"Living history -- cannon fire" by U.S. National Park Service , Public domain:Contract transferred to NPS

Vicksburg

National Military Park - MS, LA

Vicksburg National Military Park preserves the site of the American Civil War Battle of Vicksburg, waged from May 18 to July 4, 1863. The park, located in Vicksburg, Mississippi, and Delta, Louisiana (flanking the Mississippi River), also commemorates the greater Vicksburg Campaign which led up to the battle. Reconstructed forts and trenches evoke memories of the 47-day siege that ended in the surrender of the city. Victory here and at Port Hudson, farther south in Louisiana, gave the Union control of the Mississippi River.

maps

Official visitor map of Vicksburg National Military Park (NMP) in Mississippi and Louisiana. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Vicksburg - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Vicksburg National Military Park (NMP) in Mississippi and Louisiana. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Natchez Trace Parkway (PKWY) in Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Natchez Trace - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Natchez Trace Parkway (PKWY) in Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/vick/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vicksburg_National_Military_Park Vicksburg National Military Park preserves the site of the American Civil War Battle of Vicksburg, waged from May 18 to July 4, 1863. The park, located in Vicksburg, Mississippi, and Delta, Louisiana (flanking the Mississippi River), also commemorates the greater Vicksburg Campaign which led up to the battle. Reconstructed forts and trenches evoke memories of the 47-day siege that ended in the surrender of the city. Victory here and at Port Hudson, farther south in Louisiana, gave the Union control of the Mississippi River. To Confederate President Jefferson Davis, Vicksburg was the "nailhead that holds the South's two halves together." President Abraham Lincoln remarked "Vicksburg is the key" to victory, and could be the north's lifeline into the south. As the federals closed in on the Fortress City, they were met by a ring of forts with over 170 cannon. The resulting battle would determine the war's outcome. Plane — Closest commercial airport: Jackson, MS, 50 miles to the east. Car — Directions to Vicksburg: From the east — Take Interstate 20 west to Vicksburg, MS. Use exit ramp 4B. Follow Clay Street (US-80) west 0.25 miles to park entrance. From the north — Take Interstate 55 south to Jackson, MS. To save time, use Interstate 220 bypass on west side of Jackson. Take Interstate 20 west to Vicksburg approximately 40 miles. Use exit ramp 4B. Follow Clay Street (US-80) west 0.25 miles to park entrance. USS Cairo Museum Visitor Center and museum to the USS Cairo. Exhibits include a film, artifacts from the USS Cairo, models, and the actual USS Cairo that visitors can walk on. From Vicksburg- head north on Cherry Street. Cherry Street becomes Ft. Hill Drive. Proceed through the entrance station and make a left, following signs for the USS Cairo Museum. Visitor Center Inside the Visitor Center, Park Rangers are ready to answer your questions and assist with your orientation to park areas. To help ensure that their visit is safe and enjoyable, large groups or tours should check in with the ranger at the desk when they arrive. Interpretive media including exhibits and park film are located inside the Visitor Center. Plane — Closest commercial airport: Jackson, MS, 50 miles to the east. Car — Directions to Vicksburg: From the east — Take Interstate 20 west to Vicksburg, MS. Use exit ramp 4B. Follow Clay Street (US-80) west 0.25 miles to park entrance. From the north — Take Interstate 55 south to Jackson, MS. To save time, use Interstate 220 bypass on west side of Jackson. Take Interstate 20 west to Vicksburg approximately 40 miles. Use exit ramp 4B. Follow Clay Street (US-80) west 0.25 miles to park entrance. Union Cannon Union cannon aimed at Confederate lines The Union artillery played a major role in the outcome of the Vicksburg Campaign. Headstone in Tree a headstone is seen in a tree A headstone in the Vicksburg National Cemetery rest beside a tree. Illinois State Memorial Stars behind the Illinois State Memorial Stars gleam behind the Illinois State Memorial. The Shirley House Roses in bloom in front of the Shirley House Roses in bloom in front of the Shirley House, the only remaining Civil War structure in the park. 2019 George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service Celebrate 50 years of the NPS Volunteer-in-Parks Program, and learn about the contributions of the volunteer recipients of the 2019 George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service, for work performed in fiscal year 2019. a volunteer wearing a red life vest walks towards you with a smile, lifting a canoe paddle Rehabilitation of the Indian Mound Steps in Vicksburg National Cemetery Visitors looking to enjoy to scenic vistas over the Louisiana plains and reflect on the sacrifices gained during the American Civil War climb the aged brick stairs to the pavilion that sits on an ancient Indian mound. Your contributions through fee revenue will rehabilitate these venerable steps and ensure thousands of visitors can experience this consecrated ground for generations to come. Brick stairs leading up to a pavilion Locating Graves at Vicksburg National Cemetery While preparing a grave site for a rare burial of a World War II veteran at the Vicksburg National Cemetery, workers were dismayed to find that the plot was already occupied by a casket. There was neither a headstone nor a record of interment to suggest that the plot was occupied. National Park Service (NPS) staff at Vicksburg promptly began efforts to identify additional unmarked and unrecorded burials, and sift through decades of archives to identify the unknown soldiers. Archeologically located unmarked military graves at Vicksburg NMP. Women Amidst War The extreme demands of wartime industry and the loss of traditional family breadwinners to military service caused hardship, but also presented opportunities to women for employment, volunteerism, and activism that previously had been unavailable to them. While many of these gains would be temporary, the Civil War nonetheless represents an important step forward in American society's view of the role of women. Women were increasingly seen (and saw themselves) as the foundat Photo of women at a house on the Cedar Mountain battlefield National Parks and National Cemeteries Currently, the National Park Service manages 14 national cemeteries. These cemeteries represent a continuum of use dating to a period before the establishment of the historical parks of which they are an integral part and are administered to preserve the historic character, uniqueness, and solemn nature of both the cemeteries and the historical parks of which they are a part. Setting sun lights up graves and decorations Death and Dying The somber aftermath of Civil War battles introduced Americans--North and South--to death on an unprecedented scale and of an unnatural kind, often ending in an unmarked grave far from home. Neither individuals, nor institutions, nor governments were prepared to deal with death on such a massive scale, for never before or since have we killed so many of our own. The Civil War revolutionized the American military's approach to caring for the dead, leading to our modern cult Photo of freshly buried marked and unmarked graves near Petersburg, Va. Jennie Hodgers, aka Private Albert Cashier Small, reclusive, but undeniably a brave man - thus the soldiers of Company G, 95th Illinois Infantry remembered their comrade, Pvt. Albert Cashier. What they may or may not have known, however, was that "he" had been born an Irish girl named Jennie Hodgers. Tombstone of Union veteran Private Albert Cashier The Military Experience The course of the war was the cumulative result of political, economic, and social policies that affected (and were affected by) military operations and battles waged across a front spanning 2,000 miles. The battles and campaigns of 1861-65 ultimately demonstrated that the simple application of massive military force, even with innovations in technologies and tactics, was insufficient to resolve a conflict between two sections mobilized against one another politically, socia Engraving of soldier warming himself by a fire Photo of U.S. Sanitary Commission office. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Vicksburg National Military Park, Mississippi and Louisiana Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] headstones and fall leaves The Civilian Experience in the Civil War After being mere spectators at the war's early battles, civilians both near and far from the battlefields became unwilling participants and victims of the war as its toll of blood and treasure grew year after year. In response to the hardships imposed upon their fellow citizens by the war, civilians on both sides mobilized to provide comfort, encouragement, and material, and began to expect that their government should do the same. Painting of civilians under fire during the Siege of Vicksburg Abraham Lincoln: The War Years 1861-1865 No president up to that point in American history was called on to be commander-in-chief like Abraham Lincoln. From monitoring the War Department telegraph office to selecting of commanding generals and developing military strategy, Lincoln guided the nation through its darkest hour. Abraham Lincoln and General George McClellan following the Battle of Antietam The Changing War Begun as a purely military effort with the limited political objectives of reunification (North) or independence (South), the Civil War transformed into a social, economic and political revolution with unforeseen consequences. As the war progressed, the Union war effort steadily transformed from a limited to a hard war; it targeted not just Southern armies, but the heart of the Confederacy's economy, morale, and social order-the institution of slavery. Woodcut of spectators watching a train station set fire by Sherman's troops Vicksburg National Cemetery The Siege of Vicksburg lasted almost two months, and left thousands wounded and killed. To honor the memory of those who lost their lives in the taking of Vicksburg a National Cemetery was constructed. For thousands of men, Vicksburg National Cemetery is their final resting place. Photo of headstones at Vicksburg National Cemetery The Story of “Uncle Joe” Rudolph 'Uncle Joe" Rudolph was the brother of First Lady Lucretia Garfield. Read more about his Civil War service with the 42nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry, his brother-in-law's regiment, and his life after as he spent many years living at the Mentor farm with the family. young man in his late teens early twenties who is wearing a suit and tie Colonel Don Pardee of the 42 Ohio Volunteer Infantry (Part 1) Don Pardee and James A. Garfield were both from Ohio and they were both in the Union Army during the Ciivl War. Learn more about their friendship here! Part 2 is also available. yellow faded picture of a man in military uniform Colonel Don Pardee of the 42nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Part II Part 2 of Colonel Don Pardee of the 42nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry. yellow faded picture of a man in military uniform National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Paleogene Period—66.0 to 23.0 MYA Colorful Paleogene rocks are exposed in the hoodoos of Bryce Canyon National Park and the badlands of Badlands and Theodore Roosevelt national parks. Extraordinary Paleogene fossils are found in Fossil Butte and John Day Fossil Beds national monuments, among other parks. fossil skull with teeth expsoed Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center James A. Garfield and the Civil War (Part II) Part 2 of James A. Garfield and the Civil War explores Garfield involvement during the Battle of Chickamauga and later wartime experiences. Battle of Chickamauga The Adventures of George in Besieged Vicksburg The short story of an enslaved adolescent boy named George, who braved the dangers of Union shell fire during the Siege of Vicksburg, took care of Mary Loughborough, the wife of a Confederate officer. An activity with questions follows the story that allows students to think about George's circumstances and placing themselves in his shoes. A color cartoon drawing of a black slave chasing dogs away with a stick from eating his cook pot. Series: African American History at Gettysburg Abraham Brian, Basil Biggs, James Warfield, and Mag Palm are just a few of the many individuals that were affected by the Civil War and the Battle of Gettysburg, and each has their own story to tell. We have collected their stories in one place so that you can learn more about their various trials during this tumultuous time in American history. A black and white photograph of a black family posing with a white man and his horse in a dirt road.

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