Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts

National Park - Virginia

Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts is a performing arts center located on 117 acres (47 ha) of national park land in Fairfax County, Virginia, near the town of Vienna.

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Official visitor map of George Washington Memorial Parkway (MEMPKWY) in Virginia and District of Columbia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).George Washington - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of George Washington Memorial Parkway (MEMPKWY) in Virginia and District of Columbia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Chesapeake & Ohio Canal - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/wotr/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolf_Trap_National_Park_for_the_Performing_Arts Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts is a performing arts center located on 117 acres (47 ha) of national park land in Fairfax County, Virginia, near the town of Vienna. No matter what your age or taste in shows, you'll find something you like onstage at Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts. From May through September, multiple amphitheaters in the park present performances such as musicals, dance, opera, jazz, and popular and country music. A good time to explore the beauty and history of the park without the crowds is October - April. Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts is located in Vienna, Virginia. The park can be accessed by traveling from Route 7, the Dulles Toll Road (Route 267), Beulah Road or Old Courthouse Road. For more detailed information visit the park's directions page. Ranger Station The Ranger Station is located on the left side of the Main Gate to the Filene Center. Brochures, trail maps, and Junior Ranger books are available inside. Lost and Found can also be found here and retrieved during office hours. Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts is located in Vienna, Virginia between the Dulles Toll Road (RT 267) and Leesburg Pike (RT 7). Filene Center Blast Off The Filene Center House full of patrons Everyone is ready to kickoff the Filene Center season. Catherine Filene Shouse Bust Bust of Catherine Filene Shouse with building in back Catherine Filene Shouse donated her land to the National Park Service, which Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts was established. Junior Ranger Day A ranger swears in two new Jr. Rangers during Jr. Ranger Day activities at the park. Junior Ranger Days occur throughout the summer. Dimple Meadow Native garden with the Filene Center in the background In 2012, park staff and volunteers planted 42 species of native grasses and wildflowers here to create a habitat that now supports over 40 kinds of bees and 25 types of butterflies. Natural Side of a Park for the Performing Arts Filene Center in the background with autumn leaves There are opportunities year-round to hike and enjoy the outdoors, picnic and participate in ranger programs or walks. Children's Theatre-in-the-Woods Performances Sold out show at Theatre-in-the-Woods Most of the activities in the park during the summer are centered around performances at the Filene Center and Theatre-in-the-Woods. Pawpaw: Small Tree, Big Impact Pawpaw are small trees that don't grow past 100 feet. Yet they have a big influence-- they're the most commonly observed sapling in our National Capital Region forests. Pawpaw trees are virtually immune to deer browse and also produce the largest edible fruit native to North America! A hand holds a lumpy green pawpaw fruit Prescribed fire in the national capital area Learn how the National Park Service uses prescribed fire in the National Capital Area. Forest Regeneration 2018 In 2018, tree seedlings and small saplings are in short supply in the parks of the National Capital Region. Without these trees of tomorrow, what will our forests look like? A forest plot in Rock Creek Park showing some vegetation recovery. Sustainability in Action: Reducing Wolf Trap's Carbon Footprint Wolf Trap Completes First-ever Prescribed Fire On April 6, 2018, NPS firefighters successfully completed the first prescribed fire in Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts. The goals of burning the one-acre native meadow were to return nutrients to the soil, help native species’ seeds germinate, and control non-native plants such as stiltgrass. A firefighter feeds a hose over a wooden fence into a recently burned area. American Eels in the Potomac Watershed American eels are found everywhere along the Atlantic Coast, but many aspects of these fish remain poorly understood. They are perhaps one of the most mysterious fish in the Potomac watershed. Hands hold a 2 to 3 foot long eel over a red container. National Capital Region Energy Savings Performance Contract The National Park Service is investing $29 million in 81 individual energy efficiency and water conservation projects at national parks throughout the greater Washington region. Cherry Blossoms at the National Mall Forest Regeneration 2017 Tree seedlings and small saplings are in short supply in the parks of the National Capital Region. Without these trees of tomorrow, what will our forests look like? A forest plot showing tree seedling and low-growing plant recovery. Go green for the National Park Service’s birthday! We're adding energy- and water-saving improvements to save money! How can you do the same in your home? National Mall and Memorial Parks Yearly Savings 50.9 M gallons of water, $1 M, 2.7M kwh. Stream Restoration Dreams: Stage Zero Learn “stage zero” stream restoration basics and how they could be applied in Mid-Atlantic streams. Water spreads across the ground around standing and fallen trees Wolf Trap Online Junior Ranger Activities Learn about the only national park dedicated to the performing arts and become a Wolf Trap Junior Ranger, all from home! Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts Junior Ranger Badge (graphic image) Ash Tree Update 2017 The state of ash trees in 2017 in the National Capital Region after more than 10 years of harm from the invasive emerald ash borer. A white ash leaf Forest Regeneration 2019 In 2019 tree seedlings and small saplings are in short supply in National Capital Area parks. Without these trees of tomorrow, what will our forests look like? A brown bird with a white breast and dark spots on its chest stands on the leaf-littered ground. DOI Region 1, National Capital Area Utilizes Prescribed Fire as a Management Tool Resource and facility managers in the National Capital Area (NCA) are relying more frequently on prescribed burning as a tool to protect, restore, enhance and maintain historic Civil War sites. Fire in grasses burn near a Civil War cannon. Oak Decline Learn more about oak decline where a host of stressors interact to weaken trees over time, leading to what becomes "death by a thousand cuts." Looking up into the canopy of a mature oak showing symptoms of oak decline. Spring Amphibian Timeline Learn how the progression of amphibian appearances unfurls every spring. A gray tree frog clings to a small tree branch. Amphibian Diversity & Habitat Connectivity Habitat fragmentation is a major threat to amphibian communities, especially in National Capital Region parks at risk due to the region's growing urbanization. A small frog crouches on a lichen-covered rock. Forest Soils Highlights from a 2007-2017 study of soils in National Capital Region Network I&M-monitored parks. Includes discussion of parent materials, heavy metal soil pollutants like lead, and how past land use effects O horizons. Collage of 6 color photos of soil profiles showing colors from orange-y reds to browns and grays. B.A.R.K. Ranger Activity Checklist Learn the B.A.R.K. Core Principles, complete an activity, and help your canine companion become the newest Wolf Trap B.A.R.K. Ranger! A dog on leash stands at a Wolf Trap Trail trailhead. Explore DC’s national parks with a new, free app Navigate to popular destinations, get up-to-date information and discover lesser-known parks. With nearly 800 points of interest, the app includes the National Mall, President's Park, Rock Creek Park, Anacostia Park, Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, Wolf Trap, Arlington House, Theodore Roosevelt Island, Frederick Douglass NHS, Mary McLeod Bethune Council House NHS, Carter G. Woodson NHS, and hundreds more. National Park Service logo with Washington Monument and other memorials. American Chestnuts in the Capital Region In 1904, a deadly fungus began killing American chestnut trees, once one of the most dominant trees of the eastern U.S. Despite overwhelming odds, some American chestnut trees survive today in parks of the National Capital Region Green American chestnut tree leaves on a slender branch. Freshwater Sponges Freshwater sponges are found in lakes and streams growing on firm substrates like rocks and branches. They feed by filtering small particles from the water. Though little is known about these sponges in the Mid-Atlantic, they are usually a sign of good water quality. A freshwater sponges attached to a streambed rock. Stiltgrass and Tree Seedling Recovery Recent analysis at Maryland's Catoctin Mountain Park shows Japanese stiltgrass does not limit the growth of tree seedlings in a forest recovering from deer overpopulation. Invasive Japanese stiltgrass blankets the sides of a shady forest road. Spotted Lanternfly 101 What you need to know about spotted lanternfly: a new, invasive, insect pest approaching the National Parks of the Mid-Atlantic. A spotted lanternfly with wings spread showing namesake spots Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts, Virginia Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] children's theatre in the woods Spotted Lanternfly in Perspective While spotted lanternfly and emerald ash borer are both invasive insect pests, introduced from Asia, that feed on trees (primarily), they have few other similarities. Learn how they differ in host preferences, feeding mode, and life cycle. A spotted lanternfly with black wingspots on a tree branch Amphibian Disease Risk in the National Capital Area Looking for disease, including ranaviruses and chytrid fungi, is an important part of amphibian monitoring done by the National Capital Region Inventory & Monitoring Network. Learn more about the risks posed by these diseases and the biosecurity protocols field crews use to reduce the risk of accidental spread. Red-spotted newt on brown forest floor leaves. Black spots and eyes contrast with vivid orange skin. Forest Regeneration 2020 What is the future of our forests? A look at forest regeneration capacity in National Capital Area national parks based on 2020 monitoring data. hand holding a leaflet on a white ash seedling Plan Like A Park Ranger - Top 10 Tips For Visiting Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts While this summer may look and feel different than years past, visiting the only national park for the performing arts will still be a special experience! Here are our tips to help you prepare for your visit and have a positive park experience. A side angled view of the Filene Center on a sunny day. Plants and Climate Change Changing climate increases stressors that weaken plant resilience, disrupting forest structure and ecosystem services. Rising temperatures lead to more frequent droughts, wildfires, and invasive pest outbreaks, leading to the loss of plant species. That causes a ripple of problems throughout their ecosystems. Monocacy tulip poplar tree Beech Trees in the National Capital Area American beech (Fagus grandifolia), the most common tree species in National Capital Area parks, is currently facing the emerging threat of Beech Leaf Disease (BLD). A forest with healthy green leafed beech trees Overview of the Urban Forests The eight urban forests measured in the Urban Ecology i-Tree analyses are diverse. The following articles explore just a few of the common ecological benefits the urban trees in these parks provide to the parks and the surrounding areas. Overview of the Urban Forests icon of tree silhouettes. Icon put over photo of Prince William Forest Other Benefits of Urban Forests Other benefits of urban forests include: Trees and Building Energy Use and Oxygen Production. Trees affect energy consumption by shading buildings, providing evaporative cooling, and blocking winter winds. Oxygen production is one of the most commonly cited benefits of urban trees. Other Tree Benefits icon of house with a tree besides it. Icon put over photo of cherry blossoms Structural Values of Urban Forests A tree’s structural value can be thought of as the cost of having to replace a tree with a similar tree. It can be calculated with factors like the tree trunk area and the tree’s health condition. Various insects and diseases can infest urban forests, potentially killing trees and reducing the health, structural value and sustainability of the urban forest. Structural Values of Trees icon of tree on field. Icon put over photo of snow covered trees. Avoided Runoff and Urban Forests Surface runoff, particularly from storms, can be a cause for concern in many urban areas because the large amounts of paved surfaces will increase the amount of water that cannot soak into the ground. These large volumes of stormwater runoff can carry surface impurities into streams, wetlands, rivers, lakes, and oceans, contributing pollution, garbage, and excessive nutrients into aquatic ecosystems. Urban forests, however, are beneficial in reducing surface runoff. Avoided Runoff icon of rain over a tree branch. Icon put over raindrops on red fall leaves Carbon Storage by Urban Forests Climate change is an issue of global concern. Urban trees can help mitigate climate change by storing carbon in tree tissue and sequestering atmospheric carbon from the key greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon Storage & Sequestration icon of CO2 going into a tree. Icon put over photo tree trunk. Air Pollution Removal by Urban Forests Poor air quality is a common problem in many urban areas. It can lead to decreased human health, damage to landscape materials and ecosystem processes, and spoiled scenic views due to reduced visibility. The National Park Service monitors and assesses air quality in park units. The trees in NPS’s urban forests contribute to improved air quality. Air Pollution Removal Icon of green lungs. Icon put over photo of tree canopy gap. Forest Regeneration 2021 The latest look at forest regeneration capacity in National Capital Area national parks based on monitoring data from 2021. Green forest showing healthy understory of oak seedlings. Resilient Forests Initiative - Managing Deer Impacts A healthy forest needs to have enough tree seedlings and saplings to regenerate the forest canopy after a disturbance. Analysis of NPS I&M and other long-term datasets makes it clear that many eastern national parks lack adequate tree regeneration due to decades of over browsing by white-tailed deer. Deer impacts I&M Networks Support Resilient Forest Management NPS Inventory and Monitoring Networks have been tracking forest health in eastern national parks since 2006. This monitoring information can guide resilient forest management and support parks in adapting to changing conditions through the actions described below. Forest health monitoring Managing Resilient Forests. A Regional Initiative Forests cover tens of thousands of acres in eastern national parks and these critical resources face a range of interacting stressors: over-abundant white-tailed deer populations, invasive plant dominance, novel pests and pathogens, among other threats. The Resilient Forests Initiative will help parks address these issue collectively. Forest health monitoring Autumn Amphibians Frog antifreeze and red efts? Learn more about fall amphibian life in the National Capital Area, including marbled salamanders, spring peepers, and red-spotted newts! A red-orange juvenile red-spotted newt climbs a rock Series: Managing Resilient Forests Initiative for Eastern National Parks Forests in the northeastern U.S. are in peril. Over-abundant deer, invasive plants, and insect pests are impacting park forests, threatening to degrade the scenic vistas and forested landscapes that parks are renowned for. With regional collaboration, parks can manage these impacts and help forests be resilient. This article series explores tools available to park managers to achieve their goals. Healthy forests have many native seedlings and saplings. Resilient Forests Initiative - Managing Invasive Plants & Pests Park forests are threatened by invasive plants and pests. Strategically tackling invasive plants to protect park’s highest priority natural resources and planning around forest pests and pathogens are important actions in managing resilient forests. Forest Regeneration Ash Tree Update 2021 Emerald ash borer (EAB) has killed most of the 300,000 ash trees in National Capital Region parks since 2014. Fewer than 80,000 living ash trees remain. Some ash-dominated swamps transformed into shrublands as ash root systems re-sprouted after EAB attack. In dry habitats, EAB proved more quickly fatal. A sunny swamp with dead tree trunks emerging from dense shrubs Vines on Trees at Forest Edges Learn how climbing vines affect tree growth and mortality in National Capital Region park forests. This material was originally presented in a 2016 resource brief. Vines climb on trees at the forest edge at Rock Creek's Barnard Hill Park. Re-Growing Southeastern Grasslands Native grasslands once covered vast swaths of the southeastern U.S. Learn how national parks in DC, Maryland, and Virginia are working on conserving, rehabilitating, and restoring these grassland communities. A sunny grassland with rolling hills in the distance

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