"Dall sheep, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park & Preserve, 2015." by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Wrangell St. Elias

National Park & Preserve - Alaska

Wrangell–St. Elias National Park and Preserve is in south central Alaska. It is the largest area managed by the National Park Service -- more than 6 time the area of Yellowstone National Park. The park includes a large portion of the Saint Elias Mountains, which include most of the highest peaks in the United States and Canada, yet are within 10 miles (16 km) of tidewater, one of the highest reliefs in the world. Wrangell–St. Elias borders on Canada's Kluane National Park and Reserve to the east and approaches another American national park to the south, Glacier Bay. The park's glacial features include Malaspina Glacier, the largest piedmont glacier in North America, Hubbard Glacier, the longest tidewater glacier in Alaska, and Nabesna Glacier, the world's longest valley glacier. The Bagley Icefield covers much of the park's interior, which includes 60% of the permanently ice-covered terrain in Alaska.

maps

Official visitor map of Wrangell - St Elias National Park & Preserve (NP & PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Wrangell - St. Elias - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Wrangell - St Elias National Park & Preserve (NP & PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map 3 of the Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Copper River Delta in Chugach National Forest (NF) in Alaska. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Chugach MVUM - Map 3 - Copper River Delta 2021

Map 3 of the Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Copper River Delta in Chugach National Forest (NF) in Alaska. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Map 1 of the Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Yakutat Ranger District (RD) of Tongass National Forest (NF) in Alaska. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Tongass MVUM - Yakutat Map 1 2021

Map 1 of the Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Yakutat Ranger District (RD) of Tongass National Forest (NF) in Alaska. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Map of State Moose and Caribou Hunt Restricted Areas in the Game Management Unit 13B (GMU) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).GMU 13 - GMU 13 B - Moose and Caribou Hunt Restrictions

Map of State Moose and Caribou Hunt Restricted Areas in the Game Management Unit 13B (GMU) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of State Moose and Caribou Hunt Restricted Areas in the Game Management Unit 13A (GMU) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).GMU 13 - GMU 13 A - Moose and Caribou Hunt Restrictions

Map of State Moose and Caribou Hunt Restricted Areas in the Game Management Unit 13A (GMU) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Visitor Guide to Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve (NP&PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Wrangell-St. Elias - Visitor Guide 2021

Visitor Guide to Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve (NP&PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/wrst/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wrangell%E2%80%93St._Elias_National_Park_and_Preserve Wrangell–St. Elias National Park and Preserve is in south central Alaska. It is the largest area managed by the National Park Service -- more than 6 time the area of Yellowstone National Park. The park includes a large portion of the Saint Elias Mountains, which include most of the highest peaks in the United States and Canada, yet are within 10 miles (16 km) of tidewater, one of the highest reliefs in the world. Wrangell–St. Elias borders on Canada's Kluane National Park and Reserve to the east and approaches another American national park to the south, Glacier Bay. The park's glacial features include Malaspina Glacier, the largest piedmont glacier in North America, Hubbard Glacier, the longest tidewater glacier in Alaska, and Nabesna Glacier, the world's longest valley glacier. The Bagley Icefield covers much of the park's interior, which includes 60% of the permanently ice-covered terrain in Alaska. Wrangell-St. Elias is a vast national park that rises from the ocean all the way up to 18,008 ft. At 13.2 million acres, the park is the same size as Yellowstone National Park, Yosemite National Park, and Switzerland combined! Within this wild landscape, people continue to live off the land as they have done for centuries. This rugged, beautiful land is filled with opportunities for adventure. The administrative building and main park visitor center are located along the Richardson Highway (Hwy 4), which is a paved state highway that runs through Copper Center, AK. The buildings are 8 miles south of the Glenn Highway and Richardson Highway intersection near Glennallen, Alaska. This is approximately 200 miles east of Anchorage, AK and 250 miles south of Fairbanks, AK. Chitina Ranger Station Located in downtown Chitina at mile 33 on the Edgerton Highway. Upon entering Chitina town southbound, turn left at the Chitina Hotel, drive down the gravel road 0.2 mile (300 meters), station on left. The light brown historical log cabin with mint green trim is the Chitina Ranger Station. The Chitina Ranger Station is 58 miles away from the Copper Center Visitor Center, located in the town of Chitina, behind the State of Alaska Wayside (vault toilet and interpretive panels). Located in downtown Chitina at mile 33 on the Edgerton Highway. Upon entering Chitina town southbound, turn left at the Chitina Hotel, drive down the gravel road 0.2 mile (300 meters), station on left. The light brown historical log cabin has mint green trim. Look for the flagpole in front of the building. Copper Center Visitor Center Enjoy the exhibits, view the park film, hike nature trails, shop in the bookstore, gather park & area information, conduct backcountry trip planning, and view the large 3-D interactive map display. Park rangers provide guided talks and walks daily during the summer months. Subsistence fishing and hunting permits are also available. The Copper Center Visitor Center is the main park visitor center. It is located along the Richardson Highway (Hwy 4), which is a paved road that runs through Copper Center, AK. This visitor center is located 10 miles south of Glennallen, Alaska, and approximately 200 miles northeast of Anchorage, AK and 250 miles south of Fairbanks, AK. Kennecott Visitor Center Located in the "Blackburn School," the Kennecott Visitor Center has exhibits and Rangers available to help with your trip planning. After being dropped off by the McCarthy to Kennecott shuttle, or if you walk/bike from McCarthy to Kennecott (5 miles), when you approach the town entrance, proceed to the visitor center on the left, inside the historical Blackburn School. Slana Ranger Station Get the latest Nabesna Road conditions and information about its recreational opportunities. Located 60 miles from the junction of the Richardson Highway and the Tok Cut-off (Glenn Highway). Turn east on Nabesna Road in Slana, drive 1 mile (1.6 km), turn right on gravel dead-end service road, drive 0.2 mile (300 meters), log cabin Slana Ranger Station on right. Yakutat District Office The Yakutat District is located in the southern portion of the park along the coastline in Yakutat Bay at the base of the St. Elias Mountains. Accessible only by plane or boat, this area encompasses the park's coastal region, with 155 miles of little-known coastline, where giant mountains, enormous glaciers, and temperate rainforest meet the ocean. For information, please call Park Headquarters in Copper Center at (907) 822-5234. Yakutat is a remote community and, like many cities in Southeast Alaska, can only be accessed by air or water. Alaska Airlines offers daily jet passenger and freight service to and from both Juneau and Anchorage. Flight times vary depending on the season. The local airport is 4 miles southeast of the city of Yakutat. The Alaska State Ferry System offers a stop in Yakutat, but does not service the community year-round. Kendesnii Campground Located on the Nabesna Road, this free camping area is the only National Park Service campground in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park. It has 10 designated campsites, each with a picnic table and a fire ring. There are two vault toilets. Each site can accommodate a small to medium RV or other vehicles. It is free and open year-round on a first-come, first-served basis, but is not plowed during the winter so campsites may not be accessible. Reservations are not taken and are not required. Camping Fee 0.00 Free Camping. The use of Kendesnii campground and its amenities is free. Aerial View of Kendesnii Campground Aerial view of a campground surrounded by Boreal Forest. Kendesnii Campground contains 10 campsites. Kendesnii Campground Entrance Kendesnii Campground sign with forest in the background. Kendesnii Campground is located off of the Nabesna Road. There is no entrance fee. Ground View of Kendesnii Campground View of campground road and campsites with forest and cloudy skies in the background. Kendesnii Campground is located in the Boreal Forest next to two lakes. Numerous recreational activities are available. Kendesnii Campground Amenities Outside view of vault toilet next to bear-proof trash canisters with forest in the background This is a primitive campground. Amenities are primarily vault toilets, picnic tables, and fire rings. Kendesnii Campsite Campsite in the forest with tents, picnic table, and vehicle. One of the campsites in Kendesnii Campground Icy Bay with Mt. St. Elias Glaciers loom over the ocean with large snowy mountains rising into blue skies Wrangell-St. Elias National Park contains a diversity of natural features. Landscapes unique to the North American continent are common here. Backpackers in Mentasta Mountains Two backpackers sitting in an alpine meadow with snowy mountains in the background Wrangell-St. Elias National Park is a backpacker's paradise. A variety of routes take you into beautiful country, including the Mentasta Mountains. Kennecott Mill Town Historic, large, red buildings with mountains in the background Kennecott Mines National Historic Landmark is found within Wrangell-St. Elias National Park. This early 1900's copper mining operation overcame numerous challenges and found success in the heart of the Alaskan wilderness. Logan Glacier A large glacier with stripes of different colored rock nestled in between barren mountain slopes. Wrangell-St. Elias National Park contains the greatest concentration of glaciers in North America. More than 3000 glaciers covering over three million acres of land are found in the park. Wrangell Mountains Four large snow covered mountains rise above dense forest into blue skies. The Wrangell Mountains dominate the view of the northern half of the park. This range lies entirely within the park and reaches 16,390 ft (4,996 m) in height. Copper Center Visitor Center Copper Center Visitor Center Copper Center Visitor Center Slana Ranger Station Slana Ranger Station Slana Ranger Station Chitina Ranger Station Chitina Ranger Station Chitina Ranger Station Kennecott Visitor Center Kennecott Visitor Center in the historic Blackburn School Kennecott Visitor Center in the historic Blackburn School Yakutat coastal area Yakutat coastal area Yakutat coastal area Enhancement of Traditional Fish Passage Design on the Trans Alaska Pipeline System. Alyeska Pipeline Service Company There are hundreds of fish streams that cross the Trans Alaska Pipeline System; most go through a drainage structure called a Low Water Crossing (LWC) which is an equipment ford that allows vehicle access and fish passage. LWCs require on-going maintenance due to vehicle use and can become widened and flattened during normal usage. They also can develop a grade break that can lead to an impedance or blockage to fish passage which can cutoff miles of important fish habitat. Enhancement of Traditional Fish Passage Design on the Trans Alaska Pipeline System Preliminary Results from the Excavation of NAB-533, a Multi-Component Prehistoric Archaeological Site in the Northern Copper River Basin. NAB-533 is a buried multi-component prehistoric site located in the northern Copper River Basin. In 2019 a team from the Center for the Study of the First Americans at Texas A&M University initiated test excavations to establish the stratigraphic context of the artifacts and cultural features, collect geoarchaeological samples, obtain additional radiocarbon dates, and increase the sample of artifacts. Preliminary Results from NAB-533 Prehistoric Archaeological Site Bob Reeve: Eastern Alaska’s Early Air Prospector, 1932-1938 Bob Reeve is arguably one of Alaska’s most recognizable bush pilots. Although his independent airline pioneered commercial routes from Anchorage throughout the Alaska Peninsula and the Aleutian Chain between 1947 and 2000, the pilot is most known for his ability to land and take off from glaciers. This technique allowed him to play a huge role in Alaska's early mining industry, particularly in the region that became Wrangell-St Elias National Park and Preserve. man standing near a small propeller airplane The Meteorology on the Debris-Covered Tongue of Kennicott Glacier, Wrangell Mountains -- from the Micro to the Macro Scale. Debris-covered glaciers are characterized by a continuous layer of rock material on their tongue and surface energy balance models are commonly used to estimate melt rates of these glaciers. This requires direct on-glacier measurements of energy fluxes that are rare in many mountain ranges globally and completely absent in Alaska. The Meteorology on the Debris-Covered Tongue of Kennicott Glacier Geolinguistic Evidence of Dene Presence at High-water Levels of Glacial Lake Atna. Kari (2019) introduces a theory of Na-Dene prehistory, "the Proto-Dene Lex Loci" that derives from Lexware dictionary files and cumulative place name for seven adjacent Alaska Dene languages. To investigate Dene prehistory in the Copper River and circum–Glacial Lake Atna (GLA) region, we discuss a selection of 67 Dene place names from seven Dene languages in four Alaska river basins. Geolinguistic Evidence of Dene Presence at High-water Levels of Glacial Lake Atna Integrating Science-Based Research and Data Analyses into Sustainable Management of the Commercial, Personal Use, Sport, and Subsistence Fisheries of the Copper River Drainage, Alaska. Management of the Copper River drainage fisheries have generally accepted biological information and specific research findings from our region to inform adaptive management decisions and sustainable management objectives for the Copper River's diverse fishery resources. Subsistence Fisheries of the Copper River Drainage Alaska The Gulkana Hatchery, Then and Now. Prince William Sound Aquaculture Corporation The Gulkana Hatchery was established in 1973 by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) to mitigate for lost spawning habitat, and by 1984 the hatchery was incubating the largest number of sockeye salmon eggs of any hatchery in Alaska. In 1993, ADF&G contracted the Prince William Sound Aquaculture Corporation (PWSAC) to operate and manage the hatchery at no cost to the state and by 1999 Gulkana Hatchery sockeye salmon runs reached a peak of over 1 million fish. The Gulkana Hatchery, Then and Now. Prince William Sound Aquaculture Corporation Results of Recent Archeological Investigations of Glacial Lake Atna Shorelines in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve Results of Recent Archeological Investigations of Glacial Lake Atna Shorelines in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, Alaska. Lee Reininghaus, Wrangell-St. Elias NPP Ancient Glacial Lake Atna abstract cover Nic'anilen Na': A Partnership in Conservation, Stewardship, and Education. Nic anilen Na Partnerships WISE Nic anilen Na Partnerships WISE poster Report on Willow Creek Research Project, a Ten Year Citizen Science Project. Report on Willow Creek Research Project, a Ten Year Citizen Science Project. Dave Wellman, Willow Creek Water Consortium, and Robin Mayo, WISE Report on Willow Creek Research Project Modern Changes in Kennicott Glacier: Implications for Residents, Visitors, and the Other 3,120 Glaciers in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve Modern Changes in Kennicott Glacier: Implications for Residents, Visitors, and the Other 3,120 Glaciers in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve. Michael Loso, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, michael_loso@nps.gov Chris Larsen, University of Alaska Fairbanks National Park Service scientists taking glacier depth measurements Watershed-Scale Partnerships Resulting in On-the-Ground Action. Kate Morse and Kari Rogers, Copper River Watershed Project Watershed-Scale Partnerships Resulting in On-the-Ground Action. Kate Morse and Kari Rogers, Copper River Watershed Project Watershed Partnerships Environmental Education in Rural Alaska: A Community Approach. Robin Mayo, WISE Environmental Education in Rural Alaska: A Community Approach. Robin Mayo, WISE Environmental Education in Rural Alaska: A Community Approach poster Continuous Climate Data Collection in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve: Lessons Learned and Emerging Trends. The National Park Service (NPS) Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) program has maintained five continuous automatic weather stations within Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve for the past fifteen years. Observations include air temperature, summer rainfall, relative humidity, snow depth, wind speed, wind direction, and soil temperatures. Stations range in elevation from 1,880 feet to 5,240 feet and represent distinct climate regimes. Climate Data Collection in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve Addressing Climate Change Uncertainty in Planning, Vulnerability Assessment and Natural Resource Management. Climate change affects the natural and built environment in many, often complexly related ways. Yet, incorporating future climate projections into management agency or community planning is a requirement for obtaining other resources such as grants. One definition of co-production is an iterative partnership between managers who use science as part of their decision making and the researchers who develop that science. Addressing Climate Change and Natural Resource Management Snowshoe Hare Snowshoe hares live in the boreal forests of North America and are active year-round. They gain their curious name from their very large hind feet form a snowshoe, supporting their weight on the surface of the snow. Hares greatly influence the world around them, including the vegetation, predators, and other herbivores and omnivores that live in the same habitats. a white colored hare under a shrub in snow Summer movements of female Golden Eagle 1502 at the northwestern edge of North America. Wrangell St. Elias NPP to Bering Land Bridge NP: summer movements of Golden Eagle 1502. Satellite telemetry is expanding our understanding of Golden Ecology and revealing the stories of non-territorial Golden Eagles in Alaska during the breeding season. USFWS Biologist Stephen Lewis holds Golden Eagle 1502 while extending her right wing. NPS Alaska Region Fire Ecology Annual Report Summary 2017 The National Park Service (NPS) Alaska region fire ecology program provides science-based information to guide fire and land management planning, decisions and practices in order to maintain and understand fire-adapted ecosystems in Alaska. Smoke rises over the Yukon River from the Trout Creek Fire July 15, 2017. Fire Ecology Annual Report 2017 - Communicating Results As park staff began to ramp up for the summer season, the fire ecology program pitched in with two train-the-trainer sessions. Teachers in Denali count tree rings from a tree core to determine the age of spruce trees. Fire Ecology Annual Report 2017 - Research & Technology The AKR fire ecology program coordinates research and facilitates the use of scientific data, modeling and technology to address the needs of the fire management program. The Kungiakrok burn site is shown five years after the fire. Fire Ecology Annual Report 2017 - Monitoring and Inventory Monitoring and inventories are utilized by the fire ecology program to provide feedback to the NPS fire management program on activities such as fuels treatments and to continue to gain a better understanding of the effects of wildfire on the landscape. Fire Ecology Annual Report 2017 - Planning and Compliance The fire ecology program participates in planning activities for the Fire Management and Park Land Management Programs. Keynote: Using Science in Decision Making National Park Service Director Jonathan Jarvis delivered the opening keynote at the 11th Biennial Scientific Conference on the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem on October 9, 2012. The article that follows is based on an edited transcription of his remarks at the conference. Chisana Caribou Herd Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve hosts 3 of 32 recognized caribou herds in Alaska. Of these, one herd is unique. The Chisana Caribou herd, whose range crosses the border between Alaska and Canada, is the only woodland caribou in Alaska. A large snow-capped peak Abandoned Mine Lands in Alaska National Parks—An Overview From the thousands of mining claims that existed at when Congress created most national parks in Alaska, around 750 still remain. These are mainly abandoned sites and features, in various stages of disrepair and failure. Since 1981, the NPS has worked to quantify the number and type of hazards posed by these sites and has pursued a variety of solutions to mitigate the issues, such as visitor safety hazards, presented by relic mining features. dilapidated wood building in a mountainous setting Subsistence The study of subsistence resources in parks has been a mix of long-term work and projects instigated by issues facing the Federal Subsistence Board. Winter hunting is an important subsistence activity in many Alaska communities and park areas. Red Fox Despite the name, red foxes come in a variety of colors. They're found throughout the United States and are not uncommon sightings in many national parks. two red foxes Science in Wilderness Marine Reserves ANILCA establishes the largest scientific laboratory...ever! A spawning salmon struggles to get back into the water. Mining in the Parks Resource protection goals, resource data, the study areas and other decisions made in the environmental impact state-ment process held up under public scrutiny and federal appeals court review, and became an integral part of evaluating new mining plans of operations in parks. A semi-truck hauling two trailers filled with ore on a gravel road. Taan Fjord Landslide and Tsunami Read the abstract and get the link to several articles, including this one published in Scientific Reports: Higman, B., D. H. Shugar, […] M. Loso. 2018. The 2015 landslide and tsunami in Taan Fiord, Alaska. Scientific Reports 8: 12993. An NPS skiff of researchers is dwarfed by a massive coastal landslide. Mt Sulzer Debris Flow Over several years, there have been at least three large movements of earth on the north side of Mt. Sulzer. This article talks about those slides and the debris flow on the White River in Wrangell-St Elias National Park and Preserve. Debris slide on the White River. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Wrangell-St. Elias National Park, Alaska Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] hikers on precipice Nugget Creek The Nugget Creek landscape exemplifies the development of a small-scale copper-lode mine in Alaska. The landscape, which contains the camp, developed mine workings, an isolated cabin ruin, and the former McCarthy cabin, is a typical copper mining operation of the era and region. In 1902, James McCarthy first staked his claims in the drainage; the mine operations ended in 1919, but many indications of the operation still remain. A wooden structure without a roof appears to tumble down the rocky slope upon which it was built. In Celebration of ANILCA Former President, Jimmy Carter, offers a sentimental introduction to the 25th Anniversary Edition of Alaska Park Science and the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA). Black and white photo of six white men standing in front of an old National Park Service Building. National Park Service Aviation Personnel Attend DOI National Pilot Ground School During the week of December 10, 2017, twenty-eight National Park Service (NPS) airplane and helicopter pilots, pilot trainees, national and regional aviation staff attended the 2017 DOI National Pilot Ground School (NPGS). The weeklong training brought together over 100 DOI pilots from the NPS, US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and DOI’s Office of Aviation Services (OAS). A group of 17 men stand in front of a room. Alaska NPS Pilot Awarded Title “Alaska Aviation Legend” On October 27, 2017, the Alaska Air Carriers Association (AACA) recognized and bestowed the esteemed title of Alaska Aviation Legend to National Park Service pilot, Darry “Lynn” Ellis. Award and program Cleaning Up Alaska's Beaches Cleanup crews hit the beaches in 5 of Alaska's coastal national parks in 2015 to collect, assess and ultimately remove abandoned and washed up trash. The massive endeavor was part of a larger project aimed at understanding the sources of marine debris and keeping it out of the ocean and off of Alaska's beaches. NPS staff and volunteers with bags of trash collected off beach. Life and Times of Tundra Plants: How Long Do They Live, and How They Are Responding to Climate Change Multi-year ecological studies can have a perverse logic: the more data you have already collected, the more mundane, but also the more useful, each new year of research becomes. two people on a hillside overlooking a mountain shrouded in clouds A History of Science in Alaska's National Parks National park units in Alaska precede the establishment of the National Park Service in 1916. The first park unit, Sitka National Monument, was conceived in 1908, and by the mid-1920s four national monuments along with Alaska’s first national park were part of the growing park system. Discover how the early 1900s and observations of a few helped to establish the National Park Service in Alaska. Black and white photo of Arno Cammerer sitting at his desk looking through papers. Old is Getting Older In the last 25 years, persistent archaeological survey and improved scientific techniques have resulted in new data which confirms that Alaska sites are actually much earlier than we once believed. NPS archaeologist works at Amakomanak site in Noatak National Preserve. Mining Legacy in National Parks of Alaska Mining is intrinsically tied to the history of Alaska as a territory and then state of the United States. Thousands of historic and active mining sites exist within national parks across Alaska - some with a rich cultural history and others with disturbed lands and hazardous conditions. gold dust in a pan A Partnership to Remove Marine Debris from Alaskan Coastal Parks Marine debris can affect marine mammals and birds through entanglement, strangulation, and digestive blockage. In summer 2015, we conducted an extensive multi-partner project to remove over 11 tons of marine debris from remote beaches in five Alaska parks. park rangers putting trash into white plastic bags on a rocky beach PARKS...IN...SPAAAACE!!! NASA astronauts have quite literally an out-of-this-world view of national parks and take some pretty stellar pictures to share. Travel along with the space station on its journey west to east getting the extreme bird’s eye view of national parks across the country. And one more down-to-earth. View of Denali National Park & Preserve from space Black-Capped Chickadee Black-capped chickadees and boreal chickadees are tiny but tough songbirds that are year-round residents in many parts of Alaska. Seasonal Wildland Fire and Fuels Project Work Begins in Alaska for 2019 The 2019 fire season on National Park Service lands in Alaska starts out with lightning ignited wildfires in Lake Clark National Park, Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve and fuels reduction project work in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve. A male firefighter in full personal protective equipment walks safely away before felling a tree. Kennecott Cemetery The Kennecott Cemetery was used for burials between 1908 and 1938, coinciding with the decades of development in the remote Alaskan mill town. The site is closely associated with the history of the area. The graves reflect the ethnic diversity of the town and the dangers of the mining work. Wooden crosses stand in an overgrown plot, surrounded by white picket fence. Monitoring Migratory Golden Eagles Read the abstract and get the link to an article published in the Journal of Raptor Research: McIntyre, C. and S. B. Lewis. 2016. Observations of migrating Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in eastern interior Alaska offer insights on population size and migration monitoring. Journal of Raptor Research 50(3): 254-264. A Golden Eagle flies along a mountain ridge. Michael Loso - Geologist Michael Loso is a geologist with Wrangell-St Elias National Park and Preserve and a physical scientist (focused on the cryosphere) for the Central Alaska Inventory and Monitoring Network. Physical scientist Mike Loso measures snowpack on a glacier. Fire Ecology Annual Report 2016 - Monitoring and Inventory Monitoring and inventories are utilized by the fire ecology program to provide feedback to the NPS fire management program on activities such as fuels treatments and to continue to gain a better understanding of the effects of wildfire on the landscape. Trees were thinned and limbed to o provide a fuel break in the event of a wildfire. Fire Ecology Annual Report 2016 - Research and Technology The AKR fire ecology program coordinates research and facilitates the use of scientific data, modeling and technology to address the needs of the fire management program. Read on to learn more about the three fire research proposals submitted to NPS in 2016. Researchers from University of Montana collect tree cores from Wrangell-St. Elias. Fire Ecology Annual Report 2016 - References A list of reports, presentations and other forms of communication completed in 2016 for the Fire Ecology Annual Report. Residents and Fire Staff of Wrangell-St. Elias National Park & Preserve Create Firewise Zone After removing flammable vegetation around their property, private residents in the Kennecott Mines National Historic Landmark of Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve requested that the NPS reduce vegetation on NPS lands adjacent to their property. In September 2012, NPS fire staff and a Southeast Alaska Guidance Association crew selectively thinned, limbed, and hauled away for safe pile burning flammable vegetation on NPS lands surrounding private property. Fire Communication and Education Grants Enhance Fire Interpretation and Outreach in the National Parks in 2015 and Beyond The 2015 National Park Service Fire Communication and Education Grant Program provided funding for projects, programs, or tasks in twelve parks around the country. A woman studies a small coniferous tree while a younger woman looks on. Bison Bellows: Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve Meet the herd of Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve! A view of a large mountain and pine forest with a single bison mostly concealed in the distance Land Ownership in National Park System Units in Alaska and Possibilities for Mining and Other Developments There are over 54 million acres of National Park System units in Alaska, which is 65 percent of the entire National Park System. Although most of those lands are in federal ownership and are managed by the NPS, there are over two million acres of non-federally owned lands within those units. These non-federal lands are in private, state, borough, or municipal ownership. The existence of these lands creates the possibility of mining and other developments within the boundaries rustic buildings near a creek, hills and mountains in the distance Volcanic Hazards in Alaska’s National Parks There are over 100 volcanoes in Alaska, 54 of which are considered historically active, and 14 are found in Alaska national parks, preserves, and monuments. The Alaska Volcano Observatory monitors and conducts research on volcanoes in Alaska in order to better understand volcanic processes and determine the likelihood of future volcanic hazards, with a primary goal of informing the public about volcanic hazards and impending volcanic activity. Alaska Park Science 18(1), 2019. A snow covered volcanic peak. Fire Ecology Annual Report 2018 Fire Season Despite the relatively quiet fire season in Alaska in 2018, the National Park Service saw 24 wildfires spanning over 36,000 acres burning within and adjacent to park boundaries. Six of those fires were in Cape Krusenstern National Monument. An anvil-shaped smoke plume rises above the tree line on the Yukon River. Building PIO capacity in Alaska National Park Service Public Information Officers were in short supply last fire season. To help bolster the numbers, NPS Alaska recruits 12 new staff members to assist with all hazard and wildfire incidents. A fire public information officer highlights updates on a fire to members of the public. NPS Alaska Region Fire Ecology Annual Report Summary During the 2016 field season, the Alaska NPS fire ecology program conducted monitoring at the Wrangell-St. Elias McCarthy University Subdivision fuels reduction site, re-measured plots that have burned multiple times in Denali, and assisted with fire research projects at both sites. Two fire ecologists in bright, lime-yellow rain suits, monitor the impacts of multiple fires. Monitoring Glacial Lake Outburst Floods in Alaska Check out this story map about monitoring glacial lake outbursts in Alaska. Bear Lake at the end of Bear Glacier. Aurora Borealis: A Brief Overview A brief overview of how Northern Lights occur. two ribbons of greenish light in a dark blue sky, over a very dark forest Practice Safe Bear Spray Use Proper behavior in bear country and understanding bear behavior can help to avoid dangerous situations for people and bears. Bear spray should be used as a last line of defense when dealing with bears- not immediately upon seeing one. This introduction will help cover bear behaviors as well as safe use of bear pepper spray. A black bear stands on a wooden bench. Hunting and Subsistence Use of Dall Sheep Learn about the two ways humans harvest sheep - for subsistence use and in sport hunting. a male sheep Small Mammals as Indicators of Climate, Biodiversity, and Ecosystem Change This is a time of rapid environmental changes in Alaska. Species that have evolved within tundra habitats over multiple glacial cycles are not only best adapted to high-latitude and high-elevation environments, but may also respond more slowly to change. Studies of small mammal communities could provide valuable insights to larger ecosystem changes. two marmots perched atop a large boulder POET Newsletter March 2013 Pacific Ocean Education Team (POET) newsletter from March 2013. Articles include: The Japan Tsunami Marine Debris Summary; Restoring "Plastic Beach" Back to Kamilo Point; Coming to a Beach Near You; and An Unexpected Visitor. dock on beach Wolverines Wolverine. The name alone stirs up visions of northern wilderness. Wolverines belong to the mustelidae family along with weasels, mink, marten, and otters. The family mustelidae makes up most of the order Carnivora (carnivores). a wolverine on a snow-covered river digging at something partially buried 2019 Science Education Grants The Murie Science and Learning Center (MSLC) funds numerous outreach projects through the Science Education Grant program. These grants help MSLC partner parks pay for science education outreach projects. Funding for the Science Education grant program is provided by Alaska Geographic. Read about the 2019 Science Education Grant recipients and their outreach projects. a park ranger and kids standing in shallow lake water National Park Getaway: Wrangell-St. Elias National Park & Preserve Discover adventure on a grand scale at Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve. It's hard to picture a more perfect Alaska wilderness. Filled with mountains, glaciers, and wild rivers, Wrangell-St. Elias is bigger than the states of Vermont, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island combined! With more than 13 million acres, this is our nation's largest national park. Backpacker in a mountainous wilderness Bat Projects in Parks: Alaska Region Parks Bats in Alaska? Find out! A scenic view of Alaska, mountains in the distance and a grizzly in front of a lake in the front. Physical Hazards Abatement: "Look but Don’t Touch & Stay Out, Stay Alive" Given the historical significance of many mining areas, explosives management and mine closure efforts have been coordinated closely with cultural and natural resource managers to identify the best approaches for mitigating often extreme hazards and protecting public and employee safety with cultural sensitivity. A pile of old, abandoned explosives are left on the ground. Abandoned Mineral Land Restoration Activities in Alaska The National Park Service has had an ongoing Abandoned Mineral Land restoration program (AML) since the 1990s. Many mined areas remain to be restored and made safe for public use. A Brief History of Coastal Marine Grant Projects This issue of Alaska Park Science highlights projects funded by the Coastal Marine Grant Program administered by the Ocean Alaska Science and Learning Center. a large tidewater glacier nearly closing off a fjord Logan Hovis Logan Hovis was a Mining Historian and Blasting Officer for the National Park Service for 27 years, recently retiring in 2012. His role was part of the NPS effort to identify, prioritize, and mitigate potential physical hazards associated with historic mines on Alaska landscapes. A man in a red helmet stands with one hand on his hip and one hand against a rock face. Michael J. Heney: The Irish Prince The Klondike Gold Rush (1897-1898) sparked an influx of fortune seekers to the Canadian interior. Transportation systems were quickly developed to aid the movement of new arrivals and goods over the rugged terrain. Michael J. Heney, also known as the "Irish Prince," was responsible for authorizing and supervising construction of successful railroad routes in Alaska. A group of workers pose beside railroad ties on an incomplete section of railroad. Fire Ecology 2018 Annual Report Summary, Monitoring & Inventory During the 2018 field season, the NPS Alaska fire ecology program conducted monitoring in Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve. This article provides a brief summary about the Yukon-Charley Rivers results, research projects, and fire ecology program activities. Lichens growing toward the sun years after a wildfire. 2018 Science Education Grants The Murie Science and Learning Center (MSLC) funds numerous outreach projects through the Science Education Grant program. These grants help MSLC partner parks pay for science education outreach projects. Funding for the Science Education grant program is provided by Alaska Geographic. Read about the 2018 Science Education Grant recipients and their outreach projects. an instructor and a camper work on a carving Fire Ecology Annual Report 2016 - Communicating Results Communicating results of projects or research is an important aspect the fire ecology program in order to provide information and outreach to fire managers, park staff, and the public. Students in the North for Science program measuring an unburned plot. The Fate of Permafrost At present, permafrost is continuous in Arctic parks and discontinuous in Denali and Wrangell St.-Elias national parks and preserves. We expect the distribution of permafrost will still be continuous in Arctic parks by the 2050s; however, it is very likely that the distribution of permafrost in Denali and Wrangell-St. Elias will become sporadic by then. a person standing next to an eroded hillside Influence of Climate Change on Geohazards in Alaskan Parks Alaska’s parks are dynamic and are undergoing constant geomorphic change as glaciers and streams erode and cliffs collapse. Based on climate projec-tions, some permafrost in Alaska will thaw, and many glaciers will thin and retreat, over the remainder of this century, uncovering potentially unstable valley walls. Both permafrost thaw and glacier thinning will contribute to an increase in the incidence of landslides. mountain with its base eroded away 2017 Science Education Grants The Murie Science and Learning Center (MSLC) funds numerous outreach projects through the Science Education Grant program. These grants help MSLC partner parks pay for science education outreach projects. Funding for the Science Education grant program is provided by Alaska Geographic. Read about the 2017 Science Education Grant recipients and their outreach projects. two girls sit in a kayak out on the water 2015 Microgrant Recipients The Murie Science and Learning Center (MSLC) funds numerous outreach projects through the Microgrant program. These grants help MSLC partner parks pay for science education outreach projects. Funding for the Microgrant program is provided by Alaska Geographic. Read about the 2015 Microgrant recipients and their outreach projects. Students kneel in a wetland and examine a net Judy Putera - Wildlife Biologist Judy Putera is a wildlife biologist with Wrangell-St Elias National Park and Preserve and conducts wildlife monitoring for the Central Alaska Network. Judy stands by a helicopter on a break doing winter caribou surveys. Identifying Fish Presence by their eDNA Read the abstract and get the link for an article on the use of eDNA: Menning, D., T. Simmons, and S. Talbot. 2018. Using redundant primer sets to detect multiple native Alaskan fish species from environmental DNA. Conservation Genetics Resources https://doi.org/10.1007/s12686-018-1071-7. scientist collects data near a stream Wrangell-St. Elias Coloring Activity Check out our coloring pages sketched by Alaskan Artist Jona Van Zyle. Wrangell-St. Elias hosted renowned Alaskan Artists, Jon and Jona Van Zyle in 2006 as Artists-In-Residence. Jona's beautiful drawings reflect her passion for wild places like Wrangell-St. Elias. You can be creative and learn more about Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve by downloading and coloring these beautiful drawings. animals in nature with birds, caribou and bear by a stream with mountains in distance How Bald Eagles on the Copper River respond to temperature and salmon abundance Read the abstract and link to a paper published in Oecologia on the effects of salmon and spring weather on bald eagle nesting success: Schmidt, J. H., J. Putera, and T. L. Wilson. 2019. Direct and indirect effects of temperature and prey abundance on bald eagle reproductive dynamics. Oecologia An eagle carrying a fish back to a nest on a rock ledge. Why Glaciers Collapse Read the abstract and link to an article that explores the drivers of glacier collapse: Jacquemart, M., M. Loso, M. Leopold, E. Welty, E. Berthier, J. S. S. Hansen, J. Sykes, and K. Tiampo. 2020. What drives large-scale glacier detachments? Insights from Flat Creek glacier, St. Elias Mountains, Alaska. Geology. A researcher walks down the tundra to a large river valley scarred from a landslide. Catastrophic Glacier Collapse and Debris Flow at Flat Creek Debris flows are common events in mountainous regions. At Flat Creek, we expected to find a very large debris flow or landslide. Instead, we found that an entire glacier had spontaneously detached off the mountainside, sending millions of cubic yards of ice and debris shooting down the valley in two catastrophic mass flows. Almost six years later, we are only just starting to piece together what actually happened. Alaska Park Science 18(1):2019. View from a plane window of a massive debris flow. The 2015 Taan Fiord Landslide and Tsunami On October 17, 2015, 180 million tons of rock slid into Taan Fiord generating a tsunami that stripped forest from 8 square miles and reached as high as 633 feet above the fjord, the fourth-highest tsunami ever recorded. Luckily, no one was near enough to be harmed. Cracking and shifting of the mountain for decades before the landslide could have provided warning, and similar conditions exist elsewhere in Alaska parks. Alaska Park Science 18(1):2019. A man stands by a very large rock deposited by a landslide. McCarthy Creek Airstrip The 35 acre landscape of McCarthy Creek Airstrip was significant to the development of aviation and air travel in the eastern region of Alaska. It played a vital role in the development of the Chitina and Copper River Valley by serving as a focal point for initial flights. It also maintained an important link between the region and the port cities of Valdez and Cordova, and supplied local mines and miners with reliable transportation, mail, and supplies. Historic Photo of McCarthy Creek Airstrip Collared Pika Collared pikas are small mammals within the same order as rabbits and hares, and they resemble small rabbits with very short ears and small limbs. Adapted to thrive at high elevations in Alaska, their habitat is at risk -- climate change may drastically change the fragile environment in which they live. tiny gray rabbit-like creature sitting on a rock Arctic Ground Squirrel The largest of the North American ground squirrels, arctic ground squirrels are burrowing rodents that resemble prairie dogs, with small ears, a flat tail, and a white-spotted back. They are very common throughout much of Denali and live mainly in the alpine tundra. two ground squirrels Dall Sheep Dall sheep are unmistakable, looking like pure-white bighorn sheep. Like bighorn sheep, they have large, curled horns, but Dall sheep horns are longer and skinnier than their southern counterparts. They inhabit mountain ranges in Alaska and Canada and are often visible from quite far away. Close up of sheep face and horns Bison Conservation Initiative The 2008 BCI has been a touchstone for DOI bureaus for 12 years. The commitments made there have now resulted in meaningful technical products and organizational improvements that continue to advance the conservation of American bison. The Bison Working Group, established as a mechanism for implementing the 2008 BCI, quickly became a productive model of interagency collaboration. Federal professionals working in support of bison conservation note that today we enjoy an ... Bison Conservation Initiative Hoary Marmot Hoary marmots are large rodents that live mainly in alpine areas. Their loud, clear warning calls are a common sound in mountainous regions. closeup of a marmot baby Bone and Copper Arrows Found in Melting Ice Patches Read the abstract and get the link to an article published in the Journal of Glacial Archaeology on new artifacts found in ice patches in the St Elias Mountains: Thomas, C. D., P. G. Hare, J. D. Reuther, J. S. Rogers, H. K. Cooper, and E. J. Dixon. 2020. Yukon First Nation use of copper for end-blades on hunting arrows. Journal of Glacial Archaeology (2016):109-131. Two images showing antler and copper arrow blades. Understanding what Drives Plant Diversity in Alaska Read the abstract and get the link to a peer-reviewed article on the environmental conditions that impact plant diversity in Alaska: Roland, Carl A., Giancarlo Sadoti, E. Fleur Nicklen, Stephanie A. McAfee, and Sarah E. Stehn. 2019. A structural equation model linking past and present plant diversity in Alaska: A framework for evaluating future change. Ecosphere 10(8): e02832. An infographic showing the relationships between plant diversity, climate, and physical factors. Harmful Algal Toxins in Alaska's Seabirds and Marine Mammals Seabirds and marine mammals along Alaska's coastline have been experiencing unusually large and consistent die-offs for the past several years, in conjunction with warming ocean temperatures. Researchers want to know if harmful algal blooms, typically associated with warmer climates, are playing a role in these deaths. A researcher examines a dead glaucus gull on a beach. Prey Pulses in a Marine Environment Forage fish serve an important role in our marine environment; these fish serve as prey for many fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. whale fluke in water Population Viability Study This study confirms that management of DOI bison herds in isolation promotes the loss of genetic diversity within all herds. More importantly, this study demonstrates that increased herd size and targeted removal strategies can reduce rates of diversity loss, and that adopting a Departmental metapopulation strategy through facilitated periodic movement of modest numbers of bison among DOI herds (i.e., restoring effective gene flow) can substantially reduce the... Bison Population Viability Study Weather Impacts on Dall's Sheep Read the abstract and link to a recent paper in Ecosphere on Dall's sheep population impacts from weather events: Rattenbury, K. L., J. H. Schmidt, D. K. Swanson, B. L. Borg, B. A. Mangipane, and P. J. Sousanes. 2018. Delayed spring onset drives declines in abundance and recruitment in a mountain ungulate. Ecosphere 9(11):e02513. 10.1002/ecs2.2513 Dalls sheep lambs and ewes on a rock cliff. Research Fellowship Recipients (2015) Learn about 2015 Research Fellowship recipients a man sitting in a forest Research Fellowship Recipients: 2011 Learn about 2011 research fellowship recipients. Research Fellowship Recipients: 2008 Learn about 2008 fellowship recipients Monitoring Seasonal and Long-term Climate Changes and Extremes in the Central Alaska Network Climate is a primary driver of ecological change and an important component of the Central Alaska Inventory and Monitoring Network (CAKN). By monitoring seasonal and long-term climate patterns in the region, we can correlate climate changes and extremes to other variations in the ecosystem, such as changes in permafrost extent or vegetation composition. rain squall over a mountain landscape Climate-related Vegetation Changes in the Subarctic The vast landscapes of interior Alaska are changing: Large glaciers are melting and rapidly receding up valleys, ancient permafrost is degrading and turning frozen soils into soupy gelatin, woody vegetation is spreading dramatically into open areas, and boreal ponds and wetlands are shrinking. composite of two aerial images of a river, with one containing substantially more trees in the image Beringia from a Cretaceous Perspective This article explores fossils and rocks found in the Beringia region and what can be learned from these discoveries. The content and makeup of these rocks and fossils are discussed which leads to drawing conclusions on the ecosystem in Beringia. Map of Beringia with NPS units highlighted in green. The Social Structure of Dall Sheep Dall sheep employ a sophisticated social structure. A ewe and two lambs stand on a rocky cliff Tracking Mineral and Energy Development Projects near Alaska Parks through Web Mapping Visitors flock to places like Glacier Bay to experience a connection with the landscape. Early visitors to the state also discovered gold and other resources, development of these which helped shape modern Alaska. A careful balance between conservation and resource development continues today. Visual mapping allows land managers, visitors, and the public to more easily understand the type, scale, and scope of resource development adjacent to parks. aerial view of a dirt road and equpiment in a tree-less landscape Monitoring Dall Sheep Discovery how and why scientists monitor Dall sheep in national parks throughout Alaska. A group of three dall sheep walk down a dirt road Dall Sheep and Climate Change How might climate change impact the world's northernmost wild sheep population? ewe and lamb on a rocky outcropping Shallow Lakes - Microcosms of Change Changes in shallow lakes throughout central Alaska illustrate the effects of our rapidly changing climate. brush-lined lake reflecting a distant mountain Moose Surveys Science Summary (2012) - By estimating moose numbers, wildlife managers can understand if the local population of animals can be considered 'natural and healthy.' The information is also used in crafting hunting regulations. Moose populations also indicate the biological integrity of an area. a moose cow and calf in brush What Future for the Wildness of Wilderness in the Anthropocene? Visionary as it was, the Wilderness Act did not anticipate today’s human-driven, global-scale changes. The idea of preserving wild lands challenges us with the irony that such places, untouched by humans, will only continue through our will to keep them that way. A resolute human purpose is needed to maintain the decision to have areas that are free of human purpose. aerial view of wolves moving single-file through a snowy forest Using Ethics Arguments to Preserve Naturalness: A Case Study of Wildlife Harvest Practices on NPS Lands in Alaska The NPS responsibility to maintain natural wildlife populations is inherently challenging. For example, many animals migrate out of parks either seasonally or long-term. Typically, we collect and analyze data, and then publish our work. However, the answer rarely, if ever, lies solely in the data. Often the question is not even one of biology, but one of values. In these cases, nonscientific tools such as rigorous and transparent argument analyses are appropriate. bear eating a fish in shallow water Whispers Wispy and Wishful Wilson Justin's emotional and haunting recollection of a blissful childhood growing up in the wilderness near the Nabesna Road, eroded by the present-day pain of a changing landscape and the pressures of modern life. dirt road leading through forest toward distant mountains Research Fellowship Recipients: 2012 Learn about 2012 Research Fellowship recipients woman in a red shirt and white hat Research Fellowship Recipients | 2014 Learn about 2014 Research Fellowship recipients. woman kneeling in water Sea Kayaking in Wrangell – St Elias National Park and Preserve By kayak, on your own or on a guided trip, you can use your own power to explore the rugged, yet beautiful bay and its mountain views. You can paddle through the frigid waters that are home to Steller sea lions, orcas, numerous seabirds, and many other animals. Create Your Own Park Logo or Arrowhead Create Your Own Park Logo or Arrowhead - Wrangell St Elias National Park & Preserve Wrangell St Elias logo with river and mountain lines Conserving pinnipeds in Pacific Ocean parks in response to climate change The evolutionary record from previous climate perturbations indicates that marine mammals are highly vulnerable but also remarkably adaptable to climatic change in coastal ecosystems. Consequently, national parks in the Pacific, from Alaska to Hawaii, are faced with potentially dramatic changes in their marine mammal fauna, especially pinnipeds (seals and sea lions). black harbor seal Aviation and Cultural Landscapes of Alaska Aviation history is not just about looking to what happened in the sky. Since the early days of flight, airstrips have been essential to transportation into the remote parts of Alaska. These airstrips represent the shared practices and lifestyles that connect people in rugged places like Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve. Today, these cultural landscapes contain features like cabins, airstrips, hangers, mail shacks, and planes, and some continue to be used. A cleared air strip cuts path through a forstwith East Meets West: Active Fuels Management Collaboration in Wrangell-St. Elias This summer, the Alaska NPS Eastern and Western Area fire management programs worked together to protect the Wrangell-St. Elias National Park headquarters and visitor center from wildfire. The combined crew of nine men and women completed thinning and limbing trees and hauled off woody debris. In addition, the crews were prepared to respond to fires over the warm 4th of July weekend. Two wildland firefighters use chainsaws to cut evergreen trees. National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Alaska Aviation Safety In Alaska, small planes are often the best way to get around but flying has its risks. Aviation safety requires more than just a pilot’s skill–it takes all of us. Learn more about aviation to increase the safety of your next park flight. An NPS pilot in a plane cockpit flying over a turquoise lake The 19th Amendment, Elizabeth Peratrovich, and the Ongoing Fight for Equal Rights In Alaska, women's suffrage passed in 1913—seven years prior to the 19th Amendment—and antidiscrimination legislation passed nearly 20 years prior to the major national civil rights bills of the 1960s. In the 1940s, Elizabeth Peratrovich—a Tlingit woman who was Grand President of the Alaska Native Sisterhood—led the charge to end discrimination against Alaska Natives. gold coin of a raven, a woman's face, and words elizabeth peratrovich anti-discrimination law The Day it Rained Rocks An interdisciplinary team of researchers studies one of the most massive landslide/tsunamis on record in the hopes of increasing understanding of these large-scale events. Photo: Ground Truth Trekking Two geologists looking at landslide deposits Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 16 Issue: Science in Alaska's Arctic Parks The National Park Service manages five parks that fall partially or entirely within the Arctic tundra biome. These five parks encompass 19.3 million acres of land and constitute approximately 25% of the land area managed by the National Park Service nationwide. These are undeveloped places, with free-flowing rivers and wilderness at a massive scale. a group of muskox running across a field Series: Dall Sheep in Alaska's National Parks Discover the importance of Dall Sheep in Alaska's National Parks Two sheep rest on a snowy mountain Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 12 Issue 2: Climate Change in Alaska's National Parks In this issue: * Status and Trends of Alaska National Park Glaciers * Tracking Glacial Landscapes: High School Science Gets Real * Climate Change Scenario Planning Lessons from Alaska a hillside overlooking a wide valley filled by a glacier, surrounded by steep mountains Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 13 Issue 2: Mineral and Energy Development There’s no denying that energy and mineral extraction have been and will continue to be important across the North for a long time. Mining and energy-related industries provide direct and indirect employment for thousands of people, taxes and other revenues. Our need is for science, engineering, and scholarly research; to develop safe, effective, and affordable technologies; to protect, preserve, and restore the natural and human environment; and to record and communicate our history. aerial view of buildings and a pier sticking out into the ocean Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 13 Issue 1: Wilderness in Alaska This issue includes: * Economics of Wilderness * Using Ethics Arguments to Preserve Naturalness * Busing Through the Wilderness: "Near-Wilderness" Experiences in Denali ... and more! mountains reflecting into a calm lake, the words 'alaska park science' Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 15 Issue 1: Coastal Research Science in Alaska's National Parks This issue focuses on studies occurring in coastal areas throughout national parks in Alaska. Articles include a variety of studies on arctic coastal lagoons, background on a large research project studying coastal brown bears, and more. a brown bear investigating a clam on a beach Series: Denali Fact Sheets: Biology Discover the secret lives of animals in Denali! a beaver Series: The Legacy of ANILCA The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act impacts the National Park Service in many ways. ANILCA stipulates the designation of wilderness, subsistence management, transportation in and across parklands, use of cabins, mining, archaeological sites, scientific research studies and more. Two men drag a harvest seal from icy blue waters across frozen ice. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Mesozoic Era The Mesozoic Era (251.9 to 66 million years ago) was the "Age of Reptiles." During the Mesozoic, Pangaea began separating into the modern continents, and the modern Rocky Mountains rose. Dinosaurs, crocodiles, and pterosaurs ruled the land and air. As climate changed and rapid plate tectonics resulted in shallow ocean basins, sea levels rose world-wide and seas expanded across the center of North America. fossil dinosaur skull in rock face Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: Copper River Basin Symposium - Wrangell-St Elias National Park and Preserve February 2020: With a theme of Tradition, Science, and Stewardship, the two-day symposium included keynote speakers, 26 short presentations, and a poster session. A panel discussion delved into opportunities in working with indigenous communities. Ahtna elders provided wisdom in daily welcomes, and there was a presentation by Copper River Stewardship Youth. Topics ranged widely from fisheries to archaeology to geology. As well as sharing knowledge, participants shared meals, stories, and ideas. Copper River Basin Symposium logo by Lindsay and Elvie Series: Wildlife in the Badlands Ever wonder what kind of wildlife could survive the harsh climate of the Badlands? Two small, grey young lambs walk down brown badlands slope. Series: Research in Badlands National Park Scientists often look to the Badlands as a research subject. Many studies have been conducted in the park on a variety of topics, including paleontology, geology, biology, and archaeology. Learn more about these research topics in this article series. two researchers converse over a sheet of paper while a woman to their right uses a microscope. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Alaska Park Science, Volume 18, Issue 1, Understanding and Preparing for Alaska's Geohazards Alaska is the most geologically active part of North America. Much of the awe-inspiring landscapes of Alaska's parks are created by geologic processes. But sometimes, these processes can be hazardous. This issue explores the state of the science to understand geohazards in Alaska national parks. Alaska Park Science 18(1): 2019. A man jumps down a dune of volcanic ash. Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 6 Issue 2: Crossing Boundaries in a Changing Environment This issue covers the proceedings of the Central Alaska Park Science Symposium, held in Denali National Park. Topics include climate change monitoring, landscape and wildlife ecology, physical sciences, fisheries, subsistence, and using science as a tool for park management. person in a canoe on a misty lake Series: NPS Alaska Region Fire Ecology Annual Report for 2017 The Alaska Region Fire Ecology Annual Report for 2017 offers a summary of the fire season, monitoring and inventories utilized, the methods and how information and outreach was used to communicate the results for the year. Smoke rises from the Trout Creek Fire over the Yukon River (July 2017) Series: National Park Service Alaska Region Fire Ecology Annual Report Calendar Year 2016 This series offers the summary of the 2016 fire season, inventory and monitoring projects in both Denali and Wrangell-St. Elias National Parks and Preserves, the research and technology involved, and the communication of results. Fire ecologists, wearing bright yellow-lime rain suits, monitor fire impacts in Denali. Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 12 Issue 1: Science, History, and Alaska's Changing Landscapes Science, history and Alaska's changing landscapes. In this issue: * Life and Times of Alaska’s Tundra Plants * Silurian Rocks at Glacier Bay * Using Story to Build Stewardship wide, tree-less valley leading up to a rounded mountain Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 9 Issue 1: Monitoring the "Vital Signs" of Healthy Park Ecosystems This issue explores the "vital signs" of parks. The National Park Service's Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) Network studies broad ecological trends throughout parks, and uses those trends, or vital signs, to gauge the health of a park's ecosystem. man standing in a shallow creek Series: Alaska Park Science: Volume 8, Issue 2: Park Science in the Arctic This symposium, the third in a series focused on science and scholarship in and around Alaska’s national parks, is a joint effort with the Beringia Days International Conference. Our theme “Park Science in the Arctic – the Natural and Cultural Heritage of Greater Beringia” is focused on very special places deliberately set aside by nations to preserve their exceptional, natural, cultural, historic, and inspirational significance. dozens of sled dogs curled up in snow near a handful of people talking to each other Consider the source: How to build better ecological models Read the abstract and get the link to a peer-reviewed article on the use of climate models in ecological modeling: Sardoti, G., S. A. McAfee, E. F. Nicklen, P. J. Sousanes, and C. A. Roland. 2020. Evaluating multiple historical climate products in ecological models under current and projected temperatures. Ecological Applications 0(0): e2240. A researcher walks along a steep talus slope. Permian Period—298.9 to 251.9 MYA The massive cliffs of El Capitan in Guadalupe Mountains National Park represent a Permian-age reef along the supercontinent Pangaea. The uppermost rocks of Grand Canyon National Park are also Permian. flat-top mountain Cretaceous Period—145.0 to 66.0 MYA Many now-arid western parks, including Chaco Culture National Historical Park and Mesa Verde National Park, were inundated by the Cretaceous Interior Seaway that bisected North America. Massive dinosaur and other reptile fossils are found in Cretaceous rocks of Big Bend National Park. dinosaur footprint in stone Triassic Period—251.9 to 201.3 MYA The brightly colored Triassic rocks of Petrified Forest National Park yield not only the petrified trees but many other plant and animal fossils. fossil footprint on stone Jurassic Period—201.3 to 145.0 MYA Dinosaur National Monument is home to thousands of dinosaur fossils making it a true “Jurassic Park.” A vast desert covered Southwest North America in the Jurassic, and ancient sand dunes now form tall cliffs in many parks including Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. dinosaur skull in rock face Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Mesozoic Era The Mesozoic Era (251.9 to 66 million years ago) was the "Age of Reptiles." During the Mesozoic, Pangaea began separating into the modern continents, and the modern Rocky Mountains rose. Dinosaurs, crocodiles, and pterosaurs ruled the land and air. As climate changed and rapid plate tectonics resulted in shallow ocean basins, sea levels rose world-wide and seas expanded across the center of North America. fossil dinosaur skull in rock face Glacier Ice Caves on Root and Kennicott Glaciers within Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve Look inside a glacier on this visit to an Ice Cave in the Root Glacier in America's largest national park. a person entering an ice cave Fire in Ecosystems: Boreal Forest The boreal forest, also called taiga, is the largest forested habitat in the world, making up one third of the earth’s total forested area. In North America, the boreal forest spreads from Alaska, across Canada, and into the Great Lakes region of the United States. Boreal forests have burned naturally for thousands of years creating a variety of landscapes, or mosaic, with young and old trees living on the landscape. Aerial view of flaming front in coniferous trees putting off a lot of smoke. Mapping and Monitoring Landscape Changes Using Structure from Motion from Aircraft Aerial SfM is an accessible tool for mapping and monitoring landscape changes for a wide range of applications and disciplines across parks in Alaska. The success of the Alaska Region aerial SfM system during the first four years of testing and deployment has demonstrated its value to park mangers to address rapidly changing park landscapes. Alaska Park Science 20(1), 2021 A split image showing two different kinds of remote sensing. Using Aquatic Invertebrates to Measure the Health of Stream Ecosystems: New Bioassessment Tools for Alaska’s Parklands Aquatic insects are good indicators of stream ecosystem health because they are common, reasonably well understood, easy to collect and analyze, and sensitive to the environment in which they live. We can determine the relative health of a stream by comparing what insects we find to what we would expect to find in a similar healthy stream. This straightforward approach can be used in all kinds of settings and compared across a region. Alaska Park Science 20(1), 2021 A man stands with an insect collection net with Denali in the background. Making Sound Decisions Using Bioacoustics in Alaska’s National Parks Animals are continuously immersed in acoustic signals. Acoustic recording devices allow us to extend our sense of hearing to remote places, times, and even frequencies we normally cannot access. By studying the sounds animals make, and the sounds in their environment, we can better understand their conservation needs. Presented here are examples from bats, birds, frogs, and whales. Alaska Park Science 20(1), 2021 A man sets up acoustic recording equipment in the backcountry. High-definition Laser Scanning for Documenting Cultural Resources High-definition laser scanning is a recently adopted technology to collect highly accurate and detailed spatial data that can be processed into a three-dimensional digital model. It is a powerful tool to quickly and accurately document historical buildings and sites, which can facilitate conservation and restoration of these cultural resources. Alaska Park Science 20(1), 2021 A scanned image overlaid on a photo. Series: Alaska Park Science Volume 20 Issue 1 - Parks as Proving Grounds Parks in Alaska pose special challenges to researchers: they are large, remote, and less is known about them. This makes it all the more important that tools and techniques we use here are practical, effective, and impactful. While researchers often focus on sharing the findings from their work, here we shine a light on the devices and approaches used by researchers with attention to the innovation needed to work in Alaska. Alaska Park Science 20 (1), 2021 A scientist uses a probe on the top of a mountain. A Tale of Two Spruce Read the abstract and get a link to a recently published paper: Nicklen, E. F., C. A. Roland, R. W. Ruess, T. Scharnweber, and M. Wilmking. 2021. Divergent responses to permafrost and precipitation reveal mechanisms for the spatial variation of two sympatric spruce. Ecosphere 12(7): e03622. A boreal forest landscape. People of the Upper Tanana Visitors to the northern part of Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve may come away with memories of a spectacular mountain wilderness with glacial rivers, snow-covered peaks, elusive wildlife and brightly colored wildflowers. Underlying these spectacular vistas, however, is a land-scape of indigenous human habitation. To the Native peoples of the upper Tanana region, this area is where they and their ancestors lived, traveled, hunted, fished, trapped, and gathered. Upper Tanana WRST article cover image of woman and dog and a map Chief Walter Northway Many different groups of people have traditionally called the area within and around Wrangell-St. Elias their homeland, including the Ahtna and Upper Tanana Athabascans. Collage of Walter Northway and related images Bumble Bees of Alaska: A Field Guide This field guide to bumble bees will help you identify these abundant and conspicuous pollinators, which are found across most of Alaska. They are well-adapted to cold, harsh climates and live in every habitat where there are flowers offering up pollen and nectar, including forests, shrublands, tundra, wetlands, riparian areas, beaches, and gardens. a bumble bee perched on tiny pink flowers How climate changes the timing of wood frog calls Read the abstract and get the link to a published article on what we learned from monitoring the timing of wood frog calls: Larsen, A. S., J. H. Schmidt, H. Stapleton, H. Kristenson, D. Betchkal, and M. F. McKenna. 2021. Monitoring the phenology of the wood frog breeding season using bioacoustic methods. Ecological Indicators 131: 108142. Wood frog. Series: Pacific Ocean Education Team (POET) Newsletters From 2009 to 2015, the Pacific Ocean Education Team published a series of short newsletters about the health of the ocean at various National Park Service sites in and around the Pacific Ocean. Topics covered included the 2010 tsunami, marine debris, sea star wasting disease, ocean acidification, and more. Ocean waves wash in from the right onto a forested and rocky shoreline.
Visitor Guide National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior + The K’ełt’aeni The Official Guide of Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve 2021 Yakutat coast, Alaska Park visitor centers and ranger stations are providing limited services due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Trail and road information, trip-planning assistance, and permits are available via window services (Copper Center, Slana, & Chitina) or Dial-A-Ranger (all locations including Kennecott). See details on page 10. The National Park Service App is the official app for all 420+ national parks. The App including interactive maps, saved data for offline use when in a remote area with no internet service, accessibility, self-guided tours, things to do, where to stay, shareable digital postcards, passport stamp locations, points of interest and operating hours and seasons. Download the official NPS mobile app before your next visit or take a virtual tour of the park. Apple devices Android devices The National Park Service was established on August 25, 1916 “to conserve the scenery and the natural and historic objects and the wildlife. . . and to provide for the enjoyment of the same in such manner and by such means as will leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations.” Authorized by Congress in 1980, Wrangell-St. Elias preserves some of the largest rivers, glaciers, mountains, and wilderness in America. The name of the park newspaper, K’ełt’aeni (kel-TAH-nee), is an Ahtna word for the Wrangell volcano that means “The one that controls the weather.” Superintendent Ben Bobowski Mailing Address PO Box 439 Mile 106.8 Richardson Hwy Copper Center, AK 99573 Visitor Centers & Ranger Stations: Copper Center, Kennecott, Slana, Chitina, Yakutat E-mail wrst_info@nps.gov Park Phone 907-822-5234 Park Website www.nps.gov/wrst Like us on Facebook facebook.com/WrangellSt EliasNPP Tweet us on Twitter twitter.com/WrangellStENPS Follow us on Instagram instagram.com/wrangellstenps Find park images on Flickr flickr.com/photos/wrst View videos on YouTube youtube.com/user/WrangellNPS Youth and people of all ages can become a WrangellSt. Elias National Park & Preserve Junior Ranger. Go online for the Junior Ranger Activity Book. Complete the required sections, state the official pledge and mail the book in to earn your own badge and certificate. Visit the park website at nps.gov/wrst/learn/kidsyouth Information and Services Accessibility Gas Stations Social Media The Visitor Centers at Copper Center, Kennecott and Slana are wheelchair accessible. Gasoline is available in Glennallen, Tazlina, Copper Center, Kenny Lake and Chitina. There is no gas available in Slana or McCarthy. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram and Flickr! Go to www.nps.gov/wrst to view park information. Administration Offices Suspicious Behavior If you have a business-related question or you need to reach a specific employee, please call the park administration offices at 907-822-5234. Grocery Stores There is a grocery store in Glennallen, and convenience stores in Copper Center, Kenny Lake and McCarthy. Please contact a park ranger if you see suspicious or questionable behavior. Do not approach suspicious individuals. Call 911 if threatened or in an emergency. ATMs & Banks Junior Ranger Wi-Fi/Internet ATMs and banking facilities can be found in Glennallen, Kenny Lake, Chitina and McCarthy. Kids of all ages can have fun earning a badge and certificate. A free booklet is available online and at visitor centers. Free wireless internet is available at the visitor centers in Copper Center, Chitina and Slana. Many lodges and private campgrounds provide wireless access. Backcountry Permits Lodging Permits are not required for the backcountry. However, we highly reccommend that you complete a backcountry itinerary form available by email at wrst_backcountry@nps.gov There is private lodging within and around the park. For a list of lodging options, go to the Glennallen Chamber Visitor Center at the intersection of Hwys 1 and 4 in Glennallen. Collecting Pets Some items may be collected including berries, mushrooms, plants, driftwood, seashells, and small rocks. Recreational gold panning is allowed. Items may only be collected for personal use and may not be sold. Items that may NOT be collected are silver, platinum, gemstones, fossils, antlers, horns, cave formations, archeological items, and threatened/ endangered species. Rules may vary for subsistence users. Pets are permitted on trails and in the backcountry. Dogs must be leashed and under control by their owner at all times. Please clean up after your dog. Phones Cell phone coverage is extremely limited. There are phones available for local calls at the Wrangell-St. Elias Visitor Center and Slana Ranger Station, and a pay phone in McCarthy. Entrance Fees There are no entrance fees for the park. We do not sell or issue any interagency passes. Post Office There is a post off

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