Star-Spangled Banner

National Historic Trail - MD,VA,DC

The Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail, named after the United States national anthem, commemorates the Chesapeake Campaign of the War of 1812. The 290-mile (467 km) trail consists of water and overland routes. The trail extends from Tangier Island, Virginia, through southern Maryland, the District of Columbia, the Chesapeake Bay, and Baltimore, Maryland. The trail also contains sites on Maryland's Eastern shore. Sites on the trail include towns raided and/or burned by the British, battles and engagements, museums, and forts.

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maps

Map of the Underground Railroad routes that freedom seekers would take to reach freedom. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Underground Railroad - Routes to Freedom

Map of the Underground Railroad routes that freedom seekers would take to reach freedom. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/stsp/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star-Spangled_Banner_National_Historic_Trail The Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail, named after the United States national anthem, commemorates the Chesapeake Campaign of the War of 1812. The 290-mile (467 km) trail consists of water and overland routes. The trail extends from Tangier Island, Virginia, through southern Maryland, the District of Columbia, the Chesapeake Bay, and Baltimore, Maryland. The trail also contains sites on Maryland's Eastern shore. Sites on the trail include towns raided and/or burned by the British, battles and engagements, museums, and forts. For three years the young United States was embroiled in the War of 1812 and the Chesapeake Bay region felt the brunt of it, choked by shipping blockades and ravaged by enemy raids. Through sites and landscapes in Virginia, the District of Columbia, and Maryland, the Trail tells the stories of the events, people, and places that led to the birth of the U.S. national anthem. The Trail's headquarters is at Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine. The park is three miles southeast of the Baltimore Inner Harbor and just off I-95. Follow the brown Fort McHenry directional signs along all major routes to the park. From I-95 northbound, take Exit 55 Key Highway and follow Fort McHenry signs. To visit other trail locations, download a trail map. Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine The trail has many points of entry and exploration along its auto route and water route. The visitor center at Fort McHenry serves as the trail's headquarters and visitor center. A short 10-minute orientation film is shown two times per hour. Restrooms, exhibits and a gift shop are also located in the building. The park is three miles southeast of the Baltimore Inner Harbor and just off I-95. Follow the brown Fort McHenry directional signs along all major routes to the park. From I-95 northbound, take Exit 55 Key Highway and follow Fort McHenry signs. PRIDE OF BALTIMORE II A tall ship sails on the water. The PRIDE OF BALTIMORE II is a sailing ambassador for the Trail. Historic Sotterley Image of a large historic house with green lawn in foreground. Historic Sotterley White House A close-up of the White House portico. British forces set fire to the original home of the U.S. president on August 26, 1814. Paddling on the Sassafras A person in a yellow kayak paddles through lotus blossoms. The Sassafras River Water Trail is one of the many paddle trails to explore along the Star-Spangled Banner Trail Living History at Fort McHenry People in 18th century period clothing standing in a line and firing muskets. Living history at Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine. Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historic Trail e-Newsletter Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historic Trail, WARO quarterly e-newsletter War of 1812: Burning of the Sewall House Why did British troops burn down Robert Sewall's house on August 24, 1814? Summer 1814: American troops flee in humiliation, leaving Washington exposed In the hot, humid summer of 1814, British troops advanced on Washington, DC. Their only obstacle was American troops guarding the heights at Bladensburg, Maryland, ten miles outside the capital. After a brief battle, the Americans took flight in their most humiliating defeat of the war, and British troops captured Washington. British troops watch in foreground as city of Washington burns in background "At early dawn his eye was again greeted by the proudly-waving flag of his country" The British 1814 failure to capture Baltimore Harbor helped change the course of the War of 1812 and inspired the American national anthem. Illustration of British ships bombarding Fort McHenry "The first step was plunder without distinction" Americans living on the Chesapeake Bay paid a steep price for the War of 1812. Portrait of Admiral Cockburn with smoke of Washington burning behind Ten Tips for Visiting Fort Washington Park Follow these tips to make your visit to Fort Washington Park memorable. The grassy fort in front of a river

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