"Asan_Bay_Overlook" by NPS Photo , public domain

War in the Pacific

National Historical Park - Guam

The War in the Pacific National Historical Park is a protected area in the United States territory of Guam, in Apra Harbor, which was established in 1978 in honor of those who participated in the Pacific Theater of World War II. Various sites on the island of Guam are part of the Park. It is unique among the National Park System insofar as it honors the bravery and sacrifices of all those who participated in the Pacific Theater. During World War II, Guam was captured by the Japanese forces in 1941 and liberated by the Americans in 1944. The park includes former battlefields, gun emplacements, trenches, caves, and historic structures. Nations involved in the War in the Pacific include the United States, Japan, Australia, Canada, Mexico, China, France, Great Britain, New Zealand, the Netherlands, and the Soviet Union.

maps

Official visitor map of War in the Pacific National Historical Park (NHP) in Guam. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).War in the Pacific - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of War in the Pacific National Historical Park (NHP) in Guam. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/wapa/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_in_the_Pacific_National_Historical_Park The War in the Pacific National Historical Park is a protected area in the United States territory of Guam, in Apra Harbor, which was established in 1978 in honor of those who participated in the Pacific Theater of World War II. Various sites on the island of Guam are part of the Park. It is unique among the National Park System insofar as it honors the bravery and sacrifices of all those who participated in the Pacific Theater. During World War II, Guam was captured by the Japanese forces in 1941 and liberated by the Americans in 1944. The park includes former battlefields, gun emplacements, trenches, caves, and historic structures. Nations involved in the War in the Pacific include the United States, Japan, Australia, Canada, Mexico, China, France, Great Britain, New Zealand, the Netherlands, and the Soviet Union. War in the Pacific National Historical Park was established to commemorate the bravery and sacrifice of those participating in the campaigns of the Pacific Theater of World War II and to conserve and interpret outstanding natural, scenic, and historic values and objects of the island of Guam. From the airport or Tumon, where most hotels are located, make your way to Route 1, Marine Corps Drive. Head south until the road ends and you arrive at the Naval Station Guam front gate. To the right, adjacent to the large 2-man Type-C Japanese midget submarine, is the T. Stell Newman Visitor Center. T. Stell Newman Visitor Center T. Stell Newman Visitor Center is open on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays from 9 am to 4 pm Asan Beach Overlook Mountain view down toward beach. Overlooking the invasion Asan Beach, this overlook honors the men and women killed on Guam in World War II. Memorial Day Flag Honors at Asan Beach Night view of light up US flags. Honoring the Chamorro citizens and US service personnel killed during World War II. Apaca point Calm water beach at sunset. This serene scene of Apaca Point does not reveal the intensity felt on the July 21, 1944 invasion. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—War in the Pacific National Historical Park, Guam Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] green slopes above seashore Coral Bleaching Monitoring on Guam In response to stresses such as higher water temperatures, corals can lose the symbiotic microscopic algae (which provides up to 95% of the coral’s nutrition) from their tissues causing them to look white or "bleached." If favorable conditions return, corals can sometimes recover. However, bleached corals are more vulnerable to disease and other stressors, which can lead to death. This worldwide trend of coral bleaching is linked to global warming. A bleached coral documented in Guam during inventory and monitoring. Relics of War at War in the Pacific National Historical Park The safety of National Park Service (NPS) staff in the field is paramount, and dangers take many forms. When NPS Pacific Islands Inventory & Monitoring Network biological technicians came across a WWII era grenade in a vegetation monitoring plot they knew what to do. A WWII era grenade discovered in the War in the Pacific National Historical Park. Outside Science (inside parks): Youth Summer Programs in Guam See how oung citizen scientists are helping monitor coral reef health in War In The Pacific National Historic Site. youth pointing to coral Outside Science (inside parks): Clam Monitoring in Guam Follow along as scientists track the growth and health of giant clams War In The Pacific National Historic Site. giant white clam Outside Science (inside parks): Coral Bleaching in Guam See how scientists are dealing with coral bleaching War In The Pacific National Historic Site. coral underwater Climate Change Clues from Monitoring As climate changes, significant changes in weather conditions impact the natural environment by shifting patterns of precipitation, promoting extremes in storm behavior, and influencing bird migration, invasive species spread, coral reef decline, and much more. The Pacific Island Network (PACN) undertakes systematic long-term monitoring of a wide variety of natural resources to accurately determine if change is occurring and why. Precipitation seen over the lush valleys of Kalaupapa National Historical Park. Stream Life in Hawai‘i National Parks Changes in weather patterns affect the quantity and quality of the water, which has profound effects on our native stream animals. In the Hawaiian Islands, the total amount of rain is expected to decrease as the impacts of climate change manifest. POET Newsletter September 2012 Pacific Ocean Education Team (POET) newsletter from September 2012. Articles include: Sea Level Rise and Coastal Parks; Fun with Coral Reefs and Climate Change Education; and Climate Change Exhibits From Sea to Rising Sea. people on beach Guam in World War II While Guam is only 212 square miles, the island is rich in history. Only hours after Pearl Harbor was attacked, the Japanese began aerial bombings on Guam. After two days of strafing, the Japanese came ashore and hours later the naval governor surrendered the American territory. The island remained under Japanese control for 31 months until July 21, 1944 when the United States returned and liberated the island. Marines on Guam Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Pacific Ocean Education Team (POET) Newsletters From 2009 to 2015, the Pacific Ocean Education Team published a series of short newsletters about the health of the ocean at various National Park Service sites in and around the Pacific Ocean. Topics covered included the 2010 tsunami, marine debris, sea star wasting disease, ocean acidification, and more. Ocean waves wash in from the right onto a forested and rocky shoreline. POET Newsletter September 2014 Pacific Ocean Education Team (POET) newsletter from September 2014. Articles include: Sea Star Wasting Disease; Corallivore: Crown of Thorns Starfish Wreak Havoc in American Samoa — The NPS Responds; Seafloor in 3D; and Coral Bleaching Monitoring on Guam. A large, red-colored sunflower sea star that appears to be melting or disintegrating.

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