"SLBE Dune Climb Family Fun" by U.S. National Park Service , Public domain:No Restrictions

Sleeping Bear Dunes

National Lakeshore - Michigan

Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore is located along the northwest coast of the Lower Peninsula of Michigan in Leelanau and Benzie counties near Empire, Michigan. The park covers a 35-mile-long (56 km) stretch of Lake Michigan's eastern coastline, as well as North and South Manitou islands. This Northern Michigan park was established primarily because of its outstanding natural features, including forests, beaches, dune formations, and ancient glacial phenomena. The lakeshore also contains many cultural features including the 1871 South Manitou Island Lighthouse, three former stations of the Coast Guard (formerly the Life-Saving Service) and an extensive rural historic farm district.

maps

Official Visitor Map of Sleeping Bear Dunes (NLS) in Michigan. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Sleeping Bear Dunes - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Sleeping Bear Dunes (NLS) in Michigan. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/slbe/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleeping_Bear_Dunes_National_Lakeshore Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore is located along the northwest coast of the Lower Peninsula of Michigan in Leelanau and Benzie counties near Empire, Michigan. The park covers a 35-mile-long (56 km) stretch of Lake Michigan's eastern coastline, as well as North and South Manitou islands. This Northern Michigan park was established primarily because of its outstanding natural features, including forests, beaches, dune formations, and ancient glacial phenomena. The lakeshore also contains many cultural features including the 1871 South Manitou Island Lighthouse, three former stations of the Coast Guard (formerly the Life-Saving Service) and an extensive rural historic farm district. Miles of sand beach, bluffs that tower 450’ above Lake Michigan, lush forests, clear inland lakes, unique flora and fauna make up the natural world of Sleeping Bear Dunes. High dunes afford spectacular views across the lake. An island lighthouse, US Life-Saving Service stations, coastal villages, and picturesque farmsteads reflect the park’s rich maritime, agricultural, and recreational history. From the south (Detroit or Chicago areas) :Take US-31, US-131, US-27 to M-115 & M-37, I-75 and M-72 North to Traverse City, then west on M-72 to the Village of Empire. You will see the visitor center as you enter Empire on your right. You may also get to Empire from the south via US-31 to Ludington and then north to Manistee. You can follow either US-31 or M-22 from north of Manistee. From the north (Michigan's Upper Peninsula), take I-75 to Grayling and follow M-72 to Traverse City or take US-31 south Philip A. Hart Visitor Center The Philip A. Hart Visitor Center is located on M-72 just east of the intersection with M-22 in Empire, MI. You will find a wealth of information about the park and the natural and human history of the area. Park passes, brochures, and maps are available at the Information Desk. If you have questions, rangers and volunteers are available to assist you. From the south (Detroit or Chicago areas): Take US-31, US-131, US-27 to M-115 & M-37, I-75 and M-72 North to Traverse City, then west on M-72 to the Village of Empire. You will see the visitor center as you enter Empire on your right. From the north (Michigan's Upper Peninsula):take I-75 to Grayling and follow M-72 to Traverse City or take US-31 south to Traverse City, then go west on M-72 to the Village of Empire. Port Oneida Heritage Center The Port Oneida Heritage Center, at the Olsen farmhouse is operated by Preserve Historic Sleeping Bear, a nonprofit partner of the national park. During seasonal open hours the Heritage Center offers exhibits and artifacts in the farmhouse that tell the story of the late 1800s agricultural community of Port Oneida. The large barn is open and people can enjoy the gardens and a small museum store. South Manitou Island Visitor Center The former general store for the island now serves as a visitor venter. It houses an interesting collection of photos and artifacts that tell the story of what life was like for the loggers, farmers, and members of the Life-Saving Service who made the island home. Bay Campground - South Manitou Island The Bay Campground is the closest campground to the dock. Bring water filtration equipment because there is no source of purified drinking water. There are 25 individual sites and 3 group sites. Bay Campground for 1-4 persons 10.00 Nightly fee for Bay Campground for 1-4 persons Bay Campground Group SItes 30.00 Nightly fee for Bay Campground group sItes for 7-20 persons Bay Campground Tent on sand surrounded by conifer trees and grasses. Bay Campground D. H. Day Campground The rustic D.H. Day Campground is located in the northern district of the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, on the lower peninsula of Michigan. This beautifully wooded campground is one of the most popular in northern Michigan, with easy access to the Dune Climb, the Pierce Stocking Scenic Drive, and museums and the historic village of Glen Haven. and is located only 2 miles from the restaurants and shops of beautiful downtown Glen Arbor. DHDCG campsite for 1-6 persons 20.00 Nightly fee for a DHDCG campsite for 1-6 persons. October 15 - end of November 10.00 From October 15, water is turned off in the campground and the fees drop to $10 per site/night, $5 per site/night with Interagency Senior/Access pass Biking through DH Day Campground Woman on bike riding by a campsite. Biking in the campground D. H. Day Campground Group Campground The D.H. Day Group Campground offers more rustic camping. You will find dirt roads, vault toilets, and ready access to the Lake Michigan beach. There are no electric hook-ups or showers. The campground is located in the northern part of the park mid-way between Glen Haven and Glen Arbor. DHDCG group campsite for 7-25 persons 40.00 Nighlty fee for a DHDCG group campsite for 7-25 persons DH Day Group Campground Tent sprawl across the DH Day group campground Tent sprawl across the DH Day group campground Platte River Campground Platte River Campground is open year-round and offers a wide variety of camping styles. You can find back-in and pull-through sites for RV's, including electrical hookups; but it also offers beautiful tent sites, walk-in sites for the slightly more adventurous, and group sites (hike-in, tents only) accommodating up to 25 people. There is even a nearby backcountry campground for those who enjoy a great backpacking experience, but don't have the time to head for the Manitou Islands. PRCG campsite with electrical hook-up 31.00 Nightly fee for a PRCG campsite with electrical hook-up for 1-6 persons PRCG campsite with no electrical hook-up 26.00 Nightly fee for a PRCG campsite with no electrical hook-up for 1-6 persons. PRCG group campsites 50.00 Nightly fee for a PRCG group campsites (hike in, tents only) for 7-25 persons. PRCG Walk-in Sites 22.00 PRCG walk-in sites Platte River Campground Ranger Station Ranger outside of the Platte River Campground Ranger Station Entering the ranger staiton. Popple Campground - South Manitou Island The Popple Campground is the furthest from the dock (about 3.5 miles), so you are likely to have fewer people camping there. The campground is close to the beach on the northern tip of the island. Bring water filtration equipment since there is no source of purified drinking water. There are 7 individual sites Popple Campground for 1-4 persons 10.00 Nightly fee for Popple Campground for 1-4 persons Popple Campground Wood sign that reads "Popple" in front of a trail and forest. Popple Campground Village Campground - North Manitou Island The small Village Campground contains eight designated campsites, two fire rings and one outhouse. There is a limit of two tents and four people per site. Fires are permitted in the community fire rings at the Village Campground. Village Campground Campsites for 1-4 persons 10.00 Nightly fee for Village Campground campsites for 1-4 persons Village Campground Tent on sand surrounded by forest with a tarp tied above. Village Campground Weather Station Campground - South Manitou Island The Weather Station Campground overlooks Lake Michigan from the bluffs on the south side of the island. Camp sites are well secluded from each other and have fire pits for open fires. Follow the wooded trail past the lighthouse about 1.3 miles to the campground. Bring water filtration equipment since there is no source of purified drinking water. There are 20 individual sites and 3 group sites. Weather Station Campground for 1-4 persons 10.00 Nightly fee for Weather Station Campground for 1-4 persons Weather Station Group Campground for 7-20 persons 30.00 Nightly fee for Weather Station Group Campground for 7-20 persons Weather Station Campground Wood sign that reads "Weather Station Campground" in front of woody shrubs. Weather Station Campground White Pine Backcountry Campground This camp has 6 sites and is located about 2 miles from the Trail's End Road trailhead on the Platte Plains hiking trail south of Empire just off of M-22 and is about 1/2 mile from the Lake Michigan shore where you can obtain fresh water. There is no well water at White Pine, so if you use water from Lake Michigan, it must be treated before drinking it. White Pine backcountry site 10.00 Nightly fee for a White Pine backcountry site White Pine Campsite A blue tent nestled in the woods White Pine campsite Beach pebbles Sand and pebbles in foreground with turquoise water in background Lake and beach Lake Michigan overlook sun A bright sun begins to set into Lake Michigan Sunset viewing is a favorite activity--especially from the Lake Michigan overlook. Winter sunset A man is sillouetted against the winter sun setting in the lake. Enjoying a winter sunset from a frozen sand perch. Glen Haven Village Historic District Landscape The Glen Haven Village Historic District contains examples of vernacular architecture, a nineteenth-century cordwood station, and steamboat stop. Originally a marine transportation company-operated village, Glen Haven provided goods and services for passing steamboats and later served as a tourist destination. The district is historically significant for the period 1864-1931. Two story Sleeping Bear Inn along a road in a bright snowy landscape beside Lake Michigan NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, Michigan Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] dunes and lakeshore Great Lakes Mapping Great Lakes Network staff assisted Midwest Region staff in a mapping project that reveals a whole new way of looking at the Great Lakes parks. oblique view of the Gull Island shoal, Apostle Islands NL, Lake Superior NPS Structural Fire Program Highlights 2014 Intern Accomplishments Port Oneida Rural Historic District Cultural Landscape Port Oneida Rural Historic District at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore is one of the largest and most complete historic agricultural landscape in public ownership. Beginning around the early 1860s, the site supported a lucrative lumber industry. By the 1890s, the decline in demand for lumber and deforestation motivated a transition to an agricultural-based economy. The agrarian community existed into the mid-19th century. A rural agricultural landscape with wooden farm buildings and open fields. Nighttime Navigation and Light Station Landscapes Lighthouses of the Great Lakes region are historic navigational aids that have guided sailors under dark skies, around dangerous coast lines, and through treacherous weather. The light station landscapes are an important cultural resource, representing developments in navigational technology and patterns of commerce and settlement. The landscape features suggest the lives of the keepers and their families who operated these lights, guiding ships through dark waters. Aerial view of a light station with cylindrical light tower, surrounded by trees and grass. First Ever Prescribed Fire at Sleeping Bear Dunes Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore conducted it's first ever broadcast prescribed fire on May 7. A wildland firefighter ignites a prescribed fire along a walking trail in a pine forest. The Mother Bear and Cubs of Sleeping Bear Dunes Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore honors a faithful mother bear. Dunes and dune grass Letter to the Editor The EPA updated its criteria for assessing water and sediment quality. This enabled a more nuanced analysis of water quality conditions in the Great Lakes. Our analysis suggests that parks would benefit from additional work on water clarity. Nearshore water quality monitoring station near Sand Island, Apostle Islands National Lakeshore Great Lakes Fire Management Zone Fire Departments receive much needed wildland fire supplies and equipment. Three Fire Departments protecting NPS units in the Great Lakes Fire Management Zone received over $95,000 in wildland fire equipment this year through the Rural Fire Readiness Grant. NPS and Burns Harbor Firefighters stand in front of donated fire engine Nearshore conditions in the Great Lakes national parks: A baseline water quality and toxicological assessment Field survey results suggest generally good water quality, although nutrient concentrations were unexpectedly high near several parks, and metals and legacy pollutants continue to affect sediments and fish. Nearshore water quality monitoring station near Sand Island, Apostle Islands National Lakeshore Fire Prevention Success--What’s Being Accomplished in the National Parks Sleeping Bear Point Life-Saving Station The Sleeping Bear Point Life-Saving Station (now the Maritime Museum) was built in 1901 to house the crew and equipment which would be called upon to save the lives of passengers and crew of ships in distress in the Manitou Passage. The U.S. Life-Saving Service was merged with the Revenue Cutter Service in 1915 to create the U.S. Coast Guard. US Life-Saving Service The United States Life-Saving Service (USLSS), the predecessor to the United States Coast Guard, formed in 1878. The story of the USLSS dates to almost 100 years before the service became an official agency, to the noble efforts of the Humane Society of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, a group of affluent individuals seeking to prevent needless deaths from shipwrecks. A black and white photo of seven men wearing uniforms and standing in front of a boat house. Zehra Osman Zehra Osman has been a Landscape Architect with the National Park Service since 2001. Through her work at a variety of parks around the country, Zehra explores how cultural landscape documentation and research contributes to historic preservation and planning projects. A smiling woman in a green NPS uniform with arms crossed Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Wildland Fire in Red Pine and White Pine The red pine and white pine forest inhabits the cooler climates of the upper Midwest. They once covered large areas of northern Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan. Red and white pine forests owe their presence and persistence in large part to fire. Although both types of trees can live in areas without fire, especially on very sandy soils, frequent fires are necessary for healthy forests. Small flames consume dead pine needles and log under red and white pine trees. Boekelodge Log Cabin Cultural Landscape District The period of significance for Boekelodge is 1929 to 2005, corresponding to the original cabin construction and use of the land as a homestead, purchase and use by the Boekeloo family, and the purchase by the NPS and expiration of the use agreement. The cultural landscape contains beach, dunes, woodland, trails, buildings, and small-scale features. It was one of the last existing wilderness retreats, which were popular in the mid-20th century, in the state of Michigan. A log cabin to the right of a pond, which is surrounded by trees and grasses Top Ten Tips for Visiting Sleeping Bear Dunes Plan Like a Park Ranger: Top Ten Tips for Visiting Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore A overview of a sand dune overlooking Lake Michigan Series: Cultural Landscapes of Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore The cultural landscapes of Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore include a rural historic district, agricultural landscapes, homesteads and retreats, a light station, and a life-saving station. The documentation and care of landscape characteristics at these sites, within the natural environmental setting, helps to preserve a view of how the landscapes developed and were used over time. A wooden barn stands beside a smaller outbuilding with a stone foundation and gabled roof

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