"Northern access to the river, Upper Delaware Scenic & Recreational River, 2015." by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Upper Delaware

Scenic & Recreational River - NY,PA

The Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River is located near Narrowsburg, New York, and Lackawaxen, Pennsylvania, on the Delaware River. It includes parts of five counties along this section of the river: Delaware, Orange, and Sullivan in New York, and Pike and Wayne in Pennsylvania. The site includes and protects Roebling's Delaware Aqueduct and the Zane Grey Museum. The Zane Grey Museum sustained significant damage due to the Eastern United States flooding of June 2006. The Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River stretches along approximately 73.4 miles (118.1 km) of the Delaware River from Hancock, New York, to Sparrowbush, New York. Most of the land in this unit of the National Park System is privately owned, the federal government owns only approximately 30 acres (12 ha).

maps

Official Visitor Map of Upper Delaware Scenic & Recreational River (SRR) in New York and Pennsylvania. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Upper Delaware - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Upper Delaware Scenic & Recreational River (SRR) in New York and Pennsylvania. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area (NRA) in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Delaware Water Gap - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area (NRA) in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Upper Delaware SRR https://www.nps.gov/upde/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Upper_Delaware_Scenic_and_Recreational_River The Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River is located near Narrowsburg, New York, and Lackawaxen, Pennsylvania, on the Delaware River. It includes parts of five counties along this section of the river: Delaware, Orange, and Sullivan in New York, and Pike and Wayne in Pennsylvania. The site includes and protects Roebling's Delaware Aqueduct and the Zane Grey Museum. The Zane Grey Museum sustained significant damage due to the Eastern United States flooding of June 2006. The Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River stretches along approximately 73.4 miles (118.1 km) of the Delaware River from Hancock, New York, to Sparrowbush, New York. Most of the land in this unit of the National Park System is privately owned, the federal government owns only approximately 30 acres (12 ha). Canoe through rapids and quiet pools as the Delaware River winds its way through a valley of swiftly changing scenery or fish amid rolling hills and riverfront villages in one of the finest fishing rivers in the northeastern United States. The clean water of the Delaware, the last major undammed river in the eastern United States, supports a healthy ecosystem and offers tranquility and excitement. See complete directions on Upper Delaware S&RR's webpage. Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River a view of the Delaware River A view of Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River Park Ranger - Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River a Park Ranger shows children the wonders of nature A Park Ranger shows children the wonders of nature Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River a rocky shore of the Delaware River Geological wonders of Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River Zane Grey Museum - Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River the Zane Grey Museum at Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River The Zane Grey Museum at Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River Roebling's Delaware Aqueduct - Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River Roebling's Delaware Aqueduct at Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River Roebling's Delaware Aqueduct at Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River Lackawaxen, PA River Access at Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River park ranger canoes on the shore at Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River Park Ranger canoes on the shore at Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Upper Delaware National Scenic and Recreation River, New York and Pennsylvania Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] canoes on river bank Bat Population Monitoring at Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River Little brown bats, a species that is rare across the Northeast because of white-nose syndrome, can still be found in unusually large colonies at Upper Delaware Scenic and National River. In order to protect these populations, scientists are studying little brown bats, as well as the entire bat community, in the park. A cluster of twenty or more little brown bats gathered together in an attic roost. Crystal Clear: Installing Four Continuous Water Quality Monitors Near Delaware River Basin Marcellus Shale Development National Park Service Delaware River parks collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Science Centers in New York, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey on a USGS/NPS Water Quality Partnership technical assistance proposal to install four continuous water quality monitors near Delaware River Basin Marcellus Shale development. This project was selected for funding in 2012. green trees reflected in still blue river water 2019 Weather In Review: Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River The year 2019 was the 21st wettest and 24th warmest recorded at the park since 1895. View of the Delaware River with blue sky and puffy white clouds. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Crystal Clear: A Call to Action In 2016, the nation celebrates the centennial of the National Park Service (NPS) as the steward of special places that represent our natural and cultural heritage. Many national parks were founded on the beauty and value of water. Since the preservation of the Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park in 1872, the National Park System has grown to include significant examples within majestic rivers, the Great Lakes, oceans and coasts, and other spectacular water resources. bright blue lake green islands in between Devonian Period—419.2 to 358.9 MYA The Devonian is part of the “Age of Fishes.” Fish fossils from Death Valley National Park shed light on the early evolution of fish in North America. Tilted Devonian rocks in Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park attest to continued Appalachian Mountain formation. fossil brachiopod Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix 2020 Weather In Review: Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River In all, 2020 was very warm year on the upper Delaware but total annual precipitation was near normal. The year ended as the 3rd warmest and 60th wettest on record. Canoes on the bank of the Delaware River.

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