"Hazel Mountain Overlook Sunrise" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Shenandoah

National Park - Virginia

Shenandoah National Park extends along the Blue Ridge Mountains in the U.S. state of Virginia. The Skyline Drive runs its length, and a vast network of trails includes a section of the long-distance Appalachian Trail. Mostly forested, the park features wetlands, waterfalls and rocky peaks like Hawksbill and Old Rag mountains. Shenandoah is home to many bird species, plus deer, squirrels and the elusive black bear.

maps

Official Visitor Map of Shenandoah National Park (NP) in Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Shenandoah - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Shenandoah National Park (NP) in Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Blue Ridge Parkway (PKWY) in North Carolina and Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Blue Ridge - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Blue Ridge Parkway (PKWY) in North Carolina and Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Tail Map of Appalachian National Scenic Trail (NST) in Connecticut, Georgia, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, Vermont, West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Appalachian - Trail Map

Tail Map of Appalachian National Scenic Trail (NST) in Connecticut, Georgia, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, Vermont, West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Chesapeake & Ohio Canal - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/shen/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shenandoah_National_Park Shenandoah National Park extends along the Blue Ridge Mountains in the U.S. state of Virginia. The Skyline Drive runs its length, and a vast network of trails includes a section of the long-distance Appalachian Trail. Mostly forested, the park features wetlands, waterfalls and rocky peaks like Hawksbill and Old Rag mountains. Shenandoah is home to many bird species, plus deer, squirrels and the elusive black bear. Just 75 miles from the bustle of Washington, D.C., Shenandoah National Park is a land bursting with cascading waterfalls, spectacular vistas, fields of wildflowers, and quiet wooded hollows. With over 200,000 acres of protected lands that are haven to deer, songbirds, and black bear, there's so much to explore...and your journey begins right here! Shenandoah National Park is located in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, west of Washington, D.C. It stretches 105 miles and has four entrances: Front Royal (northern entrance), Thornton Gap, Swift Run Gap, and Rockfish Gap (southern entrance to Shenandoah and the northern entrance to the Blue Ridge Parkway). The physical address listed is to the administrative offices, not the Park itself. GPS can be unreliable for navigating to the Park, so we encourage you to check out our website for more info. Dickey Ridge Visitor Center Dickey Ridge Visitor Center (mile 4.6) is located near Front Royal, Virginia, in the northern part of the Park. It's the ideal place for visitors entering through the Front Royal Entrance Station to find restrooms, information, a bookstore, publications, and maps. Right across Skyline Drive from the visitor center you will find the popular Fox Hollow Trail trailhead. From Washington, D.C. metro area, travel west on Interstate 66 to Front Royal, Virginia (62 miles). Take the exit onto Route 340 South and follow signs for Shenandoah National Park and Skyline Drive, which will lead you to the Front Royal Entrance Station . Once on Skyline Drive, make your way south to mile marker 4.6; you will find Dickey Ridge Visitor Center on your right. Harry F. Byrd, Sr. Visitor Center Byrd Visitor Center (mile 51) is located across from Big Meadows in the center of Shenandoah National Park. Available facilities include: restrooms, information desk, ranger programs, bookstore, publications, maps, and first aid. Within close proximity to countless activities and hikes, it's a great place to start your next trip! From Front Royal or Thornton Gap (Luray), head south on the Skyline Drive to mile 51. The visitor center will be on your right, across from Big Meadows. From Swift Run (Elkton) or Rockfish Gap (Waynesboro), head north on the Skyline Drive to mile 51. The visitor center will be on your left, across from Big Meadows. Big Meadows Campground Big Meadows Campground (mile 51.2) is centrally-located in Shenandoah National Park, providing easy access to many of the most popular destinations in the Park, including Big Meadows, Dark Hollow Falls, and Byrd Visitor Center. All sites include a place for a tent or RV, a fire ring, and a picnic table. Group Campsite (Nonelectric) 45.00 Big Meadows Campground has two nonelectric group sites. Each group site can accommodate 7-15 people. Standard Campsite (Nonelectric) 20.00 A standard, nonelectric campsite for tent or RV (motorhome, pop-up, or 5th-wheel). Standard campsites are limited to six people (or 1 immediate family) per site and one RV. Big Meadows Campground A small pop-up camper is parked in a campground with green trees overhead. Come relax under the shade of verdant trees in the campground at Big Meadows. Dundo Group Campground Dundo Group Campground (mile 83.7) is a small, beautiful campground located in the southern part of Shenandoah National Park that offers group campsites, only. The Appalachian Trail passes through the campground. All sites include fire rings and picnic tables. Group Campsite (Nonelectric) 45.00 Dundo Group Campground has three nonelectric group sites. Each group site can accommodate 7-20 people. Dundo Group Campground Several large tents sit behind a man who is standing at a table in a campground. Dundo Group Campground offers a great opportunity to enjoy Shenandoah with friends and family. Lewis Mountain Campground Lewis Mountain (mile 57.5), the smallest campground in Shenandoah National Park, appeals to those who want a little more privacy while still staying within a close distance to many of the most popular destinations in the Park, including Big Meadows (7 miles away). Standard Campsite (Nonelectric) 15.00 A standard, nonelectric campsite for tent or RV (motorhome, pop-up, or 5th-wheel). Standard campsites are limited to six people (or 1 immediate family) per site and one RV. Lewis Mountain Campground A paved road branches off at the entrance to a campground, with cabins in the distance. Loft Mountain Campground Loft Mountain (mile 79.5), the largest campground in the park, sits atop Big Flat Mountain in the southern part of Shenandoah National Park, with outstanding views to east and west. Two waterfalls and the trails into the Big Run Wilderness area are nearby. Standard Campsite (Nonelectric) 15.00 A standard, nonelectric campsite for tent or RV (motorhome, pop-up, or 5th-wheel). Standard campsites are limited to six people (or 1 immediate family) per site and one RV. Loft Mountain Campground A group of people sit at a picnic table next to a tent under a canopy of green trees in a campground Loft Mountain Campground offers a great place to unwind with friends and family. Mathews Arm Campground Mathews Arm Campground (mile 22.1) is the nearest campground for those entering Shenandoah National Park from Front Royal, in the northern section of the Park. All sites include a place for a tent or RV, a fire ring, and picnic table. Elkwallow Wayside, with camping supplies and food service, is two miles away. Standard Campsite (Nonelectric) 15.00 A standard, nonelectric campsite for tent or RV (motorhome, pop-up, or 5th-wheel). Standard campsites are limited to six people (or 1 immediate family) per site and one RV. Group Campsite (Nonelectric) 50.00 Mathews Arm Campground has three nonelectric group sites. Each group site can accommodate 7-25 people. Mathews Arm Campground A white and red camper sits in a campsite under fall foliage. Mathews Arm Campground is a great place to unwind after a busy day exploring the Park. Adventure Awaits A man stands on a rocky outcrop overlooking the receding mountains. There are over 60 peaks with an elevation over 3,000 feet in Shenandoah. Wonderful Waterfalls A man stands with his back facing us, looking at a waterfall. Dark Hollow Falls, at 70 feet, is our most visited waterfall. Red-Bellied Woodpecker A close up shot of a Red-Bellied Woodpecker with a blurry teal background. There are over 200 species of bird that call Shenandoah "home." Driving on Skyline Drive A road surrounded by fall foliage turns a curve around a small waterfall. There are 105 miles to explore on Skyline Drive. Find Yourself in Nature Looking up at a poplar stand canopy, which is turning yellow in fall. This poplar stand at mile 8 is a popular stop for visitors entering from the north entrance. Bat Population Monitoring in Shenandoah National Park Shenandoah National Park supports a number of rare species, many of which can be found at higher elevations in the park. Researchers have recently discovered that several rare bat species also prefer the park's mountaintops during summer months. Scientists are using acoustic detectors, radio telemetry, and mist nets, to better understand the park's bat communities. A little brown bat clinging to the side of a tree. Parks are worth the effort to reduce air pollution and address climate change Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy visit Shenandoah National Park to highlight the work being done by the National Park Service (NPS) and the EPA to provide clean air, clear views, and dark skies for us and our future generations. Fall colors in Shenandoah National Park Evaluating Ecological Impacts of the 2012 Neighbor Mountain Fire Members of NPS fire effects crews from the Northeast and Southeast regions joined forces for 4 days in August 2013 to conduct field reconnaissance and gather data evaluating the ecological effects of the 2012 Neighbor Mountain fire that took place in Shenandoah National Park. Crew members from Shenandoah NP, Great Smoky Mountains NP, and Natchez Trace Parkway participated in this effort. Throughout the year these fire ecology crews share information, resources, and personnel. Around the country with the monarch butterfly It's about to begin! What parks will the monarchs amazing journey take them? A mock monarch selfie at Ozakrs National Scenic Riverways National Parks Pitch In to Help Save Monarch Butterflies As scientists and citizen scientists have noted, insect populations are plummeting across the globe. Monarch butterfly populations are no exception. Recent counts show that the western population has experienced a precipitous drop. As of 2018, the population of monarchs overwintering along the California coast stands at just 0.6% of what it was in the 1980s. Monarch butterflies among eucalyptus leaves, viewed through a scope CCC Jobs Two Civilian Conservation Corp boys stand next to hillside after completing erosion control work. Two CCC boys pose on hillside with erosion control measures. Park Air Profiles - Shenandoah National Park Air quality profile for Shenandoah National Park. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Shenandoah NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Shenandoah NP. Appalachian Trail on Loft Mountain Wildland Fire: Park Conducts Prescribed Fire for Resource Benefits In April 2013, personnel from the Northeast Region completed the 500-acre Jarman Gap prescribed fire at Shenandoah National Park.  The objectives included restoring dry oak and pine communities and reducing hazardous fuels in the wildland-urban interface. A preliminary assessment of the fire effects indicates that the prescribed burn met the primary objectives. This was a multiagency effort with firefighters and other resources participating from across the region. Bat Projects in Parks: Shenandoah National Park Partnering with Virginia Tech and USGS, Shenandoah continued surveys of bats in the park. A ranger using telemetry gear in Shenandoah National Park Park Concessions: Historic Privatization By the time the National Park Service was established in August 1916, Congress had created nine national parks and twelve national monuments. Although these sites were under the jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Interior, most were in the West and were run by the Army which saw its function strictly as the protection of timber and mineral resources and the prevention of homesteading. Miriam M. Sizer: Patroness or Patronizing Miriam M. Sizer was an educator hired to study the mountain residents in Nicholson, Weakley, Corbin, and Richards Hollows, to make recommendations as to solutions to the problems inherent in relocation. Her beliefs and bias, supported by George Freeman Pollock and William E. Carson, have influenced popular thought for three generations. Mountain Settlements Located on the eastern slopes of the Blue Ridge, in the shadow of Old Rag Mountain in Madison County, Virginia, the three hollows were home to approximately 460 persons when Shenandoah National Park was created in the 1930s, having been continuously occupied by settlers of European descent since the late eighteenth century. Hunter C. and Mrs. Dodson The Displaced While emphasizing the complexity of pre-park life, the recent archaeological research has clearly contributed to overturning the negative history of the region and helped to return it to the control of the displaced and their descendants. The challenge now is to continually strive for accuracy in our understanding and presentation of the park's complex historic past while remaining ever aware of the impact of the past upon the present. Man from Shenandoah Mountains Thoughts on Whiskey Earthenware jugs and stills were used in the past as "humorous" display objects to ridicule the "moonshining mountain folk", but in reality they represent the final chapters in a centuries-old American agricultural tradition. Segregation and Desegregation at Shenandoah National Park Primary source documents reveal the thinking and decision making of park managers, from the highest level of the National Park Service to local concessionaires, surrounding the creation of segregated facilities in Shenandoah National Park in the 1930s and the desegregation of the same facilities by 1950. A black and white historical photo of a large entrance sign for a segregated park facility. Shenandoah: Not Without the CCC The first Civilian Conservation Corps camps in national parks were located at what would become Shenandoah National Park. Over 1,000 young men would eventually work at one of ten camps in and around Shenandoah. From the gentle curves of Skyline Drive to the stone walls enclosing the overlooks, the projects that these young men took on shaped Shenandoah National Park as we know it today. A black and white photograph of tents in a meadow. Shenandoah: Wilderness by Design? Today, 40% of land in Shenandoah is designated wilderness. This wilderness is a relatively new development. During the first decade of the Park's history, park managers sought to erase all traces of humans on the mountain and worked to create a park with the natural qualities that met their perception of what nature should be. Why did Shenandoah's original managers become agents of environmental change? A historical photograph of young men transplanting a tree. World War II Plane Crashes in National Parks During WWII, more than 7,100 air crashes involved US Army Air Force (USAAF) aircraft occurred on American soil. Collectively these crashes resulted in the loss of more than 15,599 lives (Mireles 2006). Many of these military aircraft accidents occurred in remote, often mountainous, areas managed by the National Park Service. plane crash at base of grassy hill Shenandoah National Park Fights Emerald Ash Borer Shenandoah National Park, partnering with the Shenandoah National Park Trust, is vigorously fighting the potential destruction of 99% of its ash trees due to the emerald ash borer. Staff inject ash trees with a compound to ward off the emerald ash borer. Shenandoah's Civil War Connection The Blue Ridge Mountains running along the East side of the Shenandoah Valley make up the core of Shenandoah National Park where Skyline Drive runs along their crest. What visitors may not realize is that they are driving along one of the most significant tools the Confederacy utilized during the American Civil War. Historic map sketched by Jedediah Hotchkiss. Shenandoah National Park: From Idea to Reality There were many people who played a role in the foundation of Shenandoah National Park. Learn about how these people, who together represented public committees, private interests, local government all the way up to the Department of the Interior, brought the idea of an eastern national park into reality, and the events along the way that shaped a section of Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains into the Shenandoah National Park we know today. A historical photograph of a seated man leaning over a table, surrounded by people. Demmer Scholars Hike through 2012 Wildfire at Shenandoah National Park In August 2014, a group of talented university students hiked through the 2012 Neighbor Mountain fire at Shenandoah National Park to learn about the history and nature of wildland fire. Students in the William A. Demmer Scholars Program take a senior-level class in natural resources policy while working full-time as paid interns at federal agencies or nongovernmental organizations that focus on natural resources. Ten Tips for a Successful Field Trip Here are a few quick tips to help make your next field trip a success. Teaching Outdoors Basics on what outdoor teaching is and why it can be an effective form of teaching. 2019 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. Women in Fire Science: Ellen Frondorf Ellen Frondorf has worked in fire effects monitoring for the National Park Service. She shares her story of work in fire science. A woman in a baseball cap stands in a meadow. National Parks’ Homefront Battle: Protecting Parks During WWII Though the National Park Service (NPS) was only 25 years old at the outbreak of World War II, the agency found itself fighting a battle on the homefront. With little precedent to work from and dwindling budgets and staff, the NPS strongly defended its parks against a flood of demands to log, mine, graze, drain, and take over national parks Unwelcome Guests in Acadia The spread of non-native plants and animals is one of the biggest threats facing natural areas. Non-native species, especially those considered invasive, threaten rich communities of native plants and animals across the United States. In national parks, more than 2.6 million acres of park lands are affected by invasive plant species, and 234 National Park Service areas have invasive animals in need of management. Friends of Acadia volunteer helps remove invasive species. Herbert Hoover's National Parks Herbert Hoover is not thought of as one of our better presidents, but he made lasting contributions in the national parks he established. During Herbert Hoover's presidency from 1929 to 1933, the land designated for new national parks and monuments increased by 40 percent. Sepia photo of Herbert Hoover standing at the rim of the Grand Canyon. Big Meadows Cultural Landscape Construction of the Big Meadows developed area began in 1935 as part of a park master plan. It is significant in the areas of entertainment/recreation and politics/government for its association with Shenandoah National Park as one of the first eastern national parks, and it is associated with the early twentieth century movement to accommodate the growing popularity of the automobile while also conserving natural and scenic areas. A man stands beside a low wooden structure, a seed and transplant flat, in Big Meadows. National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Shenandoah National Park, Virginia Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] mountain ridges and valleys Brinnen Carter - Cultural Resource Program Manager Brinnen Carter is Cultural Resource Program Manager at Shenandoah National Park. Brinnen Carter giving a presentation. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ The Precambrian The Precambrian was the "Age of Early Life." During the Precambrian, continents formed and our modern atmosphere developed, while early life evolved and flourished. Soft-bodied creatures like worms and jellyfish lived in the world's oceans, but the land remained barren. Common Precambrian fossils include stromatolites and similar structures, which are traces of mats of algae-like microorganisms, and microfossils of other microorganisms. fossil stromatolites in a cliff face Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Connie Rudd: Defining a Career Path Connie Rudd's career with the National Park Service began as a seasonal ranger in 1979. Her continual desire to learn propelled her to various sites and positions in interpretation, planning, and management until 2014, when she retired as Park Superintendent. In this Spotlight article, Rudd reflects on her career path, changes in interpretation, and being in upper management as a woman. Part of "Women’s Voices: Women in the National Park Service Oral History Project." Connie Rudd smiles for a portrait in an outdoor setting, wearing a NPS uniform and flathat Shenandoah Virtual Junior Ranger Even if you can't earn a Junior Ranger badge in person while at Shenandoah National Park, you can still become a Virtual Junior Ranger from wherever you are in the world! Complete the online activities and take the pledge to get your virtual badge today! Taking the Long View: Clean Air, Clear Views On very clear days, we can see the bright, crisp colors and textures of national park landscapes highlighting the spectacular natural and historic settings that define these special places. Distant features appear on the horizon, and even in places without distant features, vibrant blue skies and bright white clouds with sharp edges can be seen on clear days. Air pollution can create a haze that dulls these scenes by softening the textures, fading colors, and obscuring... Clean Air View Spotted Lanternfly The Spotted Lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) (SLF), a member of the planthopper family, is an invasive insect that was first discovered in the United States (eastern Pennsylvania) in 2014. SLF are native to Southeast Asia and feed on a wide range of plants and trees. SLF are spreading throughout much of the Mid Atlantic area including northcentral Virginia and have the potential to become a major threat to the region’s agriculture and forestry industries. Top 10 Tips for Visiting Shenandoah in the Summer Take a moment to learn ten simple things you can do to help everyone enjoy a safe and memorable trip to Shenandoah National Park! A young man takes a picture with his phone of a scenic mountain overlook. Thinking Like an Archeologist Undergraduate students engaged in archeological field schools and short-term surveys at Shenandoah National Park. Responsible not only for college credit but also professional-level work that meets the Secretary’ Professional Standards, and Virginia SHPO standards, the students’ assessments included contributions to CRM reports and conference papers. September 11, 2001, NPS Oral History Project This oral history project recorded the memories and perspectives of NPS staff who experienced the events of 9/11 and their aftermath. Transcripts and a 2004 report about the NPS response are available online. A petinad hand holds a flame aloft in the air.
Shenandoah Shenandoah National Park Virginia National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior The Lure of the Mountaintop HIKERS—NPS / JOHN F. MITCHELL; BUCKEYE (BELOW)—NPS Mountaintops have always beckoned humans. To stand at the top—to see as far as the eye allows, to take in the vastness of our world—is to be awed and humbled and inspired all at once. The giant boulders of Old Rag’s ancient granite dwarf hikers. Hemlock Springs lies cloaked in winter. Find a beautiful waterfall in Doyles River. A walk in foggy woods is magical. NPS / BOB KUHNS NPS NPS NPS Shenandoah National Park, established in 1935 before skyscrapers and air travel were commonplace, was designed to give millions the opportunity to travel to the top. From the beginning, national park planners, capitalizing on the new popularity of motor cars, called for Shenandoah’s “greatest single feature” to be a sky-line drive on which motorists could enjoy a leisurely drive through the Blue Ridge and where they could experience the awe and inspiration of magnificent views. Construction of Skyline Drive—your road to the top—was begun even before Congress established the national park. Today, Skyline Drive is your portal to a multitude of experiences. Discover the rich natural and cultural stories hidden in the forests and hollows of Shenandoah. Learn about the establishment of this new park in the East that would give urban residents the national park experience that had become popular in the West. Formed from over 1,000 privately owned tracts of land, Shenandoah started as a patchwork of forests, fields, orchards, and home sites. In 1976 Congress designated over 40 percent of the park as Wilderness, providing the highest level of protection to this precious resource. A pileated woodpecker feeds its young. © ANN SIMPSON White-tailed deer fawns have spots for camouflage. Mountain laurel blooms in June. NPS / ED KNEPLEY NPS / JOHN F. MITCHELL NPS / BOB KUHNS CCC workers build erosion controls along Skyline Drive. Autumn colors beckon people to the mountains. Top: View from the top of Little Stony Man Cliffs. NPS / ED KNEPLEY; TOP—NPS / JOHN F. MITCHELL Seasonal Change in Shenandoah Spring may arrive at your home on some specific date, but here it climbs up the mountains about 100 feet per day, starting in March with blooming red maple, hepatica, and serviceberry. Chipmunks and groundhogs appear above ground again. Trees won’t leaf out on peaks until late May. Wildflowers begin to bloom in April and May, and the large-flowered trillium carpets forest floors. Pink azalea blooms in late May, mountain laurel in June. Migrating birds in colorful plumage return. Each seasonal cycle in the year is different, bringing new reasons to return to the park. Summer wears its mantle of deep greens on ridge and in hollow. Birds are nesting— catbirds, indigo buntings, and towhees. Deer fawns and bear cubs are out and about exploring and learning. Blooming wildflowers proliferate as summer progresses, covering roadsides and open areas by late summer. Crisp fall days bring brilliant leaf colors, usually peaking between October 10 and 25. The southward migrations of birds feature hawks in large numbers flying down the ridge. Black bears thrive in Shenandoah. Explore new worlds with a park ranger. Trilliums dot the forest floor in spring. © ANN SIMPSON NPS / JOHN F. MITCHELL NPS / BARB STEWART NPS Shenandoah Stories NPS; BELOW—NPS / ED KNEPLEY Lady’s slippers adorn woodland trails. Groundhogs are a common sight along the Drive. People came to the Blue Ridge mountains of Virginia for rest and recreation long before Shenandoah National Park was established. Skyland Resort has hosted weary urbanites for long stays since the late 1800s. Later, President Herbert Hoover and First Lady Lou Henry Hoover built their Rapidan Camp as a retreat to escape the stress of work and summer’s heat and humidity in the Nation’s Capital. The Depression-era Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) “boys” came in the 1930s to build many rustic-style park facilities—some still seen and used today—so that everyone could retreat to the mountains for recreation and relaxation. With more clear days and leaf-bare trees, winter is the time for distant views and the frozen sculptures tumbling waterfalls create. Seasons and colors change; migratory songbirds, hawks, and monarch butterflies come and go. Shenandoah’s yearround residents, deer, bears, and others, adapt to each season in turn, making each day different and exciting. Remnants of home sites can still be found in the park’s backcountry. Concrete trail markers direct hikers. NPS / JOHN F. MITCHELL NPS You can compare notes with those of earlier visitors by exploring Shenandoah’s rich stories in more depth. Visit Skyland Resort and tour the restored Massanutten Lodge. Plan a trip to Rapidan Camp to see the restored presidential cabin and an exhibit about the Hoovers. Stop at visitor centers to see films and
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Dickey Ridge Area | Shenandoah National Park 2017 D Cemetery ic k FOX HOLLOW ey MP R id Fox ge w H o l lo T r a i l 4 Dickey Ridge Visitor Center Tr ai l P Picnic Grounds P MP 5 D i ck F a r m R oa d ey S ne a d Signal Knob Overlook R i d ge il Tr a Snead Barn MP Dickey Hill op 6 Lo Trail e Sn ad North Farm P Hiking Trail Unpaved Road Skyline Drive Park Boundary Stream 0 0 P Parking Building 0.5 Kilometer 0.5 Mile Summit Emergency 1-800-732-0911 • Information 540-999-3500 • Online www.nps.gov/shen Fox Hollow Trail Hike Markers & Blazes 1.2-mile circuit ¾-hr hiking time Easiest 310-ft elevation gain Trail markers are at trailheads and intersections. The metal bands are stamped with directional and mileage information. From the trailhead, located across the Skyline Drive from Dickey Ridge Visitor Center, go left onto Dickey Ridge Trail, then right onto Fox Hollow Trail. Stay on Fox Hollow Trail - past rock piles and the Fox family cemetery - back to your starting point. Trail blazes are found on trees and rocks throughout the Park. The color identifies the trail type: Snead Farm Loop Hike 3.7-mile circuit 2½-hrs hiking time Moderate 580-ft elevation gain Blue - Hiking trail White - Appalachian Trail Yellow - Open to horses From the trailhead, located across the Skyline Drive from Dickey Ridge Visitor Center, go right onto Dickey Ridge Trail. Go left on Snead Farm Road, which will take you to Snead Barn. Continue on the Snead Farm Loop Trail to its intersection with the Dickey Ridge Trail. Turn right and follow it back to your starting point. Need to Know Hiking Difficulty Scale Easiest: Generally suitable for anyone who enjoys walking. Mostly level or with a slight incline. Generally less than 3 miles. Moderate: Generally suitable for novice hikers seeking a bit of a challenge. The terrain will involve a moderate incline and may have some steeper sections. Generally 3 to 5 miles. Moderately Strenuous: Generally challenging for an unconditioned person. The terrain will involve a steady and often steep incline. Generally 5 to 8 miles. Strenuous: Will challenge most hikers. The hike will generally be longer and steeper, but may be deemed strenuous because of the elevation gain. Generally 7 to 10 miles. Very Strenuous: Only well-conditioned and well-prepared hikers should attempt. Generally long and steep, and may include rock scrambling, stream crossings, and other challenging terrain. Generally 8 miles and over. ■ ■ ■ ■ Pets are not allowed on Fox Hollow Trail. Where allowed, pets must be on a leash no longer than 6’ at all times. Take plenty of water—at least a quart per hour. When you return from your hike, check for ticks. Be sure someone knows where you are and when to expect your return. Good to Know On both of these trails you will see evidence of the families who once lived in this area. When the Park was established, it was carved out of eight counties and 1,081 tracts of land. Numerous families were displaced. We can show our appreciation by respecting their cemeteries and honoring their sacrifices. Leave No Trace ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Plan ahead and prepare. Travel and camp on durable surfaces. Dispose of waste properly. Leave what you find. Respect wildlife. Be considerate of other visitors. Trail maintenance and map funded by entrance fee dollars.
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Compton Gap Area | Shenandoah National Park D ic k e y e MP l Rid g 9 Tr ai MP 8 Lands Run P Parking Hicker son Ho llo w Tra il 2017 Dickey Ridge Horse Trail Fort Windham Rocks Tra il Spring hous e Roa d Compto n 10 Ga p MP Road e Fir Compton Gap Lands P Parking Run Indian Run Overlook Compton Peak West MP 11 Compton Peak East Columnar Jointing North MP 12 P Hiking Trail Hiking Trail (Appalachian Trail) Hiking Trail (Horses) Unpaved Road Unpaved Road (Horses) Jenkins Gap Parking Skyline Drive Park Boundary Stream P Parking Summit 0 0.5 Kilometer 0 Viewpoint 0.5 Mile Waterfall Emergency 1-800-732-0911 • Information 540-999-3500 • Online www.nps.gov/shen Compton Peak, West and East Hike 2.4-mile round trip 1¾-hrs hiking time Moderate 855-ft elevation gain Markers & Blazes Trail markers are at trailheads and intersections. The metal bands are stamped with directional and mileage information. From the Compton Gap parking area at mile 10.4, cross Skyline Drive and look for the concrete trail marker indicating the Appalachian Trail (A.T.). Take the A.T. south to the intersection and go right. Continue to the western viewpoint. Return to the intersection and continue straight to the eastern viewpoint. Trail blazes are found on trees and rocks throughout the Park. The color identifies the trail type: Fort Windham Rocks Hike 0.8-mile round trip ½-hr hiking time Easiest 130-ft elevation gain Blue - Hiking trail White - Appalachian Trail Yellow - Open to horses From the Compton Gap parking area at mile 10.4, follow the Appalachian Trail (A.T.) north to its intersection with the Dickey Ridge Trail. Turn left. In about 300 yards, look for Fort Windham Rocks on the right, deeply split boulders rising 50 feet above ground. Need to Know ■ ■ Lands Run Falls Hike 1.3-mile round trip 1½-hrs hiking time Easiest 325-ft elevation gain From the Lands Run parking area at mile 9.2, follow the fire road downhill for about 0.6-mile and look for a small stream that flows under the road (it may be waterless in dry conditions). Follow the stream about 25 feet to the right to the top of a small falls. There is a series of cascades that descend about 80 feet into a gorge. It’s a beautiful area to explore, but use caution around the falls and steep, rocky areas. Hiking Difficulty Scale Easiest: Generally suitable for anyone who enjoys walking. Mostly level or with a slight incline. Generally less than 3 miles. Moderate: Generally suitable for novice hikers seeking a bit of a challenge. The terrain will involve a moderate incline and may have some steeper sections. Generally 3 to 5 miles. Moderately Strenuous: Generally challenging for an unconditioned person. The terrain will involve a steady and often steep incline. Generally 5 to 8 miles. Strenuous: Will challenge most hikers. The hike will generally be longer and steeper, but may be deemed strenuous because of the elevation gain. Generally 7 to 10 miles. Very Strenuous: Only well-conditioned and well-prepared hikers should attempt. Generally long and steep, and may include rock scrambling, stream crossings, and other challenging terrain. Generally 8 miles and over. Trail maintenance and map funded by recreation fee dollars. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Pets must be on a leash no longer than 6’ at all times. Do not attempt to cross streams during icy conditions or flooding. It’s dangerous and potentially deadly to climb on the rocks near waterfalls. Be sure you are physically able to complete the hike you’ve chosen. Take plenty of water—at least a quart per hour. When you return from your hike, check for ticks. Be sure someone knows where you are and when to expect your return. Good to Know You can see one of the best examples of columnar jointing in Shenandoah on the Compton Peak hike if you are up for a bit of climbing. Once you are at the eastern viewpoint, follow the blue blazes down and around to the base of the cliff - look up from there to see the columnar jointing. It’s steep and rocky, but worth the trip. Fun to Know What’s so cool about Fort Windham rocks? It’s greenstone and is part of a series of lava flows that includes the Pedlar granodiorite - the oldest rocks in the Park. These are covered with lichen and weathering rapidly so you’ll see some wonderful colors! Leave No Trace ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Plan ahead and prepare. Travel and camp on durable surfaces. Dispose of waste properly. Leave what you find. Respect wildlife. Be considerate of other visitors.
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Keyser Run Area | Shenandoah National Park ra MP 21 P Little Hogback Overlook il MP Tra il Hogback Overlook ra nT P sT r a il Trail Tr ac e oll ow a – O v e r a ll R u el lH ail Mathews Arm Campground i He sk T ro r W e d d le w o o d Tu sco r es T Trac il 2017 in 23 Piney River MP P 22 Rattlesnake Point Overlook Keyser Run Parking Devils Piney Branch Upper Trail Jeremys Run Upper Trail Little Devils Stairs Overlook R oa d MP P L i tt le Knob Mountain Cutoff Trail Sugarloaf Trai l n ta Elkwa llow Tra il M K no b ou 20 Pole Bridge Link Trail F Range View Cabin i re MP 24 i Tra Trail Tr ai l a ir s St P l Elkwallow n Ru Up pe r Little Hogback Overlook Ridge P er ch Pin ey n Thor ey Ridge Trail Pin to Hu ll Sc hool Trail P n pp er T rail ou MP F ork M Ri ve rU ta n 26 Hiking Trail Hiking Trail (Appalachian Trail) Hiking Trail (Horses) Unpaved Road Unpaved Road (Horses) in Tra il Piney Branch Lower Trail Paved Road Skyline Drive Park Boundary Stream P Parking Building oad ire R nF u R er ys Ke P i n ey Ke y s 25 B ran MP 0 0 North 1 Kilometer 1 Mile Waterfall Emergency 1-800-732-0911 • Information 540-999-3500 • Online www.nps.gov/shen Little Devils Stairs Loop Hike Markers & Blazes 7.4-mile circuit 8½-hrs hiking time Strenuous 1,897-ft elevation gain Trail markers are at trailheads and intersections. The metal bands are stamped with directional and mileage information. From the Keyser Run parking area at mile 19.4, take the Keyser Run Fire Road (yellow-blazed) and follow it to the parking area on the boundary. Please respect private property and stay on the fire road. Pick up the blue-blazed Little Devils Stairs Trail and follow it back to Keyser Run Fire Road and the parking area. Trail blazes are found on trees and rocks throughout the Park. The color identifies the trail type: Sugarloaf Loop Hike 5-mile circuit 7-hrs hiking time Moderate 1,120-ft elevation gain From the Piney River parking area at mile 22, take the Piney Branch Upper Trail to its intersection with the Pole Bridge Link Trail. Go left on the Pole Bridge Link Trail and then left on Sugarloaf Trail. This will bring you out near Skyline Drive above Hogback Overlook. Turn left to take the Appalachian Trail (white-blazed) back to your starting point. Knob Mountain–Jeremys Run Hike 6-mile circuit 7½-hrs hiking time Moderately strenuous 1,303-ft elevation gain From the parking lot at Elkwallow Wayside at mile 24, take the Appalachian Trail (white blazed) to its junction with Jeremys Run Trail (blue blazed). The A.T. goes sharply left here, but stay straight onto Jeremys Run Upper Trail. Then take a right onto the Knob Mountain Cutoff Trail and another right on Knob Mountain Trail (yellow-blazed). Follow it to Mathews Arm Campground registration station where you can take the Elkwallow Trail back to the wayside. Hiking Difficulty Scale Easiest: Generally suitable for anyone who enjoys walking. Mostly level or with a slight incline. Generally less than 3 miles. Moderate: Generally suitable for novice hikers seeking a bit of a challenge. The terrain will involve a moderate incline and may have some steeper sections. Generally 3 to 5 miles. Moderately Strenuous: Generally challenging for an unconditioned person. The terrain will involve a steady and often steep incline. Generally 5 to 8 miles. Strenuous: Will challenge most hikers. The hike will generally be longer and steeper, but may be deemed strenuous because of the elevation gain. Generally 7 to 10 miles. Blue - Hiking trail White - Appalachian Trail Yellow - Open to horses Need to Know ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Pets must be on a leash no longer than 6’ at all times. Be sure you are physically able to complete the hike you’ve chosen. Take plenty of water—at least a quart per hour. When you return from your hike, check for ticks. Stay on the trail and respect private property. Be sure someone knows where you are and when to expect your return. Leave what you find. Artifacts are protected by law. Please respect family cemeteries. Good to Know You may see evidence of the families who once lived in this area. When the Park was established, it was carved out of eight counties and 1,081 tracts of privately owned land. Numerous families were displaced. We can show our appreciation by respecting their cemeteries and honoring their sacrifices. Leave No Trace ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Plan ahead and prepare. Travel and camp on durable surfaces. Dispose of waste properly. Leave what you find. Respect wildlife. Be considerate of other visitors. Very Strenuous: Only well-conditioned and well-prepared hikers should attempt. Generally long and steep, and may include rock scrambling, stream crossings, and other challenging terrain. Generally 8 miles and over. Trail maintenance and map funded by recreation fee dollars.
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Mathews Arm Area | Shenandoah National Park 2017 Hollo w Trail il Tuscarora Tra Overall Ru n Th o mp so n North ail r T Tusc ar o ra – O v er all Overall/Beecher Connector Trail Ru n il Tra ee B Ma th e Be ec h er rm sA w Trail is k He ra e Weddl wo od T Mathews Arm Campground Kno bM ou nt Hiking Trail Hiking Trail (Appalachian Trail) Hiking Trail (Horses) Unpaved Road Unpaved Road (Horses) Hogback Overlook ail Tr Tuscarora–Overall P Run Trail MP 21 ce n ai Tra il sT rail Heiskell Hollow l rai es T Trac Trail P Registration ra oll ow il e ll H d Mathew sA rm Ro a Ridge il Tra Tuscarora–Ov era l l R un Tra il er ch Overall Run Falls (93’) Traces T rai l R id g e Trail T ail w Tr allo w Elk Paved Road Skyline Drive Park Boundary Stream P Parking Building 0 0.5 Kilometer 0 Viewpoint 0.5 Mile Waterfall Emergency 1-800-732-0911 • Information 540-999-3500 • Online www.nps.gov/shen Overall Run Falls Hike Markers & Blazes 5.1-mile circuit 4-hrs hiking time Moderately strenuous 1,291-ft elevation gain Trail markers are at trailheads and intersections. The metal bands are stamped with directional and mileage information. From the Mathews Arm Campground registration parking area at mile 22.2, take Traces Trail to the yellow-blazed Mathews Arm Road. The road becomes Mathews Arm Trail. Stay on the right at its intersection with Beecher Ridge Trail and continue on Mathews Arm Trail following it to the intersection with Tuscarora-Overall Run Trail. Go left and follow it about a tenth of a mile to a side trail. From here you can see the upper falls. Continue downhill on the main trail and use the side trail to get a view of the biggest falls in Shenandoah at 93 feet. Retrace your steps back to your starting point. Trail blazes are found on trees and rocks throughout the Park. The color identifies the trail type: Blue - Hiking trail White - Appalachian Trail Yellow - Open to horses NOTE: If the campground is closed, you can park at mile 21 and take the Appalachian Trail to the Tuscarora-Overall Run Trail. This route adds another mile to your hike. If you are already in the campground, you can take the yellow-blazed Mathews Arm Road from the B-loop. Traces Trail Hike Need to Know ■ 1.7-mile circuit 1¼-hrs hiking time Easiest 333-ft elevation gain From the registration parking area at mile 22.2, take the blueblazed Traces Nature Trail around the campground. Hiking Difficulty Scale Easiest: Generally suitable for anyone who enjoys walking. Mostly level or with a slight incline. Generally less than 3 miles. Moderate: Generally suitable for novice hikers seeking a bit of a challenge. The terrain will involve a moderate incline and may have some steeper sections. Generally 3 to 5 miles. Moderately Strenuous: Generally challenging for an unconditioned person. The terrain will involve a steady and often steep incline. Generally 5 to 8 miles. Strenuous: Will challenge most hikers. The hike will generally be longer and steeper, but may be deemed strenuous because of the elevation gain. Generally 7 to 10 miles. Very Strenuous: Only well-conditioned and well-prepared hikers should attempt. Generally long and steep, and may include rock scrambling, stream crossings, and other challenging terrain. Generally 8 miles and over. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Pets are not allowed on Traces Trail. Where allowed, pets must be on a leash no longer than 6’ at all times. Do not attempt to cross streams during icy conditions or flooding. It’s dangerous and potentially deadly to climb on the rocks near waterfalls. Be sure you are physically able to complete the hike you’ve chosen. Take plenty of water—at least a quart per hour. When you return from your hike, check for ticks. Be sure someone knows where you are and when to expect your return. Leave what you find. Artifacts are protected by law. Filter or treat water from streams before drinking. Good to Know Traces Trail is a fairly smooth walk with a few moderately steep places through a former homesite. Look for rock walls and old road beds. Shenandoah was created from over 1,000 privately owned tracts of land. Throughout the Park you can find traces of those who lived and worked in these mountains and sacrificed their land and homes for this national park. Please show your respect by not disturbing artifacts. Leave No Trace ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Plan ahead and prepare. Travel and camp on durable surfaces. Dispose of waste properly. Leave what you find. Respect wildlife. Be considerate of other visitors. Trail maintenance and map funded by recreation fee dollars.
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Thornton Gap Area | Shenandoah National Park 2017 R oc ky ntain ou M Branch Trail l Trai Pass Mountain Hut ss Pa MP 30 North ut Fire Road tain H oun sM Pas Pass Mountain Overlook Pass Mountain Overlook Trail P MP 31 US Entrance Station Restrooms P 211 Thornton Gap P US 211 MP 32 US 211 Trail Mary’s Rock Tunnel Buck Hollow Overlook w Tra ll o Ho il Tunnel Overlook Mary’s Rock Summit MP ck Bu P Ri dge H Byrds Nest 3 Shelter R Trail Buck az ck Ro s g din Le a Meadow Spring Trail id ge 33 Hazel Mountain Overlook h it W el e MP 34 i Tr a Mo un t ai n H Hiking Trail Hiking Trail (Appalachian Trail) Hiking Trail (Horses) Unpaved Road Paved Road Skyline Drive Park Boundary Stream P Parking Building 0 0 el az er l il Tra T rai l Ri v 1.0 Kilometer 1.0 Mile Viewpoint Emergency 1-800-732-0911 • Information 540-999-3500 • Online www.nps.gov/shen Marys Rock Summit Hike Markers & Blazes 3.7-mile round trip 2¼-hrs hiking time Moderate 1210-ft elevation gain Trail markers are at trailheads and intersections. The metal bands are stamped with directional and mileage information. From the trailhead at the back of the Panorama parking area at mile 31.6, take the short connector trail to the Appalachian Trail and go left (south). At the trailpost take a right to the viewpoint. Retrace your steps. Trail blazes are found on trees and rocks throughout the Park. The color identifies the trail type: Marys Rock Summit 2 Hike 2.9-mile round trip 3-hrs hiking time Moderate 830-ft elevation gain Blue - Hiking trail White - Appalachian Trail Yellow - Open to horses From Meadow Spring parking area at mile 33.5, cross skyline Drive and take the Meadow Spring Trail to its intersection with the Appalachian Trail (A.T.). Go right onto the A.T. and follow it to the trailpost. Go left to the viewpoint. Retrace your steps. Pass Mountain Loop Hike Need to Know 3.4-mile round trip 2½-hrs hiking time Moderate 670-ft elevation gain From the trailhead at the back of the Panorama parking area at mile 31.6, take the short connector trail to the Appalachian Trail (A.T.) and go right (north). Cross Rt. 211 and Skyline Drive. Go right onto the fire road and follow it to the hut. There, look for the blue-blazed Pass Mountain Trail and take that back to the A.T. south which will take you back to your starting point. Hazel River Falls and Cave Hike 5.3-mile round trip 5-hrs hiking time Moderate 1070-ft elevation gain From Meadow Spring parking area at mile 33.5, take the yellowblazed Hazel Mountain Trail past the Buck Ridge Trail. At the fork, go left onto the yellow-blazed White Rocks Trail. At the next trailpost, go right and continue to see two small waterfalls and a modest cave. Retrace your steps. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Pets must be on a leash no longer than 6’ at all times. Be sure you are physically able to complete the hike you’ve chosen. Take plenty of water—at least a quart per hour. When you return from your hike, check for ticks. Be sure someone knows where you are and when to expect your return. Stay on the trail and avoid trampling sensitive vegetation Good to Know When hiking in Shenandoah, it’s always good to stay on the trail for your safety and for the protection of the natural and cultural resources. On Marys Rock, it’s particularly important! Fragile plants and lichens thrive in these rocky places.Take in the expansive views, but don’t forget to notice what’s underfoot to avoid crushing fragile plants and lichen! Fun to Know Like many of the Park trails, Marys Rock Trail was built by the “boys” of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). While you’re at the Park stop by Byrd Visitor Center (mile 52) to learn more about these young men who made Shenandoah what it is today! Hiking Difficulty Scale Easiest: Generally suitable for anyone who enjoys walking. Mostly level or with a slight incline. Generally less than 3 miles. Moderate: A moderate hike generally suitable for novice hikers seeking a bit of a challenge. The terrain will involve a moderate incline and may have some steeper sections. Generally 3 to 5 miles. Moderately Strenuous: Generally challenging for an unconditioned person. The terrain will involve a steady and often steep incline. Generally 5 to 8 miles. Strenuous: Will challenge most hikers. The hike will generally be longer and steeper, but may be deemed strenuous because of the elevation gain. Generally 7 to 10 miles. Very Strenuous: Only well conditioned and well prepared hikers should attempt. Generally long and steep, and may include rock scrambling, stream crossings, and other challenging terrain. Generally 8 miles and over. Trail maintenance and map funded by recreation fee dollars.
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Skyland Area | Shenandoah National Park 2017 MP 39 Little Stony Man P Parking la n Sky d il Tra F ir qu P as s ama od dy e Ro Stony Man Trail ad Furnace Spring Trail Stony Man Horse Trail Skyland 40 Dining Hall P Massanutten Lodge Registration Skyla He ad MP Stony Man Parking Conference Hall Mill ers Hemlock Springs Overlook l Trai n d Amphitheater Thorofare Mountain Overlook MP 42 Bi g Horse Stables Whiteoak Canyon Parking P MP 41 W h it il Tra yon eoak Can l Trai le St nd Sky la Me ad ow s ab P Limberlost Parking Limberlost Trail MP 43 Rag H or se d Ol R o ad Fire Limberlost Trail North Whiteoak Canyon Trail Crescent Rock Trail Hiking Trail Hiking Trail (Appalachian Trail) Hiking Trail (Horses) Unpaved Road (Horses) Paved Road Skyline Drive Stream P Parking Building ail Tr Timber Hollow Overlook 0 0 .5 Kilometer .5 Mile Viewpoint Emergency 1-800-732-0911 • Information 540-999-3500 • Online www.nps.gov/shen Limberlost Hike Markers & Blazes 1.7-mile circuit 1½-hrs hiking time Easiest 130-ft elevation gain Trail markers are at trailheads and intersections. The metal bands are stamped with directional and mileage information. Take the trail to the right of the trailhead and follow the greenstone path back to your starting point. Detailed accessibility information at the trailhead. NO PETS. Trail blazes are found on trees and rocks throughout the Park. The color identifies the trail type: Millers Head Hike 1.6-mile round trip 2-hrs hiking time Easiest 450-ft elevation gain Blue - Hiking trail White - Appalachian Trail Yellow - Open to horses From the trailhead just up the hill from the Amphitheater, take the Millers Head Trail to a spectacular viewpoint and site of a former fire tower. The trail is rocky and the return is a bit steep. Stony Man Hike 1.6-mile circuit 1-hrs hiking time Easiest 340-ft elevation gain Take the Appalachian Trail (A.T.) to the trail post. Continue on the blue-blazed Stony Man Trail to the viewpoint. Then continue on the Stony Man Trail to its intersection with the A.T. and retrace your steps to your starting point. NO PETS. Passamaquoddy Loop Hike 3.4-mile circuit 3-hrs hiking time Moderate 770-ft elevation gain From the north end of the Stony Man parking area, look for the trail post and the yellow-blazed Furnace Spring Horse Trail. Take it to the blue-blazed Passamaquoddy Trial where you will turn right. Follow the Passamaquoddy Trail to its junction with the A.T., turn right and follow it back to the parking area. Need to Know Pets are not allowed on Limberlost and Stony Man Trails. Where allowed, pets must be on a leash no longer than 6’ at all times. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Be sure you are physically able to complete the hike you’ve chosen. Take plenty of water—at least a quart per hour. When you return from your hike, check for ticks. Stay on the trail and avoid trampling sensitive vegetation. Be sure someone knows where you are and when to expect your return.. Fun to Know When you hike in the Skyland area you are carrying on a long tradition. Before Shenandoah National Park was established, and even before we used the word “hike,” vacationers to Skyland Resort in the late 1800s and early 1900s “tramped” these same trails and enjoyed these same spectacular views. Stop by Massanutten Lodge to learn more about the history of Skyland Hiking Difficulty Scale Easiest: Generally suitable for anyone who enjoys walking. Mostly level or with a slight incline. Generally less than 3 miles. Moderate: A moderate hike generally suitable for novice hikers seeking a bit of a challenge. The terrain will involve a moderate incline and may have some steeper sections. Generally 3 to 5 miles. Moderately Strenuous: Generally challenging for an unconditioned person. The terrain will involve a steady and often steep incline. Generally 5 to 8 miles. Strenuous: Will challenge most hikers. The hike will generally be longer and steeper, but may be deemed strenuous because of the elevation gain. Generally 7 to 10 miles. Very Strenuous: Only well conditioned and well prepared hikers should attempt. Generally long and steep, and may include rock scrambling, stream crossings, and other challenging terrain. Generally 8 miles and over. Trail maintenance and map funded by recreation fee dollars.
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Whiteoak Canyon Area | Shenandoah National Park 2017 P Whiteoak Canyon Trail Old Rag Fire Road 1 P Co rb Skyland Stables Trail MP Limberlost Trail Map Inset l rai nT Ru Thorofare Mountain Overlook 42 Whiteoak Canyon Parking an di In MP Skyland 0 untain Trail Mo in LD FEET 1500 1000 Lim be rl R A G F I R E ROAD o it e Trail Horse dows Mea oa Robertson Mountain Trail k an C Trail lost ber Lim il Tra yon Can ak iteo Wh Wh 43 2 44 Crescent Rock Overlook yo l eR oad Whiteoak Crossing Map Inset Fir 0 2 225 450 METERS FEET 1500 ny Ca k 0 375 750 1000 te W hit kC yo n 0 0 ak eo 600 hi t Whiteoak Cany on F ire Ro ad il W P Paved Road Skyline Drive Park Boundary Stream P Parking Building ra T North Hiking Trail Hiking Trail (Appalachian Trail) Hiking Trail (Horses) Unpaved Road Unpaved Road (Horses) Trail rse s Ho an Tr Whiteoak-Cedar Run Link Trail Whiteoak Boundary Parking ow ad Me eoa un rR da Ce ai l g -Bi nd Skyla hi rail Wh nT iteoak C a n yo W MP 46 Tr a i oa Hawksbill Gap Parking n rlost Trail Limbe on 45 P 750 MP MP MP O 450 METERS il Tra st Limberlost Trail 375 P Corbin Hollow Trail -Big land Sky Timber Hollow Overlook 225 0 43 1 Ca ny on Tra il 1 Kilometer 1 Mile Waterfall Emergency 1-800-732-0911 • Information 540-999-3500 • Online www.nps.gov/shen Skyline Drive to Upper Falls Hike 4.6-mile round trip 3½-hrs hiking time Moderate 1,040-ft elevation gain Markers & Blazes Trail markers are at trailheads and intersections. The metal bands are stamped with directional and mileage information. From the Whiteoak Canyon parking area (mile 42.6), follow the Whiteoak Canyon Trail and stay on this trail as you pass the junctions for the Old Rag Fire Road and the Limberlost Trail. About 2.3 miles from the start you will come to a rocky ledge that offers an excellent view of the upper falls. Retrace your steps to return to the parking lot. Remember that the return trip will be very steep. Trail blazes are found on trees and rocks throughout the Park. The color identifies the trail type: Blue - Hiking trail White - Appalachian Trail Yellow - Open to horses Cedar Run - Whiteoak Circuit Hike 7.3-mile circuit 6¼-hrs hiking time Very strenuous 2,794-ft elevation gain From Hawksbill Gap parking (mile 45.6), take Cedar Run Trail, then left on the Link Trail, and left on Whiteoak Canyon Trail. Just after the upper falls, go left on the Whiteoak Canyon Fire Road/Horse Trail (see inset #2 for a map of this last intersection). If the water is up, use the pedestrian bridge above the falls. Need to Know ■ ■ ■ Boundary to Lower Falls Hike 2-mile round trip 1½-hrs hiking time Easiest 500-ft elevation gain From the parking area located at the Park boundary (directions below), begin at Whiteoak Canyon Trail and keep right at the intersection with Cedar Run Trail. Cross a small stream and arrive shortly at the base of the lower falls. Return by the same route. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Directions to Boundary Trailhead From Sperryville - Follow Route 211 to Route 522 south for 0.8 mile. Turn right on Route 231, follow 10.2 miles to Etlan, turn right on Route 643. Follow for 4.5 miles and turn right onto Route 600. Proceed 3.5 miles to the parking area. From Madison - Route 29 Business, take 231 north for 5.6 miles to Route 670 at Banco. Continue 3.6 miles to Route 643 in Syria. Follow 0.8 mile on Route 643 to Route 600. Continue on Route 600 to the parking area. It’s dangerous and potentially deadly to climb on the rocks near waterfalls. Pets must be on a leash no longer than 6’ at all times. Do not attempt to cross streams during icy conditions or flooding. Be sure you are physically able to complete the hike you’ve chosen. Take plenty of water - at least a quart per hour. When you return from your hike, check for ticks. Be sure someone knows where you are and when to expect your return. There is no public transportation on Skyline Drive or at the Whiteoak boundary trailhead. Good to Know ■ ■ Even if you are hiking from the boundary, you must have an entrance permit or annual pass. Please be prepared to self-pay (correct change or credit card) at the boundary trailhead. Backcountry camping sites are very limited in this area, so be prepared to go to a different area in the Park to camp, especially on weekends. Be sure you have a backcountry camping permit and that you understand the regulations, particularly those pertaining to site choice. Hiking Difficulty Scale Easiest: Generally suitable for anyone who enjoys walking. Mostly level or with a slight incline. Generally less than 3 miles. Moderate: A moderate hike generally suitable for novice hikers seeking a bit of a challenge. The terrain will involve a moderate incline and may have some steeper sections. Generally 3 to 5 miles. Moderately Strenuous: Generally challenging for an unconditioned person. The ter
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Hawksbill Area | Shenandoah National Park Ro ck Tra il 2017 nt sce e r C Crescent Rock Overlook North Whiteoak Canyon Fire Road Hawksbill Gap Parking MP 45 P Hawksbill Viewing Platform C l i d Ru Lo w e r H a w k ll sbi lan Rock Spring Cabin Rock Spring Hut n il r Tra S ala mande 46 Tr a il er H Upp w do Old Rag View Overlook s Trail Spitler Knoll Overlook ea 48 M MP sbill awk MP 47 r Upper Hawksbill Parking Ho P se P B ig MP Rock Spring Access Road (no vehicle access) Rock Spring Cabin Parking ar a Tr Sky (day use only) ed Byrds Nest 2 Shelter Trail Skyland-Big Meadows Horse Tr ail Hiking Trail Hiking Trail (Appalachian Trail) Hiking Trail (Horses) Unpaved Road Paved Road Skyline Drive 0 0 P Parking Building 0.5 Kilometer 0.5 Mile Summit Emergency 1-800-732-0911 • Information 540-999-3500 • Online www.nps.gov/shen Hawksbill Summit Hike Markers & Blazes 1.7-mile round trip 1¼-hrs hiking time Easiest 690-ft elevation gain Trail markers are at trailheads and intersections. The metal bands are stamped with directional and mileage information. From the Hawksbill Gap parking area at mile 45.5, take the Lower Hawksbill Trail to Byrds Nest 2 Shelter and then follow the trail to the viewing platform. Retrace your steps to return to starting point. Trail blazes are found on trees and rocks throughout the Park. The color identifies the trail type: Upper Hawksbill to Hawksbill Summit Hike 2.1-mile round trip 1½-hrs hiking time Easiest 520-ft elevation gain Blue - Hiking trail White - Appalachian Trail Yellow - Open to horses From the Upper Hawksbill parking area at mile 46.5, take the Upper Hawksbill Trail to Byrds Nest 2 Shelter and then follow the trail to the viewing platform. Retrace your steps to return. Hawksbill Loop Hike 2.9-mile circuit 2-hrs hiking time Moderate 860-ft elevation gain From the north end of the Hawksbill Gap parking area at mile 45.5, take the short connector trail to the Appalachian Trail (A.T.). At the trail post, turn left onto the A.T. south. Continue on the A.T. south to the trail post indicating the Salamander Trail. Go left onto the blue-blazed Salamander Trail and follow it to the summit. Be sure to take the short trail past the shelter to the viewing platform. To return to the parking area be sure to take the blueblazed Lower (NOT the Upper) Hawksbill Trail. Hiking Difficulty Scale Easiest: Generally suitable for anyone who enjoys walking. Mostly level or with a slight incline. Generally less than 3 miles. Moderate: Generally suitable for novice hikers seeking a bit of a challenge. The terrain will involve a moderate incline and may have some steeper sections. Generally 3 to 5 miles. Moderately Strenuous: Generally challenging for an unconditioned person. The terrain will involve a steady and often steep incline. Generally 5 to 8 miles. Strenuous: Will challenge most hikers. The hike will generally be longer and steeper, but may be deemed strenuous because of the elevation gain. Generally 7 to 10 miles. Very Strenuous: Only well-conditioned and well-prepared hikers should attempt. Generally long and steep, and may include rock scrambling, stream crossings, and other challenging terrain. Generally 8 miles and over. Need to Know ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Pets must be on a leash no longer than 6’ at all times. Take plenty of water—at least a quart per hour. When you return from your hike, check for ticks. Be aware that you are in snake habitat. Be sure someone knows where you are and when to expect your return. Good to Know Many of Shenandoah’s most popular views are from rocky outcrops like Hawksbill. Did you know that these popular spots are also home to some of the Park’s most rare and sensitive vegetation? Look closely to see these tough, yet fragile plants— they look like they are growing right out of the rocks! Constant trampling puts this rare vegetation at risk, so please be aware of these special plants we are working to protect. Fun to Know Hawksbill is Shenandoah’s highest peak at 4,051 ft. Be sure to see the view from the observation platform just a few feet up the trail from the shelter. How far you can see will depend on a number of factors including the current air quality. It’s a great reminder of the simple things we can all do to reduce emissions and improve air quality—not just for the views, but also for our health! Leave No Trace ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Plan ahead and prepare. Travel and camp on durable surfaces. Dispose of waste properly. Leave what you find. Respect wildlife. Be considerate of other visitors. Trail maintenance and map funded by entrance fee dollars.
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Old Rag Area | Shenandoah National Park 2017 I n ia nd ! n Ru Fi r or C Co rb in ail Tr Ra g rb Co d Ol Ol d Nicho lso n in Trail nta ou M bin Mou Hol low nt ain Trail Tra il in e ad Ro Hollo w Robertson Mountain il Tra ain t n ert son M o u Ro a llo We akley Ho w Fi r e W hit eo ak C eT r a il (0.8 mi from trailhead) Fi re Roa d Rob n yo an d Ri d il Tra Saddle Trail Berry Hollow Parking (end of vehicle access) Byrds Nest 1 Shelter (day use only) ge ail Tr ROCK SCRAMBLE N0 CAMPING ZONE ABOVE 2800 FT North Be rr y Ho llow Ro ad P Chain Gate Old Rag (3,291’) Old Rag Shelter (day use only) Whiteoak -Ceda r Ru n Li nk T rail 600 P Old Rag Parking Ri dg Ra g Trail Chain Gate ollow Fire Road ey H akl e W Whiteoak Entrance P Whiteoak Boundary Parking Circuit Hike Hiking Trail Unpaved Road Unpaved Road (Horses) Paved Road Park Boundary Stream P Parking Building 0 0 1 Kilometer 1 Mile Summit Emergency 1-800-732-0911 • Information 540-999-3500 • Online www.nps.gov/shen Old Rag Circuit Hike Markers & Blazes 9.2-mile circuit 7½-hrs hiking time Very strenuous 2,380-ft elevation gain Trail markers are at trailheads and intersections. The metal bands are stamped with directional and mileage information. From Old Rag Parking, walk along Route 600. Pass the Nicholson Hollow Trailhead (on the right). Take the blue-blazed Ridge Trail to the left. Continue along the Ridge Trail, across the rock scramble and descend on the Saddle Trail, which becomes a fire road after you pass Old Rag Shelter. At the T-intersection, go right and immediately right again at the fork onto Weakley Hollow Fire Road to return to your starting point. Pets are prohibited on the Ridge and Saddle Trails. Trail blazes are found on trees and rocks throughout the Park.The color identifies the trail type: Blue - Hiking trail White - Appalachian Trail Yellow - Open to horses Notice the numbers below the blue trail blazes as you hike Old Rag. In an emergency, note the closest number to the incident and include this in your report. Watch for this sign at the intersection. Be sure to go right at the fork onto Weakley Hollow Fire Road towards the Old Rag parking area. Berry Hollow Parking - Old Rag Summit Hike 5.4-mile round trip 6¼-hrs hiking time Strenuous 1,760-ft elevation gain This hike allows you to get to the summit without having to navigate the rock scramble. From Berry Hollow parking area, take the Berry Hollow Road 0.8-mile to the junction with Old Rag Fire Road. Turn right and continue 0.4-mile to the Old Rag Shelter. Turn left onto the Saddle Trail and continue the remaining 1.6 miles to the summit. Return by the same route to avoid the very strenuous and often crowded Ridge Trail rock scramble. Pets are prohibited on the Ridge and Saddle Trails. Robertson Mountain Trail - Alternate Hike for Pets 7.8-mile round trip 6½-hrs hiking time Strenuous 2,130-ft elevation gain From Old Rag parking area, walk along Rt. 600. Pass the Nicholson Hollow Trailhead and continue straight on to the Weakley Hollow Fire Road. Take Weakly Hollow Fire Road to Robertson Mountain Trail. Follow to the summit and descend to the Old Rag Fire Road. Turn left and then another left onto Weakley Hollow Fire Road. Continue on this fire road and stay straight on the intersection with Rt. 600 back to the Old Rag parking area. Nicholson Hollow Trail - Alternate Hike for Pets 8-mile round trip 7-hrs hiking time Moderately strenuous 1,240-ft elevation gain From Old Rag parking area walk along Rt. 600. Look for the Nicholson Hollow Trail (concrete marker) on the right. Follow the Nicholson Hollow Trail to Corbin Cabin and return. You’ll cross several streams along the way. Directions to Parking Areas Sperryville to Old Rag Parking - From Route 211, turn onto Route 522 and follow it south for 0.8 mile. Turn right on Route 231, follow 8 miles, turn right onto Route 601 and follow signs to the Old Rag parking area, approximately 3 miles. Madison to Old Rag Parking - From Route 29 Business, turn onto Route 231 and follow it for 12.8 miles. Turn left onto Route 602. Follow signs for the parking area. Old Rag parking is approximately 3 miles from the turn onto Route 602. Sperryville to Berry Hollow Parking - Start by taking Route 231 South past the turnoff for Nethers. From Madison, start from Route 29 Business, turning onto Route 231. Once on Route 231 (from either Sperryville or Madison), turn onto Route 670 near Banco. Turn right at Syria, then left onto Route 600. Go past the Whiteoak Canyon parking area to Berry Hollow parking area. Parking is extremely limited. Need to Know ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Do not attempt this hike unless you are physically able. Be prepared: bring sturdy footwear, flashlights, extra layers of clothing, food, and plenty of water. Be sure you know what time it gets dark and plan for extra time. There can be a sign
Big Meadows Area - Shenandoah National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior 2017 Red Gate Fire Road re st a il P L oo p n ou M 51 Visitor Center THE MEADOW e d Ra pid a n Fir R id ge Fir Rapidan Road Parking il R Wayside a Tr oa P tain P Ro ad Dark Hollow Falls (70’) Dark Hollow Falls Parking MP Tanners Ridge Overlook e Sto Dark Hollow Falls Trail Tr Lewis Falls (81’) Fi ny Air Quality Monitoring Station e Ros River e os r Fo R il Le wi sS pri ng e Road th 50 ir e of ver Ri MP F St o r y Rose River Falls (67’) River Big Meadows Campground Blackrock Skyland -Big Me ado ws Ho rse Tr ai l Lodge Fal ls Tr a Rose Amphitheater Trail Fishers Gap Overlook Big Meadows Picnic Grounds e Road MP ida Ta n ne R ap rs 52 M il F ir e Ho r s e Fi re l Tra il n Pro n R ap i d a n i g P Tr a ng l Milam Gap Parking o Pr R o ad Upper UpperDark Dark Hollow HollowFalls Trail M ill North Ro MP ad 53 Hiking Trail Hiking Trail (Appalachian Trail) Hiking Trail (Horses) Unpaved Road Unpaved Road (Horses) Paved Road Skyline Drive Park Boundary Stream P Parking Building 0 1 Kilometer 0 1 Mile Viewpoint Waterfall Emergency 1-800-732-0911 • Information 540-999-3500 • Online www.nps.gov/shen Dark Hollow Falls Hike Markers & Blazes 1.4-mile round trip 1.25-hours hiking time Moderate 440-foot elevation gain Trail markers are at trailheads and intersections. The metal bands are stamped with directional and mileage information. From the trailhead, follow the trail .75 mile to the falls and return by the same route. This trail is short, but very steep and rocky. The return climb is challenging! No pets. Trail blazes are found on trees and rocks throughout the Park. The color identifies the trail type: Story of the Forest Hike 1.8-mile circuit 1.5-hours hiking time Easiest 290-foot elevation gain Blue - Hiking trail White - Appalachian Trail Yellow - Open to horses From the front of Byrd Visitor Center, turn right and follow the sidewalk to the trail. After crossing the bridge, turn left and follow the trail to its intersection with a paved walkway near the Campground Office. Turn left and follow the walkway back to your starting point. No pets. Rose River Loop Hike Need to Know 4-mile circuit 4.5-hours hiking time Moderate 910-foot elevation gain From the north end of Fishers Gap parking at mile 49.4, cross Skyline Drive and start down the road. Just after the chain, take a left onto the Skyland-Big Meadows Horse Trail (yellow blazed). In about .6 mile take the blue-blazed Rose River Loop Trail. Follow it past beautiful falls and cascades. You’ll climb back to the road (yellow blazed), and go right across the bridge. For an added treat (and about .25 mile more hiking), you can take the Dark Hollow Falls Trail to the base of the falls and back. Then continue uphill about one mile back to Skyline Drive. Lewis Falls Trail Hike 3.3-mile circuit 4-hours hiking time Moderate 990-foot elevation gain From the Big Meadows amphitheater parking area, take the Lewis Falls Trail. Continue straight to descend—it’s a bit steep and rocky, so watch your footing—to the falls observation point. Then, take the Lewis Falls Trail to its intersection with the Appalachian Trail (A.T.). Turn left onto the A.T. and take it back to your starting point. Pets are not allowed on Dark Hollow and Story of the Forest Trails. Where allowed, pets must be on a leash no longer than 6 feet at all times. ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ Be sure you are physically able to complete your hike. Take plenty of water—at least a quart per hour. When you return from your hike, check for ticks. Stay on the trail and avoid trampling sensitive vegetation. Be sure someone knows where you are and when to expect your return. ■■ Leave what you find. Artifacts and wildflowers are protected. ■■ It’s dangerous and potentially deadly to climb on the rocks near waterfalls. ■■ Cell and GPS services are unreliable. Good to Know The Big Meadow is a great place to wander. There’s no right or wrong way to do it; just follow the animals’ paths. Every season will reveal something special: wildflowers, fawns, butterflies, tracks in the snow—you never know what you might find. The Story of the Forest Trail takes you past the Park’s Air Quality Monitoring Station. Look to your left along the fence for a sign that explains what we monitor and why! Hiking Difficulty Scale Easiest: Generally suitable for anyone who enjoys walking. Mostly level or with a slight incline. Generally less than 3 miles. Moderate: A moderate hike generally suitable for novice hikers seeking a bit of a challenge. The terrain will involve a moderate incline and may have some steeper sections. Generally 3 to 5 miles. Moderately Strenuous: Generally challenging for an unconditioned person. The terrain will involve a steady and often steep incline. Generally 5 to 8 miles. Strenuous: Will chall
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Rapidan Camp Area | Shenandoah National Park 2017 Tanners Ridge Overlook MP 51 t n Trail P Byrd Visitor Center Big Meadows Wayside M P ny Sto Fir MP Ri d ge e 52 idan Rap rs ne Tan Ro ad Rap idan Ro ad Mill Tr Prong Mill ng Pro l ai Milam Gap P Upper Dark Hollow Trail F ir e Hors e MP 53 Big Rock Falls a Tr Creel Cabin The Brown House (exhibits) Prime Minister’s Cabin (exhibits) il Naked Creek Overlook Rapidan Camp 54 ail in Tr nta ou M ll 55 o Pr North Cat Knob Trail ain unt Mo ain nt River Fir e Ro nway Co ad Fo Mou MP ng Laure l Trail Hazeltop (3812’) rk Bootens Gap P Jon es Po w e Hazeltop Ridge Overlook untain Horse T ra Mo k il r Fo Tr ai MP ad Ro l Hiking Trail Hiking Trail (Appalachian Trail) Hiking Trail (Horses) Unpaved Road Unpaved Road (Horses) Paved Road Skyline Drive Park Boundary Stream P Parking Building Roa d Staunton River Trail 0 1.0 Kilometer 0 Summit 1.0 Mile Waterfall Emergency 1-800-732-0911 • Information 540-999-3500 • Online www.nps.gov/shen Rapidan Camp Hike Markers & Blazes 4-mile round trip 2¾-hrs hiking time Moderate 870-ft elevation gain Trail markers are at trailheads and intersections. The metal bands are stamped with directional and mileage information. From the Milam Gap parking area at mile 52.4, cross Skyline Drive and take the Appalachian Trail a few feet to the trailpost. Go left onto the blue-blazed Mill Prong Trail. At the second stream crossing, stay right on the yellow-blazed Mill Prong Horse Trail and follow it downhill to the camp. Return by the same route. 3 stream crossings. Trail blazes are found on trees and rocks throughout the Park. The color identifies the trail type: Appalachian Trail to Tanners Ridge Road Hike 2.1-mile round trip 1½-hrs hiking time Easiest 175-ft elevation gain Blue - Hiking trail White - Appalachian Trail Yellow - Open to horses From the Milam Gap parking area at mile 52.4, follow the Appalachian Trail (A.T.) north. This fairly level hike takes you through a former homestead. In about a mile the A.T. intersects with the Tanners Ridge Road. Retrace your steps. Mill Prong – Laurel Prong Loop Hike 7.4-mile circuit 8-hrs hiking time Moderately Strenuous 1520-ft elevation gain From the Milam Gap parking area at mile 52.4, cross Skyline Drive and take the Appalachian Trail (A.T.) a few feet to the trailpost. Go left onto the blue-blazed Mill Prong Trail. Take a slight right onto the yellow-blazed Mill Prong Horse Trail and follow it to Rapidan Camp. After exploring the camp, take the Laurel Prong Trail (an old road trace) which is yellow-blazed for about a half mile. Continue straight on Laurel Prong when it becomes blue-blazed and stay on it past the junction with Cat Knob Trail. At the junction with the A.T. turn right and follow it north across Hazeltop, the third highest peak in Shenandoah. The A.T. will take you back to Milam Gap. 3 stream crossings. Hiking Difficulty Scale Easiest: Generally suitable for anyone who enjoys walking. Mostly level or with a slight incline. Generally less than 3 miles. Moderate: Generally suitable for novice hikers seeking a bit of a challenge. The terrain will involve a moderate incline and may have some steeper sections. Generally 3 to 5 miles. Moderately Strenuous: Generally challenging for an unconditioned person. The terrain will involve a steady and often steep incline. Generally 5 to 8 miles. Strenuous: Will challenge most hikers. The hike will generally be longer and steeper, but may be deemed strenuous because of the elevation gain. Generally 7 to 10 miles. Need to Know ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Pets must be on a leash no longer than 6’ at all times. Do not attempt to cross streams during icy conditions or flooding. Be sure you are physically able to complete the hike you’ve chosen. Take plenty of water—at least a quart per hour. When you return from your hike, check for ticks. Be sure someone knows where you are and when to expect your return. Leave what you find. Artifacts are protected by law. Filter or treat water from streams before drinking. Please respect family cemeteries Good to Know The A.T. to Tanners Ridge Road takes you through a former farm. Look for rock walls and old road traces. When you get to Tanners Ridge Road, you will see the Thomas-Madows family cemetery, one of over 100 cemeteries in the Park. Former residents still maintain and bury family in some of the cemeteries. Please respect both the cemeteries and any artifacts you may encounter. Fun to Know Rapidan Camp was the “summer white house” of President Herbert Hoover and the First Lady, Lou Henry Hoover. The President’s cabin, The Brown House has been restored and historically refurnished. An adjacent building houses an exhibit about the Hoovers and the camp. Check at the visitor center to find out when the buildings are open. There are also informational signs throughout the camp. Ve
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior South River Area | Shenandoah National Park 2017 Dry Run Falls Fire Road MP th Sou South River Overlook South River Picnic Area MP 63 Riv er Fire r Uppe South River Lower Road P ail South River Falls Tr South River Falls M ou l n ain Trai South River Hut Road Road 62 MP ck 64 ba Hensley Hollow Overlook Sa d dl e US 33 MP 65 Swift Run Entrance Station MP 66 US 33 Hightop Mountain Parking P North Swift Run Overlook MP 67 US 33 Hightop Summit (3,296’) Hiking Trail Hiking Trail (Appalachian Trail) Unpaved Road Unpaved Road (Horses) Paved Road Skyline Drive Park Boundary Stream P Parking Building 0 1.0 Kilometer 0 Summit 1.0 Mile Viewpoint Waterfall Emergency 1-800-732-0911 • Information 540-999-3500 • Online www.nps.gov/shen South River Falls Observation Point Hike 2.6-mile round trip 1¼-hrs hiking time Moderate 850-ft elevation gain Markers & Blazes Trail markers are at trailheads and intersections. The metal bands are stamped with directional and mileage information. From the South River Picnic Grounds (near the comfort station) Take the blue-blazed South River Falls Trail. You’ll cross the Appalachian Trail, but stay on the South River Falls Trail to the stone-walled observation point. Retrace your steps to return. 1 stream crossing. Trail blazes are found on trees and rocks throughout the Park. The color identifies the trail type: South River Falls Hike 3.3-mile circuit 2¼-hrs hiking time Moderate 910-ft elevation gain Follow the directions to the observation point (above). From the observation point, continue on the South River Falls Trail to the trailpost. Go left onto the yellow-blazed South River Falls Road. The trail joins the South River Fire Road. Continue on the fire road to its intersection with the Appalachian Trail. Turn left and follow it (white-blazed) to its intersection with the South River Falls Trail and go right to return to your starting point. 1 stream crossing. Blue - Hiking trail White - Appalachian Trail Yellow - Open to horses Need to Know ■ ■ ■ Hightop Summit Hike 3-mile round trip 3-hrs hiking time Moderate 935-ft elevation gain From the Hightop Mountain parking area at mile 66.7, cross skyline Drive and take the white-blazed Appalachian Trail (A.T.) As you climb, the trail winds its way up the ridge and then right. You’ll swing left around the summit, then look for a side trail on your right that leads to a rocky viewpoint. Retrace your steps to return. Hiking Difficulty Scale Easiest: Generally suitable for anyone who enjoys walking. Mostly level or with a slight incline. Generally less than 3 miles. Moderate: Generally suitable for novice hikers seeking a bit of a challenge. The terrain will involve a moderate incline and may have some steeper sections. Generally 3 to 5 miles. Moderately Strenuous: Generally challenging for an unconditioned person. The terrain will involve a steady and often steep incline. Generally 5 to 8 miles. Strenuous: Will challenge most hikers. The hike will generally be longer and steeper, but may be deemed strenuous because of the elevation gain. Generally 7 to 10 miles. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Pets must be on a leash no longer than 6’ at all times. Do not attempt to cross streams during icy conditions or flooding. Be sure you are physically able to complete the hike you’ve chosen. Take plenty of water—at least a quart per hour. When you return from your hike, check for ticks. Be sure someone knows where you are and when to expect your return. Filter or treat water from streams before drinking. Be aware that you are in snake habitat.. Good to Know South River is a hike for all seasons, but especially spring! Look for a profusion of wildflowers, especially trillium. Returning migrant songbirds are a treat then as well! When we’ve had plenty of rain, the falls are impressive, but be careful on the stream crossing. It’s also particularly important to stay on the trail—there’s quite a bit of poison ivy in the area Leave No Trace ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Plan ahead and prepare. Travel and camp on durable surfaces. Dispose of waste properly. Leave what you find. Respect wildlife. Be considerate of other visitors. Very Strenuous: Only well conditioned and well prepared hikers should attempt. Generally long and steep, and may include rock scrambling, stream crossings, and other challenging terrain. Generally 8 miles and over. Trail maintenance and map funded by recreation fee dollars.
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Loft Mountain Area | Shenandoah National Park 2017 ck Ro ytop Big Run Porta l Tra il Trail Pa Big Run Loop Trail North Big Run Loop Trail South 79 l Frazier Discovery Trail Big Run Overlook MP 80 81 P MP 82 n Run Fire Road B r ow registration Doyles River Overlook Loft Mountain Camground Fir e ns Browns Gap P Parking MP campstore amphitheater Doyles River Cabin Trail Doyles River Parking Big Run Loop Trail diso ge Tra i MP Ga p Ma MP Loft Mountain Wayside Riv er Aus tin Mo un tai nT rai l tte rson Rid Upper Doyles River Falls (28’) 83 Dundo Overlook Lower Doyles River Falls (63’) See inset s Jone R Jones Run Falls (42’) un Trail oad R Jones Run MP 84 Parking P Doy le s Dundo Picnic Grounds and Group Campground Blackrock 0 MP 85 0.2 Mile 0 Blackrock Summit Parking Blackrock Summit Parking P ad P 0.2 Kilometer Ro Trayfoot Mountain Trail Blackrock Spur Trail Blackrock Hut Fire Road Blackrock Spur Trail Hu MP 86 t MP ck ro 85 ck B la Hiking Trail Hiking Trail (Appalachian Trail) Hiking Trail (Horses) Unpaved Road Unpaved Road (Horses) Paved Road Skyline Drive Park Boundary Stream P Parking Building North 0 1.0 Kilometer 0 Viewpoint 1.0 Mile Waterfall Emergency 1-800-732-0911 • Information 540-999-3500 • Online www.nps.gov/shen Frazier Discovery Trail Hike Markers & Blazes 1.2-mile circuit 1-hr hiking time Easiest 429-ft elevation gain Trail markers are at trailheads and intersections. The metal bands are stamped with directional and mileage information. From the north end of the Loft Mountain Wayside parking area, cross Skyline Drive and follow the blue-blazed Frazier Discovery Trail. Go right at the intersection and follow the fairly steep uphill grade to where the trail joins the Appalachian Trail. Turn left, staying on the blue-blazed trail and left again at the next trail post to descend to your starting point. NO PETS. Trail blazes are found on trees and rocks throughout the Park. The color identifies the trail type: Doyles River Falls Hike 3.3-mile round trip 2¼-hrs hiking time Moderate 1,189-ft elevation gain From the trailhead at mile 81.1, take the blue-blazed Doyles River Trail. Cross the Appalachian Trail and pass the access trails to Doyles River Cabin and Browns Gap Road. Trail posts mark the locations of Upper (2.7 miles) and Lower Doyles River Falls. 1 stream crossing. Retrace your steps to return. Jones River Falls Hike Blue - Hiking trail White - Appalachian Trail Yellow - Open to horses Need to Know ■ ■ 3.2-mile circuit 2½-hrs hiking time Moderate 1045-ft elevation gain From the trailhead at mile 84.1, Cross the Appalachian Trail and follow the blue-blazed Jones Run Trail to Jones Run Falls and return by the same route. 1 stream crossing. Browns Gap Hike ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 6.5-mile circuit 7-hrs hiking time Moderately Strenuous 1400-ft elevation gain From Browns Gap Parking at mile 83, cross Skyline Drive and take Browns Gap Fire Road to its intersection with Doyles River Trail. Turn right and connect with Jones Run Trail. At the Jones Run parking area take a right onto the Appalachian Trail and follow it back to your starting point. Blackrock Summit Hike 1-mile circuit ¾-hrs hiking time Easiest 175-ft elevation gain From the Blackrock parking area at mile 84.4, follow the Appalachian Trail (A.T.) south. At the trail post, turn right and continue to the boulder field where you can see the layers and quartzite patterns on the rocks and a beautiful view. Continue south on the A.T. around the slope. At the intersection, turn left onto the Blackrock Hut Road-Trayfoot Mountain Trail and follow to the parking lot. ■ Pets are not allowed on Frazier Discovery Trail. Where allowed, pets must be on a leash no longer than 6’ at all times. Do not attempt to cross streams during icy conditions or flooding. Be sure you are physically able to complete the hike you’ve chosen. Take plenty of water—at least a quart per hour. When you return from your hike, check for ticks. Stay on the trail and avoid trampling sensitive vegetation. Be sure someone knows where you are and when to expect your return. It’s dangerous and potentially deadly to climb on the rocks near waterfalls. Filter or treat water from streams before drinking. Hiking Difficulty Scale Easiest: Generally suitable for anyone who enjoys walking. Mostly level or with a slight incline. Generally less than 3 miles. Moderate: Generally suitable for novice hikers seeking a bit of a challenge. The terrain will involve a moderate incline and may have some steeper sections. Generally 3 to 5 miles. Moderately Strenuous: Generally challenging for an unconditioned person. The terrain will involve a steady and often steep incline. Generally 5 to 8 miles. Strenuous: Will challenge most hikers. The hike will generally be longer and steeper, but may be deemed strenuous because of the elevation ga
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Riprap Area | Shenandoah National Park 2017 Horsehead Mountain Overlook MP Chimney Rock 89 Trail Tra il rap R ip Rive r MP " 90 Big Branch Falls 91 ans rm Wi l dc at Riprap Overlook Mo o Tra MP il Riprap Moormans River Overlook Fork 92 Wildcat Ridge Parking a Ro d Nor t h Crimora Lake Overlook Min e MP No Public Access 93 Tu rk Gap Turk Mountain Overlook Tr ail Ri ve rR oa d or a P MP MP Turk Mountain (2981’) in Trail unta Mo k r Tu 94 P Turk Gap Parking Tur k ranch B Sou th Fo rk Mo or ma ns m Trail dg e i Cri Wild Turkey Lane R Charlottesville Reservoir 614 North Tra i l MP 95 Hiking Trail Hiking Trail (Appalachian Trail) Hiking Trail (Horses) Unpaved Road (Horses) Paved Road Skyline Drive Park Boundary Stream P Parking Summit 0 0 Viewpoint 1.0 Kilometer 1.0 Mile Waterfall Emergency 1-800-732-0911 • Information 540-999-3500 • Online www.nps.gov/shen Riprap – Wildcat Ridge Hike Markers & Blazes 9.8-mile circuit 8¼-hrs hiking time Very Strenuous 2,365-ft elevation gain Trail markers are at trailheads and intersections. The metal bands are stamped with directional and mileage information. You can hike this loop from Riprap Parking at mile 90 or from Wildcat Ridge Parking at mile 92.1 using a combination of the Appalachian Trail, Riprap Trail, and Wildcat Ridge Trail. Near the junction of the Riprap and Wildcat Ridge Trails there’s a popular swimming hole. There are several stream crossings and a small waterfall. Follow the map in whichever direction you choose, being careful at the intersections to take the appropriate trail. Trail blazes are found on trees and rocks throughout the Park. The color identifies the trail type: Blue - Hiking trail White - Appalachian Trail Yellow - Open to horses Chimney Rock Hike 3.4-mile round trip 2½-hrs hiking time Moderate 830-ft elevation gain From the Riprap parking area at mile 90, take the Appalachian Trail north. Turn left onto Riprap Trail. After a series of switchbacks, you’ll see a viewpoint on your right. Further on, you’ll see Calvary Rocks on left, and then, where the trail makes a sharp left Chimney Rock stands alone on the right across a gorge. Retrace your steps. Need to Know ■ ■ ■ Turk Mountain Hike 2.2-mile round trip 2¼-hrs hiking time Easiest 690-ft elevation gain From the Turk Mountain parking area at mile 94.1, cross Skyline Drive and take the Appalachian Trail south to the trailpost. Go right onto the Turk Mountain Trail and follow it to the summit for a wonderful view to the west. Hiking Difficulty Scale Easiest: Generally suitable for anyone who enjoys walking. Mostly level or with a slight incline. Generally less than 3 miles. Moderate: Generally suitable for novice hikers seeking a bit of a challenge. The terrain will involve a moderate incline and may have some steeper sections. Generally 3 to 5 miles. Moderately Strenuous: Generally challenging for an unconditioned person. The terrain will involve a steady and often steep incline. Generally 5 to 8 miles. Strenuous: Will challenge most hikers. The hike will generally be longer and steeper, but may be deemed strenuous because of the elevation gain. Generally 7 to 10 miles. Very Strenuous: Only well conditioned and well prepared hikers should attempt. Generally long and steep, and may include rock scrambling, stream crossings, and other challenging terrain. Generally 8 miles and over. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Pets must be on a leash no longer than 6’ at all times. Do not attempt to cross streams during icy conditions or flooding. Be sure you are physically able to complete the hike you’ve chosen. Take plenty of water—at least a quart per hour. When you return from your hike, check for ticks. Be sure someone knows where you are and when to expect your return. Filter or treat water from streams before drinking. Be aware that you are in snake habitat. Good to Know These hikes all take you to a very special place in Shenandoah: federally designated Wilderness. About 40% of the Park has been given this extra protection by Congress. What makes it special is what’s not there: mechanized equipment and development. What you should find is solitude and wildness. To learn more about this designation visit Shenandoah’s webpage. Leave No Trace ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Plan ahead and prepare. Travel and camp on durable surfaces. Dispose of waste properly. Leave what you find. Respect wildlife. Be considerate of other visitors. Trail maintenance and map funded by recreation fee dollars.
Mathews Arm Campground Map No Parking B90 Group 10 mph B89 Group B91 Group U W B105 B107 A61 B88 B104 Traces Trail C137 C142 This easy to moderate 1.7-mile loop circles the campground. A complete road and trail map is available at the Registration Station. C141 C146 C147 C148 C149 C152 C156 C157 C111 C159 HOST Traces Trail C160 C162 C161 C164 C170 C172 C174 C121 C117 W B69 B72 B70 A53 A52 A51 A50 B68 B67 B66 C119 A54 B73 A49 A48 A47 A46 A45 A44 U A43 A40 HOST A38 A41 B65 A42 W C115 B64 C114 B63 C113 B62 A22 A39 A36 A37 A34 A23 A26 A24 A25 A35 A32 A30 A28 A33 A31 A27 A29 A13 A10 C171 C123 A15 A12 C169 A11 W U A8 A6 C177 A19 A17 A14 C167 C175 C176 C118 A21 A20 A16 C165 C173 C120 C112 A18 C163 C168 C122 C155 C158 C166 C124 C151 U C116 W C153 C154 C125 A55 B77 B75 B71 C127 C126 C145 B74 C129 A56 B79 C131 C128 C143 C150 U C130 B81 B76 C133 C139 C144 B78 C132 A57 B83 B80 B110 A60 ra Traces T il C140 B85 B82 B109 C135 A58 B84 B108 C138 A59 B86 B106 C134 C136 B87 A4 C178 A2 A9 A7 A5 A3 A1 RV Dump Station Generator-Free Area Reservable Sites Indicated in RED Accessible Overflow Parking Check Out Box Restrooms Registration Station Recycle & Dumpster Emergency Phone Amphitheater To Skyline Drive W Water U Utility Sink Host sites: A40 and C111 www.nps.gov/shen Shenandoah National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Park Emergency Number (800) 732-0911 05/16 Mathews Arm Campground Park Information recording: (540) 999-3500 (option 2) or online at www.nps.gov/shen Welcome to Mathews Arm Campground. Camping in Shenandoah National Park can be a fun and rewarding experience. Remember that you are sharing this space with plants, animals, and other campers. Consideration and cooperation are important. Obtaining a Campsite Mathews Arm Campground sites are $15/night. Stays are limited to 30 days. Checkout time is noon. Clip your camping pass to your site post to show occupancy. Camping fees must be paid within one (1) hour of occupying a site. Campsites Each campsite is equipped with a picnic table, fire grate, and parking area. Electric and water hookups are not available. Vehicles must be parked in designated parking areas for the campsite and must fit on pavement. Additional parking is available in the lot across from the registration station. Sites limited to one motorhome and six people. Tents must only be erected on pads when provided and must fit in the established campsite area. Do not impact surrounding area or resources. Please do not trench your site or put nails in trees. Use of horseshoes is prohibited. Group Sites There are three group sites: B89, B90, and B91. Each site can accommodate 7-25 people and is $50/night. Picnic tables, fire grates, and parking areas are provided. Group sites can be reserved up to one year in advance. Quiet Hours and Generators Quiet hours are from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. Generators may be used from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. and from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. From October 15 through the end of the season generator hours are extended to 9 p.m. for the purpose of generating heat. Generator use is prohibited in sites designated as “generator-free” and in group sites. Food Storage and Wildlife This is bear country, and deer, raccoons, and skunks are also year-round residents. Food, garbage, equipment used to prepare or store food, and all scented items must be kept in a vehicle when not being actively used. It is illegal to feed or disturb wildlife. All resources such as wildflowers, plants, animals, and artifacts are protected by law in national parks. Campfires For firewood, do not cut, saw, or break any standing trees, dead or alive. To help slow the spread of the Emerald Ash Borer, visitors must use ONLY USDA-certified firewood or dead wood that is down on the ground in the Park. Certified firewood can be purchased in the Park. If purchased outside the Park, wood must have the USDA stamp. Please check the park map in the visitor guide for areas where you may collect firewood. Fires are allowed only in designated fire grates. Do not build rock rings or burn trash in the grate. Never leave fires or hot coals unattended and extinguish them completely before leaving. Sanitation Do not wash dishes in restrooms or at water fountains. Strained dishwater must be disposed of in the utility sinks at the restrooms. Dispose of food particles in trash bins. Sewage and wastewater from trailers and RVs must be emptied at the dump station located near the registration station. Please sort and place all trash and recyclables in the appropriate bins. Campstore, Laundry, and Showers Shenandoah National Park operates the campgrounds. The official park concessioner operates a small campstore at the Elkwallow Wayside, located two miles south at mile 24. There are no shower or laundry facilities at Mathews Arm Campground or Elkwallow Wayside. The closes
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Big Meadows Campground | Shenandoah National Park 2017 Reservations: 877-444-6777 or online at www.recreation.gov North 10 mph To Appalachian Trail E175 Overflow Parking A104 D144 Laundry, Wood, Ice, Phone, Showers D146 D142 A58 Registration Station 3 1 1-7 7 10 11 15 C132 D159 C136 D169 Group D167 D165 C133 B110 B109 C137 C139 C140 W A70 B120 B114 B116 B118 B119 B112 B111 A62 W B113 B115 A63 A64 18-24 16 Tents Only B117 A65 A68 A67 A74 A71 A76 A78 42 41 40 38 35-44 34 30 28 43 Tents Only Tents Only 27 44 35 33 27-34 A69 A66 Group 45 39 A72 C135 46 A79 A75 A73 C141 C138 A77 48 47 Tents Only A80 W 50 49 45-53 U A83 A85 A87 D161 D164 D166 D168 D160 C134 A84 C131 B107 8-17 Tents Only A89 D162 D163 C129 A61 A88 A86 51 A81 A82 A91 C130 B108 A60 14 D158 C128 C126 U W D157 A90 52 E191 E192 E193 D156 B106 9 13 D154 B105 8 12 D155 C127 6 A93 D153 D152 C125 4 A92 A95 E190 E194 A94 A96 D151 C124 Tents Only 5 W C123 A59 2 D149 D145 D147 D143 C121 D150 C122 HOST A57 U A98 D148 53 A97 A100 Trail To Lodge E178 E176 E174 E180 E179 E172 W i220 i219 i222 E183 i224 E181 HOST E182 i221 i218 E185 E184 i223 i226 W H211 H212 E186 E187 i225 i228 W E188 H213 G204 i227 G205 i230 H214 W i229 F198 G206 F199 H215 i231 F200 G207 F201 G208 H217 A102 E197 E189 G209 F202 A101 E196 W G210 A99 E195 F203 A103 Picnic Area Picnic Grounds To Big Meadows Lodge E177 E173 31 36 32 37 29 20 17 18 21 24 19 22 No Wood Collection 23 Reservable Sites indicated in RED Story of the Forest Trail (No pets on this trail) U To Dump/Fill Station, Byrd Visitor Center, Skyline Drive Accessible Emergency Phone Amphitheater Restrooms Ranger Station Recycle & Dumpster Showers Appalachian Trail Utility Sink W Water Supply Generator-Free Zone Food storage boxes are available at most walk-to sites. Host Sites: A57 & i218 Emergency 1-800-732-0911 • Information 540-999-3500 • Online www.nps.gov/shen National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Big Meadows Campground | Shenandoah National Park Welcome! Campfires Welcome to Big Meadows Campground. Camping in Shenandoah National Park can be a fun and rewarding experience. Remember that you are sharing this space with plants, animals, and other campers. Consideration and cooperation are important. Obtaining a Campsite Sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis and through reservations. Make reservations up to 6 months in advance online at www.recreation.gov, or by calling 1-877-444-6777. Sites are $20/night. Camping fees are not refundable. Stays are limited to 14 consecutive days during peak seasons and 30 consecutive days during other times. Check out time is noon. Clip your camping pass to your site post to show occupancy. You must pay camping fees within one hour of occupying a site. First-come, firstserved campers: Subsequent night’s use of a campsite may not be possible due to reservations. Please check at the registration station for information. Visitors can purchase certified firewood in the Park, or gather dead wood on the ground in the Park. Do not saw, cut, chop, or harvest any parts from a standing tree, dead or alive. Due to the threat from the Emerald Ash Borer, firewood from outside the Park shall be USDA certified and labeled. Build fires only in designated fire grates, and do not build rock rings or burn trash in the grate. Never leave fires or hot coals unattended and extinguish them completely before leaving. Sanitation Wash dishes at your campsite; not in restrooms, drinking fountains, or at water spigots. Strain dishwater to remove food particles and dispose strained water only in the restroom utility sinks. Dispose of food particles in trash bins, not in sink drains. Trailers and RVs must empty sewage and wastewate at the dump station 1/4 mile from the campground. Water is a precious and limted resource, especially on top of the mountain; use it wisely. Please sort and place trash and recyclables in appropriate bins. Campsites Campsites are limited to 6 people (OR 1 immediate family) per site. RV sites are limited to 1 RV (motorhome, pop-up, or 5th-wheel), 6 people, and 1 vehicle. Erect tents only on pads when provided. They must fit within established campsite and not negatively impact the surrounding area or resources. Park vehicles only on paved/graveled areas provided for your campsite. Walk-to sites are for tents only and require a 25-100 yard walk to your campsite. Please do not trench your site or put nails in trees. Campsites are equipped with picnic tables, fire grates, and parking areas. Campstore, Laundry, and Showers Shenandoah National Park operates the campgrounds. The official park concessioner operates the campstore, laundry, and showers. Quarters are required for the shower and laundry machines. There is a change machine nea
Shenandoah National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Park Emergency Number (800) 732-0911 1/15 Lewis Mountain Campground Park information recording: (540) 999-3500 (option 2) or online at www.nps.gov/shen Welcome to Lewis Mountain Campground. Camping in Shenandoah National Park can be a fun and rewarding experience. Remember that you are sharing this space with plants, animals, and other campers. Consideration and cooperation are important. Obtaining a Campsite Lewis Mountain Campground operates on a self-registration, first-come, first-served basis. Please follow the posted directions. Camping fees are $15 per night. Stays are limited to 30 consecutive days. Checkout time is noon. Clip your camping pass to your site post to show occupancy. Camping fees must be paid within one (1) hour of occupying a site. Campsites Each campsite is equipped with a picnic table, fire grate, and parking area. Electric and water hookups are not available. Campsites are limited to 2 tents, 6 people, and 2 vehicles (including RV) per site. Additional parking is available at the campstore. Vehicles must stay on paved/graveled areas. Please do not trench your site or put nails in trees. Use of horseshoes is prohibited. Quiet Hours and Generators Quiet hours are from 10:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. Generators may be used only from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. and from 4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. From October 15 through end of season generator hours are extended to 9:00 p.m. for the purpose of generating heat. Food Storage and Wildlife This is bear country, and deer, raccoons, and skunks are also year-round residents. Food, garbage, equipment used to prepare or store food, and all scented items must be kept in a vehicle when not being actively used. It is illegal to feed or disturb wildlife. All resources such as wildflowers, plants, animals, and artifacts are protected by law in national parks. Campfires For firewood, do not cut, saw, or break any standing trees, dead or alive. To help slow the spread of the Emerald Ash Borer, visitors must use ONLY USDA-certified firewood or dead wood that is down on the ground in the Park. Certified firewood can be purchased in the Park. If purchased outside the Park, wood must have the USDA stamp. Please check the park map in the visitor guide, Shenandoah Explorer, for areas where you may collect firewood. Fires are allowed only in designated fire grates. Do not build rock rings or burn trash in the grate. Never leave fires or hot coals unattended and extinguish them completely before leaving. Sanitation Do not wash dishes in restrooms or at water fountains. Strained dishwater must be disposed of in the utility sinks at the restrooms. Dispose of food particles in trash bins. Sewage and wastewater from trailers and RVs must be emptied at the dump station. The nearest location is at Big Meadows Campground, approximately 7 miles north at milepost 51. Please sort and place all trash and recyclables in the appropriate bins. Campstore, Laundry, and Showers Shenandoah National Park operates the campgrounds. The official park concessioner operates the rental cabins, showers, laundry, and campstore. Quarters are required for the shower and laundry machines. A change machine is not available. Vehicles and Other Wheeled Devices All roads in the campground are one-way and the speed limit is 10 mph. Keep all vehicles, including motorcycles and trailers, on paved areas at all times. Bicycles are permitted on paved areas only. Skates, rollerblades, skateboards, scooters, and similar devices are prohibited. Recreational Activities Be sure to check the schedule of ranger-conducted activities in the park visitor guide, Shenandoah Explorer. Visitor centers have exhibits, maps, videos, publications, and hiking information. Byrd Visitor Center is at milepost 51 and Dickey Ridge Visitor Center is at milepost 4.6. Pets When outside of a vehicle or camping unit, pets must be on a leash no longer than 6 feet. Do not leave pets unattended, and please clean up after them. Pet food (including bowls) is scented and must be stored in vehicle when not in use. If needed, kennels are available in communities bordering the park. Emergencies Contact the campground hosts at site 1, use the emergency phone at the self-registration kiosk, or call 1-800-732-0911. The nearest hospital is located in Harrisonburg, 8 miles south on Skyline Drive, then 22 miles west on U.S. Highway 33. Leave No Trace Preservation through education: building awareness, appreciation, and most of all, respect for our public recreation places. Lewis Mountain Campground Map Reservations: Campground Sites: first-come, first-served Cabin Rentals: www.visitshenandoah.com 10 mph Skyline Drive South to Swift Run Entrance Station PICNIC GROUNDS LEGEND Accessible Restrooms Recycle & Dumpster Emergency Phone Showers Store Appalachian Trail W Water U Utility Sink CABINS Host site: 1 Picnic Shelters Laundry Wood Ice CABINS Check Out Box W HOST W U CA
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Loft Mountain Campground | Shenandoah National Park 2017 Reservations: 877-444-6777 or online at www.recreation.gov 10 mph North 23 21-44 Tents Only 29 30 21 31 41 42 40 33 32 44 36 38 A78 45 46 A79 A76 W C107 35 D132 37 A77 25 26 28 27 D129 D131 E159 E157 E155 E160 E158 E156 A75 24 34 39 43 A68 22 E154 D130 E153 D128 W E151 E152 F172 B91 D123 C99 C101 B85 B82 B84 B83 W C96 C94 A60 C93 C92 D115 D116 A57 20 D113 17 D114 HOST W D111 D112 47 1 5 19 18 D110 U U A58 A56 C95 D109 E143 F179 F177 F175 F173 E141 E139 E146 F170 W E137 W E144 E135 F171 U E142 F168 45-50 E133 G206 49 Tents Only E140 E138 G204 F165 F169 W G202 F161 E136 50 F163 G200 A80 E134 F167 G180 G207 G205 G198 G203 F166 F162 G181 A81 G201 A55 F164 G196 A54 G182 W G199 G195 A53 G183 G184 A52 Overflow G197 G193 Parking G186 G185 4 G194 G191 G189 A51 Check Out 3 G192 Box G187 2 9 G190 W G188 48 A59 D108 D119 D117 E147 E145 A61 B86 C98 C97 D118 A62 A63 B87 U C100 D121 D120 B88 B89 C102 E149 W E148 B90 A64 A67 A65 W C103 D125 A69 C105 D124 U D122 HOST E150 F178 F176 F174 D126 A71 A74 C106 C104 D127 A72 A73 A66 A70 6 7 16 15 14 10-20 Tents Only 13 12 11 10 8 1-9 Tents Only Registration and Ranger Station Amphitheater Parking To Doyles River Trail LEGEND To Frazier Discovery Trail • • • Appalachian Trail (A.T.) Recycle Accessible Restroom Amphitheater RV Dump Station Campstore Shower Generator-Free Zone Utility Sink Phone Water Supply Reservable sites are in red. Food storage boxes are available at most walk-to sites. Host Sites: D112, E149 To Skyline Drive Emergency 1-800-732-0911 • Information 540-999-3500 • Online www.nps.gov/shen National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Loft Mountain Campground | Shenandoah National Park Campfires Welcome! Welcome to Loft Mountain Campground. Camping in Shenandoah National Park can be a fun and rewarding experience. Remember that you are sharing this space with plants, animals, and other campers. Consideration and cooperation are important. Obtaining a Campsite Sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis and through reservations. Make reservations up to 6 months in advance online at www.recreation.gov, or by calling 1-877-444-6777. Sites are $15/night. Camping fees are not refundable. Stays are limited to 30 nights in any calendar year. Check out time is noon. Clip your camping pass to your site post to show occupancy. You must pay camping fees within one hour of occupying a site. First-come, first-served campers: Subsequent night’s use of a campsite may not be possible due to reservations. Please check at the registration station for information. Campsites Campsites are limited to 6 people (OR 1 immediate family) per site. RV sites are limited to 1 RV (motorhome, pop-up, or 5th-wheel), 6 people, and 1 vehicle. Electric and water hookups are not available. Erect tents only on pads when provided. They must fit within established campsite and not negatively impact the surrounding area or resources. Park vehicles only on paved/graveled areas provided for your campsite. Additional parking is available beyond site A81, near the campground exit. Walk-to sites are for tents only and require a 25-100 yard walk to your campsite. Please do not trench your site or put nails in trees. Campsites are equipped with picnic tables, fire grates, and parking areas. Quiet Hours Visitors can purchase certified firewood in the Park, or gather dead wood on the ground in the Park. Do not saw, cut, chop, or harvest any parts from a standing tree, dead or alive. Due to the threat from the Emerald Ash Borer, firewood from outside the Park shall be USDA certified and labeled. Build fires only in designated fire grates, and do not build rock rings or burn trash in the grate. Never leave fires or hot coals unattended and extinguish them completely before leaving. Sanitation Wash dishes at your campsite; not in restrooms, drinking fountains, or at water spigots. Strain dishwater to remove food particles and dispose strained water only in the restroom utility sinks. Dispose of food particles in trash bins, not in sink drains. Trailers and RVs must empty sewage and wastewater at the dump station 1/4 mile from the campground. Water is a precious and limited resource, especially on top of the mountain; use it wisely. Please sort and place trash and recyclables in appropriate bins. Campstore, Laundry, and Showers Shenandoah National Park operates the campgrounds. The official park concessioner operates the campstore, laundry, and showers. Quarters are required for the shower and laundry machines. There is a change machine near the showers. Vehicles and Other Wheeled Devices All roads in the campground are one-way with a 10-mph speed limit. Keep all vehicles, motorcycles, trailers, and bicycles on paved areas at all times. Sk
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Dundo Group Camground and Picnic Ground Shenandoah National Park 2016 Reservations Online: www.recreation.gov Phone: (877) 444-6777 Site 3  Site 2 W   Camping is permitted only in shaded Site areas. W Site 1   10 mph      W     ive Dr e in  Skyl To  W   North Restroom W Water Source Recycle/Dumpster Hiking Trail Picnic Table Hiking Trail (A.T.)  Traffic Flow Campsite 0 0 25 m 100 ft 50 m 200 ft Park Emergency Number 1-800-732-0911 Dundo Group Campground and Picnic Ground Shenandoah National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior 2016 Camping Reservations may be made up to one year in advance online at www.recreation.gov or by calling 877-444-6777. You may inquire on a night-by-night basis at Loft Mountain Campground. All Dundo check-ins are at Loft Mountain Campgound, mile 79.5. Check out or re-register by noon. Group camping fees are non-refundable and there are no discounts. Camping is limited to 14 consecutive days per year. Campsites Campsites are equipped with picnic tables and fire grates. Generators are prohibited. Your group must have a minimum of seven people and a maximum of 20. Do not trench your tent or put nails in trees. Leave something on your campsite at all times to show it is occupied. Quiet hours are 10:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. Campfires Fires are allowed only in grates. Do not build rock rings in the grate. Firewood must be gathered or purchased in the Park or if brought in, it must have a USDA-approved sticker. Gather only down and dead wood. Do not saw, cut, or break any standing trees, dead or alive. Do not leave fires or hot coals unattended. Food Storage/Resource Protection Proper food storage is a MUST! This is bear country, and deer, raccoons, and skunks are also year-round residents. Keep all food, garbage, equipment used to prepare or store food, and all scented items in your vehicle when not in use. It is illegal to feed or disturb wildlife. All resources including plants, animals, and artifacts are protected by law. Do not disturb! Hunting is prohibited. Pets Pets must be on a leash at all times. Please clean up after your pet and do not leave them unattended. There are a few trails that are not suitable for pets; please check the list in the visitor guide. Please do not take pets to Ranger Programs. Sanitation Wash dishes at your site; not at water spigots. Water spigots are for public use. Please do not attach hoses or leave water running. Dispose of trash and recyclables in the appropriate bins. Facilities Pay phones, a campstore with wood, ice, and groceries, and showers and laundry are 3.7 miles north at Loft Mountain Campground. These facilities are open May through October. Vehicles All roads in the campground are one-way and the speed limit is 10 mph. Keep all vehicles, including motorcycles, on paved areas. Bicycles are permitted on paved roads only. Skates, rollerblades, scooters, and skateboards are prohibited. Recreation Check the Ranger Programs schedule in the visitor guide for guided walks, talks, and evening programs. The closest visitor center is at mile 51 where there are exhibits, movies, maps, hiking information and more. Emergencies The nearest phone is 3.7 miles north at Loft Mountain. The emergency number is 1-800-7320911. The nearest hospital is in Harrisonburg: drive 18 miles north, exit onto Rt. 33 and go 22 miles west. Park Emergency Number 1-800-732-0911

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