Ste. Geneviève

National Historical Park - Missouri

Ste. Genevieve is home to one of the highest concentrations of distinctive types of French colonial architecture known as poteaux en terre, or post in ground, and Poteaux-sur-sol, or post on sill. Both of these styles involve construction of walls consisting of vertical logs, the former placed directly into the ground, and the latter onto a horizontal sill of wood or stone. Prominent local examples of these architectural styles include the Beauvais-Amoureux House, the Felix Vallé House State Historic Site, La Maison de Guibourd, the Delassus-Kern House, the Louis Bolduc House (itself listed separately as a National Historic Landmark) and Old MillerSwitch Train station was a vital part of History proving supplies and Rest on the Old Railroad.

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Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/stge/learn/news.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ste._Genevieve_Historic_District Ste. Genevieve is home to one of the highest concentrations of distinctive types of French colonial architecture known as poteaux en terre, or post in ground, and Poteaux-sur-sol, or post on sill. Both of these styles involve construction of walls consisting of vertical logs, the former placed directly into the ground, and the latter onto a horizontal sill of wood or stone. Prominent local examples of these architectural styles include the Beauvais-Amoureux House, the Felix Vallé House State Historic Site, La Maison de Guibourd, the Delassus-Kern House, the Louis Bolduc House (itself listed separately as a National Historic Landmark) and Old MillerSwitch Train station was a vital part of History proving supplies and Rest on the Old Railroad. Established by 1750, Ste. Geneviève was the first permanent European settlement in Missouri. Early French Canadian settlers were drawn here by the rich agricultural land known as Le Grand Champ (the Big Field). After the flood of 1785, the town relocated to its present location on higher ground approximately three miles to the northwest of its original site. From St. Louis and points north, take Interstate 55 S to exit 154, follow US-61 S for about 7 miles, make a left on Market Street. From Cape Girardeau and points south, take Interstate 55 N to exit 150, follow state route 32 until it ends at US-61, continue straight. From southern Illinois, you can also take the Ste. Genevieve - Modoc Ferry across the Mississippi. Please visit http://stegenmodocferry.com/ for hours and rates. Ste. Genevieve National Historical Park Visitor Center 66 South Main Street Ste. Genevieve, MO 63670 For additional information, call 573-880-7189. From I-55: Exit 150. Turn east onto Hwy. 32. Travel 4.6 miles to the intersection of Hwy 32 andHwy 61. Continue straight through stoplight, continue .9 miles to intersection of Fourth and Market. Turn right on Market to enter the Historic District of Ste. Genevieve. Presentation inside STGE Visitor Center Park Ranger giving presentation to audience inside a building. A Park Ranger gives a presentation inside the Visitor Center at Ste. Geneviève National Historical Park Park Guide Leading Tour of Jean-Baptiste Valle House park ranger leading tour on street corner with frame house in background & visitors in semi-circle. Ranger Rob Lippert leads a program to a group on the corner of Market and Main Street. Across the street is the the Bolduc-LeMeilleur house and Jean Baptiste Valle house. Amoureux House Frame house made of wood with U.S. and French flags flying on front porch. Amoureux House Jean-Baptiste Valle House red tulips in foreground with cream colored two story frame house in background. Jean-Baptiste Valle House Welcome Sign Unveiled at Ste. Geneviève National Historical Park five people stand next to a sign with text that reads "Ste. Geneviève National Historical Park." A new welcome sign is unveiled at the Visitor Center during the Ste. Geneviève National Historical Park Dedication Ceremony on November 2, 2020. French Culture On the Frontier This Ste. Genevieve culture was unlike anything else in what is now the United States. It is also substantially different from its parent cultures in Canada, Louisiana, and France. As a cultural zone it was unique in terms of law, religion, customs, use of the land, architecture, personal philosophy, slave law, and even in a skewed version of spoken and written French. Read more about how this culture was not like any other. Illinois Country Society In Illinois Country, class structure was relaxed. Unlike Canada, class it was not distinct. There were few if any titled individuals. The word habitant was not synonymous with peasant, as it was in Canada, but instead simply stood for a settler. Read more about how the French politicians and citizens, African-Americans, and American Indians coexhisted in one place. Language Like food, language helps define a culture. In Sainte Genevieve it was a melding of cultures. Thus new words came into being. Learn how people and place influence common terms still in use today. The Law of Illinois Country By 1804 there had developed an odd mixture of French and Spanish law in Illinois Country, that made the communities more akin to democratic New England than to France or to Canada. Learn about a syndic, what their role is, and who they reported too. Compare these historic roles to other leadership positions throughout time. What is the same? What is different? The Common Fields The pattern of land usage, settlement, and agriculture that developed in the middle Mississippi River Valley during the 18th century was unique in North America. The system paralleled the communal agriculture of northern France during the period of the high Middle Ages. Read more about life on the commons. Uncommon Cuisine On the Mississippi Cooking in the Illinois country was region-specific and thus unique. It has been described as the art form found nowhere else. Get a little taste of Ste. Genevieve. La Mode From simple to sophisticated, clothing on the French frontier was varied and unique as any society can be. Some were even said to be in good taste. Get your sense of fashion on here.

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