"Sunrise at the McFadden Farm" by NPS Volunteer - Buddy Secor , public domain

Stones River

National Battlefield - Tennessee

Stones River National Battlefield, a 570-acre (2.3 km2) park along the Stones River in Rutherford County, Tennessee, three miles (5 km) northwest of Murfreesboro and twenty-eight miles southeast of Nashville, memorializes the Battle of Stones River, a key battle of the American Civil War that took place on December 31, 1862 and January 2, 1863, which resulted in a strategic Union victory.

maps

Official visitor map of Stones River National Battlefield (NB) in Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Stones River - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Stones River National Battlefield (NB) in Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Trail of Tears National Historic Trail (NHT) in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Trail of Tears - Trail Map

Official visitor map of Trail of Tears National Historic Trail (NHT) in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Natchez Trace Parkway (PKWY) in Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Natchez Trace - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Natchez Trace Parkway (PKWY) in Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/stri/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stones_River_National_Battlefield Stones River National Battlefield, a 570-acre (2.3 km2) park along the Stones River in Rutherford County, Tennessee, three miles (5 km) northwest of Murfreesboro and twenty-eight miles southeast of Nashville, memorializes the Battle of Stones River, a key battle of the American Civil War that took place on December 31, 1862 and January 2, 1863, which resulted in a strategic Union victory. The Battle of Stones River began on the last day of 1862 and was one of the bloodiest conflicts of the Civil War. The battle produced important military and political gains for the Union, and it changed forever the people who lived and fought here. From Interstate 24 - Take Exit 76 and turn left (eastbound) or right (westbound) onto Medical Center Parkway. Turn left onto Thompson Lane. Turn left at the park entrance at 1563 N. Thompson Lane. Follow the tour road to the visitor center. From Interstate 40 - Take Exit 235 onto TN 840. Take Exit 55 onto US 41/TN 70 and follow the signs for Murfreesboro. Turn right onto Thompson Lane at the first traffic light. Turn right at the park entrance at 1563 N. Thompson Lane. Visitor Center The visitor center offers a museum, a movie about the battle, and a bookstore. From March 1st through October 31st, the Stones River National Battlefield visitor center is open from 9 AM to 5 PM daily. From November 1st through February 28th visitor center hours are 9 AM to 4 PM daily. The visitor center is closed on Thanksgiving and December 25th. From Interstate 24 - Take Exit 76 and turn left (eastbound) or right (westbound) onto Medical Center Parkway. Turn left onto Thompson Lane. Turn left at the park entrance at 1563 N. Thompson Lane. Follow the tour road to the visitor center. From Interstate 40 - Take Exit 235 onto TN 840. Take Exit 55 onto US 41/TN 70 and follow the signs for Murfreesboro. Turn right onto Thompson Lane at the first traffic light. Turn right at the park entrance at 1563 N. Thompson Lane. Sunrise at Mendenhall's Artillery Trail The sun rises behind a green field with a cannon in the foreground. On January 2, 1863, fifty-seven Union cannons fired from this line ending the Battle of Stones River by killing or wounding more than 1,800 Confederates in less than an hour. Stones River National Cemetery A ray of sunlight shines on the ground at Stones River National Cemetery. More than 6,100 Union soldiers lie in Stones River National Cemetery. The Chicago Board of Trade Battery Two cannons sit in an icy field. The men of the Chicago Board of Trade Battery got their first taste of combat at the Battle of Stones River and helped stem the Confederate tide from this position during the afternoon of December 31, 1862. Union Infantry Program Union soldiers fire muskets. Living history programs help visitors visualize the trials of soldiers during the Battle of Stones River. Bike Tour Bicyclists ride down a road bracketed by trees. Thousands of visitors enjoy biking and hiking through the park. Listening to the Eclipse: National Park Service scientists join Smithsonian, NASA in nationwide project A solar eclipse is visually stunning, but what will it sound like? NPS scientists will find out by recording sounds in parks across the USA. An NPS scientist installs audio recording equipment in a lush valley at Valles Caldera NP. National Parks and National Cemeteries Currently, the National Park Service manages 14 national cemeteries. These cemeteries represent a continuum of use dating to a period before the establishment of the historical parks of which they are an integral part and are administered to preserve the historic character, uniqueness, and solemn nature of both the cemeteries and the historical parks of which they are a part. Setting sun lights up graves and decorations Death and Dying The somber aftermath of Civil War battles introduced Americans--North and South--to death on an unprecedented scale and of an unnatural kind, often ending in an unmarked grave far from home. Neither individuals, nor institutions, nor governments were prepared to deal with death on such a massive scale, for never before or since have we killed so many of our own. The Civil War revolutionized the American military's approach to caring for the dead, leading to our modern cult Photo of freshly buried marked and unmarked graves near Petersburg, Va. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Stones River National Battlefield, Tennessee Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] high ground and woods Hispanics and the Civil War The Civil War was an American epic and an American tragedy. The bloodiest war in United States history claimed the lives of more than 620,000 Americans. Hispanics were very much a part of this conflict. They knew hardship, fear, death, and destruction. They experienced victory and defeat. Some performed acts of spectacular gallantry. Others provided steady service that attracted little comment or notice. Painting of the Battle of Glorieta Pass Stones River Virtual Ranger Activity While you can earn your Junior Ranger badge on your visit to Stones River National Battlefield, we have also put together an opportunity for you to become a Stones River National Battlefield Virtual Ranger. Using the pages of our website, you can complete the quiz below to earn your Virtual Ranger badge! When you finish, download and print your badge to add to your collection! A badge that reads The Civilian Experience in the Civil War After being mere spectators at the war's early battles, civilians both near and far from the battlefields became unwilling participants and victims of the war as its toll of blood and treasure grew year after year. In response to the hardships imposed upon their fellow citizens by the war, civilians on both sides mobilized to provide comfort, encouragement, and material, and began to expect that their government should do the same. Painting of civilians under fire during the Siege of Vicksburg The Changing War Begun as a purely military effort with the limited political objectives of reunification (North) or independence (South), the Civil War transformed into a social, economic and political revolution with unforeseen consequences. As the war progressed, the Union war effort steadily transformed from a limited to a hard war; it targeted not just Southern armies, but the heart of the Confederacy's economy, morale, and social order-the institution of slavery. Woodcut of spectators watching a train station set fire by Sherman's troops National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains James A. Garfield and the Civil War (Part II) Part 2 of James A. Garfield and the Civil War explores Garfield involvement during the Battle of Chickamauga and later wartime experiences. Battle of Chickamauga Series: African American History at Gettysburg Abraham Brian, Basil Biggs, James Warfield, and Mag Palm are just a few of the many individuals that were affected by the Civil War and the Battle of Gettysburg, and each has their own story to tell. We have collected their stories in one place so that you can learn more about their various trials during this tumultuous time in American history. A black and white photograph of a black family posing with a white man and his horse in a dirt road.

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