reluctantly desegregated its buses only after November 13, 1956, when the Supreme Court ruled Alabama's bus segregation laws unconstitutional. B&W; marchers with American flags walking past white house. Coca-Cola sign hangs on right. Selma to Montgomery March On March 21 the official Selma to March began with the final number of supports reaching near 25,000 people on March 25. Five months later, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act which prohibits discrimination in voting practices or procedures because of race and color. B&W; marchers with American flags walk in front of a white house. Coca-cola sign hangs on right National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map

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