Yellowstone

National Park - ID, MT, WY

Yellowstone National Park is a nearly 3,500-sq.-mile wilderness recreation area atop a volcanic hot spot. Mostly in Wyoming, the park spreads into parts of Montana and Idaho too. Yellowstone features dramatic canyons, alpine rivers, lush forests, hot springs and gushing geysers, including its most famous, Old Faithful. It's also home to hundreds of animal species, including bears, wolves, bison, elk and antelope.

location

maps

Official visitor map of Nez Perce National Historical Park (NHP) in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Nez Perce - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Nez Perce National Historical Park (NHP) in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of Yellowstone National Park (NP) in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yellowstone - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Yellowstone National Park (NP) in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Highway Map of Montana. Published by the Montana Department of Transportation.Montana State - Montana Highway Map

Highway Map of Montana. Published by the Montana Department of Transportation.

Map of Seasonal and Year-Round BLM Public Land User Limitations in the BLM Cody Field Office area in Wyoming. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Wyoming Public Land - Cody

Map of Seasonal and Year-Round BLM Public Land User Limitations in the BLM Cody Field Office area in Wyoming. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of McRenolds Reservoir Quadrangle in Idaho and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - ID,WY McRenolds Reservoir 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of McRenolds Reservoir Quadrangle in Idaho and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Rammell Mountain Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Rammell Mountain 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Rammell Mountain Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Ranger Peak Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Ranger Peak 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Ranger Peak Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Colter Bay Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Colter Bay 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Colter Bay Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Two Ocean Lake Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Two Ocean Lake 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Two Ocean Lake Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Whetstone Mountain Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Whetstone Mountain 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Whetstone Mountain Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Gravel Mountain Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Gravel Mountain 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Gravel Mountain Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Sheep Falls Quadrangle in Idaho and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - ID,WY Sheep Falls 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Sheep Falls Quadrangle in Idaho and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Hominy Peak Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Hominy Peak 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Hominy Peak Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Survey Peak Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Survey Peak 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Survey Peak Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Flagg Ranch Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Flagg Ranch 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Flagg Ranch Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Huckleberry Mountain Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Huckleberry Mountain 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Huckleberry Mountain Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Bobcat Ridge Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Bobcat Ridge 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Bobcat Ridge Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Gravel Peak Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Gravel Peak 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Gravel Peak Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Warm River Butte Quadrangle in Fremont County, Idaho. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - ID Warm River Butte 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Warm River Butte Quadrangle in Fremont County, Idaho. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Bechler Falls Quadrangle in Wyoming and Idaho. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY,ID Bechler Falls 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Bechler Falls Quadrangle in Wyoming and Idaho. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Cave Falls Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Cave Falls 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Cave Falls Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Grassy Lake Reservoir Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Grassy Lake Reservoir 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Grassy Lake Reservoir Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Lewis Canyon Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Lewis Canyon 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Lewis Canyon Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Snake Hot Springs Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Snake Hot Springs 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Snake Hot Springs Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Mount Hancock Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Mount Hancock 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Mount Hancock Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Crooked Creek Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Crooked Creek 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Crooked Creek Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Badger Creek Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Badger Creek 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Badger Creek Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of The Trident Quadrangle in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY The Trident 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of The Trident Quadrangle in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Open Creek Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Open Creek 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Open Creek Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Thorofare Buttes Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Open Creek 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Thorofare Buttes Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Big Grassy Quadrangle in Fremont County, Idaho. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - ID Big Grassy 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Big Grassy Quadrangle in Fremont County, Idaho. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Buffalo Lake Quadrangle in Idaho and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - ID,WY Buffalo Lake 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Buffalo Lake Quadrangle in Idaho and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Trischman Knob Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Trischman Knob 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Trischman Knob Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Shoshone Geyser Basin Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Shoshone Geyser Basin 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Shoshone Geyser Basin Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Lewis Falls Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Lewis Falls 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Lewis Falls Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Mount Sheridan Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Mount Sheridan 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Mount Sheridan Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Heart Lake Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Heart Lake 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Heart Lake Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Alder Lake Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Alder Lake 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Alder Lake Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Trail Lake Quadrangle in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Trail Lake 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Trail Lake Quadrangle in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Eagle Peak Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Eagle Peak 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Eagle Peak Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Pinnacle Mountain Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Pinnacle Mountain 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Pinnacle Mountain Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Sheep Mesa Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Sheep Mesa 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Sheep Mesa Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Latham Spring Quadrangle in Idaho and Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - ID,MT Latham Spring 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Latham Spring Quadrangle in Idaho and Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Buffalo Lake NE Quadrangle in Idaho, Wyoming and Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - ID,WY,MT Buffalo Lake NE 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Buffalo Lake NE Quadrangle in Idaho, Wyoming and Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Summit Lake Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Summit Lake 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Summit Lake Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Old Faithful Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Old Faithful 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Old Faithful Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Craig Pass Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Craig Pass 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Craig Pass Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of West Thumb Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY West Thumb 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of West Thumb Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Dot Island Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Dot Island 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Dot Island Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Frank Island Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Frank Island 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Frank Island Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Sylvan Lake Quadrangle in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Sylvan Lake 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Sylvan Lake Quadrangle in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Plenty Coups Peak Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Plenty Coups Peak 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Plenty Coups Peak Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Eagle Creek Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Eagle Creek 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Eagle Creek Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Chimney Rock Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Chimney Rock 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Chimney Rock Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Reas Pass in Idaho and Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - ID,MT Reas Pass 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Reas Pass in Idaho and Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Jack Straw Basin Quadrangle in Montana and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - MT,WY Jack Straw Basin 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Jack Straw Basin Quadrangle in Montana and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Buffalo Meadows Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Buffalo Meadows Peak 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Buffalo Meadows Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Lower Geyser Basin Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Lower Geyser Basin 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Lower Geyser Basin Quadrangle in Teton County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Mary Lake Quadrangle in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Mary Lake 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Mary Lake Quadrangle in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Beach Lake Quadrangle in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Beach Lake 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Beach Lake Quadrangle in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Lake Quadrangle in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Lake 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Lake Quadrangle in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Lake Butte Quadrangle in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Lake Butte 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Lake Butte Quadrangle in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Mount Chittenden Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Mount Chittenden 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Mount Chittenden Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Cathedral Peak Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Cathedral Peak 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Cathedral Peak Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Pahaska Tepee Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Pahaska Tepee 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Pahaska Tepee Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Sunlight Peak Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Sunlight Peak 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Sunlight Peak Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Madison Arm Quadrangle in Montana and Idaho. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - MT,ID Madison Arm 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Madison Arm Quadrangle in Montana and Idaho. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of West Yellowstone Quadrangle in Montana and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - MT,WY West Yellowstone 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of West Yellowstone Quadrangle in Montana and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Mount Jackson Quadrangle in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Mount Jackson 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Mount Jackson Quadrangle in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Madison Junction Quadrangle in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Madison Junction 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Madison Junction Quadrangle in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Norris Junction Quadrangle in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Norris Junction 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Norris Junction Quadrangle in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Crystal Falls Quadrangle in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Crystal Falls 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Crystal Falls Quadrangle in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Canyon Village in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Canyon Village 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Canyon Village in Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of White Lake Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY White Lake 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of White Lake Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Pelican Cone Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Pelican Cone 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Pelican Cone Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Little Saddle Mountain Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Little Saddle Mountain 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Little Saddle Mountain Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Pollux Peak Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Pollux Peak 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Pollux Peak Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Stinkingwater Peak Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Stinkingwater Peak 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Stinkingwater Peak Quadrangle in Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Hebgen Mountain Quadrangle, Gallatin County, Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - MT Hebgen Mountain 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Hebgen Mountain Quadrangle, Gallatin County, Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Richards Creek Quadrangle in Montana and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - MT Richards Creek 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Richards Creek Quadrangle in Montana and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Three Rivers Peak Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Three Rivers Peak 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Three Rivers Peak Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Mount Holmes Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Mount Holmes 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Mount Holmes Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Obsidian Cliff Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Obsidian Cliff 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Obsidian Cliff Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Cook Peak Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Cook Peak 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Cook Peak Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Mount Washburn Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Mount Washburn 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Mount Washburn Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Amethyst Mountain Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Amethyst Mountain 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Amethyst Mountain Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Opal Creek Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Opal Creek 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Opal Creek Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Wahb Springs Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Wahb Springs 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Wahb Springs Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Canoe Lake Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Canoe Lake 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Canoe Lake Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Hurricane Mesa Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Hurricane Mesa 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Hurricane Mesa Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Upper Tepee Basin, Gallatin County, Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - MT Upper Tepee Basin 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Upper Tepee Basin, Gallatin County, Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Divide Lake in Montana and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - MT,WY Divide Lake 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Divide Lake in Montana and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Joseph Peak, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Joseph Peak 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Joseph Peak, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Quadrant Mountain in Wyoming and Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY,MT Quadrant Mountain 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Quadrant Mountain in Wyoming and Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Mammoth Quadrangle in Wyoming and Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY,MT Mammoth Quadrangle 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Mammoth Quadrangle in Wyoming and Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Blacktail Deer Creek in Wyoming and Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY,MT Blacktail Deer Creek Quadrangle 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Blacktail Deer Creek in Wyoming and Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Tower Junction Quadrangle in Wyoming and Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY,MT Tower Junction 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Tower Junction Quadrangle in Wyoming and Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Lamar Canyon Quadrangle in Wyoming and Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY,MT Lamar Canyon 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Lamar Canyon Quadrangle in Wyoming and Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Mount Hornaday Quadrangle in Wyoming and Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY,MT Mount Hornaday 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Mount Hornaday Quadrangle in Wyoming and Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Abiathar Peak Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Abiathar Peak 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Abiathar Peak Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Pilot Peak Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Pilot Peak 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Pilot Peak Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Jim Smith Peak Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - WY Jim Smith Peak 2021

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Jim Smith Peak Quadrangle, Park County, Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Sunshine Point, Gallatin County, Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - MT Sunshine Point 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Sunshine Point, Gallatin County, Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Big Horn Peak in Montana and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - MT,WY Big Horn Peak Lake 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Big Horn Peak in Montana and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Sportsman Lake in Montana and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - MT,WY Sportsman Lake 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Sportsman Lake in Montana and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Electric Peak in Montana and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - MT,WY Electric Peak 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Electric Peak in Montana and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Gardiner, Park County, Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - MT Gardiner 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Gardiner, Park County, Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Ash Mountain, Park County, Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - MT Ash Mountain 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Ash Mountain, Park County, Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Specimen Creek, Park County, Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - MT Specimen Creek 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Specimen Creek, Park County, Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Hummingbird Peak, Park County, Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - MT Hummingbird Peak 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Hummingbird Peak, Park County, Montana. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Roundhead Butte, Park County, Montana and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - MT,WY Roundhead Butte 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Roundhead Butte, Park County, Montana and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Cuttoff Mountain in Montana and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - MT,WY Cuttoff Mountain 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Cuttoff Mountain in Montana and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Cuttoff Mountain in Montana and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - MT,WY Cooke City 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Cuttoff Mountain in Montana and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Fossil Lake in Montana and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - MT,WY Fossil Lake 2020

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Fossil Lake in Montana and Wyoming. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

brochures

The Fall edition of the Yellowstone Visitor Guide for Yellowstone National Park (NP) in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yellowstone Guide - Fall 2022

The Fall edition of the Yellowstone Visitor Guide for Yellowstone National Park (NP) in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Historic flooding in mid-June caused major damage to roads, bridges, and infrastructure in northern Yellowstone. This Gate Flyer for the June 22 Re-opening has information about current travel restrictions for Yellowstone National Park (NP) in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yellowstone Guide - June 22 Re-opening

Historic flooding in mid-June caused major damage to roads, bridges, and infrastructure in northern Yellowstone. This Gate Flyer for the June 22 Re-opening has information about current travel restrictions for Yellowstone National Park (NP) in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

The Summer edition of the Yellowstone Visitor Guide for Yellowstone National Park (NP) in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yellowstone Guide - Summer 2022

The Summer edition of the Yellowstone Visitor Guide for Yellowstone National Park (NP) in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

The 150th Anniversary Visitor Guide Insert for Yellowstone National Park (NP) in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yellowstone Guide - 150th Anniversary Visitor Guide Insert

The 150th Anniversary Visitor Guide Insert for Yellowstone National Park (NP) in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

The Spring edition of the Yellowstone Visitor Guide for Yellowstone National Park (NP) in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yellowstone Guide - Spring 2022

The Spring edition of the Yellowstone Visitor Guide for Yellowstone National Park (NP) in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

The Winter edition of the Yellowstone Visitor Guide for Yellowstone National Park (NP) in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yellowstone Guide - Winter 2021/2022

The Winter edition of the Yellowstone Visitor Guide for Yellowstone National Park (NP) in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Yellowstone Resources and Issues Handbook. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yellowstone Handbook 2019 - Complete Guide

Yellowstone Resources and Issues Handbook. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Yellowstone Resources and Issues Handbook. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yellowstone Handbook 2019 - Table of Contents

Yellowstone Resources and Issues Handbook. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Yellowstone Resources and Issues Handbook. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yellowstone Handbook 2019 - Welcome, Park Facts, and Frequently Asked Questions

Yellowstone Resources and Issues Handbook. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Yellowstone Resources and Issues Handbook. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yellowstone Handbook 2019 - History of the Park

Yellowstone Resources and Issues Handbook. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Yellowstone Resources and Issues Handbook. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yellowstone Handbook 2019 - Preserving Cultural Resources

Yellowstone Resources and Issues Handbook. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Yellowstone Resources and Issues Handbook. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yellowstone Handbook 2019 - Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

Yellowstone Resources and Issues Handbook. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Yellowstone Resources and Issues Handbook. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yellowstone Handbook 2019 - Geology

Yellowstone Resources and Issues Handbook. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Yellowstone Resources and Issues Handbook. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yellowstone Handbook 2019 - Life in Extreme Heat

Yellowstone Resources and Issues Handbook. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Yellowstone Resources and Issues Handbook. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yellowstone Handbook 2019 - Vegetation

Yellowstone Resources and Issues Handbook. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Yellowstone Resources and Issues Handbook. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yellowstone Handbook 2019 - Fire

Yellowstone Resources and Issues Handbook. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Yellowstone Resources and Issues Handbook. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yellowstone Handbook 2019 - Wildlife - Mammals

Yellowstone Resources and Issues Handbook. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Yellowstone Resources and Issues Handbook. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yellowstone Handbook 2019 - Wildlife - Birds, Aquatic Species, Reptiles, and Amphibians

Yellowstone Resources and Issues Handbook. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Backcountry Trip Planner --  The most important publication for anyone planning to camp in the backcountry --. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Backcountry - Backcountry Trip Planner

Backcountry Trip Planner -- The most important publication for anyone planning to camp in the backcountry --. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Beyond Roads End provides regulations and guidelines for backcountry travel in Yellowstone. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Backcountry - Beyond Roads End

Beyond Roads End provides regulations and guidelines for backcountry travel in Yellowstone. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Booklet on boating regulations and safety in Yellowstone National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Backcountry - Boating Regulations

Booklet on boating regulations and safety in Yellowstone National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Tear-Off Maps for Yellowstone National Park (NP) and Grand Teton National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Backcountry - Yellowstone and Grand Teton Tear-Off Maps

Tear-Off Maps for Yellowstone National Park (NP) and Grand Teton National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Yellowstone National Park’s "Natural Resource Vital Signs" report is a valuable tool used to assist park managers and scientists more fully understand the status of important indicators of resource condition. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Nature - Vital Signs and Select Park Resources 2017

Yellowstone National Park’s "Natural Resource Vital Signs" report is a valuable tool used to assist park managers and scientists more fully understand the status of important indicators of resource condition. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Yellowstone Grizzly Bears: Ecology and Conservation of an Icon of Wildness. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Nature - Grizzly Bears

Yellowstone Grizzly Bears: Ecology and Conservation of an Icon of Wildness. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Yellowstone Bison: Conserving an American Icon in Modern Society. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Nature - Bisons

Yellowstone Bison: Conserving an American Icon in Modern Society. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Yellowstone Bird Project - Annual Report 2018. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Nature - Birds

Yellowstone Bird Project - Annual Report 2018. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/yell https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellowstone_National_Park Yellowstone National Park is a nearly 3,500-sq.-mile wilderness recreation area atop a volcanic hot spot. Mostly in Wyoming, the park spreads into parts of Montana and Idaho too. Yellowstone features dramatic canyons, alpine rivers, lush forests, hot springs and gushing geysers, including its most famous, Old Faithful. It's also home to hundreds of animal species, including bears, wolves, bison, elk and antelope. On March 1, 1872, Yellowstone became the first national park for all to enjoy the unique hydrothermal wonders. Today, millions of people come here each year to camp, hike, and enjoy the majesty of the park. Yellowstone National Park covers nearly 3,500 square miles in the northwest corner of Wyoming (3% of the park is in Montana and 1% is in Idaho). Yellowstone has five entrance stations, and several are closed to regular vehicles during winter. It takes many hours to drive between these entrances, so be sure to check the status of roads at the entrance you intend to use while planning your trip and before you arrive. Albright Visitor Center Here you can gather park information, orient yourself to the rest of the park (including road conditions, and campground and lodge availability), shop for souvenirs, explore exhibits to learn more about the wildlife and history of Yellowstone, join a ranger program, acquire a permit for fishing or backcountry camping at the backcountry office in the basement, or use the restrooms. This visitor center also has free Wi-Fi. The Albright Visitor Center is located at Mammoth Hot Springs, five miles south of the North Entrance at the northern part of the upper loop of the Grand Loop Road. It is housed in one of the old stone buildings of Fort Yellowstone, a US Army fort built during the early days of the national park. Canyon Visitor Education Center Stop by the Canyon Visitor Education Center to learn more about the geologic story of the area, including the Yellowstone volcano, and view a room-size relief map of Yellowstone. You can also get orientation information, pick up a fishing permit, shop for a souvenir, find out what ranger programs are available, watch a 20-minute film, or use the restrooms. Restrooms are available 24 hours a day. The Canyon Visitor Education Center is located in the Canyon Village complex near the center of the Grand Loop Road system. It can be accessed from three different directions. Fishing Bridge Visitor Center and Trailside Museum The distinctive stone-and-log architecture of this old building—known as "parkitecture"—was one of several prototypes for park buildings around the country. Today, the visitor center and museum highlight the ecology of Yellowstone Lake, focusing on birds. Also stop by to visit with a ranger and find out when ranger programs are scheduled, buy a fishing permit, pick up a souvenir, or take in some truly stunning views of Yellowstone Lake and the surrounding mountains. Fishing Bridge Museum is situated near the north shore of Yellowstone Lake on the East Entrance Road. It can be accessed from the east and west directions. Grant Visitor Center Fire plays an important, natural role in the ecosystems found in Yellowstone National Park and the surrounding region. Learn more about this and the fires of 1988 in the exhibit hall, gather park information and trip ideas, shop for souvenirs at the park store, join a ranger program, buy a fishing, boating, or backcountry camping permit at the backcountry office next door, or use the restrooms. Grant Visitor Center is located on the western shore of Yellowstone Lake, a short distance south of the West Thumb Geyser Basin. There are two directions from which to access Grant Village. Madison Information Station and Trailside Museum Located about halfway between Old Faithful and West Yellowstone, you can stop here for park information as visitors have been doing since 1930. The structure is an example of "parkitecture" or designing a building in a way that reflects the surrounding ecosystem. You can also shop for souvenirs in the park store, attend a ranger program, purchase a fishing permit, or use the restrooms. Located just south of Madison Junction. Madison can be reached from two different directions, so check your map carefully before driving. Museum of the National Park Ranger Once a US Army outpost built in 1908, this visitor center houses exhibits that celebrate the history of the park ranger profession. To enhance the story of the park ranger experience, this visitor center is staffed by volunteer retired rangers. The current structure replaced previous structures dating back to 1884. Located off the Grand Loop Road at the entrance to Norris Campground. Norris Geyser Basin Museum and Information Station Situated on the ridge overlooking the Norris Geyser Basin, this historic building is staffed during the summer with rangers who provide park information and facilitate ranger programs. Visitors have been seeking information here since 1930 when the museum was built as a "trailside museum" to serve people traveling in their own automobiles without a guide. Restrooms are located in the parking lot. The Norris Geyser Basin Museum is located 1/4-mile west of Norris Junction just off the Grand Loop Road. It can be accessed from three directions so check a map carefully before planning your trip. Old Faithful Visitor Education Center Located near Old Faithful Geyser, this visitor center offers views of the geyser's eruption from the tall, windowed front of the visitor center. Additionally, you can gather park information, talk with a park ranger at the front desk, shop for souvenirs in the park store, delve into the natural wonders of Yellowstone in the exhibit hall, join a ranger program, or use the restrooms. Located in the Upper Geyser Basin, Old Faithful Visitor Education Center can be accessed from two different directions so check your map before traveling. West Thumb Information Station A small facility at the start of the West Thumb Geyser Basin boardwalks, where you can visit with a park ranger and gather park information, shop for souvenirs in the park store, or join a ranger program. The structure was built in 1925 and is an example of historic ranger-station architecture in Yellowstone. A few miles north of Grant Village on the western shore of Yellowstone Lake, West Thumb can be accessed from three different directions. West Yellowstone Visitor Information Center Located in the town of West Yellowstone, Montana, there is a desk staffed by National Park Service rangers (summer and winters only). The building is open year-round and a second desk is staffed by the West Yellowstone Chamber of Commerce. Stop by to obtain backcountry and fishing permits, get park information or to use the restrooms. Located inside the West Yellowstone Chamber of Commerce, in the town of West Yellowstone. West Yellowstone Visitor Information Center (NPS Desk) Located in the town of West Yellowstone, Montana, there is a desk and backcountry office staffed by National Park Service rangers (summer and winters only). The building is open year-round and a second desk is staffed by the West Yellowstone Chamber of Commerce. Stop by to obtain backcountry and fishing permits at the NPS backcountry office, to get park information, or to use the restrooms. Call 307-344-2876 for additional information. Located inside the West Yellowstone Chamber of Commerce Bridge Bay Campground Bridge Bay Campground—elevation 7,800 feet (2377 m)—is located near Yellowstone Lake, one of the largest, high-elevation, fresh-water lakes in North America. Campers at Bridge Bay will enjoy spectacular views of the lake and the Absaroka Range rising above the lake's eastern shore. Yellowstone National Park Lodges provides reservations for this campground. Nightly Fee 29.00 Rates do not include taxes or utility fees and are subject to change. Interagency Access and Senior Pass holders receive a 50% discount. Hiker/bicyclist Nightly Fee 9.40 This is the per-person cost for a hiker/bicyclist campsite for one night. Group (1–19 People) 146.00 Nightly cost for a group campsite with 1–19 people in the party. All rates subject to applicable taxes and fees. Group (20–29 People) 219.00 Nightly cost for a group campsite with 20–29 people in the party. All rates subject to applicable taxes and fees. Group (30–39 People) 282.00 Nightly cost for a group campsite with 30–39 people in the party. All rates subject to applicable taxes and fees. Group (40–49 People) 430.00 Nightly cost for a group campsite with 40–49 people in the party. All rates subject to applicable taxes and fees. Group (50–60 People) 399.00 Nightly cost for a group campsite with 50–60 people in the party. All rates subject to applicable taxes and fees. Bridge Bay Campground Sign Bridge Bay Campground is located close to the Bridge Bay Marina and Yellowstone Lake. Bridge Bay Campground Tents at campsite The campground location encompasses woods and meadows and some sites look out on Yellowstone Lake. Bridge Bay Campground Tents at campground site Bison are frequent visitors at Bridge Bay Campground. Bridge Bay Campground Tent at campground Bridge Bay Campground. Bridge Bay Campground Campsite in trees Bridge Bay Campground offers camping sites in the trees and meadows. Bridge Bay Campground RV at campsite Bridge Bay Campground Bridge Bay Campground RV at campsite Bridge Bay Campground Bridge Bay Campground Tent at campsite Bridge Bay Campground Canyon Campground Canyon Campground—elevation 7,900 feet (2408 m)—lies in a lodgepole pine forest at Canyon Village, south of the Washburn range and near the breath-taking Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River. Canyon Village offers stores, restaurants, and lodging. Nearby hikes include Cascade Lake, Mount Washburn, and the Canyon Rim trails. Yellowstone National Park Lodges provides reservations for this campground. Nightly Fee 34.00 Rates do not include taxes or utility fees and are subject to change. Interagency Access and Senior Pass holders receive a 50% discount. Hiker/bicyclist Nightly Fee 9.40 This is the per-person cost for a hiker/bicyclist campsite for one night. Canyon Campground Campsite in the Canyon Campground Campsite in the Canyon Campground Canyon Campground RV dump station at the Canyon Campground RV dump station at the Canyon Campground Canyon Campground Campsites Canyon Campground Canyon Campground Large boulder at a campsite Canyon Campground Canyon Campground Campsite at campground Canyon Campground Canyon Campground Tent at campsite Canyon Campground Canyon Campground Tent at campsite Canyon Campground Canyon Campground RV at campsite Canyon Campground Fishing Bridge RV Park Fishing Bridge RV Park—elevation 7,800 feet (2377 m)—is located near the Yellowstone River where it exits Yellowstone Lake on its way toward the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. Only campground in Yellowstone to offer water, sewer, and electrical hookups. Because grizzly bears frequent the area, no tents or tent campers are allowed. Yellowstone National Park Lodges provides reservations for this campground. Nightly Fee 83.00 Rates do not include taxes or utility fees and are subject to change. Interagency Access and Senior Pass holders do not receive discounts at this campground. Fishing Bridge RV Park Park structure Fishing Bridge General Store Fishing Bridge RV Park Man dressed inraincoat standing in front of building. Fishing Bridge RV Park has laundry and showers. Fishing Bridge RV Park Recreational Vehicle parked. An RV at Fishing Bridge RV park. Fishing Bridge RV Park Campers and RVs parked in campground. Fishing Bridge RV Park. Fishing Bridge RV Park Hard-sided camper at campground Hard-side camping only at Fishing Bridge. Fishing Bridge RV Park Row of RVs in a campground Fishing Bridge RV Park Fishing Bridge RV Park RV at campsite Located near Yellowstone Lake and Yellowstone River, Fishing Bridge is hard-sided camping only. Grant Village Campground Grant Campground—elevation 7,800 feet (2377 m)—is located in Grant Village, just off the Grand Loop Road at the south end of Yellowstone Lake. It is one of the larger campgrounds in the park. Group and wheel-chair accessible sites are available. Nearby there are stores, a restaurant, gas station, visitor center, and boat ramp. Yellowstone National Park Lodges provides reservations for this campground. Nightly Fee 33.00 Rates do not include taxes or utility fees and are subject to change. Interagency Access and Senior Pass holders receive a 50% discount. Hiker/bicyclist Nightly Fee 9.40 This is the per-person cost for a hiker/bicyclist campsite for one night. Group (1–19 People) 136.00 Nightly cost for a group campsite with 1–19 people in the party. All rates subject to applicable taxes and fees. Group (20–29 People) 199.00 Nightly cost for a group campsite with 20–29 people in the party. All rates subject to applicable taxes and fees. Group (30–39 People) 262.00 Nightly cost for a group campsite with 30–39 people in the party. All rates subject to applicable taxes and fees. Group (40–49 People) 336.00 Nightly cost for a group campsite with 40–49 people in the party. All rates subject to applicable taxes and fees. Group (50–60 People) 399.00 Nightly cost for a group campsite with 50–60 people in the party. All rates subject to applicable taxes and fees. Grant Village Campground Tent at campsite Grant Village Campground Grant Village Campground Tent at campsite Grant Village Campground Grant Village Campground Restroom at campground Grant Village Campground Grant Village Campground Tent and campers at campsite. Grant Village Campground Grant Village Campground Family picnicking at campsite. Grant Village Campground Grant Village Campground Camp trailer at campsite Grant Village Campground Indian Creek Campground CLOSED FOR 2022. Located about eight miles south of Mammoth Hot Springs on the road to Norris, Indian Creek Campground—elevation 7,300 feet (2225 m)—sits near the base of the Gallatin Mountains and offers breathtaking views of Electric Peak. The area offers easy access to fishing and hiking. The campground is away from the main road and provides a quieter, more primitive, experience than many other locations. This is a reservable campground run by the National Park Service. Nightly Fee 20.00 Interagency Access and Senior Pass holders receive a 50% discount. Hiker/bicyclist Night Fee 10.00 This is the per-person cost for a hiker/bicyclist campsite for one night. Indian Creek Campground People standing in front of log building Indian Creek Campground Indian Creek Campground Bear Country sign All campgrounds in Yellowstone including Indian Creek Campground is in bear country. Indian Creek Campground RV and people at a campsite Indian Creek Campground Indian Creek Campground Tent at people at campsite. Indian Creek Campground Indian Creek Campground Visitors setting up tent at campsite. Indian Creek Campground Indian Creek Campground Campsite with tent and picnic table. Indian Creek Campground Lewis Lake Campground Lewis Lake Campground—elevation 7,800 ft (2377 m)—is about eight miles from the South Entrance and a short walk from the southeast shore of Lewis Lake. A boat ramp is located near the campground information and registration area. Canoes, kayaks, and motor boats are allowed on Lewis Lake. Boat permits and an aquatic invasive species inspection performed by park staff are required. This is a reservable campground run by the National Park Service. Nightly Fee 20.00 Interagency Access and Senior Pass holders receive a 50% discount. Hiker/bicyclist Nightly Fee 10.00 This is the per-person cost for a hiker/bicyclist campsite for one night. Lewis Lake Campground A view of Lewis Lake A view of Lewis Lake Lewis Lake Campground Log building at campground Lewis Lake Campground Lewis Lake Campground Wooded campsite at Lewis Lake Wooded campsite at Lewis Lake Lewis Lake Campground Tents and bikes at campsites Lewis Lake Campground NPS/Renkin Vehicle at boat dock Lewis Lake Campground has a boat ramp located near the campground information and registration area. Lewis Lake Campground Tent at campsite Lewis Lake Campground Lewis Lake Campground Tent at campsite Lewis Lake Campground Lewis Lake Campground Tent and camp chairs at campsite. Lewis Lake Campground Lewis Lake Campground Campsite Lewis Lake Campground Madison Campground Madison Campground—elevation 6,800 feet (2073 m)—sits about 14 miles east from the town of West Yellowstone and 16 miles north of Old Faithful. Nearby, the Gibbon and Firehole rivers join to form the Madison River. In early summer, meadows teem with wildflowers and bison. In September and October, you can often hear bugling elk. Yellowstone National Park Lodges provides reservations for this campground. Nightly Fee 29.00 Rates do not include taxes or utility fees and are subject to change. Interagency Access and Senior Pass holders receive a 50% discount. Hiker/bicyclist Nightly Fee 9.40 This is the per-person cost for a hiker/bicyclist campsite for one night. Group (1–19 People) 146.00 Nightly cost for a group campsite with 1–19 people in the party. All rates subject to applicable taxes and fees. Group (20–29 People) 219.00 Nightly cost for a group campsite with 20–29 people in the party. All rates subject to applicable taxes and fees. Group (30–39 People) 282.00 Nightly cost for a group campsite with 30–39 people in the party. All rates subject to applicable taxes and fees. Group (40–49 People) 356.00 Nightly cost for a group campsite with 40–49 people in the party. All rates subject to applicable taxes and fees. Group (50–60 People) 430.00 Nightly cost for a group campsite with 50–60 people in the party. All rates subject to applicable taxes and fees. Madison Campground Camping sites Even on a rainy day, there are many things to do at Madison, including having a meal under a canopy. Bench overlooking Firehole River Bench near the Firehole River Bench overlooking Firehole River Madison Campground Parked RV RV at Madison Campground Tent sites at the Madison Campground Tents pitched at campground Tent sites at the Madison Campground Madison Campground Camping site Even on a rainy day at Madison Campground there are many things to do nearby including the Madison Information Station. Madison Campground Campsites Madison Campground is set in a partially woody area. Mammoth Campground CLOSED ALL OF 2022 The only campground in the park open year-round, Mammoth Campground—elevation 6,200 feet (1890 m)—is located five miles south of the park's North Entrance. Scattered juniper and Douglas fir trees provide shade during hot summer months. The campground is close to fishing, hiking, and the Mammoth Hot Springs. Great wildlife viewing opportunities abound with elk and bison occasionally passing through the campground. This is a reservable campground 4/1–10/15 run by the National Park Service. Nightly Fee 25.00 Interagency Access and Senior Pass holders receive a 50% discount. Hiker/bicyclist Nightly Fee 10.00 This is the per-person cost for a hiker/bicyclist campsite for one night. Mammoth Hot Springs Campground Mammoth Campground Mammoth Hot Springs Campground facing north Mammoth Hot Springs Campground Camping Sites Camping sites at Mammoth Hot Springs Campground Mammoth Hot Springs Campground Camping sites Mammoth Hot Springs Campground view of sites looking north Mammoth Hot Springs Campground Tents pitched at the Mammoth Hot Springs Campground Tents pitched at the Mammoth Hot Springs Campground Mammoth Hot Springs Campground Tent pitched at campground Tent pitched at Mammoth Hot Springs Campground Mammoth Hot Springs Campground Pop-up camper in the Mammoth Hot Springs Campground Mammoth Hot Springs Campground can accommodate tents, bikers, hikers, RVs and pop-ups. Mammoth Hot Springs Campground Winter campsite at Mammoth Hto Springs Mammoth Hot Springs Campground is the only campground in the park open year-round. Mammoth Hot Springs Campground Road in campground The Mammoth Hot Springs Campground is the only campground open year-round. Norris Campground CLOSED ALL OF 2022. This campground–elevation 7,500 feet (2,286 m)–is located near a large open meadow, which provides opportunity for wildlife viewing. Bison frequently walk through the campground. Most sites are shaded by lodgepole pine. The Museum of the National Park Ranger is a quick walk from the campground, as are Norris Geyser Basin Museum and Norris Geyser Basin--the hottest and most changeable thermal area in Yellowstone. This is a reservable campground run by the National Park Service. Nightly fee 25.00 Interagency Access and Senior Pass holders receive a 50% discount. Hiker/bicyclist Nightly Fee 10.00 This is the per-person cost for a hiker/bicyclist campsite for one night. Norris Campground Tent campsite pitched next to nearby stream Norris campground site Norris Campground Small RV parked at a campground Norris Campground campsite Norris Campground Tent pitched at a campground Norris Campground campsite Norris Campground Bison in campground Bison are a frequent visitor at the Norris Campground Norris Campground Campsite Norris Campground Norris Campground RV at campground Norris Campground Pebble Creek Campground CLOSED FOR 2022. Pebble Creek Campground—elevation 6,900 feet (2103 m)—lies against the dramatic backdrop of the Absaroka Mountains near the park's Northeast Entrance and offers a more isolated camping experience. Day hiking opportunities are available nearby. Soda Butte Creek offers fishing opportunities and there are outstanding wildlife viewing opportunities throughout Lamar Valley. This is a reservable campground run by the National Park Service. Nightly Fee 20.00 Interagency Access and Senior Pass holders receive a 50% discount. Hiker/bicyclist Nightly Fee 10.00 This is the per-person cost for a hiker/bicyclist campsite for one night. Pebble Creek Campground The entrance to the Pebble Creek Campground The Pebble Creek Campground offers partially shaded sites on the edge of the Absaroka Mountains. Pebble Creek Campground Tent and camper at campsite. Pebble Creek campgrund Pebble Creek Campground RV at campsite Pebble Creek Campground Pebble Creek Campground Camping trailer at campsite Pebble Creek Campground Pebble Creek Campground Campsite with stream Pebble Creek Campground Pebble Creek Campground Campsites at the Pebble Creek Campground Campsites at the Pebble Creek Campground Pebble Creek Campground Bear proof food storage at the Pebble Creek Campground Bear proof food storage at the Pebble Creek Campground Pebble Creek Campground Food storage box, picnic table, tent at campsite. Pebble Creek Campground Slough Creek Campground CLOSED FOR 2022. Near some of the best wildlife watching opportunities in the park. Located at the end of a two mile dirt road, this campground is best suited for tents and small RVs. There are plenty of hiking and fishing opportunities in the area, including the Slough Creek Trail which begins nearby. Nighttime offers a quiet, unimpeded view of the stars and the possibility of hearing wolves howl. Elevation: 6,250 ft (1905 m). This is a reservable campground run by the National Park Service. Nightly Fee 20.00 Interagency Access and Senior Pass holders receive a 50% discount. Slough Creek Campground Campsites in the Slough Creek Campground Campsites in the Slough Creek Campground Slough Creek Campground Visitors and tent at campsite. Slough Creek Campground Slough Creek Campground Tent and camp chair at campsite Slough Creek Campground Slough Creek Campground Campsite near stream. Slough Creek Campground Slough Creek Campground Truck with camping trailer, RV at campsite Slough Creek Campground Slough Creek Campground Campsites in the Slough Creek Campground Campsites in the Slough Creek Campground Tower Fall Campground Tower Fall Campground—elevation 6,600 feet (2012 m)—is located on the north side of the steep, winding, road to Dunraven Pass. The campground is near the Tower General Store and Tower Fall. The Lamar Valley, with spectacular wildlife viewing opportunities, is located nearby as are several hiking trails. Roosevelt Lodge, a short drive from the campground, offers dining and horseback riding. This is a reservable campground run by the National Park Service. Nightly Fee 20.00 Interagency Access and Senior Pass holders receive a 50% discount. Hiker/bicyclist Nightly Fee 10.00 This is the per-person cost for a hiker/bicyclist campsite for one night. Tower Fall Campground A view of the Tower Fall Campground A view of the Tower Fall Campground Tower Fall Campground Campsite at Tower Fall Campground Campsite at Tower Fall Campground Tower Fall Campground RVs at the Tower Fall Campground RVs at the Tower Fall Campground Tower Fall Campground Campsite with bear proof food storage at Tower Fall Campground Campsite with bear proof food storage at Tower Fall Campground Tower Fall Campground Setting up camp in the Tower Fall Campground Setting up camp in the Tower Fall Campground Grand Prismatic Spring Brilliant blues and greens of a hot spring ringed by oranges, yellows, reds, and browns. The bright colors found in Grand Prismatic Spring come from thermophiles—microorganisms that thrive in hot temperatures Aurum Geyser A crowd of people standing along a wooden boardwalk watches a geyser erupt. Aurum Geyser erupting Black Pool A visitor stands on a boardwalk near a hot spring and a lake. Black Pool at the West Thumb Geyser Basin Beehive Geyser People on a wooden boardwalk watch a geyser erupt. Visitors to the Upper Geyser Basin watch Beehive Geyser erupt. Wolf howling A wolf howls while standing on a snowy field. Alpha male of the Canyon wolf pack Fishing Bridge Trailside Museum Visitors walk into a rustic, log and stone building. The stone-and-log architecture of Fishing Bridge Trailside Museum became a prototype for park buildings all around the country Great Fountain Geyser A geyser erupting in the middle of a large pool. Great Fountain Geyser erupts against a blue summer sky Old Faithful Geyser in winter A crowd in front of an erupting geyser during a snowy winter day. Winter is a magical time to watch Old Faithful Geyser erupt Palette Spring Visitors walk in front of a brightly colored, terraced landscape. The vibrant colors of Palette Springs are formed by thermophiles—heat-loving organisms Bighorn sheep Two bighorn sheep laying on the ground. Two bighorn rams rest and chew their cud Lower Falls from Artist Point A river plunges into a steep, barren canyon. Lower Falls from Artist Point Bison herd in a thermal area A herd of bison grazing through a barren and steaming thermal area. Bison near Mud Volcano Grizzly bear A grizzly bear standing on a fallen tree. Grizzly bear in the woods Yellowstone River A greenish river meanders through a hilly river valley. The Yellowstone River near Tower Fall Lone Star Fire Smoke from the new Lone Star fire temporarily closes road in Yellowstone National Park. A lightning-ignited wildfire was reported on Saturday, August 22 at 5:15 p.m. about three miles south of Old Faithful in Yellowstone National Park. As of Saturday evening, the fire was estimated at 300 acres and not burning toward Old Faithful. Currently, staff are implementing protection measures for the Old Faithful area in the event the fire moves in that direction. A Day in the Field, Collaboration is Key to Upper Gibbon Fishery Restoration In September 2017, a collection of 35 biologists and ecologists, interns, and park volunteers from several parks, agencies, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) gathered at a series of lakes in the upper Gibbon watershed of Yellowstone National Park (YNP). The task at hand was to implement an ambitious project. The project area included 16 km (10 mi) of the Upper Gibbon River and Grebe, Ice, and Wolf lakes, totaling over 92 ha (228 surface acres)... Biologists prepare for the application of rotenone at Grebe Lake in September 2017 SHORT: Past Warm Periods Provide Vital Benchmarks for Understanding the Future of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem The wildlife, vegetation, and ecosystems discussed in this issue of Yellowstone Science are vital signs of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) that warrant continued monitoring. Determining which organisms and processes are truly vital ecosystem components requires both an understanding of modern ecological interactions and insight into the resilience of organisms and processes to stressors in the past... Trees rise out of the mist Sneak Peek The grassland and sagebrush-steppe habitats in and near Yellowstone National Park (YNP) have been referred to as America’s Serengeti because they support abundant and diverse ungulates and their predators. Thousands of bison and elk, and hundreds of bighorn sheep, deer, and pronghorn migrate seasonally across the landscape where they interact with black bears, coyotes, grizzly bears, and wolves, thereby providing one of the premier places in the world... Three bison push through deep winter snows. 2014 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2014 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards 2010 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2010 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards 2009 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2009 Environmental Achievement Awards 2011 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2011 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards 2015 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2015 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards 2012 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2012 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards 2008 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2008 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Geologic Overview of a Bison-Carcass Site at Norris Geyser Basin Geologic Overview of a Bison-Carcass Site at Norris Geyser Basin A uniformed person standing near a bison carcass Temporal Variation in Wold Predation Dynamics in Yellowstone Beginning with the pioneering work of Adolph Murie (1944) in Mount McKinley (now Denali National Park) in 1939-1941, ecologists have long been interested in evaluating the factors influencing wolf predation dynamics. Murie, who had just recently studied coyote ecology in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), was hired to assess wolves’ relationship with Dall sheep. .. Figure from Metz paper The Big Scientific Debate: Trophic Cascades Wolves generate controversy. Usually it’s of a cultural kind, like how they should be managed or should we have them at all. Scientific debates tend to take the back seat. Probably the most intense of these is the impact of wolves on their prey because the answer may influence wildlife management. In Yellowstone, a somewhat unique controversy, largely centered within scientific circles, has cropped up and questions how wolves impact ecosystems–if at all... Aspen grove in Yellowstone National Park. The Plight of Aspen: Emerging as a Beneficiary of Wolf Restoration on Yellowstone's Northern Range Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) is the most widely distributed tree in North America and is native to Yellowstone National Park’s (YNP) northern range, a 250,000 acre area including the valleys of Yellowstone, Lamar, and Gardner rivers. Aspen make up a small component of vegetation on Yellowstone’s landscape, and most stands on the northern range are less than five acres in size... close up photo of an aspen leap with water droplets Bear Spray Canister Recycling Bear spray is an important tool for reducing bear-human conflicts and keeping both bears and people safe. To help keep Yellowstone's environment safe please recycle your used, expired, or unwanted bear spray canisters. Bear spray canister is disassembled and all components are laid out. News and Notes (YS-26-1) Yellowstone Science shares information from scientists and researchers with the public to highlight in-depth, science-based knowledge about the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. The production of Yellowstone Science is made possible, in part by a generous grant to the Yellowstone Park Foundation by Canon U.S.A. Yellowstone Science Volume 26 Issue 1 May 2018 Mine tailings reclamation project improves water quality in Yellowstone’s Soda Butte Creek Contaminated with heavy metals for more than 80 years, Yellowstone’s Soda Butte Creek was recently recommended for removal from Montana’s 303(d) Impaired Waters List. McLaren Gold Mine near Cooke City, Montana. Park Air Profiles - Yellowstone National Park Air quality profile for Yellowstone National Park. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Yellowstone NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Yellowstone NP. Signpost at Yellowstone National Park Science Plan in Support of Ecosystem Restoration, Preservation, and Protection in South Florida The Florida Everglades is a complex ecosystem of diverse, interconnected subtropical habitats. Once comprised of over 4 million acres, today the historic Everglades have been reduced by half. The conflict of human versus natural elements in South Florida began in earnest in the early 1900s, when the control of water and the drainage of wetlands were first considered essential for commerce and human safety. A swamp with varying vegetation Sneak Peek: 60 Years of Archeology in Yellowstone Wild, pristine, untrammeled. When thinking about Yellowstone, a vast and amazing backcountry, large carnivores, ungulates, iconic geysers, and geothermal features fill the imagination. However, 11,000 years of Yellowstone’s human history is for most people a hidden text. As we approach sixty years of archeological research in the park, we know a great deal more about how ancestors of today’s Native American tribes lived in Yellowstone... Archeologist working on the shores of Yellowstone Lake A Day in the Field: Of Mice and Hantivirus Yellowstone’s northern range, undoubtedly one of the prime wildlife viewing spots in North America, harbors impressive bison herds, wolf packs, and meandering bears. Visitors are likely to depart from the park’s northern lands with at least one, if not more, checks on their wildlife card. Beneath the awe of the large herds and charismatic megafauna lives a quiet, hidden life... Jessica Richards at work in Lamar Valley Stop Aquatic Invaders Aquatic invasive species, including fish, snails, mussels, algae and disease are primarily spread from water to water by human activity, often on boats, fishing gear or other recreational equipment. The good news is, you as a visitor to park waters, can help stop aquatic hitchhikers. Plastic pipe recovered from infested waters, encrusted with quagga mussels Wildland Fire History — Fire Is Fire—Or Is It? The historic fires in the Greater Yellowstone Area in 1988 brought issues at the wildland-urban interface to the forefront. This article discusses the differences between fighting a wildland fire and a structural fire. The Yellowstone fires were the impetus behind the National Park Service’s current focus on the wildland-urban interface. Two firefighters use a hose to spray foam on the Old Faithul Inn. Wildland Fire History — The Endless Summer of ’88 at Yellowstone: Madness, Macintoshes, and Mail Yellowstone park ranger describes education and outreach efforts to schools in the wake of the historic 1988 wildfires. The park received artwork, letters of concern and gratitude, and offers of help from all 50 states and several countries. They shared with teachers information about the environmental education curriculum, Expedition: Yellowstone, and wrote a primer on the fires and the park’s perspective. They developed the self-guiding Children’s Fire Trail. Wildland Fire History — The History of National Park Service Fire Policy Article presents a short history of fire management policy on NPS lands.Scientists know that fire plays a number of essential roles in some forest types. After the 1988 Yellowstone fires, an interagency team investigating current federal fire management policies found that the objectives and philosophy behind prescribed natural fire policies in national parks and wilderness areas are fundamentally sound, but needed to be refined, strengthened, and reaffirmed. Wildland Fire History — Blazing New Trails for Wildland Fire Management The historic 1988 Yellowstone area fires will have a significant effect on NPS fire management program thanks to widespread public and political interest. Needs include better cooperation among land management agencies with contiguous borders and more funding for and training in prescribed fire. Efforts are underway to meet these goals. (Article originally published in 1989.) Wildland Fire History — Are Your Bags Packed? An NPS interpretive specialist recounts her experiences during the historic 1988 Greater Yellowstone Area fires. SHORT: Aquatic Vascular Macrophytes as Vital Signs Large, readily visible plants (macrophytes) are central species of aquatic ecosystems. Macrophytes have diverse morphological and ecological strategies for living in divergent ecological conditions or niches that span the water column. For example, macrophytes can be free-floating on the surface, entirely or partially submerged, and emergent. Of the 41 vital signs selected for Yellowstone National Park (YNP), nearly two of every five (40%) can be connected to macrophytes... Myriophyllum quitense and Stuckenia x suecica, Firehole River. Assessing the Ecological Health of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem Species declines and extinctions are occurring at rates that are unrivaled in human and geological history (Ceballos et al. 2017). Similarly, wild places are also dwindling in area (Watson et al. 2018). Some large, protected areas like the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) have experienced less change than more populated corners of the world primarily because the GYE benefits from a substantial level of federal agency protection... acre-ecosystem wit Satellite image of Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem SHORT: Yellowstone bats important indicator ecosystem health The popularity of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) is often gauged by the abundance of wildlife that calls it home, but the ecological health of the park is regularly assessed by a suite of indicator species. Bioindicators are typically species or species groups that are easily observed; however, a silent gray blur darting overhead at twilight may turn out to be an important indicator of environmental health... A Townsend's big-eared batcaptured during a mist net survey in Yellowstone National Park. SHORT: Yellowstone Birds Are Vital Traveling through Yellowstone National Park (YNP), visitors frequently stop to enjoy the park’s birds: small songbirds flitting about the willows, sandhill cranes engaged in their ritual mating dances, or myriad species of waterfowl loafing in one of the park's many wetlands. Typically while driving the roads of YNP, a majority of visitors consider a stopped car and raised binoculars a sure sign of some large mammal sighting... Two blue herons take flight over a wintry landscape Yellowstone Science 27(1) - Vital Signs Download a PDF of the entire issue. Cover of Yellowstone Science 27(1): The Vital Signs Issue A Day in the Field: Citizen Science Engagement Understanding long-term environmental change and documenting patterns in nature requires rigorous protocols, dedicated observers, and a long-term commitment. Increasingly citizen scientists or volunteers from outside the scientifc community are contributing to monitoring programs that are difcult or impossible to carry out (Bonney et al. 2009)... The Montana-Yellowstone Archeological Project at Yellowstone Lake Native Americans who lived within the northwestern Great Plains, the northern Rocky Mountains, and the far northeastern edge of the Great Basin drew on Yellowstone Lake during seasonal subsistence and settlement. Using ethnohistoric (information derived from the study of native peoples from a historical and anthropological perspective) and archeological data, researchers are evaluating questions about the use of Yellowstone Lake in prehistory. Yellowstone knife 2019 Connecting with our Homelands Awardees Hopa Mountain, in partnership with the National Park Service, is pleased to announce the 2019 awardees of the Connecting with our Homelands travel grants. Twenty-one Indigenous organizations, schools, and nonprofits have been awarded travel funds for trips to national park units across 12 states/territories within the United States. An elder and young student talk while sitting on a rock. Lessons Learned from the Yellowstone Wolf Restoration Project Bruce Babbit, former Secretary of the Interior, writes about his role in wolf reintroduction. Secretary of the Interior Bruce Babbit and Wolf Project lead Doug Smith watch wolves in Lamar Valley Five Questions Three scientists at the forefront of wolf ecology answer the same questions about wolf biology and management. Read more about the interview with L. David Mech, Rolf O. Peterson, & Douglas W. Smith, as interviewed by Charissa Reid.  L. David Mech and Durward Allen examine a wolf kill in the 1960s. Mammoth Hot Spring Historic District Acorn Lights Improvement Project This project improved energy efficiency of lamps in the National Historic District by removing old mercury vapor lamps and replacing them with custom-designed fixtures which both maintain the historic significance of the fixtures, and minimize light pollution. Redesigned lamp fixture with LEDs and shaded top. Sneak Peek (YS-26-1) In medicine, vital signs, such as blood pressure and pulse rate, are simple routine measurements used to assess human health. When tracked over time, vital sign measurements contribute to diagnoses and support decisions concerning the response of patients to medical treatments. Slight abnormalities in vital sign measurements (e.g., elevated body temperature) are usually not critical but may warrant a more careful diagnosis, whereas extremely abnormal vital signs... Illustration of the vital signs concept. The Yellowstone Story Little did Philetus Norris know that when he picked up Native American artifacts and sent them off to the Smithsonian Institution in the latter half of the 19th century, that he launched what would eventually be a complex and dynamic field of inquiry into the archeology of the world’s first national park. For Yellowstone National Park (YNP), archeology provides a compelling counter narrative to the idea that Yellowstone is a wilderness, untouched by humans... Photo of Tobin Roop smiling in ranger attire. A Brief History of Archeology at Yellowstone National Park The fact that Native Americans used the landscape of present-day Yellowstone National Park (YNP) for millennia was evident to the early European-American trappers, prospectors, and explorers, who encountered native peoples during their travels and noted ancient trails and chipped stone artifacts. Carmen Clayton and Elaine Hale in the field. Shorts (YS 26-1) Learn more about ongoing research and findings in this reoccurring series of short articles. Robin Park holds a stone artifact. America's Best Idea: Featured National Historic Landmarks Over 200 National Historic Landmarks are located in national parks units. Some historical and cultural resources within the park system were designated as NHLs before being established as park units. Yet other park units have NHLs within their boundaries that are nationally significant for reasons other than those for which the park was established. Twenty of those NHLs are located in parks featured in Ken Burn's documentary, The National Parks: America's Best Idea. watchtower against blue sky Bat Projects in Parks: Yellowstone National Park If only bats were as easy to see as other wildlife in Yellowstone National Park. Find out how they are monitoring for bats! People watching Beehive Geyser erupt with Lion Geyser in the background Army Couple Visits 59 National Parks When you’re a dual-military couple, it can be a challenge to try to find things to do together, especially when you’re at separate duty stations or on deployment. For one Army couple, what started out as a simple idea to get out of the house turned into a five-year adventure. Couple standing in front of The Windows at Arches National Park. Yellowstone Wolf Project Report 2016 There were at least 108 wolves in 11 packs (7 breeding pairs) living primarily in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) through December 2016 (figures 1& 2). Breeding pairs are defined as an adult male and an adult female with two pups that survive through the end of the year. Overall, wolf numbers have fluctuated between 83-108 wolves and 6-9 breeding pairs from 2009 to 2016... 2016 Yellowstone Wolf Project Report Protecting the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem from Aquatic Invasive Species Perhaps no greater threat exists to public recreation, infrastructure, and aquatic resources in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) than that from aquatic invasive species (AIS). AIS are aquatic animals, plants, and pathogens that can negatively impact ecosystems, industry, tourism, and even human health when they become established in waters outside of their historic range... Fisheries Staff at Sunset on Yellowstone Lake Yellowstone National Park, 1988: A 25th Anniversary Retrospective August 20, 2013, marks the 25th anniversary of Black Saturday, the most significant single day of fire growth to occur during the 1988 Yellowstone fires. About 36 percent of the park was burned, and 67 structures were destroyed. Across the nation, national parks and forests suspended and updated their fire management plans. The NPS has created a web page with relevant documents. historic image of fire crew working on the Yellowstone fire of 88 NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] Crested Pool hot spring SHORT: An Uncertain Future: the Persistence of Whitebark Pine in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem If ever I was to love a tree, this is the tree (figure 1) that would own my heart. Enduring gracefully at the base of a narrow, high-elevation cirque in the Wind River Range, it is a challenging off-trail scramble to be in its presence. My first encounter with this massive whitebark pine was in July 2014. Located just a stone’s throw from our monitoring plot, I felt compelled to pay homage to this incredible specimen that has clearly withstood hardship... Biologists measure the girth of a whitebark pine tree. SHORT: The Yellowstone River Fish-Kill Trout are socioeconomically and ecologically important in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA), yet these fish face numerous threats. Disease may begin to play a larger role in reducing fish populations, partly because many existing threats may interact to exacerbate the frequency, extent, and severity of fish diseases (Lafferty 2009)... Dead mountain whitefish found along the Yellowstone River shore Patterns of Primary Production & Ecological Drought in Yellowstone Photosynthesis converts sunlight into stored energy in millions of leaves, flowers, and seeds that maintain the web of life in Yellowstone. This transformation of energy fixes carbon, supplies organic matter to soils, and creates fuel for wildfire. As the first link of the food chain, new plant biomass is called primary production and provides energy to consumers, including wildlife... A mountain field in bloom Tribute: Tom Henderson Tom Henderson, a friend and colleague of Yellowstone National Park, passed away unexpectedly in October 2018. Tom was a devoted husband and father and a Senior Environmental Project Manager with the Montana Department of Environmental Quality’s (DEQ) Abandoned Mine Lands Program. Many in Yellowstone worked with and knew Tom for his leadership role in the reclamation and clean-up of the abandoned McLaren Mill and Tailings site on Soda Butte Creek... Tom Henderson stands near Soda Butte Creek SHORT: Taking the Pulse of Wetlands Why indeed care about tiny frogs, with so many spectacular and elsewhere-rare animals inhabiting Yellowstone National Park (YNP)?... Male boreal chorus frog inflating throat sac to call at a breeding site. Soda Butte Creek - A Success Story! Soda Butte Creek was removed from the Clean Water Act 303(d) impaired waters list after an extensive reclamation of the McLaren Mill and Tailings site, making this creek the first Montana water body to be delisted after completion of an abandoned mine reclamation. narrow creek with red water on the left and the same creek on the right with clear water PARKS...IN...SPAAAACE!!! NASA astronauts have quite literally an out-of-this-world view of national parks and take some pretty stellar pictures to share. Travel along with the space station on its journey west to east getting the extreme bird’s eye view of national parks across the country. And one more down-to-earth. View of Denali National Park & Preserve from space Research Report: Using Radio Collars to Study Yellowstone Wolves Since the reintroduction of gray wolves to Yellowstone National Park in 1995 and 1996, radio collars have been used as the main tool for monitoring and research. Collaring efforts were never intended to be used as tool to locate wolves for public viewing. Now, 24 years, 7 wolf generations, and 616 collars later, radio-collaring remains an important method to collect all kinds of data and has undergone its own technological evolution. Learn more... A collared wolf - the alpha male from the Canyon Pack. Irrigation controls in Mammoth Hot Springs Historic District Irrigation controls in Mammoth Hot Springs Historic District were updated to conserve water, while continuing to maintain the historic landscape. An elk drinks from a lawn sprinkler in Mammoth Hot Springs. Electric Vehicles in Yellowstone Yellowstone now has a network of charging opportunities for visitors driving electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles, and for staff conducting official park operations. Electric Vehicle Charging Station icon Idle-Free Campaign with Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy Coalition The Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy Coalition of the US Department of Energy's Clean Cities Program developed an Idle-Free campaign for the greater Yellowstone region. Red circle with a red slash over an image of a bison in a cloud of car exhaust. Crystal Clear: McLaren Tailings Restoration Soda Butte Creek downstream of the McLaren Tailings is listed by Montana as an impaired water body for contamination by toxic metals that exceed safe thresholds for aquatic life under the Clean Water Act. The tailings dam is located adjacent to Soda Butte Creek where high flows could erode and saturate the dam causing an unacceptable risk of dam failure. a creek tainted orange due to contaminants. Discovering Life in Yellowstone Where Nobody Thought it Could Exist Small scale views in Yellowstone are compelling, especially the colors in hot pots and deep pools. But far from being merely aesthetically pleasing, these colors are significant because they sparked an important scientific inquiry with long-lasting implications for science, technology, and society. Close-up image of yellow, brown and white bacteria in a thermal pool Human dimensions of winter use in Yellowstone National Park: A research gap analysis Social scientists review the winter use literature of Yellowstone, identifying recurring themes of inquiry and areas lacking investigation. Large yellow snow vehicles What’s the Buzz? How Bees Interrelate with Birds, Wildflowers, and Deer Ecosystems are complex and intricate and sometimes have a surprising web of relationships. Learn how deer, bees, birds, and wildflowers connect in the park ecosystems of the northeast. A bee pollinates a wildflower Sidebar: Reclamation work at McLaren Mill and Tailings Sidebar article discussing the reclamation work done the McLaren Mill and Tailings Sidebar: Environmental legacy Sidebar discussing the environmental legacy of McLaren Mill Sidebar: Mining history of the region Sidebar article discussing the mining history of region Specialized Helicopter Rescue Skills Prove Valuable Yellowstone National Park's helicopter, Lama 230 US, and crew completed a successful short-haul extrication of an injured smokejumper on August 10, 2011 in Flathead National Forest. A person walks away from a helicopter in the air Bison Bellows: A Case Study of Bison Selfies in Yellowstone National Park Learn from this case study: a selfie with a bison is a big mistake. Flyer stating WARNING, showing a cartoon drawing of a person being thrown up in the air by a bison Fish Population Responses to the Suppression of Non-native Lake Trout Unprecedented actions are being taken on Yellowstone Lake to suppress lake trout, recover native cutthroat trout, and restore the natural character of the ecosystem. To understand the outcomes of these actions, long-term monitoring of the fish populations is conducted to inform an adaptive management strategy. Multiple lines of evidence are used to assess status and trends... Gillnetting on Yellowstone Lake Research Report: Pollinator Hotshot Crews Pollinator Hotshot Crews, funded through the National Science Foundation travel to parks across the country, including Yellowstone to document insects and the plants they pollinate. Yellowstone National Park recently conducted a BioBlitz and bee bowl study to create a park pollinator species list. Students, interns, and citizen science volunteers visit monitoring sites from the Gardiner basin, elevation 5,259’ all the way to the top of Mt. Washburn... Pollinator Hotshot Crews collect data on a beautiful Yellowstone summer afternoon Fly Fishing Volunteers Support Native Fish Conservation in Yellowstone The Yellowstone Fly Fishing Volunteer Program was conceived in 2002 as a way Yellowstone’s biologists could acquire information about fish populations without having to travel to distant locations throughout the park and sample the populations themselves using electrofishing or other sophisticated gear... Volunteer Angerls in the field Preservation of Native Cutthroat Trout in Northern Yellowstone The northern portion of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) is a valuable stronghold for native fish; it presents many opportunities to protect and restore them where they have been impacted by human activities. More than 3,700 km (2,299 mi.) of streams drain into the Yellowstone River and flow north into Montana (figure 1). The Lamar River drainage alone contains over 1,792 km (1,113 mi.) of streams and accounts for almost 20% of the stream distance in YNP ... Selective removal of non-native and hybrid fish by electofishing and angling An Approach to Conservation of Native Fish in Yellowstone In the late 1800s, the waters of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) supported an abundance of fish. Twelve species (or subspecies) of native fish, including Arctic grayling, mountain whitefish, and cutthroat trout, dispersed to this region about 8,000-10,000 years ago following glacier melt. These native fish species provided food for both wildlife and human inhabitants. At the time YNP was established in 1872, park inhabitants and visitors initially harvested fish... Artwork copyright James Prosek Non-native Lake Trout Induce Cascading Changes in the Yellowstone Lake The mountainous region within and bordering southeastern Yellowstone National Park (YNP) is among the most remote in the contiguous United States. Lying completely within wilderness, the watershed of the upper Yellowstone River is pristine. Snowmelt waters feed numerous tributaries to the Yellowstone River, which ultimately winds northward to Yellowstone Lake. The Yellowstone River contributes one-third of the flow to Yellowstone Lake within a watershed that encompasses... Sunset over Yellowstone Lake Status & Conservation of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout in the GYE Yellowstone cutthroat trout are native to the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) and surrounding drainages, including the Yellowstone River, Snake River, and Two Ocean Pass that facilitate connectivity between these drainages... Yellowstone Science 25-1 Native Fish Conservation Native Trout on the Rise The waters of Yellowstone National Park are among the most pristine on Earth. Here at the headwaters of the Missouri and Snake rivers, the park’s incredibly productive streams and lakes support an abundance of fish. Following the last glacial period 8,000-10,000 years ago, 12 species/subspecies of fish recolonized the park. These fish, including the iconic cutthroat trout, adapted and evolved to become specialists in the Yellowstone environment... Yellowstone Science 25-1 Native Fish Conservation Effects of Rotenone on Amphibians and Macroinvertebrates in Yellowstone NPS Photo - J. Fleming Boreal toad eggs Environmental DNA: A New Approach to Monitoring Fish in Yellowstone National Park The waters of Yellowstone National Park are among the most pristine on Earth. Here at the headwaters of the Missouri and Snake rivers, the park’s incredibly productive streams and lakes support an abundance of fish. Following the last glacial period 8,000-10,000 years ago, 12 species/subspecies of fish recolonized the park. These fish, including the iconic cutthroat trout, adapted and evolved to become specialists in the Yellowstone environment... History — Yellowstone is Burning: Communicating the Story In 2008, to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the Yellowstone fires, NPS commissioned an oral history project to capture knowledge, lessons learned, and memories from the seminal event that changed NPS fire management. Media coverage of the Yellowstone fires was controversial. The fires were large, complex, and difficult to report. No one had seen or even imagined a fire event on this scale before. Article includes seven videos. Film crew carrying equipment in dense smoke during the 1988 Yellowstone fires Wildland Fire History — Media Coverage of the 1988 Yellowstone Fires The Yellowstone wildfires were a media event. Many Americans were left with the impression that Yellowstone had burned down, and that NPS wildfire policy was the reason. This perception persists in spite of the fact that (1) the largest fire was fought from inception, and (2) several of the fires started outside the park. The article explores how this misperception occurred. The challenge facing park interpreters is to put the story into an environmental context. Wildland Fire History — Yellowstone’s Fire Regime Article discusses Yellowstone ecology (mainly geology, vegetation, and climate) and how it affected which areas burned in the historic fires of 1988. Discusses effects of different fire intervals, common misperceptions following the 1988 fires, findings of scientific research on Yellowstone forests, and unanswered questions. As much as we already know about fire in Yellowstone, the summer of 1988 showed us that we still Wildland Fire History — A Summer to Remember A park ranger in Yellowstone during the 1988 fires remembers how the park’s interpretive message changed throughout the summer. He discusses media and public outreach and education efforts during and after the fires. Telling the public the ecological lessons of the Yellowstone fires may be one of the greatest challenges National Park Service interpreters ever faced. History — Yellowstone is Burning: Managing Yourself and the Fires In 2008, to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the Yellowstone fires, NPS Fire and Aviation Management, in partnership with the Wildland Fire Lessons Learned Center, commissioned a history project to capture knowledge, lessons learned, and memories from the seminal event that changed NPS fire management. Article includes nine embedded YouTube videos. Yellowstone's 2018 Sustainability Spotlight Projects Here are three highlights of sustainability projects that occurred within Yellowstone National Park in 2018. Visitors study menus posted on a window and other visitors walking into a dining hall. Old Faithful Geyser Old Faithful Geyser is one of the most iconic geysers in the world. Its eruptions are also fairly predictable, happening around every 90 minutes. A plume of steam and water shoots out of a low, barren hill surrounded by buildings. Surrogate Species: Piecing Together the Whole Picture National parks, such as Yellowstone National Park (YNP), are ecologically and socially important resources conservatively valued at $92 billion (Haefele et al. 2016). To properly protect and conserve these places, decision makers require reliable information to track and understand the manifestations of environmental change... Pika sitting on a rock The Spatial Footprint and Frequency of Historic Snow Droughts in Yellowstone In the face of climate change and increasing human pressures, monitoring and characterizing environmental change is increasingly important in national parks and protected areas (Hansen and Phillips 2018). Regional measurements of snowpack are a critical vital sign (see “Vital Signs Monitoring is Good Medicine for Parks,” this issue) both for monitoring ecosystem health and anticipating future water availability... Electric Peak is covered with snow below a full moon on a blue sky day. Water Quality and Flow Monitoring in the Yellowstone, Lamar, and Madison Rivers Yellowstone National Park contains 2,500 miles of streams and rivers. Water quality is largely high in the park, but the chemistry of these waters is nearly as varied as the geologic terrain. Water quality is influenced by geothermal inputs and by melted water from mountain snowpacks. The Greater Yellowstone Network monitors water quality and flow in the Lamar, Yellowstone, and Madison rivers in the park to protect these important resources. calm blue river lined by shrubs and trees with snow-capped mountains in the distance. Research Report: Going on a Snail Hunt Yellowstone National Park recently hosted a team of five researchers from Russia who are exploring the role of the Bering Land Bridge faunal exchange in the evolution and dispersal of animals. For this work, they focus on tiny and often overlooked animals in the park: pond snails and pea clams. The project has a particular interest in the role that hydrothermal water might have played as possible cryptic refugia for species crossing the Bering Land Bridge... Two scientists look at a specimen in a summer meadow. Research Report:Using Seismic Waves to Map the Ground Below Old Faithful Geyser Continuing fieldwork conducted in 2015 and 2016, researchers from the University of Utah and the University of Texas El Paso returned to Yellowstone’s Upper Geyser Basin in November of 2017. They are studying seismic activity around the highest concentration of geysers in the world. The research team utilizes small temporary seismometers, which are roughly the size of a football... Geologists Study Upper Geyser Basin Research Report: Revealing Mysteries of the Microbial World How do microscopic heat-loving organisms not only live, but thrive, in the extreme conditions found in and around thermal features? Learn more about Brent Peyton's important research into this question. Scientists in the Upper Geyser Basin on a snowy winter day Debunking the Myth, America's Eden Excerpt from “Engineering Eden” by Jordan Fisher Smith To early Euro-American visitors, in comparison to New England, Yellowstone certainly looked like a wilderness. But it had been under some kind of human influence for thousands of years before it became a nature-management kindergarten for an otherwise highly advanced civilization that had by then laid a telegraph cable across the bottom of the Atlantic between Ireland and Nova Scotia... Bison cross the Lamar Valley in the evening summer sun. Historical Archeology Public perceptions of archeological sites in the Northern Rocky Mountains are heavily geared towards prehistoric sites, such as lithic scatters, quarries, tipi rings, and bison jumps. Although these types of archeological sites are important in that they reflect the majority of human occupation in the area, there is much to be learned from the more recent past, also known as the historical period. What exactly is historical archeology and why is it important? Photograph of the original Tower Falls Soldier Station near Calcite Springs Overlook, 1905. Obsidian: The MVP of Yellowstone's "Stones" Obsidian is a volcanic glass formed when magma is extruded from the earth’s crust and cools very rapidly, with little moisture content or crystalline inclusions. It was generally the most popular tool stone material used by the ancestors of Native Americans in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) and was prized as a tool stone material for practical (and potentially cultural) reasons. Obsidian Cliff (ca. 1953), a National Historic Landmark. Debunking the Myth, Seasonal Use of Yellowstone Historically there have been narratives that Yellowstone was either sparsely occupied by Native American groups or never inhabited by them at all. These accounts are at odds with both the wealth of prehistoric archeological sites in the park, and ethnographic accounts and oral traditions of the park’s 26 associated tribes. A photo of a pink sunset over the Beartooth range in early spring. Debunking the Myth, Fear of Yellowstone One of the persistent myths about Native American attitudes regarding Yellowstone is that they were afraid of this place and avoided it. The stories passed to us by early Anglo explorers and park administrators report that the geysers, fumaroles, and other thermal features frightened the native peoples. Geyser erupting in the Upper Geyser Basin. Archeology Along the Nez Perce National Historic Trail When Yellowstone National Park (YNP) was created in 1872, much of the western Great Plains and Rocky Mountains remained uncharted wilderness still dominated by various Native American tribal groups, some of which were fighting for their own survival. Figure 1. Map showing Nez Perce National Historic Trail. A Volunteer's Impressions My introduction to the field of archeology was fortuitous for me and came late in my life. The field of archeology was essentially unknown to me when I applied to become a volunteer for the National Park Service (NPS). I had applied to increase my knowledge of NPS operations in order to become an advocate for the park system in my retirement. Superintendent Suzanne Lewis, John Reynolds, and Ann Johnson Dendrochronology - The Study of Tree Rings The science of dendrochronology can be used to estimate when a tree was felled or naturally died, if the calendar year dates of tree growth rings can be determined. This axe-cut stump was cut late in the growing season of 1877. Archeology Facts The Heritage & Research Center in Gardiner holds 611,196 cultural and natural history objects, as of October 2017. Learn more... Yellowstone Archeology Timeline 2014 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients Introducing the national and regional recipients of the 2014 Freeman Tilden Awards, given in recognition of new and innovative programs in interpretation. Two rangers holding a whale skull 2016 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients In 2016, six rangers were awarded a national or regional Freeman Tilden Award for excellence in interpretation. Learn more about their amazing programs! Lynette Weber 2015 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients Meet the recipients of the 2015 Freeman Tilden Awards, the highest National Park Service honor for interpretation, and learn more about their exciting programs. Ernie Price World War II Plane Crashes in National Parks During WWII, more than 7,100 air crashes involved US Army Air Force (USAAF) aircraft occurred on American soil. Collectively these crashes resulted in the loss of more than 15,599 lives (Mireles 2006). Many of these military aircraft accidents occurred in remote, often mountainous, areas managed by the National Park Service. plane crash at base of grassy hill Yellowstone Fire 1988: What Did We Learn? An area commander of the historic 1988 Greater Yellowstone Area fires offers lessons learned about tactics and equipment in an article originally published in 1989. Points covered include foam, fireline explosives, fire shelters, sprinklers, minimum impact suppression, role of incident management teams, use of military resources, training needs, and command issues. Two firefighters use a hose to spray foam on a dormitory structure. Wildland Fire History — Yellowstone: The Smoke Clears In this article originally published in 1989, Yellowstone’s superintendent and technical writer argue that to refer to the park as being “reborn” after the historic 1988 fires gives the public the inaccurate impression that the park was “dead” and that fire is “evil.” They argue against simplistic messages such as these because they often lead to misunderstandings later. They also discuss the difference between the missions of the National Park Service and the Forest Service. Wildland Fire History — The Yellowstone FIRE Team Discusses the Yellowstone Fire Interpretation and Resource Education (FIRE) outreach team created in the wake of the 1988 fires to educate audiences in Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming service clubs, community groups, chambers of commerce, and schools. They talked about what happened with the fires, why, and what they could expect in the future. The team sought to inform mainly those who wanted more information and were unsure what to think about the fires. Wildland Fire History — Under the Orange Sky A park ranger in Yellowstone National Park during the historic 1988 fires recounts her experiences with evacuating the public, leaving her own apartment, and experiencing the fire’s advance firsthand. SHORT: Invasive Plants as Indicators of Ecosystem Health Healthy, native plant communities provide sustainable habitat for wildlife, insects, and soil biota. They can persist through drought and contribute to ecosystem services, such as clean air and water. When invasive species are introduced into a native plant community, there can be numerous deleterious efects with minor to major consequences... A panoramic picture of the north entrance of the park showing spread of invasive plants. SHORT: Insects as a Vital Sign in the GYE Insects far outnumber vertebrates in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), North America, and worldwide. In fact, 80% of all named species are invertebrates (Cardoso et al. 2011). Despite their abundance, ecological importance, and benefits to society, numerous opportunities for discovery and for elevating the understanding of insects’ contributions to health of ecosystems still remains... montane meadow butterfly SHORT: Improving Visitor Preparedness and Safety in the Bear Country of Yellowstone National Park On August 23, 2018, a grizzly mother attacked a 10-year-old boy who was hiking the Divide Trail southeast of Old Faithful. While he was badly injured, his parents prevented the attack from being much worse due to the quick actions and use of bear spray. The bear spray had been rented from a new innovation in the park called Bear Aware, L.L.C., where visitors may rent bear spray and also receive training in the use of bear spray and on bear activity in the park... SHORT: How Have Yellowstone Backpackers Changed? Yellowstone National Park, comprises 3,472 square miles, is known for its beauty, diversity of flora and fauna, and recreation opportunities (YNP 2016). However, most visitors never go beyond a few steps from the roads and boardwalks in the park. Many visitors appear to be in a hurry and want to see the Yellowstone highlights. Indeed, Yellowstone provides a cornucopia of sights, sounds, and smells... Yellowstone Raptor Initiative The Yellowstone Raptor Initiative was a five-year (2011–2015) program designed to provide baseline information for golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), Swainson’s hawks (Buteo swainsoni), American kestrels (Falco sparverius), prairie falcons (Falco mexicanus), and owls as focal species. Two large birds perch on a dead tree limb Bechler Ranger Station Solar Array Yellowstone National Park is now powering the Bechler Ranger Station with energy from the sun. A portable solar array has been constructed on a trailer and transported to this remote location to provide renewable energy for the summer operation. The open photovoltaic panel array mounted on a trailer, located behind the Ranger Station. Yellowstone Re-introduces Hydro-electric Power After more than a century, the Mammoth Hot Springs Micro-hydro Project brought water-generated power back to Yellowstone. Turbine inside a micro-hydroelectric generator Pikas in Peril The National Park Service stewards pika populations in more than a dozen parks and seeks to understand the vulnerability of pikas and other mountain species to climate change. Pikas in Peril, funded in 2010, was a collaborative research program directed by scientists from the National Park Service, Oregon State University, University of Idaho, and University of Colorado-Boulder. Profile of a pika on rough, dark red lava rock. © Michael Durham Wolf Predation on Trout in the Gibbon River Throughout their range in North America, gray wolves (Canis lupus) prey primarily on bison, moose, elk, and deer (Mech and Boitani 2003). Although ungulates are the primary prey for wolves, they also consume fish in some regions (Darimont et al 2003).also consume fish in some regions (Darimont et al 2003). Consumption of fish by wolves has not been documented in Yellowstone National Park since the reintroduction of wolves to the area in 1995-96 (Metz et al. 2012). However... Three wolves fishing and wading in a river. Wildland Fire in Douglas Fir: Western United States Douglas fir is widely distributed throughout the western United States, as well as southern British Columbia and northern Mexico. Douglas fir is able to survive without fire, its abundantly-produced seeds are lightweight and winged, allowing the wind to carry them to new locations where seedlings can be established. Close-up of Douglas fir bark and needles. Bison Bellows: Yellowstone National Park Meet the herd of Yellowstone National Park! Bison mother and calf standing together Food Habits of Bears in the Yellowstone Ecosystem Bears are omnivores that have relatively unspecialized digestive systems similar to those of carnivores. The primary difference is that bears have an elongated digestive tract, an adaptation that allows bears more efficient digestion of vegetation than other carnivores. A grizzly bear cub sitting up next to a bison carcass. Characteristics of Bears in Yellowstone Review the key differences between the two bear species found in Yellowstone National Park: grizzly bears and black bears. Profile view of a cinnamon-colored grizzly bear. Suppressing Non-native Lake Trout to Restore Native Cutthroat Trout in Yellowstone Lake The suppression of lake trout via netting has been ongoing in Yellowstone Lake since 1994 when this non-native species was first discovered. Twenty-two years later, we continue to catch large numbers of lake trout. So, why should lake trout suppression be maintained, what’s the science behind it, and what’s the prognosis for the future?... Patriot on Yellowstone Lake Yellowstone Lake Working Group Established to Enhance Native Fish Conservation Native coldwater species, such as Yellowstone cutthroat trout, westslope cutthroat trout, fluvial Arctic grayling, and mountain whitefish, are especially important to the natural ecology and human enjoyment of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE). In the early 2000s, these native coldwater species faced multiple threats; the most significant were from introduced non-native aquatic species, including lake trout, brook trout, rainbow trout, and the exotic parasite... Yellowstone Lake Working Group members at Grayling Creek News and Notes YS-25-1 Dr. Fred Allendorf, professor emeritus at the University of Montana and member of the University’s Fish and Wildlife Genomics Group, has won the 2015 Molecular Ecology prize. This international award, bestowed annually by the journal Molecular Ecology, recognizes scientists for their significant contributions in this interdisciplinary field of research... Horns versus Antlers Ever wonder about the difference between horns and antlers? A bighorn sheep ram walking through the snow. Wildland Fire in Sagebrush Sagebrush will burn when the surrounding grasses are dry. With strong winds, fire spreads rapidly with flames sometimes reaching over 30 feet high. While fire easily kills sagebrush, the other plants resprout from protected roots producing lush forage for wildlife and livestock. Close-up of sagebrush leaves News & Notes Yellowstone National Park (YNP) supports one of the most significant aquatic ecosystems in the U.S. Headwater streams and rivers emerge from the park and join to become three of America’s most important waterways and ultimately flow into the Pacific and Atlantic oceans: the Yellowstone River, the Missouri River and the Snake River. At the heart of YNP lies Yellowstone Lake—the largest alpine body of water in North America... Hillary Robison stands in front of a herd of musk oxen. Nowcasting & Forecasting Fire Severity in Yellowstone Climb any mountain in the spring, and you will find that Yellowstone National Park (YNP) is made almost entirely in shades of green. Many grayish-blue peaks encircle the far horizon; but in the park itself, only a few nunatak mountains push up pinpoints of bare rock. Thick, green forests cover 80% of the landscape. Grassy valleys and sagebrush fill in most of the rest (Despain 1990). Yellowstone is defined by its plants... Fire burns on the northern range of Yellowstone National Park. SHORT: What We’re Listening To: How Sound Inventories Can Contribute to Understanding Change Do you want to get off the beaten track and experience Yellowstone in an entirely new way? If you answered “yes,” visit Black Sand Pool and turn an ear to the ground. The giant, imploding bubbles in Black Sand Pool make a low-frequency sound that you’ll feel through your whole body. It’s undeniably an Earth sound—a planetary sound. And listening to a hot spring is an entirely different experience than looking at a hot spring... Jennifer Jerrett records sounds in a canoe on a lake. Understanding Dynamic Ecosystems: The Pursuit of the Greater Yellowstone Network The year 1999 was a pivotal year for the National Park Service (NPS). Inspired by the book Preserving Nature in the National Parks: A History (Sellars 1997), the Natural Resource Challenge (NPS 1999) was crafted to expand the NPS’s understanding and management of park natural resources. One of the more innovative outcomes of the Natural Resource Challenge was the creation of the NPS Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) Program... NPS Photo - D. Renkin 2002 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2002 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards 2006 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2006 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards 2005 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2005 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards 2004 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2004 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Infectious Diseases of Wolves in Yellowstone The summer of 2005 began with such promise for wolves in Yellowstone. The population had been at an all-time high the last few years, and the wolves appeared to be in good condition. Several packs had been particularly busy during the breeding season, and early summer pup counts suggested another healthy crop of new wolves rising through the ranks. And then something changed. Wolf with mange Wolf Turf: A Glimpse at 20 Years of Wolf Spatial Ecology in Yellowstone Territoriality is one of several well-known characteristics of wolf natural history that has presumably evolved in response to selection for behaviors advantageous to individual reproduction and survival. Worldwide, territory characteristics vary depending on ecological conditions (e.g., prey and competitor density), geographical features, seasonal changes, and human presence (Mech and Boitani 2003)... Map of Yellowstone National Park showing wolf territories. Sneak Peek (YS-24-1) Following the recession of glaciers some 8,000-10,000 years ago, native fish began dispersing to the Yellowstone region. By the late 1800s, the waters of Yellowstone supported 12 species (or subspecies) of native fish, including Arctic grayling, mountain whitefish, and cutthroat trout. These native fish species provided food for both wildlife and human inhabitants... Photo of small YCT fry YS 24-1 Shorts Shorts are articles that summarize the results of recent scientific publications or highlight human interest stories occurring in the GYE. In this issue they discuss wolf effects on elk, Pelican Valley and the Mollie's Pack, wolf management, den closures, habituation, hunting, Winter Study, and Wolf Project sample collections. Wolf Project Staff. 2016. Why Wolves Howl It was a deep-freeze January morning, with mist peeling back in strands off the open riffles of the Lamar River like a series of gossamer curtains hiding a stage, eventually revealing the willow flats of the far shore. Out there, initially invisible, was the big Druid Peak pack. Their howls filtered to us through the mist... wolves howling on a winter hillside YS 25-1-Shorts Shorts are articles that summarize the results of recent scientific publications or highlight human interest stories occurring in the GYE. In this issue they discuss Fly Fishing Volunteers, an editorial by Nate Schweber, and birds and mammals that eat cutthroat trout in Yellowstone Lake and its tributaries. Otter on a log consuming a cutthroat trout near Trout Lake. NPS Photo - D. Bergum Wolf Restoration in Yellowstone: Reintroduction to Recovery Anthony R.E. Sinclair, long-time researcher in the Serengeti of Africa, suggests that to understand an ecosystem, one also must know its human history. For the Serengeti, he refers to the 1889 outbreak of rinderpest that killed 95% of Africa's cattle and many wild ungulates, and the 19th century ivory trade, both of which drastically altered the plant-animal associations of the 20th century... Close-up of a wolf's eye A Peak Experience Watching Wolves in Yellowstone National Park After 18 summers of working as a seasonal naturalist in Denali National Park and Glacier National Park, I transferred to Yellowstone in the spring of 1994 and worked as a seasonal naturalist with the title of Wolf Interpreter. All of my programs were on the subject of the upcoming wolf reintroduction. In May 1995, as I was returning to Yellowstone for my second summer, my goal for the season was to see at least one of the newly reintroduced wolves... A wolf as viewed through a camera lens. Yellowstone Wolf Facts Did you know a wolf howl can be heard over 9 miles away in open areas? Learn the facts about Yellowstone's wolves. Two wolves as seen from a fixed wing plane. Hillary L. Robison Hillary L. Robison is the Deputy Chief of the Yellowstone Center for Resources. Her special interests include conservation, ecology, brown bears, musk ox, and insects. Hillary in the field in the arctic, standing in front of a herd of musk oxen in the distance. Douglas W. Smith Douglas W. Smith is a supervisory wildlife biologist whose programs include wolves, elk, and birds. Doug rides Joker through a bison-filled meadow. A Look Back, Historic Relief  Model Helped the Public Understand the Human Relationship to Yellowstone Geology In the Yellowstone Justice Center in Mammoth, Wyoming, is a historic 1897 geologic relief model of Yellowstone National Park and the Absaroka Range by Edwin E. Howell. At 7 ft. square, it’s a stunning scientific sculpture of a beloved geologic region in the U.S. (figure 1). It was donated to the park in 1921 and was installed in the old Information Center in Mammoth... A detail of the Electric Peak area on the Yellowstone National Park and Absaroka Range (1897). Archeological Significance of Yellowstone Lake Yellowstone Lake is considered by many to be the heart of Yellowstone National Park. As North America’s largest, high-elevation natural lake at nearly 8,000 ft. (2,400 m) above sea level, this 20 mile long by 15 mile (32 x 24 km) wide freshwater body of water has played an important role in the lifeways of Great Plains, Great Basin, and Rocky Mountain Native Americans for 11,000 years. Matt Nelson on Dot Island with bone visible. Photo- ©D. MacDonald. A Look Back, Howard Eaton's Yellowstone Tour Howard Eaton was one of Yellowstone National Park’s (YNP) most famous and beloved concessioners who introduced hundreds of tourists to the wonders of Yellowstone between 1883 and 1921, and whose saddle-horse tours contributed to Yellowstone’s popularity during the park’s formative years. In 1923, one year after Eaton’s death, the National Park Service (NPS) named a newly-completed, 157-mile bridle and hiking trail for him... A vintage ad of the Howard Eaton experience. Archeology & Adaptation to Climate Change in Yellowstone The effects of climate change may pose the greatest threat to the integrity of natural and cultural resources that Yellowstone National Park (YNP) has ever experienced (NPS 2010). Protection and preservation of these resources requires park managers to understand potential threats using the best available research, and that they act in the long-term public interest. This artifact may represent one of the first ice patch artifacts recovered in the GYE... A Look Back, Botanical Adventures in Yellowstone, 1899 On June 24, 1899, a sentry on routine patrol discovered a party of six camped on the Madison River just inside Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Inspection revealed multiple infractions... Leslie Goodding sits between stacks of blotters, checking specimens. Yellowstone National Park Staff Manage Multiple Fires with Flexible Strategy Yellowstone National Park managers agreed to manage the Druid Complex fires by monitoring and providing point protection to infrastructure while reaping resource benefits. The experience prompted needed discussions to better prepare for future evacuations. The safety record of the fires was another notable success. Heavy equipment was used to create an indirect line around the developed area, resulting in work equaling more than 13 person years completed without injury. Aerial view of crown fire in forest. Westslope Cutthroat Trout & Fluvial Arctic Grayling Restoration The Madison and Gallatin rivers, two major headwaters of the Missouri River, originate in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) along the western boundary (figure 1). Combined, these two rivers provide 1,031 km (640 mi.) of stream habitat for both westslope cutthroat trout and Arctic grayling in YNP. Indigenous westslope cutthroat trout currently occupy 2 km (1.2 mi.) of stream within their historic range in the park, while resident grayling were extirpated from the park by 1935... Yellowstone Science 25-1 Native Fish Conservation Forest Fires in Yellowstone: the Science of Burning and Regrowth It was the fall of 1988. Dr. Monica Turner, a 29-year-old staff scientist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, flew out to Yellowstone National Park to start an experiment in forest ecology. She got her first glimpse of the Park since it had been ravaged by huge fires, the likes of which no one had ever seen. Aerial view of a forest fire with red flames and white and gray smoke 25 Years of Wolves in Yellowstone The 2019-2020 winter marked the 25th anniversary of the wolf reintroduction in Yellowstone. To commemorate this event, we spent five weeks broadcasting live on Facebook what we learned about wolves in the park over the last 25 years. Wolf walking in snow Zehra Osman Zehra Osman has been a Landscape Architect with the National Park Service since 2001. Through her work at a variety of parks around the country, Zehra explores how cultural landscape documentation and research contributes to historic preservation and planning projects. A smiling woman in a green NPS uniform with arms crossed Horace Albright's National Park Service Legacy Take a brief journey through the National Park Service career of Horace Albright. Two man stand next to each other, one in a uniform and one in a sporting jacket. Bison Conservation Initiative The 2008 BCI has been a touchstone for DOI bureaus for 12 years. The commitments made there have now resulted in meaningful technical products and organizational improvements that continue to advance the conservation of American bison. The Bison Working Group, established as a mechanism for implementing the 2008 BCI, quickly became a productive model of interagency collaboration. Federal professionals working in support of bison conservation note that today we enjoy an ... Bison Conservation Initiative Walking in the Steps of History: Retaking Panoramic Lookout Photographs Ian Grob, of the US Forest Service, collaborated with the NPS to retake panoramic lookout images ¾ of a century after the originals were taken. This page tells the story of how he came to be involved and summarizes the processes his team used and the trials and tribulations they faced in retaking the photos. Ian Grob adjusts an Osborne photo recording transit looking out over mountain and valley Protecting Yellowstone's Water: A Story Map about the Restoration of Soda Butte Creek Five miles outside the boundary of Yellowstone National Park in Montana, a ghost from the past plagued the park for decades. Take a visual journey in this GIS story map through the remarkable cleanup of mine-contaminated Soda Butte Creek on the park's boundary, which ultimately restored the creek's native Yellowstone cutthroat trout fishery. Clear, shallow, boulder-filled stream flanked by grassy meadow, forest, and mountains. Women in Science: Fisheries Yellowstone National Park presents a unique opportunity for young professionals pursuing a career in fisheries management and research. Every year seasonal fisheries technicians, Student Conservation Association (SCA) interns, and volunteers from all over the world are hired to join the fisheries team. Many who start as technicians or interns here go on to pursue graduate education and careers in the fisheries profession... The 2016 Fisheries Crew Women Geoscientists-in-the-Parks: Geologic Resource Assistants Read about the work Megan Norr and Jacob Thacker did as Geologic Resource Assistant GIPs in Yellowstone National Park in 2016. Interns working near river's edge Population Viability Study This study confirms that management of DOI bison herds in isolation promotes the loss of genetic diversity within all herds. More importantly, this study demonstrates that increased herd size and targeted removal strategies can reduce rates of diversity loss, and that adopting a Departmental metapopulation strategy through facilitated periodic movement of modest numbers of bison among DOI herds (i.e., restoring effective gene flow) can substantially reduce the... Bison Population Viability Study Lake trout–induced spatial variation in the benthic invertebrates of Yellowstone Lake Invasive lake trout indirectly increased biomass and body mass of amphipods. Lake trout in Yellowstone Lake (Copyright Jay Fleming) Parks, pikas, and physiological stress: Implications for long-term monitoring of an NPS climate-sensitive sentinel species Baseline values of physiological stress can be incorporated into monitoring plans for pikas, providing park managers with additional information related to the vulnerability of this climate-sensitive model species that occurs within a large number of western parks. American pika (Copyright Dick Orleans) Pollinators - Bumble bee Get the buzz on bumblebees! There are approximately 46 species of bumble bees (genus Bombus) native to North America and 250 species worldwide—all dependent on flowering plants. A bumblebee lands on a white flower NPS Launches Projects in Crater Lake and Yellowstone to Reduce Wildfire Risk and Protect Structures NPS Launches Projects in Crater Lake and Yellowstone to Reduce Wildfire Risk and Protect Structures. Piles created from fuels reduction project At Crater Lake National Park Monitoring Methods for the Lamar River The Greater Yellowstone Inventory and Monitoring Network monitors water resources in parks, including the Lamar River in Yellowstone National Park. This long-term monitoring is based on peer-reviewed protocols. Read about our monitoring methods here and explore the protocols by clicking on the links at the bottom of the page. An icy river lined with snow and evergreen trees The Lamar River Site The Lamar River is the largest tributary to the Yellowstone River in Yellowstone National Park. About three quarters of the Lamar's watershed is contained within the park. We monitor water flow and quality near Tower Ranger Station, WY. Shallow, rocky river lined by evergreen trees National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Water Quality Criteria for the Lamar River Links to federal and state water quality standards that apply to the Lamar River are found here. Shallow river lined with evergreen trees Water Flow in the Lamar River Daily flow measurements on the Lamar River are recorded from a U.S. Geological Survey streamflow gage near Tower Ranger Station, WY. Most recent results of discharge on the river are presented here. A measuring staff with increments from 1 to 3.3 mounted in a river. Series: GIP Participants and Project Highlights [8 Articles] Participants selected for the GIP program have a unique opportunity to contribute to the conservation of America's national parks. Participants may assist with research, mapping, GIS analysis, resource monitoring, hazard mitigation, and education. GIP positions can last from 3 months to one-year. Robyn Henderek Series: Water Resources Monitoring in the Lamar River The Greater Yellowstone Network monitors water quality and analyzes river discharge in the Lamar River between April and November each year. Water quality is high in the Lamar River; about three quarters of its watershed is contained within Yellowstone National Park. Discharge records for the Lamar River go back to 1923. Our monitoring results are presented here and will be updated each year as new information is collected. A scientist holding a piece of equipment that is submerged in a river. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: Wildlife in the Badlands Ever wonder what kind of wildlife could survive the harsh climate of the Badlands? Two small, grey young lambs walk down brown badlands slope. Series: Research in Badlands National Park Scientists often look to the Badlands as a research subject. Many studies have been conducted in the park on a variety of topics, including paleontology, geology, biology, and archaeology. Learn more about these research topics in this article series. two researchers converse over a sheet of paper while a woman to their right uses a microscope. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: Yellowstone Science 27(1) Shorts Cover of Yellowstone Science 27(1) Series: Yellowstone Science - Volume 27 Issue 1: Vital Signs - Monitoring Yellowstone's Ecosystem Health The early proponents of wildland conservation exercised extraordinary vision when they proposed the establishment of America’s first national park. In this era of rapid environmental change, declining trends in population sizes, and increased species extinction rates, we must also be forward-looking in our anticipation of future change and formalize a monitoring program that carefully tracks and regularly assesses the most vital indicators of ecosystem health. Cover image from YS 27-1 Series: Yellowstone Science - Volume 26 Issue 1: Archeology in Yellowstone Little did Philetus Norris know that when he picked up Native American artifacts and sent them off to the Smithsonian Institution in the latter half of the 19th century, that he launched what would eventually be a complex and dynamic field of inquiry into the archeology of the world’s first national park. Learn more about the archeological history of Yellowstone. Cover image from the YS-26-1 issue of Yellowstone Science: Archeology of Yellowstone Series: Parks in Science History Parks in Science History is a series of articles and videos made in cooperation with graduate students from various universities. They highlight the roles that national parks have played in the history of science and, therefore, the world's intellectual heritage. A woman looking through binoculars Series: Crystal Clear: A Call to Action In 2016, the nation celebrates the centennial of the National Park Service (NPS) as the steward of special places that represent our natural and cultural heritage. Many national parks were founded on the beauty and value of water. Since the preservation of the Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park in 1872, the National Park System has grown to include significant examples within majestic rivers, the Great Lakes, oceans and coasts, and other spectacular water resources. bright blue lake green islands in between Series: Yellowstone Science - Volume 25 Issue 1: Native Fish Conservation In this edition of Yellowstone Science, we describe the significant progress that has already been made, along with the challenges that lie ahead as we continue our efforts to conserve native fish. As most of what occurs with fish lies under the surface of the water and largely out of sight, we hope that these articles will be revealing, enlightening, and increase understanding of the management approaches taken as we promote the restoration and preservation of native fish. Cover of YS 25-1 featuring a painting by Josh Udesen Series: Yellowstone Science - Our Scientists The Yellowstone Center for Resources (YCR) was created in March 1993 to centralize the park's science and resource management functions. The goals of the YCR are to: gather, manage, and analyze data in order to better conserve the park's natural and cultural resources; understand and mitigate the environmental and historic consequences of park management; preserve and curate rare, sensitive, and valuable natural and cultural resources; and work with park partners. A wolf biologist works on boiling bones collected from a carcass survey. Series: Research Reports Learn more about the ongoing research going on in the park; both by NPS biologists and outside permitted researchers. Researchers work on a field project in Yellowstone. Series: Yellowstone Science - Volume 24 Issue 1: Celebrating 20 Years of Wolves Read more about the fascinating 20 years of research that have occurred since wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park. Illustration copyright E. Harrington Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ Lamar River Water Quality Each year, we collect water from across the entire width of the river and at multiple depths to test for chemical and metal components. We also collect core water quality measurements, including water temperature, dissolved oxygen, conductance, pH, and turbidity. A scientist filling a water bottle from a larger container of water. Pennsylvanian Period—323.2 to 298.9 MYA Rocks in Cumberland Gap National Historical Park represent vast Pennsylvanian-age swamps. Plant life in those swamps later became coal found in the eastern United States. fossil tracks on sandstone slab Mississippian Period—358.9 to 323.2 MYA The extensive caves of Mammoth Cave and Wind Cave national parks developed in limestone deposited during the Mississippian. Warm, shallow seas covered much of North America, which was close to the equator. fossil crinoid Cambrian Period—541 to 485.4 MYA The flat layers of rock exposed in Grand Canyon National Park encompass much of the Paleozoic, beginning in the Cambrian where they record an ancient shoreline. rock with fossil burrow tracks The Precambrian The Precambrian was the "Age of Early Life." During the Precambrian, continents formed and our modern atmosphere developed, while early life evolved and flourished. Soft-bodied creatures like worms and jellyfish lived in the world's oceans, but the land remained barren. Common Precambrian fossils include stromatolites and similar structures, which are traces of mats of algae-like microorganisms, and microfossils of other microorganisms. fossil stromatolites in a cliff face Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Quaternary Period—2.58 MYA to Today Massive ice sheets advanced and retreated across North America during much of the Quaternary, carving landscapes in many parks. Bering Land Bridge National Preserve contains geologic evidence of lower sea level during glacial periods, facilitating the prehistoric peopling of the Americas. The youngest rocks in the NPS include the lava of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and the travertine at Yellowstone National Park, which can be just a few hours old. fossil bone bed and murals of mammoths Paleogene Period—66.0 to 23.0 MYA Colorful Paleogene rocks are exposed in the hoodoos of Bryce Canyon National Park and the badlands of Badlands and Theodore Roosevelt national parks. Extraordinary Paleogene fossils are found in Fossil Butte and John Day Fossil Beds national monuments, among other parks. fossil skull with teeth expsoed Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center Scientist Profile: Andrew Ray, Ecologist Meet Andrew Ray, ecologist with the Greater Yellowstone Inventory & Monitoring Network! Andrew is fascinated by aquatic habitats and wetland plants. Learn about his favorite project studying the unique Crater Lake Manzama newt, and discover how he got to be where he is today. Scientist gestures to something in a fishing net as two people in NPS uniform observe. Wildland Fire in Lodgepole Pine The bark of lodgepoles is thin, which does not protect the trunks from scorching by fire. They die easily when a fire passes through. However, the serotinous cones give lodgepole pine a special advantage for spreading seeds for the next generation. Close-up of the needles of a lodgepole pine. Patterns of Pathogen Exposure in Gray Wolves Read the abstract and link to a new published article on wolf pathogens across North America: Brandell, E. E., P. C. Cross, M. E. Craft, D. W. Smith, E. J. Dubovi, ...B. L. Borg, M. Sorum, ... et al. 2021. Patterns and processes of pathogen exposure in gray wolves across North America. Scientific Reports 11: 3722. Aerial view of a wolf pack in the snow. More Than “Just” A Secretary If you’re only familiar with modern office practices, you may not recognize many of jobs necessary to run an office or national park over much of the past hundred years. Today, typewriters have given way to computers, photocopy machines have replaced typing pools, stenographers are rarely seen outside of courtrooms, and callers are largely expected to pick extensions from digital directories. Women skiing Women Who Were There No comprehensive data has been compiled about women government employees working in national parks before the NPS was founded on August 25, 1916. Their numbers are undoubtedly few but perhaps not as small as we might imagine. The four early NPS women featured here were exceptional in their own ways, but they are also proxies for the names we no longer remember and the stories we can no longer tell. Una Lee Roberts, 1933.(Courtesy of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame, Gaylord-Pickens Museum) Advancements in Analytical Approaches Improve Whitebark Pine Monitoring Results A recent evaluation of the monitoring protocol for whitebark pine in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem revealed limitations in the original analytical approach. Newer Bayesian hierarchical models corrected for these deficiencies by accounting for more factors influencing white pine blister rust prevalence, a key indicator of whitebark pine health. The study highlights the value of periodically re-evaluating monitoring protocols as new methods evolve. Whitebark pine tree in foreground with snow-capped mountains in back. The Unisex Uniform R. Bryce Workman’s book National Park Service Uniforms: Breeches, Blouses, and Skirt 1918-1991, published by the NPS in 1998, has been the go-to resource for the history of women’s uniforms. Although it contains much useful information and photographic documentation, some of his assumptions must be challenged if we are to fully understand how the uniform reflects women’s history in the NPS. The 1920 official ranger uniform coat was similar to the authorized 1917 pattern. “Girls” in Uniform Yellowstone National Park’s Superintendent Horace M. Albright was one of a few superintendents hiring women park rangers in the 1920s. Unlike W.B. Lewis at Yosemite, Albright didn’t use his superintendent’s discretion to exempt women rangers from the NPS uniform. In a 1978 oral history interview, he recalled that he “took a lot of good-natured joking” from other superintendents because the NPS had “never had girls doing work like this, never had girls in uniform.” Frieda B. Nelson in uniform, 1926. (Yellowstone National Park photo, YELL 42891) The First Woman Ranger at Hawai’i National Park Yellowstone wasn’t the only park to have a woman ranger in 1922. That same year, M. Lydia Barrette became the first temporary women ranger at Hawai’i National Park (now Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park and Haleakalā National Park). Lydia Barrett 1922 Two for the Price of One Companion, assistant, confidant, ambassador, host, nurse, cook, secretary, editor, field technician, wildlife wrangler, diplomat, and social director are some of the many roles that people who marry into the NPS perform in support of their spouses and the NPS mission. Although the wives and daughters of park rangers were some of the earliest women rangers in the NPS, many more women served as “park wives” in the 1920s–1940s. Three members of a family How Would You Like to be a Park Ranger? Between 1920 and 1927, Yellowstone National Park Superintendent Horace M. Albright hired nine women as park rangers. Some years two or three women rangers worked at various locations in the park. Albright sought out many of these women himself, offering jobs to some seemingly on the spur of the moment. Impressed by their intelligence, education, and characters, he reported that the women were “uniformly satisfactory” (no pun intended, we’re sure!). Ranger Frieda Nelson in uniform with Governor Nellie T. Ross What Did You Call Me? Only 17 women park rangers are documented from 1918 to 1927. Perhaps another three or four are hinted at in the records. Even so, the total number was probably still only around 20. Most histories of the NPS, however, put the total number of women rangers much lower. The difference isn’t just a simple matter of math. It goes to the heart of the question “What makes a ranger?” female ranger in uniform at a desk Did You Know We Never Hire Women? In 1920, as Ranger Isabel Bassett Wasson arrived at Yellowstone, Dr. Harold C. Bryant and Dr. Loye Holmes Miller launched the new NPS education program with the Free Nature Guide Service at Yosemite National Park. Female Ranger talks to a crowd Protecting the Ranger Image In 1926, five women rangers worked in Yellowstone National Park. Marguerite Lindsley was the only permanent ranger and supervised the museum at Mammoth. Frieda B. Nelson and Irene Wisdom were temporary park rangers. Wisdom worked at the entrance station, while Nelson did clerical duties in the chief ranger’s office and worked in the information office. Ranger dancing with a bear The Women Naturalists Only two early women park rangers made the transition to park naturalists. Having resigned her permanent ranger position after her marriage, Marguerite Lindsley Arnold returned to Yellowstone National Park under the temporary park ranger (naturalist) title from 1929 to 1931. Yosemite rehired Ranger Enid Michael as temporary naturalist each summer from 1928 to 1942. A handful of other parks hired a few new women under the newly created ranger-naturalist designation. Polly Mead, a woman park ranger-naturalist is giving a talk outdoors to a group of visitors. 1931 The Job is His, Not Yours In the early 1950s, park wives continued to function as they had from the 1920s to the 1940s. The NPS still got Two For the Price of One, relying on women to keep monuments in the Southwest running, to give freely of their time and talents, to build and maintain park communities, and to boost morale among park staffs. With the creation of the Mission 66 Program to improve park facilities, the NPS found new ways to put some park wives to (unpaid) work. Man and woman with telescope Substitute Rangers As the 1940s dawned, the United States was still dealing with the economic woes of the Great Depression and trying not to get drawn in WWII. Even as it continued to manage New Deal Program work in national and state parks, the NPS remained understaffed as a government bureau. The emergency relief workers and about 15 percent of NPS staff enlisted or were drafted during the first couple of years of WWII. Winifred Tada, 1940. (Courtesy of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin) Birds and Observing Them Birds are found just about everywhere. Even when you can’t see them, you can often hear them. Bird diversity changes depending on location and season. Birds can be enjoyed in so many different ways: watching their activity, listening to their songs, noting their plumage, or capturing their likeness through art. Use this guide to learn more about birds and birding. A flock of American avocets swim on a lake. Climate Smart Conservation Planning for the National Parks In response to climate change, park managers are having to rethink how they plan for the future. Climate Smart Conservation is a process that can help managers achieve goals in the face of coming changes. Under this framework, scientists and managers use their collective knowledge to anticipate problems and be proactive, rather than reactive. Pika with a mouthful of grass Collaborative Vital Signs Monitoring in Yellowstone National Park Central to understanding and promoting the health of national parks is the availability of regularly-collected, high quality, long-term ecological information on key natural resource indicators of park health that the National Park Service refers to as “vital signs”. Examples of vital signs include water quality, plant communities, and amphibians. two people looking closely at a tree Series: Intermountain Park Science 2021 Integrating Research and Resource Management in Intermountain National Parks Group of National Park Service staff and volunteers standing in front of a desert canyon. Yellowstone National Park & United States Naval Academy Partnership: Student Designs for Improved Shoreline Access at Lake Yellowstone Hotel Coastlines are dynamic and processes such as erosion and accretion challenge coastal managers and nearby infrastructure. A unique partnership between the NPS and the US Naval Academy has been established to tackle these concerns while providing valuable experience to students. Park staff and students work collaboratively to developed conceptual engineering designs that address vulnerable shoreline assets. large yellow building along shoreline Top 10 Tips for a Summer Visit to Yellowstone National Park Are you planning a summer visit to Yellowstone National Park? Explore insider tips from park rangers on how to have a memorable and safe experience! A park ranger standing on a boardwalk in front of a hot spring Volcanic Processes—Lahars Lahars are volcanic mudflows and are among the most destructive of volcanic phenomena. Lahars present significant geohazards since they can travel great distances down river valleys and impact population centers away from the immediate area of a volcano. wide river valley filled with sediment and snowy peaks in the distance Ultra-Plinian Eruptions These caldera-forming eruptions are the largest of all volcanic eruptions. These eruptions have higher eruption rates that form higher eruption columns and produce widespread pyroclastic flows. View overlooking extensive flat ground covered with trees and meadows Plan Like a Park Ranger: Top 10 Tips for a Winter Visit to Yellowstone National Park Planning a winter visit to Yellowstone National Park? Explore insider tips from park rangers on how to have a memorable and safe experience! a park ranger standing outside in snow nearby a large stone archway Crater Lakes Water lakes may exist in craters and calderas (large collapse features) as these depressions can become filled by rainwater or melting snow or ice, or be places where groundwater can accumulate at the surface. Crater lakes can be long-lived or ephemeral, and may contain fresh or acidic waters. crater lake and snowy rim Fumaroles Fumaroles are places where steam and volcanic gases are emitted. They are present on most active volcanoes. The occurrence of fumaroles and other geothermal features such as hot springs, geysers, and mud pots are important signs that a volcano is active. steam vents on the crater rim Yellowstone Developed Area Fuels Management In 2021, Yellowstone National Park continued and completed mechanical fuel treatments that began in 2020 on 262 acres in and around the Grant Village developed area. This was a continuation of a similar fuels project completed in West Yellowstone in 2019 and will be continued in the Lake District in 2022. All these projects are designed to create defensible space adjacent to structures to protect human life, property, and resources from the threat of wildfires. A masticator removes fuels in Yellowstone National Park. Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Audrey Calhoun The first Black woman in the United States to graduate with a degree in forestry, Audrey Calhoun committed to a career in national parks. Audrey Calhoun poses in her Park Service uniform. Composite Volcanoes (Stratovolcanoes) Composite volcanoes are made up of both lava flows and pyroclastic deposits and usually experience multiple eruptions over long periods of time. Mount Rainier is a composite volcano. photo of a snow covered volcanic peak Volcanic Domes Lava domes are steep-sided rounded accumulations of highly viscous silicic lava over a vent. Some domes are part of composite volcanoes, but large ones can make up their own volcanoes. Lassen Peak is a dome. photo of a rounded hill of blocky rock Dare to Imagine: Erin Stahler Meet Erin Stahler, a Biological Science Technician with the Yellowstone Wolf Project who found her dream job. In addition to her work on wolves, she also assists with the capture and collaring of bison, mule deer, bighorn sheep, elk, pronghorn, and cougars. This article is part of a National Park Foundation funded project called the Dare to Imagine project dedicated to highlighting women in parks who who are breaking barriers and showing what a scientist looks like. graphic of a young woman in the snow, Text reads Erin Stahler, Biological Science Technician Isabel Bassett Wasson In 1920, Isabel Bassett Wasson was the first woman hired as a park ranger at Yellowstone National Park. Although she only worked for one summer, she opened the door for other women rangers to follow at Yellowstone in the 1920s. Isabel Wasson wearing a short-sleeved shirt poses with trees in the background. Ranger Roll Call, 1916-1929 Recent research demonstrates that there were more women rangers and ranger-naturalists in early National Park Service (NPS) history than previously thought. However, the number of women in uniformed positions was quite low in any given year. Ranger Frieda Nelson shows of the suspenders used to hold up her uniform breeches. Mary A. Rolfe Mary A. Rolfe spent over a year in France near the close of World War I, working with the American Expeditionary Forces, YWCA, and Red Cross. In 1921, she became the second woman park ranger to work at Yellowstone National Park. Black and white portrait of Mary Rolfe. She looks to the side, away from the camera. Shield Volcanoes Shield volcanoes are typically very large volcanoes with very gentle slopes made up of basaltic lava flows. Mauna Loa and Kilauea in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park are shield volcanoes. diagram of a shield volcano with lava features Interagency Scientists Use Monitoring to Assess Greater Yellowstone’s Amphibians Amphibians are cryptic and charismatic animals. Because they depend on land and water habitats, their presence or absence in a given habitat can tell us a lot about overall ecosystem health--so it’s concerning that 40% of these animals are threatened with extinction worldwide. In Greater Yellowstone, ecologists have been studying five native amphibians for decades. A special series of papers reveals their findings. close-up of the face of a dark green salamander Women in Landscape-Scale Conservation: Jodi Hilty Jodi Hilty is the Chief Scientist and President of the Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative. See how important it is to work with Indigenous Peoples for successful large-landscape conservation. woman leans against a bridge railing in a forested area as she looks at the camera. Cinder Cones Cinder cones are typically simple volcanoes that consist of accumulations of ash and cinders around a vent. Sunset Crater Volcano and Capulin Volcano are cinder cones. photo of a dry grassy field with a cinder cone in the distance Series: Volcanic Features Volcanoes vary greatly in size and shape. Volcanoes also may have a variety of other features, which in turn, have a great range in diversity of form, size, shape, and permanence. Many volcanoes have craters at their summits and/or at the location of other vents. Some craters contain water lakes. Lakes of molten or solidified lava may exist on some volcanoes. Fumaroles and other geothermal features are a product of heat from magma reservoirs and volcanic gases. photo of a lava lake in a summit crater Women in Landscape-Scale Conservation: Cheryl Decker Cheryl Decker works hard to keep invasive plants from moving across boundaries. woman smiles at camera with rows of daffodils behind her How to Name a New Species from Badlands National Park Paleontologist Ed Welsh details the discovery and description of a new mammal species from Badlands National Park, along with the historical and personal considerations that led to his choice of a name. historic photo of a camper with a truck and tent in a field Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 14, No. 1, Spring 2022 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> photo of 2 people kneeling in shallow water at the base of a steep slope Grant and Yellowstone On March 1, 1872, Grant signed the Yellowstone National Park Protection Act, which made the area “a public park or pleasuring-ground for the benefit and enjoyment of the people.” This landmark legislation created the first National Park and led to the creation of the National Park Service. A pool of water is in the foreground with a geyser erupting in the background. Series: The Odyssey of Ulysses An unknown 2nd Lieutenant in the U.S.-Mexican War later resigns the army. He rejoins and goes on to become lieutenant general of all Union armies. In his first term as President of the United States, he establishes Yellowstone National Park. From his first battle to his family home to his final resting place — the saga of Ulysses S. Grant is preserved in your National Parks. Color lithograph of Grant at the capture of the city of Mexico. The Resource Stewardship Scout Ranger Program Brings BSA Scouts and National Parks Together To connect more youth to their local communities, NPS created the Resource Stewardship Scout Ranger Program in partnership with the Boy Scouts of America, which welcomes boys, girls, and young adults to participate. Through this program, BSA Scouts and Cub Scouts can earn award certificates and may also receive a patch. Learn more in this article. William Kai, a Cub Scout, holds up his Resource Stewardship Scout Ranger Certificate Award Explore Careers: Yellowstone National Park 2019 #WhatWeDoWednesdays From studying archeological sites, to maintaining boardwalks, to predicting the next Old Faithful eruption, there are many types of positions that help preserve the park's natural and cultural resources for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations. a park ranger driving a boat on a lake Explore Careers: Yellowstone National Park 2021 #WhatWeDoWednesdays From investigating wolf kill sites, to grooming park roads in winter, to monitoring climate sites, there are many types of positions that help preserve the park's natural and cultural resources for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations. a wildlife biologist holding up an elk skull Explore Careers: Yellowstone National Park 2020 #WhatWeDoWednesdays From designing exhibits, to monitoring hydrothermal features, to researching cougars, there are many types of positions that help preserve the park's natural and cultural resources for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations. a machine diving underwater NPS Recognizes International Firefighters' Day The National Park Service Structural Fire Branch took time away from their busy annual Structural Firefighting Leadership Council seminar to pause and remember firefighters from across the world who have given the ultimate sacrifice in the line of duty. The NPS has a robust structural and wildland firefighting program with firefighters facing challenging situations on a daily basis. It is important for us to memorialize those that we have lost, while remembering to be safe. Cake decorated with NPS structural fire logo and writing that says International Firefighters Day. Series: Volcano Types Volcanoes vary in size from small cinder cones that stand only a few hundred feet tall to the most massive mountains on earth. photo of a volcanic mountain with snow and ice Explosive Calderas Explosive calderas result from violent eruptions of great quantities of silicic magmas. These eruptions produce massive eruption columns that extend into the stratosphere, and voluminous pyroclastic flows. Eruptions that produce explosive calderas generally range from 6 (Colossal) on the Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI) to 8 super eruptions (Apocalyptic). digital oblique aerial image of a volcanic caldera Calderas Calderas are large collapse features that can be many miles in diameter. They form during especially large eruptions when the magma chamber is partially emptied, and the ground above it collapses into the momentary void. Crater Lake and Aniakchak Crater are calderas. photo of oblique aerial view of a volcanic caldera with snow and ice Resurgent Calderas Resurgent calderas are substantially larger than summit calderas with diameters of many tens of miles (kms). Although they form in areas that have previously experienced volcanism, they do not form on any preexisting volcanic edifice. VEI 7-8 eruptions lead to caldera formation. a shaded relief of a volcanic caldera with rim outlined, and domes and cones colored Series: Volcanic Eruption Styles Categories in this traditional classification are based on the eruption styles of particular volcanoes. These magmatic eruption styles are listed in the order of increasing explosivity. volcanic eruption with glowing lava Yellowstone Science 28(1): The Grazing Issue xxx Ranger Roll Call, 1930-1939 Few women worked in uniformed positions in the 1930s but those who did weren't only ranger-checkers or ranger-naturalists. Jobs as guides, historians, archeologists, and in museums opened to more women. Seven women in Park Service uniforms stand in line inside a cave. The Winds of Change The history of women rangers in the National Park Service (NPS) was believed to start with Yosemite and Mount Rainier national parks in 1918, followed by Yellowstone in 1920. New information confirms that Wind Cave National Park, which had a third of the visitors of these other parks in 1917, hired the first woman ranger in 1916 and the second in 1918. Esther Brazell in a cap and gown. Ranger Roll Call, 1940-1949 Only a small number of women held temporary ranger positions in national parks during World War II. Carlsbad Caverns National Park, national monuments in the Southwest, and historical sites in the East continued to employ more women. Although a few women veterans benefitted from post-war veteran hiring programs, most veterans were men and permanent positions became even more difficult for women to get. Catherine Byrnes and Barbara Dickinson stand outside modeling the NPS uniform. Ranger Roll Call, 1950-1959 In the 1950s, women in uniform continue to work as guides, historians, and archeologists. Few women had permanent positions. A handful of women began to get seasonal ranger-naturalists positions at large national parks for the first time in two decades. Ann Livesay in her NPS uniform standing in front of a low wall at the edge of the Grand Canyon. The Madison River Near West Yellowstone, Montana The Madison River is a renowned recreation destination for fishing birding, and wildlife viewing. The river begins in Yellowstone National Park at the confluence of the Firehole and Gibbon rivers. The Greater Yellowstone Network monitors water quality and discharge outside of the park north of West Yellowstone, Montana. A calmly flowing river winding through an area with conifer trees and snow covered shores. Pollinators in peril? A multipark approach to evaluating bee communities in habitats vulnerable to effects from climate change Can you name five bees in your park? Ten? Twenty? Will they all be there 50 years from now? We know that pollinators are key to maintaining healthy ecosystems—from managed almond orchards to wild mountain meadows. We have heard about dramatic population declines of the agricultural workhorse, the honey bee. Yet what do we really know about the remarkable diversity and resilience of native bees in our national parks? Southeastern polyester bee, Colletes titusensis. Water Quality Criteria for the Madison River near West Yellowstone, Montana The Madison River is classified as a B-1 water body. This means it is suitable for drinking after being treated, recreation, growth of salmon and other wildlife, and as a water supply for agriculture and industrial purposes. We compare our water quality results to federal and state standards. A view of a tree-lined river from a bridge with a parking area at the bend in the river. Water Monitoring Methods for the Madison River near West Yellowstone, Montana We collect water samples from the Madison River and send them to a lab to analyze the chemical composition. In addition to water chemistry analysis, we collect data on temperature, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, pH, and turbidity. Water discharge data are from a USGS gage east of West Yellowstone, MT. Five scientists standing on a bridge next to a bridge-board and reel used for water monitoring. Water Flow in the Madison River near West Yellowstone, Montana Water flow on the Madison River has been monitored since 1913. The hydrograph for the monitoring site near West Yellowstone, MT, is characteristic of a groundwater-fed system. We monitor flow to track how the river may be changing over time. A river lined with conifers and snow-covered banks on a cloudy day. Series: Water Resources Monitoring in the Madison River near West Yellowstone, Montana The Madison River has high water quality and is a popular recreation destination. The river begins in Yellowstone National Park and flows out of the park into Hebgen Lake before continuing northwest and joining two other rivers to become the Missouri River. The Greater Yellowstone Network monitors water quality and discharge just outside the park boundary north of West Yellowstone, Montana. We will update our results in this article series each year as we collect more data. A scientist on a bridge operating a bridge-board and reel to lower a water sampler into the river. Water Quality in the Madison River Near West Yellowstone, Montana The Madison River has high quality water. There are some arsenic exceedances that are likely naturally occurring from the geothermal geology in the watershed. Natural geothermal activity can contribute to raised temperature, pH, and arsenic levels above state standards. We monitor water chemistry each year to detect potential changes in water quality. A blue river in a confer forest with a shrub-lined shore and mountains in the distance. Pyroclastic Flows and Ignimbrites, and Pyroclastic Surges Pyroclastic flows and surges are among the most awesome and most destructive of all volcanic phenomena. Pyroclastic flow deposits are found in at least 21 units of the National Park System. photo of a cloud of ash and dust moving down a mountain side. Volcanic Ash, Tephra Fall, and Fallout Deposits Volcanic ash, pumice, and tephra ejected in volcanic eruptions ultimately falls back to Earth where it covers the ground. These deposits may be the thin dustings or may be many tens of feet (meters) thick near an eruptive vent. Volcanic ash and tephra can present geohazards that are present great distances from the erupting volcano. photo of a bluff with exposed fine-grained volcanic ash and pumice. Water Quality Criteria for the Yellowstone River at Corwin Springs, Montana Exiting the park at Gardiner, MT, the Yellowstone River has been classified as a B-1 water body. This means the water is suitable for drinking after treatment, recreation, agricultural and industrial water supply, and growth and propagation of salmonid fishes and associated aquatic life, waterfowl, and furbearers. We compare our water quality monitoring data with state and federal standards. Water quality graph shown as a decorative thumbnail listing element graphic. Series: Water Resources Monitoring in the Yellowstone River at Corwin Springs, Montana The Yellowstone River flows northwest from its headwaters in the Absaroka Range on Younts Peak, Wyoming, through Yellowstone National Park, exiting near Gardiner, Montana, on its way to the Missouri River. The river has relatively high water quality and is a popular cold-water fishery destination. The Greater Yellowstone Network monitors water discharge and water quality in the Yellowstone River. We will update this series as we collect more data. A river flowing through hills and mountains with reflected clouds. Water Monitoring Methods for the Yellowstone River at Corwin Springs, Montana We collect water samples monthly during ice-free periods following depth and width-integrated protocols outlined by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). In addition to water chemistry testing, we collect temperature, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, pH, and turbidity data. Daily water discharge and temperature data are collected by a USGS gaging station. A river flowing through a landscape of snowy hills. The Yellowstone River at Corwin Springs, Montana The Yellowstone River is the longest undammed river in the lower 48 states. It flows northwest through Yellowstone National Park on its way to the Missouri River. The river supports agricultural, municipal, and recreational uses and is ecologically important in the region. We monitor water quality and discharge in the Yellowstone River at Corwin Springs, MT. Map of the Yellowstone River from Yellowstone Lake to the monitoring location at Corwin Springs, MT. Water Quality in the Yellowstone River at Corwin Springs, Montana The Yellowstone River has relatively high water quality and much of the watershed upstream from the monitoring location is managed within federal lands. We measure water chemistry and core water quality parameters monthly from August to November each year. Total phosphorus and total suspended solids (TSS) tend to be highest during high flows. Arsenic, which occurs naturally in this region, tends to be lowest during high flows. A blue river lined by shrubs and rocky, treeless hills. Water Flow in the Yellowstone River at Corwin Springs, Montana A U.S. Geological Survey gaging station (USGS 06191500) has measured daily flow on the Yellowstone River most years since 1890. The river is a snow-driven system where peak flows are greater during spring runoff. We present annual discharge monitoring results from the Yellowstone River in this article. A dark blue flowing river lined by hills and mountains. 2021 National Park Service Aviation Awards In 2021, the National Park Service Aviation Program awarded the Excellence in Mentorship Aviation Award, the Tom Clausing Aviation All Risk (Hazard) Program Award, Aviator of the Year Award, and the Wright Brothers Aviation Safety Award. Five men and a woman stand surrounding a Mesa Verde Helitack sign. Two men hold awards.

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