Stonewall

National Monument - New York

Stonewall National Monument is located in the West Village neighborhood of Greenwich Village in Lower Manhattan, New York City. The designated area includes Christopher Park and the block of Christopher Street bordering the park, which is directly across the street from the Stonewall Inn—the site of the Stonewall riots of June 28, 1969, widely regarded as the start of the modern LGBT rights movement in the United States. Stonewall National Monument is the first U.S. National Monument dedicated to LGBT rights and history.

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Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Stonewall NM https://www.nps.gov/ston/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stonewall_National_Monument Stonewall National Monument is located in the West Village neighborhood of Greenwich Village in Lower Manhattan, New York City. The designated area includes Christopher Park and the block of Christopher Street bordering the park, which is directly across the street from the Stonewall Inn—the site of the Stonewall riots of June 28, 1969, widely regarded as the start of the modern LGBT rights movement in the United States. Stonewall National Monument is the first U.S. National Monument dedicated to LGBT rights and history. Before the 1960s almost everything about living openly as a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer (LGBTQ) person was illegal. New York City laws against homosexual activities were particularly harsh. The Stonewall Uprising on June 28, 1969 is a milestone in the quest for LGBTQ civil rights and provided momentum for a movement. Christopher Park is bounded by Christopher, Grove, and West Fourth Streets. By subway, take the Broadway 1 Line - 7th Avenue local to Christopher Street-Sheridan Square Station; or via the 7th Avenue bus line on the M8 or M20. From Jersey City, take the Holland Tunnel to Ericsson Pl, via exit 3, then take the Avenue of the Americas north to Christopher Street. From Brooklyn take the Manhattan Bridge to Canal Street, then take the Avenue of the Americas north to Christopher Street. Caffe Cino: Birthplace of Off-Off Broadway During its ten years, the coffeehouse changed the language of drama as a pioneer of “Off-Off Broadway,” where truly underground content could be explored. The business certainly did not make a lot of money. Cino worked other jobs to make ends meet and to pay off public officials, since he did not have a license as a theatre. Many plays contained gay content, but Caffe Cino’s embrace of bohemian and hippie life defied any single sexual identity or category. Plaque at Caffe Cino showing Joe behind the counter. NPS Photo by John Warren Gay Activist Alliance Firehouse: A "School for Democracy" Within weeks of the Stonewall Rebellion, activists formed the Gay Liberation Front (GLF). However, GLF members quickly divided over strategy. Some wanted to form alliances with other radical groups like the Black Panthers. Others wanted to focus exclusively on gay issues. The latter formed a group of their own, the Gay Activist Alliance, described as a "school for democracy." They set up shop in a former firehouse in Manhattan. June: A Month of Milestones The times are a changin’, and there’s no better time to honor those moments of change than in June. Over the course of America’s history, the month of June is filled with cultural changes, and some seasonal ones too. So just before the season changes and summer begins, take some time to visit these parks that commemorate extraordinary moments. Painting of suffragist on a horse LGBTQ Activism: The Stonewall Inn, New York City, NY Probably the most well-known event in the struggle for LGBTQ rights, the 1969 uprising at the Stonewall Inn in New York City brought the issue of queer rights into the spotlight. It helped to build solidarity among queer groups that were ready to take a stand against police harassment and violence. Stonewall Inn, New York. Photo by Daniel Case CC BY SA 3.0 The Philadelphia LGBTQ Heritage Initiative The history of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer people (LGBTQ) is a vital part of the history of our city and our nation. The Philadelphia LGBTQ Heritage Initiative encourages citizens to ensure that this chapter of history is not only preserved, but celebrated. Pennsylvania state marker commemorating Annual Reminder Days in front of Independence Hall Philadelphia's Heritage of LGBTQ Activism From American colonists declaring independence from Great Britain, to abolitionists fighting against slavery, to women's suffragists demanding voting rights, to civil rights activists calling for equality, Philadelphia has a deep history of social and political conflict and engagement. Philadelphia's Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) history follows this rich tradition of protest and action. Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell. NPS Photo by Megan Springate Storytime with a Historic Place: Stonewall Stonewall National Monument at Christopher Park played a vital role in the LGBT movement of the 1960's and 70's. This teen+ library program, Stonewall Storytime, offers a Stonewall Uprising narrative plus guidance to facilitate a conversation about universal themes and values. It is part of the Storytime with Historic Places series in the Teaching with Historic Places program. Historic sign posted inside the Stonewall Inn, "This is a Raided Premises" Washington Square: New York City Haven for Bohemians and Activists Washington Square has been known for decades as a place for bohemians, jazz and folk musicians, protesters, poets and people in love. It is also where the first gay and lesbian protest occurred in New York City after the Stonewall Uprising of 1969. Photo of Washington Square, New York by John Warren, NPS Photo The Lion's Head: "Drinkers with Writing Problems" Two doors down from the Stonewall Inn was one of the better-known bars and restaurants in New York City literary history. The walls of the Lion’s Head were covered with jacket covers of books by the writers who drank there—“drinkers with writing problems,” as its customers liked to say. For a writer, getting a space on the wall was like winning the Nobel Prize. It was also where one patron joined the rebellion two doors down at the Stonewall. Sign for Sheridan Park on a fence around a city garden The "Sip-In" at Julius' Bar in 1966 Unlike the Stonewall Inn, Julius’ Bar--just around the block from the Stonewall in Greenwich Village--had a liquor license. In fact, Julius' has been open at 159 West 10th Street and Waverly Place since the 1860s, although not always as a gay or gay-friendly bar. In fact, drinking while gay in the early 1960s was considered illegal. A three-story yellow building on a corner of the street Christopher Park: In 1969, a Refuge for LGBTQ Street Youth During the first night of the rebellion at least, a small city park across the street from the Stonewall Inn provided refuge for street youths. Christopher Park was their refuge during the day as well from a hard life on the streets. The entrance to Christopher Park, now part of Stonewall National Monument Stonewall National Monument: Rising for Equality Stonewall National Monument commemorates an important site and historic event in the the movement for LGBTQ rights. The Stonewall Inn was popular with the African American and Latinx LGBTQ community, and the crowd that gathered to demonstrate in the early hours of June 28, 1969 included many people of color. Today the site is recognized for its connection to LGBTQ history, African American history, and the history of civil rights for all in America. Street activity in front of the Stonewall Inn in New York City, 2016 Marsha P. Johnson & Sylvia Rivera Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera are recognized among other individuals as key figures in the Stonewall Uprisings. This article introduces the courageous lives and efforts of these civil rights trailblazers, Sylvia Rivera and Marsha Johnson standing under an umbrella behind a barricade Series: Finding Our Place: LGBTQ Heritage in the United States In many ways, the histories of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) Americans have been obscured and erased. The threat of physical harm and persecution led many to live a closeted lifestyle. Historical references to LGBTQ contributions to American heritage are rare and in many examples, the prejudiced attitudes of the author are obvious. In recent years, scholars have focused on uncovering the history of LGBTQ communities and expanding our understanding of American history. rainbow flag

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