Tupelo

National Battlefield - Mississippi

Tupelo National Battlefield commemorates the American Civil War battle of Tupelo, also known as the Battle of Harrisburg, fought from July 14 to 15, 1864, near Tupelo, Mississippi. The Union victory over Confederate forces in northeast Mississippi ensured the safety of Sherman's supply lines during the Atlanta Campaign.

maps

Official visitor map of Natchez Trace Parkway (PKWY) in Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Natchez Trace - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Natchez Trace Parkway (PKWY) in Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/tupe/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tupelo_National_Battlefield Tupelo National Battlefield commemorates the American Civil War battle of Tupelo, also known as the Battle of Harrisburg, fought from July 14 to 15, 1864, near Tupelo, Mississippi. The Union victory over Confederate forces in northeast Mississippi ensured the safety of Sherman's supply lines during the Atlanta Campaign. In July, 1864, Union forces, including men from the United States Colored Troops, marched into Tupelo, Mississippi. Disorganized Confederate soldiers fought fiercely but could not overpower the federal troops. Neither side could claim a clear victory, but Union troops had succeeded in their main goal: keeping the Confederates away from Union railroads in Tennessee. Tupelo National Battlefield (NB) is a one-acre monument located on Main Street, Tupelo, Mississippi. Main Street in Tupelo is also known as Highway 6 and Highway 278. Tupelo NB sits on the south side of Main Street on the west side of Tupelo. Exit off the Natchez Trace Parkway onto Highway 6 (near Milepost 260), head east, into Tupelo. Travel one mile east and find Tupelo NB on the right side of Main Street. There is limited parking available adjacent to the monument. Natchez Trace Parkway Visitor Center The National Park Service administers the National Battlefield through the Natchez Trace Parkway. Visitors are welcome to ask questions and learn more about the battlefield at the Parkway Visitor Center (Milepost 266) located about six miles north of the monument. The Visitor Center is open every day of the year except Thanksgiving, December 25, and January 1 from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (Central Time). The Natchez Trace Parkway can be reached at 800-305-7417. There are no visitor facilities at the battlefield; you may consider visiting the Natchez Trace Parkway Visitor Center. The Parkway Visitor Center is located at milepost 266 on the Natchez Trace Parkway. The visitor center is located near the intersection of highway 145 and the Natchez Trace Parkway north of Tupelo, Mississippi. GPS Address for the Visitor Center: 2680 Natchez Trace Parkway Tupelo, MS 38804 Tupelo National Battlefield Monument The monument with a cannon In July, 1864, Union forces, including men from the United States Colored Troops, marched into Tupelo, Mississippi. Disorganized Confederate soldiers fought fiercely but could not overpower the federal troops. Neither side could claim a clear victory, Death and Dying The somber aftermath of Civil War battles introduced Americans--North and South--to death on an unprecedented scale and of an unnatural kind, often ending in an unmarked grave far from home. Neither individuals, nor institutions, nor governments were prepared to deal with death on such a massive scale, for never before or since have we killed so many of our own. The Civil War revolutionized the American military's approach to caring for the dead, leading to our modern cult Photo of freshly buried marked and unmarked graves near Petersburg, Va. The Changing War Begun as a purely military effort with the limited political objectives of reunification (North) or independence (South), the Civil War transformed into a social, economic and political revolution with unforeseen consequences. As the war progressed, the Union war effort steadily transformed from a limited to a hard war; it targeted not just Southern armies, but the heart of the Confederacy's economy, morale, and social order-the institution of slavery. Woodcut of spectators watching a train station set fire by Sherman's troops Series: African American History at Gettysburg Abraham Brian, Basil Biggs, James Warfield, and Mag Palm are just a few of the many individuals that were affected by the Civil War and the Battle of Gettysburg, and each has their own story to tell. We have collected their stories in one place so that you can learn more about their various trials during this tumultuous time in American history. A black and white photograph of a black family posing with a white man and his horse in a dirt road.

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