"Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument" by Andrew Cattoir , public domain

Tule Springs Fossil Beds

National Monument - Nevada

Mammoths, lions and camels once roamed along wetlands just north of what is now known as Las Vegas, Nevada. Their history is preserved at Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument and is ready to be discovered.

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Official Visitor Map of Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument (NM) in Nevada. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Tule Springs Fossil Beds - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument (NM) in Nevada. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Visitor Map of the southern part of Desert National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Nevada. Published by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS).Desert - South

Visitor Map of the southern part of Desert National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Nevada. Published by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Official Nevada State Highway Map. Published by the Nevada Department of Transportation (NVDOT).Nevada State - Nevada State Highway Map

Official Nevada State Highway Map. Published by the Nevada Department of Transportation (NVDOT).

Tule Springs Fossil Beds NM https://www.nps.gov/tusk https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tule_Springs_Fossil_Beds_National_Monument Mammoths, lions and camels once roamed along wetlands just north of what is now known as Las Vegas, Nevada. Their history is preserved at Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument and is ready to be discovered. Over the last ~570,000 years, water has transformed the Upper Las Vegas Valley. Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument is an urban park that preserves the unique story of this ever-changing ecosystem. Because Tule Springs is a new park, there is no visitor center, facilities or parking areas. Right now to access the park, people can park on nearby public roads in the cities of Las Vegas and North Las Vegas, and they can enter the monument on foot. Federal regulations prohibit off-roading in the park. Vehicles are only permitted on approved roads and only when the vehicles are properly licensed for street use. Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument Tule Springs during winter Tule Springs during winter Protectors of Tule Springs receives Prestigious George and Helen Hartzog Award Protectors of Tule Springs Board President Jill DeStefano and Vice President Sandy Croteau accepted the George and Helen Hartzog Group Award for Outstanding Volunteer Service in Washington D.C. on Thursday, August 22. Protectors of Tule Springs and NPS staff at Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument, Nevada Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] desert landscape Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument – a Pleistocene treasure trove Tule Springs has played a vital role in shaping the history of archaeology and paleontology of the Las Vegas Valley. In fact, vertebrate fossils have been known from the area for more than a century. fossil bed A Monumental Task: A Vision for the Future of Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument Derek Carter is the new Superintendent of Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument, a rich Pleistocene fossil site northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Management of this site, which is both recently established and adjacent to a growing metro area, has numerous challenges and opportunities. Superintendent Carter looks to address visitor experience, scientific research, and resource management. fossil mammoth tusk exposed in the ground Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 12, No. 2, Fall 2020 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> fossils on the ground with two people and a mountain in the distance Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 11, No. 2, Fall 2019 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> devils tower Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 11, No. 1, Spring 2019 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> Tule Springs Fossil Beds Quaternary Period—2.58 MYA to Today Massive ice sheets advanced and retreated across North America during much of the Quaternary, carving landscapes in many parks. Bering Land Bridge National Preserve contains geologic evidence of lower sea level during glacial periods, facilitating the prehistoric peopling of the Americas. The youngest rocks in the NPS include the lava of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and the travertine at Yellowstone National Park, which can be just a few hours old. fossil bone bed and murals of mammoths Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center A New Resource for Researching America's Elephants Mammoths, mastodons, and other proboscideans are among the most familiar fossil organisms. An inventory complied by Jim Mead and others documents the occurrences of these animals in 63 National Park Service units. photo-illustration of a ranger standing next to a mammoth Illustrations, Checklists, & Inventories: Building and Sharing Baseline Knowledge at Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument is a recently established park near Las Vegas, Nevada that conserves late Pleistocene fossils from wetland habitats that once flourished in the area. The site is important to researchers seeking to understand ancients climate of the Southwest. But what lives there now? The park has recently been developing baseline knowledge of animals and plants living in the park today and creating new outreach materials to engage visitors. Desert bearpoppy flower pen-and-ink illustration. Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 13, No. 1, Spring 2021 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> park ranger in uniform Series: Parks in Science History Parks in Science History is a series of articles and videos made in cooperation with graduate students from various universities. They highlight the roles that national parks have played in the history of science and, therefore, the world's intellectual heritage. A woman looking through binoculars National Parks in the History of Science: Radiocarbon Dating Radiocarbon dating-sometimes called carbon-14 dating–is the most important method for determining the ages of ancient organic materials as old as about 60,000 years. The first time radiocarbon dating was used to answer a scientific question about human history was the early 1960s at what is now Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument in Nevada. two different images of a dug out trench in a desert landscape with people examining the walls Teratorn Approximately one-third larger than the California condor, the teratorn was the largest bird found at Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument. This scavenging raptor also hunted small mammals and had a 12-foot wingspan. illustration of an ancient bird's head Dire Wolf The dire wolf is a recent addition to the Pleistocene fauna found at Tule Springs Fossil Beds. The dire wolf was about the size of the largest gray wolves, with a shoulder height of about three feet. illustration of a dire wolf Tule Springs Pronghorn Pronghorn fossils are known from Tule Springs Fossil Beds but none of them allow for identification to species. There are several candidates for which type of pronghorn lived in the Las Vegas Valley during the Pleistocene. illustration of three pronghorn running Giant Ground Sloths Two species of giant ground sloth are represented in the Pleistocene fossil record of Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument: the Shasta ground sloth and Jefferson’s ground sloth. These extinct herbivores were approximately the size of a car. illustration of a ground sloth Columbian Mammoth The Columbian mammoth is the largest and most identified extinct large mammal found in the Las Vegas Formation at Tule Springs Fossil Bed National Monument. Columbian mammoths belonged to the same family as living elephants. illustration of a mammoth The Big Cats During the late Pleistocene, Tule Springs Fossil Beds was home to two extinct large cats: the sabertooth cat and the American lion. These apex predators represent two distinct cat lineages; one of which was the last of its kind in North America. illustration of a saber toothed cat Ancient Horse Horses first evolved in North America during the Eocene epoch and adapted to the changing climate over tens of millions of years. <em>Equus scotti</em> was one of the last of the native North American horses and had a wide distribution over the continent, before it went extinct 10,000 years ago. illustration of an ancient horse The Camels Two different genera of camelids have been identified from the late Pleistocene deposits of Tule Springs. Fossils of the ancient camel make up one third (about 38%) of the total large Pleistocene mammals identified at Tule Springs. The ancient llama is only known from one fossil specimen. illustration of an ancient llama Ancient Bison Although some species have gone extinct, bison have lived in North America for hundreds of thousands of years. Herds of now-extinct bison once lived in what is now Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument during the Pleistocene epoch, between 100,000-12,500 years ago. illustration of two ancient bison Series: Prehistoric Life of Tule Springs Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument preserves thousands of Pleistocene (Ice Age) fossils that help tell the story of an ever-changing ecosystem. These fossils were preserved within expanding and contracting wetlands between 100,000-12,500 years ago. Many of the Pleistocene animals of Tule Springs are still alive today, including the coyote (<em>Canis latrans</em>), jackrabbit (<em>Lepus</em> sp.), and aquatic snails. Some animals went extinct, disappearing from North America entirely. illustration of two ancient bison Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Margaret Lyneis Margaret Lyneis was one of the few women present at the Tule Springs Fossil Beds “Big Dig” from 1962 to 1963, which aimed to test whether humans interacted with Late Pleistocene animals at this site as well as possible associations of Pleistocene animal fossils with charcoal and tools. Woman with short hair and glasses smiles for the camera. Painting the Stories of the Past at Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument Paleontologist Lauren Parry provides information about the creation of four “snapshots” of past life at Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument by paleoartist Julius Csotonyi. painting of a turtle and a sabre toothed cat Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 14, No. 1, Spring 2022 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> photo of 2 people kneeling in shallow water at the base of a steep slope

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