"Round Marsh" by Duplaga , public domain

Timucuan

Ecological & Historic Preserve - Florida

The Timucuan Ecological and Historic Preserve is in Jacksonville, Florida. It comprises 46,000 acres (19,000 ha) of wetlands, waterways, and other habitats in northeastern Duval County. It includes natural and historic areas such as the Fort Caroline National Memorial and the Kingsley Plantation.

maps

Official visitor map of Timucuan Ecological & Historic Preserve (EHPRES) in Florida. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Timucuan - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Timucuan Ecological & Historic Preserve (EHPRES) in Florida. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Fort Caroline National Memorial (NMEM) in Florida. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Fort Caroline - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Fort Caroline National Memorial (NMEM) in Florida. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Cumberland Island National Seashore (NS) in Georgia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Cumberland Island - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Cumberland Island National Seashore (NS) in Georgia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/timu/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timucuan_Preserve The Timucuan Ecological and Historic Preserve is in Jacksonville, Florida. It comprises 46,000 acres (19,000 ha) of wetlands, waterways, and other habitats in northeastern Duval County. It includes natural and historic areas such as the Fort Caroline National Memorial and the Kingsley Plantation. Visit one of the last unspoiled coastal wetlands on the Atlantic Coast. Discover 6,000 years of human history and experience the beauty of salt marshes, coastal dunes, and hardwood hammocks. The Timucuan Preserve includes Fort Caroline and Kingsley Plantation. The beautiful expanse of the Timucuan Preserve is located within the city limits of Jacksonville, Florida. The Preserve can be accessed from major roads and highways in and around Jacksonville. Directions to individual park sites such as Kingsley Plantation, American Beach and the Ribault Column can be found on our website. Our main visitor center is located at Fort Caroline, about 14 miles northeast of downtown. Kingsley Plantation Visitor Contact Station You can explore the grounds at Kingsley Plantation, which include the slave quarters, barn, waterfront, plantation house, kitchen house, and interpretive garden. The visitor contact station/bookstore is located in a 1920s building adjacent to the plantation buildings. From I-95 north of Jacksonville: Traveling from the north via Interstate 95, exit at the I-295 East Beltway (Exit #362 A). Exit at Heckscher Drive, turn left. Continue on Heckscher 9 miles. After passing the St. Johns River Ferry landing on your right, turn left 1/2 mile later at the brown National Park Service sign onto Fort George Island. Follow the signs; the road leads directly to the Kingsley Plantation parking lot. You can also reach Kingsley Plantation by boat. Timucuan Preserve Visitor Center at Fort Caroline Located at Fort Caroline National Memorial, the Timucuan Preserve Visitor Center hosts the exhibit "Where the Waters Meet." This exhibit showcases the richness of the environment in northeast Florida and how humans have interacted with this environment for thousands of years. The Visitor Center hosts a bookstore and information desk, and activities are available to do while exploring the exhibits. Fort Caroline is located in Jacksonville, Florida about 14 miles northeast of downtown. From I-95 north of Jacksonville: Traveling from the north via Interstate 95 exit at the I-295 East Beltway. I-295 crosses the St. Johns River. Exit at Monument Road, follow the brown signs to the left, and travel to Fort Caroline Road. Turn right, and follow Fort Caroline Road as it curves to the left. The entrance to the Fort Caroline is on your left. Kingsley Plantation Slave Quarters slave cabins made of tabby with wooden roofs The tabby cabins at Kingsley Plantation were the homes of many enslaved people. Nana dune at American Beach sand dune and blue sky The sand dune at American Beach is a protected part of the Timucuan Preserve. Fort Caroline fort gate The fort exhibit at Fort Caroline teaches visitors of the failed French colony in Florida. Theodore Roosevelt Area park bench alongside a trail The Theodore Roosevelt Area trails provide a getaway from the urban hustle within the city of Jacksonville. Baby Fox A baby fox pops it's head from a burrow The Timucuan Preserve hosts wondrous biodiversity. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Timucuan Ecological and Historic Preserve Ecological and Historic Preserve, Florida Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] sunrise over river The Ceramics Assemblage from the Kingsley Plantation Slave Quarters A four-year archeological exploration of Timucuan Ecological and Historic Preserve's Kingsley Plantation focuses on the slave quarters from the early nineteenth-century. This analysis of the ceramics assemblage compared to that of the archetypal antebellum plantation of Cannon’s Point Plantation, GA is a fundamental first step to interpreting the role of material objects in the slaves’ daily lives. Photo of a row of cabins in ruins. Southeast Coast Network News July 2018 Southeast Coast Inventory and Monitoring Network newsletter for July 2018. Doors to Interpretation: Kingsley Plantation The diverse and often complex histories of Kingsley Plantation, located on Fort George Island in Florida, are reflected in its cultural landscape. The various structures, their use, and the spatial arrangement of the landscape illustrate historic boundaries of access, ownership, and power. Today, the NPS maintains and interprets these landscape features to open complex histories to interpretation. An African American man stands beside a wooden well, under an arching tree and near a row of cabins. What's in a Name? Online Jr Ranger Activity There is a story behind every name in Timucuan Preserve. This guessing game takes online Junior Rangers to every site and gives a backstory to the areas name. the sign for Fort Caroline National Memorial Timucuan Online Photo Scavenger Hunt Explore the Timucuan Preserve website searching for photos in our online Junior Ranger Challenge and see what you learn along the way. Print out your new Junior Ranger badge once you have finished. a dock with pink sky reflected in the water Monitoring Estuarine Water Quality in Coastal Parks: Fixed Station Monitoring Estuaries are the convergence of freshwater, delivered by rivers, to the ocean's salty sea water. The result is a delicate ecosystem providing existence for a multitude of fish and wildlife species. we have created the story map to help you learn more about how these estuaries formed, the potential issues they face, and the process of monitoring the water quality utilizing fixed station monitoring. Waterbirds congregate in an estuary at sunset. Monitoring Estuarine Water Quality in Coastal Parks: Park-wide Assessments Estuaries located in national parks provide recreational experiences such as fishing and boating for park visitors. Therefore, knowing what's in the water can assist the park in its mission of managing such a critcal resource. The Southeast Coast Network monitors water quality through fixed station monitoring and park-wide assessments. While the former is conducted on a monthly basis, park-wide assessments are completed every five years. Learn more with this story map. Dock stretching out into an estuary as the sun sets over the water. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains

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