"Hazel Mountain Overlook Sunrise" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Shenandoah

National Park - Virginia

Shenandoah National Park extends along the Blue Ridge Mountains in the U.S. state of Virginia. The Skyline Drive runs its length, and a vast network of trails includes a section of the long-distance Appalachian Trail. Mostly forested, the park features wetlands, waterfalls and rocky peaks like Hawksbill and Old Rag mountains. Shenandoah is home to many bird species, plus deer, squirrels and the elusive black bear.

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maps

Official Visitor Map of Shenandoah National Park (NP) in Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Shenandoah - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Shenandoah National Park (NP) in Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Blue Ridge Parkway (PKWY) in North Carolina and Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Blue Ridge - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Blue Ridge Parkway (PKWY) in North Carolina and Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Tail Map of Appalachian National Scenic Trail (NST) in Connecticut, Georgia, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, Vermont, West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Appalachian - Trail Map

Tail Map of Appalachian National Scenic Trail (NST) in Connecticut, Georgia, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, Vermont, West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Chesapeake & Ohio Canal - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/shen/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shenandoah_National_Park Shenandoah National Park extends along the Blue Ridge Mountains in the U.S. state of Virginia. The Skyline Drive runs its length, and a vast network of trails includes a section of the long-distance Appalachian Trail. Mostly forested, the park features wetlands, waterfalls and rocky peaks like Hawksbill and Old Rag mountains. Shenandoah is home to many bird species, plus deer, squirrels and the elusive black bear. Just 75 miles from the bustle of Washington, D.C., Shenandoah National Park is a land bursting with cascading waterfalls, spectacular vistas, fields of wildflowers, and quiet wooded hollows. With over 200,000 acres of protected lands that are haven to deer, songbirds, and black bear, there's so much to explore...and your journey begins right here! Shenandoah National Park is located in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, west of Washington, D.C. It stretches 105 miles and has four entrances: Front Royal (northern entrance), Thornton Gap, Swift Run Gap, and Rockfish Gap (southern entrance to Shenandoah and the northern entrance to the Blue Ridge Parkway). The physical address listed is to the administrative offices, not the Park itself. GPS can be unreliable for navigating to the Park, so we encourage you to check out our website for more info. Dickey Ridge Visitor Center Dickey Ridge Visitor Center (mile 4.6) is located near Front Royal, Virginia, in the northern part of the Park. It's the ideal place for visitors entering through the Front Royal Entrance Station to find restrooms, information, a bookstore, publications, and maps. Right across Skyline Drive from the visitor center you will find the popular Fox Hollow Trail trailhead. From Washington, D.C. metro area, travel west on Interstate 66 to Front Royal, Virginia (62 miles). Take the exit onto Route 340 South and follow signs for Shenandoah National Park and Skyline Drive, which will lead you to the Front Royal Entrance Station . Once on Skyline Drive, make your way south to mile marker 4.6; you will find Dickey Ridge Visitor Center on your right. Harry F. Byrd, Sr. Visitor Center Byrd Visitor Center (mile 51) is located across from Big Meadows in the center of Shenandoah National Park. Available facilities include: restrooms, information desk, ranger programs, bookstore, publications, maps, and first aid. Within close proximity to countless activities and hikes, it's a great place to start your next trip! From Front Royal or Thornton Gap (Luray), head south on the Skyline Drive to mile 51. The visitor center will be on your right, across from Big Meadows. From Swift Run (Elkton) or Rockfish Gap (Waynesboro), head north on the Skyline Drive to mile 51. The visitor center will be on your left, across from Big Meadows. Big Meadows Campground Big Meadows Campground (mile 51.2) is centrally-located in Shenandoah National Park, providing easy access to many of the most popular destinations in the Park, including Big Meadows, Dark Hollow Falls, and Byrd Visitor Center. All sites include a place for a tent or RV, a fire ring, and a picnic table. Group Campsite (Nonelectric) 75.00 Big Meadows Campground has two nonelectric group sites. Each group site can accommodate 7-15 people. Standard Campsite (Nonelectric) 30.00 A standard, nonelectric campsite for tent or RV (motorhome, pop-up, or 5th-wheel). Standard campsites are limited to six people (or 1 immediate family) per site and one RV. Big Meadows Campground A small pop-up camper is parked in a campground with green trees overhead. Come relax under the shade of verdant trees in the campground at Big Meadows. Dundo Group Campground Dundo Group Campground (mile 83.7) is a small, beautiful campground located in the southern part of Shenandoah National Park that offers group campsites, only. The Appalachian Trail passes through the campground. All sites include fire rings and picnic tables. Group Campsite (Nonelectric) 75.00 Dundo Group Campground has three nonelectric group sites. Each group site can accommodate 7-20 people. Dundo Group Campground Several large tents sit behind a man who is standing at a table in a campground. Dundo Group Campground offers a great opportunity to enjoy Shenandoah with friends and family. Lewis Mountain Campground Lewis Mountain (mile 57.5), the smallest campground in Shenandoah National Park, appeals to those who want a little more privacy while still staying within a close distance to many of the most popular destinations in the Park, including Big Meadows (7 miles away). Standard Campsite (Nonelectric) 30.00 A standard, nonelectric campsite for tent or RV (motorhome, pop-up, or 5th-wheel). Standard campsites are limited to six people (or 1 immediate family) per site and one RV. Lewis Mountain Campground A paved road branches off at the entrance to a campground, with cabins in the distance. Loft Mountain Campground Loft Mountain (mile 79.5), the largest campground in the park, sits atop Big Flat Mountain in the southern part of Shenandoah National Park, with outstanding views to east and west. Two waterfalls and the trails into the Big Run Wilderness area are nearby. Standard Campsite (Nonelectric) 30.00 A standard, nonelectric campsite for tent or RV (motorhome, pop-up, or 5th-wheel). Standard campsites are limited to six people (or 1 immediate family) per site and one RV. Loft Mountain Campground A group of people sit at a picnic table next to a tent under a canopy of green trees in a campground Loft Mountain Campground offers a great place to unwind with friends and family. Mathews Arm Campground Mathews Arm Campground (mile 22.1) is the nearest campground for those entering Shenandoah National Park from Front Royal, in the northern section of the Park. All sites include a place for a tent or RV, a fire ring, and picnic table. Elkwallow Wayside, with camping supplies and food service, is two miles away. Standard Campsite (Nonelectric) 30.00 A standard, nonelectric campsite for tent or RV (motorhome, pop-up, or 5th-wheel). Standard campsites are limited to six people (or 1 immediate family) per site and one RV. Group Campsite (Nonelectric) 75.00 Mathews Arm Campground has three nonelectric group sites. Each group site can accommodate 7-25 people. Mathews Arm Campground A white and red camper sits in a campsite under fall foliage. Mathews Arm Campground is a great place to unwind after a busy day exploring the Park. Adventure Awaits A man stands on a rocky outcrop overlooking the receding mountains. There are over 60 peaks with an elevation over 3,000 feet in Shenandoah. Wonderful Waterfalls A man stands with his back facing us, looking at a waterfall. Dark Hollow Falls, at 70 feet, is our most visited waterfall. Red-Bellied Woodpecker A close up shot of a Red-Bellied Woodpecker with a blurry teal background. There are over 200 species of bird that call Shenandoah "home." Driving on Skyline Drive A road surrounded by fall foliage turns a curve around a small waterfall. There are 105 miles to explore on Skyline Drive. Find Yourself in Nature Looking up at a poplar stand canopy, which is turning yellow in fall. This poplar stand at mile 8 is a popular stop for visitors entering from the north entrance. Bat Population Monitoring in Shenandoah National Park Shenandoah National Park supports a number of rare species, many of which can be found at higher elevations in the park. Researchers have recently discovered that several rare bat species also prefer the park's mountaintops during summer months. Scientists are using acoustic detectors, radio telemetry, and mist nets, to better understand the park's bat communities. A little brown bat clinging to the side of a tree. Parks are worth the effort to reduce air pollution and address climate change Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy visit Shenandoah National Park to highlight the work being done by the National Park Service (NPS) and the EPA to provide clean air, clear views, and dark skies for us and our future generations. Fall colors in Shenandoah National Park Evaluating Ecological Impacts of the 2012 Neighbor Mountain Fire Members of NPS fire effects crews from the Northeast and Southeast regions joined forces for 4 days in August 2013 to conduct field reconnaissance and gather data evaluating the ecological effects of the 2012 Neighbor Mountain fire that took place in Shenandoah National Park. Crew members from Shenandoah NP, Great Smoky Mountains NP, and Natchez Trace Parkway participated in this effort. Throughout the year these fire ecology crews share information, resources, and personnel. Around the country with the monarch butterfly It's about to begin! What parks will the monarchs amazing journey take them? A mock monarch selfie at Ozakrs National Scenic Riverways National Parks Pitch In to Help Save Monarch Butterflies As scientists and citizen scientists have noted, insect populations are plummeting across the globe. Monarch butterfly populations are no exception. Recent counts show that the western population has experienced a precipitous drop. As of 2018, the population of monarchs overwintering along the California coast stands at just 0.6% of what it was in the 1980s. Monarch butterflies among eucalyptus leaves, viewed through a scope CCC Jobs Two Civilian Conservation Corp boys stand next to hillside after completing erosion control work. Two CCC boys pose on hillside with erosion control measures. Park Air Profiles - Shenandoah National Park Air quality profile for Shenandoah National Park. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Shenandoah NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Shenandoah NP. Appalachian Trail on Loft Mountain Wildland Fire: Park Conducts Prescribed Fire for Resource Benefits In April 2013, personnel from the Northeast Region completed the 500-acre Jarman Gap prescribed fire at Shenandoah National Park.  The objectives included restoring dry oak and pine communities and reducing hazardous fuels in the wildland-urban interface. A preliminary assessment of the fire effects indicates that the prescribed burn met the primary objectives. This was a multiagency effort with firefighters and other resources participating from across the region. Bat Projects in Parks: Shenandoah National Park Partnering with Virginia Tech and USGS, Shenandoah continued surveys of bats in the park. A ranger using telemetry gear in Shenandoah National Park Park Concessions: Historic Privatization By the time the National Park Service was established in August 1916, Congress had created nine national parks and twelve national monuments. Although these sites were under the jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Interior, most were in the West and were run by the Army which saw its function strictly as the protection of timber and mineral resources and the prevention of homesteading. Miriam M. Sizer: Patroness or Patronizing Miriam M. Sizer was an educator hired to study the mountain residents in Nicholson, Weakley, Corbin, and Richards Hollows, to make recommendations as to solutions to the problems inherent in relocation. Her beliefs and bias, supported by George Freeman Pollock and William E. Carson, have influenced popular thought for three generations. Mountain Settlements Located on the eastern slopes of the Blue Ridge, in the shadow of Old Rag Mountain in Madison County, Virginia, the three hollows were home to approximately 460 persons when Shenandoah National Park was created in the 1930s, having been continuously occupied by settlers of European descent since the late eighteenth century. Hunter C. and Mrs. Dodson The Displaced While emphasizing the complexity of pre-park life, the recent archaeological research has clearly contributed to overturning the negative history of the region and helped to return it to the control of the displaced and their descendants. The challenge now is to continually strive for accuracy in our understanding and presentation of the park's complex historic past while remaining ever aware of the impact of the past upon the present. Man from Shenandoah Mountains Thoughts on Whiskey Earthenware jugs and stills were used in the past as "humorous" display objects to ridicule the "moonshining mountain folk", but in reality they represent the final chapters in a centuries-old American agricultural tradition. Segregation and Desegregation at Shenandoah National Park Primary source documents reveal the thinking and decision making of park managers, from the highest level of the National Park Service to local concessionaires, surrounding the creation of segregated facilities in Shenandoah National Park in the 1930s and the desegregation of the same facilities by 1950. A black and white historical photo of a large entrance sign for a segregated park facility. Shenandoah: Not Without the CCC The first Civilian Conservation Corps camps in national parks were located at what would become Shenandoah National Park. Over 1,000 young men would eventually work at one of ten camps in and around Shenandoah. From the gentle curves of Skyline Drive to the stone walls enclosing the overlooks, the projects that these young men took on shaped Shenandoah National Park as we know it today. A black and white photograph of tents in a meadow. Shenandoah: Wilderness by Design? Today, 40% of land in Shenandoah is designated wilderness. This wilderness is a relatively new development. During the first decade of the Park's history, park managers sought to erase all traces of humans on the mountain and worked to create a park with the natural qualities that met their perception of what nature should be. Why did Shenandoah's original managers become agents of environmental change? A historical photograph of young men transplanting a tree. World War II Plane Crashes in National Parks During WWII, more than 7,100 air crashes involved US Army Air Force (USAAF) aircraft occurred on American soil. Collectively these crashes resulted in the loss of more than 15,599 lives (Mireles 2006). Many of these military aircraft accidents occurred in remote, often mountainous, areas managed by the National Park Service. plane crash at base of grassy hill Shenandoah National Park Fights Emerald Ash Borer Shenandoah National Park, partnering with the Shenandoah National Park Trust, is vigorously fighting the potential destruction of 99% of its ash trees due to the emerald ash borer. Staff inject ash trees with a compound to ward off the emerald ash borer. Shenandoah's Civil War Connection The Blue Ridge Mountains running along the East side of the Shenandoah Valley make up the core of Shenandoah National Park where Skyline Drive runs along their crest. What visitors may not realize is that they are driving along one of the most significant tools the Confederacy utilized during the American Civil War. Historic map sketched by Jedediah Hotchkiss. Shenandoah National Park: From Idea to Reality There were many people who played a role in the foundation of Shenandoah National Park. Learn about how these people, who together represented public committees, private interests, local government all the way up to the Department of the Interior, brought the idea of an eastern national park into reality, and the events along the way that shaped a section of Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains into the Shenandoah National Park we know today. A historical photograph of a seated man leaning over a table, surrounded by people. Demmer Scholars Hike through 2012 Wildfire at Shenandoah National Park In August 2014, a group of talented university students hiked through the 2012 Neighbor Mountain fire at Shenandoah National Park to learn about the history and nature of wildland fire. Students in the William A. Demmer Scholars Program take a senior-level class in natural resources policy while working full-time as paid interns at federal agencies or nongovernmental organizations that focus on natural resources. Ten Tips for a Successful Field Trip Here are a few quick tips to help make your next field trip a success. Teaching Outdoors Basics on what outdoor teaching is and why it can be an effective form of teaching. 2019 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. Women in Fire Science: Ellen Frondorf Ellen Frondorf has worked in fire effects monitoring for the National Park Service. She shares her story of work in fire science. A woman in a baseball cap stands in a meadow. National Parks’ Homefront Battle: Protecting Parks During WWII Though the National Park Service (NPS) was only 25 years old at the outbreak of World War II, the agency found itself fighting a battle on the homefront. With little precedent to work from and dwindling budgets and staff, the NPS strongly defended its parks against a flood of demands to log, mine, graze, drain, and take over national parks Unwelcome Guests in Acadia The spread of non-native plants and animals is one of the biggest threats facing natural areas. Non-native species, especially those considered invasive, threaten rich communities of native plants and animals across the United States. In national parks, more than 2.6 million acres of park lands are affected by invasive plant species, and 234 National Park Service areas have invasive animals in need of management. Friends of Acadia volunteer helps remove invasive species. Herbert Hoover's National Parks Herbert Hoover is not thought of as one of our better presidents, but he made lasting contributions in the national parks he established. During Herbert Hoover's presidency from 1929 to 1933, the land designated for new national parks and monuments increased by 40 percent. Sepia photo of Herbert Hoover standing at the rim of the Grand Canyon. Big Meadows Cultural Landscape Construction of the Big Meadows developed area began in 1935 as part of a park master plan. It is significant in the areas of entertainment/recreation and politics/government for its association with Shenandoah National Park as one of the first eastern national parks, and it is associated with the early twentieth century movement to accommodate the growing popularity of the automobile while also conserving natural and scenic areas. A man stands beside a low wooden structure, a seed and transplant flat, in Big Meadows. National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Shenandoah National Park, Virginia Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] mountain ridges and valleys Brinnen Carter - Cultural Resource Program Manager Brinnen Carter is Cultural Resource Program Manager at Shenandoah National Park. Brinnen Carter giving a presentation. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ The Precambrian The Precambrian was the "Age of Early Life." During the Precambrian, continents formed and our modern atmosphere developed, while early life evolved and flourished. Soft-bodied creatures like worms and jellyfish lived in the world's oceans, but the land remained barren. Common Precambrian fossils include stromatolites and similar structures, which are traces of mats of algae-like microorganisms, and microfossils of other microorganisms. fossil stromatolites in a cliff face Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Connie Rudd: Defining a Career Path Connie Rudd's career with the National Park Service began as a seasonal ranger in 1979. Her continual desire to learn propelled her to various sites and positions in interpretation, planning, and management until 2014, when she retired as Park Superintendent. In this Spotlight article, Rudd reflects on her career path, changes in interpretation, and being in upper management as a woman. Part of "Women’s Voices: Women in the National Park Service Oral History Project." Connie Rudd smiles for a portrait in an outdoor setting, wearing a NPS uniform and flathat Shenandoah Virtual Junior Ranger Even if you can't earn a Junior Ranger badge in person while at Shenandoah National Park, you can still become a Virtual Junior Ranger from wherever you are in the world! Complete the online activities and take the pledge to get your virtual badge today! Taking the Long View: Clean Air, Clear Views On very clear days, we can see the bright, crisp colors and textures of national park landscapes highlighting the spectacular natural and historic settings that define these special places. Distant features appear on the horizon, and even in places without distant features, vibrant blue skies and bright white clouds with sharp edges can be seen on clear days. Air pollution can create a haze that dulls these scenes by softening the textures, fading colors, and obscuring... Clean Air View Spotted Lanternfly The Spotted Lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) (SLF), a member of the planthopper family, is an invasive insect that was first discovered in the United States (eastern Pennsylvania) in 2014. SLF are native to Southeast Asia and feed on a wide range of plants and trees. SLF are spreading throughout much of the Mid Atlantic area including northcentral Virginia and have the potential to become a major threat to the region’s agriculture and forestry industries. Top 10 Tips for Visiting Shenandoah in the Summer Take a moment to learn ten simple things you can do to help everyone enjoy a safe and memorable trip to Shenandoah National Park! A young man takes a picture with his phone of a scenic mountain overlook. Thinking Like an Archeologist Undergraduate students engaged in archeological field schools and short-term surveys at Shenandoah National Park. Responsible not only for college credit but also professional-level work that meets the Secretary’ Professional Standards, and Virginia SHPO standards, the students’ assessments included contributions to CRM reports and conference papers. September 11, 2001, NPS Oral History Project This oral history project recorded the memories and perspectives of NPS staff who experienced the events of 9/11 and their aftermath. Transcripts and a 2004 report about the NPS response are available online. A petinad hand holds a flame aloft in the air. Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background 2021 Weather In Review: Shenandoah National Park Shenandoah National Park experienced an extremely warm 2021 with total precipitation that was below normal. The year ended as the 4th warmest and 41st driest year since 1895. Pink sunrise over mountains.

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