Yorktown Battlefield

National Historical Park - Virginia

At the northern end of the Colonial Parkway, in York County at Yorktown, the park operates the Yorktown Battlefield. The Nelson House, which was built around 1724, may have served as Cornwallis's headquarters during the final battle of the Revolutionary War, and the battlefield was the site of the British defeat. The Moore House is located in the eastern part of the park and is where surrender negotiations took place in 1781. Nearby, the state-operated Yorktown Victory Center and the Yorktown Riverwalk Landing area are located.

maps

Official visitor map of Colonial National Historic Park (NHP) in Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Colonial - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Colonial National Historic Park (NHP) in Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/york/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colonial_National_Historical_Park#Yorktown_Battlefield At the northern end of the Colonial Parkway, in York County at Yorktown, the park operates the Yorktown Battlefield. The Nelson House, which was built around 1724, may have served as Cornwallis's headquarters during the final battle of the Revolutionary War, and the battlefield was the site of the British defeat. The Moore House is located in the eastern part of the park and is where surrender negotiations took place in 1781. Nearby, the state-operated Yorktown Victory Center and the Yorktown Riverwalk Landing area are located. Discover what it took for the United States to be independent as you explore the site of the last major battle of the Revolutionary War. Here at Yorktown, in the fall of 1781, General George Washington, with allied American and French forces, besieged General Charles Lord Cornwallis’s British army. On October 19, Cornwallis surrendered, effectively ending the war and ensuring independence. For an internet map search or GPS, use the following: Yorktown Battlefield Visitor Center, 1000 Colonial Parkway, Yorktown, Virginia 23690. Eastbound from the Richmond area via I-64, exit 242B for Yorktown, to the Colonial Parkway. Follow the parkway to its end. West bound Interstate 64 from the Virginia Beach/Norfolk/Hampton area for Yorktown should take Route 105 East (Fort Eustis Boulevard east), exit 250B to Route 17. Turn left onto Route 17. Follow the signs to Yorktown Battlefield. Yorktown Battlefield Visitor Center The Yorktown Visitor Center is the orientation point for your visit to Yorktown and Yorktown Battlefield. At the visitor center information desk, you can obtain a park brochure with maps and information, an orientation to the park, and an opportunity to schedule your visit around the various interpretive programs going on throughout the day. For an internet map search or GPS, use the following: Yorktown Battlefield Visitor Center, 1000 Colonial Parkway, Yorktown, Virginia 23690. Eastbound from the Richmond area via I-64, exit 242B for Yorktown, to the Colonial Parkway. Follow the parkway to its end. West bound Interstate 64 from the Virginia Beach/Norfolk/Hampton area for Yorktown should take Route 105 East (Fort Eustis Boulevard east), exit 250B to Route 17. Turn left onto Route 17. Follow the signs to Yorktown Battlefield. Cannon at Sunset Yorktown Battlefield Cannon at sunset at Yorktown Battlefield Cannon on earthworks at sunset. Yorktown Battlefield Lamb's Artillery Fire 18 pounder Cannon Yorktown Battlefield Lamb's Artillery Fire 18 pounder Cannon Yorktown Battlefield We have artillery firing programs twice a month throughout the summer at Yorktown Battlefield The Moore House The Moore House The Moore House where the terms of surrender were negotiated. National Cemetery National Cemetery showing tombstones, American Flag and Cemetery Lodge in sunlight. Civil War National Cemetery The Nelson House Nelson house on main street. The Nelson house on main street of Yorktown. Home of Thomas Nelson Jr. a signer of the Declaration of Independence. Yorktown Victory Monument Yorktown Victory Monument Yorktown Victory Monument Yorktown Battlefield Earthworks:Redoubt 9 Yorktown Battlefield Earthworks:Redoubt 9 Yorktown Battlefield Earthworks:Redoubt 9 Benedict Arnold, 1741 - 1801 It has been said that had Benedict Arnold died at the Battles of Saratoga, he would have been considered as one of America's greatest heroes. Instead, he died in England in June of 1801 as General Washington's most brilliant tactician and America's worst betrayer. Thomas Hart painting of Benedict Arnold. Death and Dying The somber aftermath of Civil War battles introduced Americans--North and South--to death on an unprecedented scale and of an unnatural kind, often ending in an unmarked grave far from home. Neither individuals, nor institutions, nor governments were prepared to deal with death on such a massive scale, for never before or since have we killed so many of our own. The Civil War revolutionized the American military's approach to caring for the dead, leading to our modern cult Photo of freshly buried marked and unmarked graves near Petersburg, Va. The Oneida Nation in the American Revolution The Oneida were one of the individual Nations of the powerful Six Nations Confederacy. The "Oneida Carry," where Ft. Stanwix was built, was located in traditional Oneida lands. Man in traditional Oneida clothing; flowing red cape, feathers on his head, & leather leggings. Series: The People of Fort Stanwix Many different people and people groups have traversed the Oneida Carry throughout its history; from natives of the Six Nations Confederacy, to armies, to families and politicians. Learn more about many of these noted individuals and groups in the following series. A statue of a man in Continental Soldier uniform. His hand on his hip hold a sword hilt. The 1st New York Regiment of the Continental Line 1776-1783 The regiment that came to be known as the 1st New York was actually authorized as the 2nd NY Regiment of the Continental Line on May 25, 1775. They were assigned to the Northern Department in Albany, NY with 10 companies from Albany, Tryon, Charlotte, and Cumberland Counties. After a year, Colonel Goose Van Schaick was designated as commander. Continental soldiers with packs on their backs that say "1NY" The 3rd New York Regiment of the Continental Line 1777-1781 The 3rd New York Regiment that defended Fort Schuyler (Stanwix) against the British in 1777 had been reorganized and established from other New York Regiments on January 26, 1777. Two Continental Soldiers stand holding their muskets with bayonets. French Alliance Day The Continental Army's alliance with France was formalized and celebrated during the Valley Forge encampment. outdoors, soldiers, cheers, hats Series: African American History at Gettysburg Abraham Brian, Basil Biggs, James Warfield, and Mag Palm are just a few of the many individuals that were affected by the Civil War and the Battle of Gettysburg, and each has their own story to tell. We have collected their stories in one place so that you can learn more about their various trials during this tumultuous time in American history. A black and white photograph of a black family posing with a white man and his horse in a dirt road.

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