by Alex Gugel , all rights reserved

Yosemite

National Park - California

Yosemite National Park is in California’s Sierra Nevada mountains. It’s famed for its giant, ancient sequoia trees, and for Tunnel View, the iconic vista of towering Bridalveil Fall and the granite cliffs of El Capitan and Half Dome. In Yosemite Village are shops, restaurants, lodging, the Yosemite Museum and the Ansel Adams Gallery, with prints of the photographer’s renowned black-and-white landscapes of the area.

maps

Official Visitor Map of Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yosemite - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of the Yosemite Valley in Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yosemite - Yosemite Valley

Official visitor map of the Yosemite Valley in Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of hiking trails in the Crane Flat & White Wolf area in Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yosemite - Crane Flat & White Wolf Area Hiking Map

Map of hiking trails in the Crane Flat & White Wolf area in Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of hiking trails in the Glacier Point area in Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yosemite - Glacier Point Area Hiking Map

Map of hiking trails in the Glacier Point area in Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of hiking trails in the Yosemite Valley in Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yosemite - Yosemite Valley Hiking Map

Map of hiking trails in the Yosemite Valley in Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of hiking trails in the Wawona area in Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yosemite - Wawona Area Hiking Map

Map of hiking trails in the Wawona area in Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of hiking trails in the Tuolumne Meadows area in Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yosemite - Tuolumne Meadows Area Hiking Map

Map of hiking trails in the Tuolumne Meadows area in Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of Glacier Point Road Winter Trails in Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yosemite - Glacier Point Road Winter Trails

Map of Glacier Point Road Winter Trails in Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of Crane Flat Winter Trails in Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yosemite - Crane Flat Winter Trails

Map of Crane Flat Winter Trails in Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Mother Lode - Boundary Map

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

The Oktober 2021 Yosemite Guide with information about trip planning, activities, scheduled events, and hours of operations for different facilities and services at Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yosemite Guide - September 29, 2021 - November 30, 2021

The Oktober 2021 Yosemite Guide with information about trip planning, activities, scheduled events, and hours of operations for different facilities and services at Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

The September 2021 Yosemite Guide with information about trip planning, activities, scheduled events, and hours of operations for different facilities and services at Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yosemite Guide - August 22, 2021 - September 28, 2021

The September 2021 Yosemite Guide with information about trip planning, activities, scheduled events, and hours of operations for different facilities and services at Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

The July 2021 Yosemite Guide with information about trip planning, activities, scheduled events, and hours of operations for different facilities and services at Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yosemite Guide - July 21, 2021 - August 21, 2021

The July 2021 Yosemite Guide with information about trip planning, activities, scheduled events, and hours of operations for different facilities and services at Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

The June 2021 Yosemite Guide with information about trip planning, activities, scheduled events, and hours of operations for different facilities and services at Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yosemite Guide - June 16, 2021 - July 20, 2021

The June 2021 Yosemite Guide with information about trip planning, activities, scheduled events, and hours of operations for different facilities and services at Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

The May 2021 Yosemite Guide with information about trip planning, activities, scheduled events, and hours of operations for different facilities and services at Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yosemite Guide - May 12, 2021 - June 15, 2021

The May 2021 Yosemite Guide with information about trip planning, activities, scheduled events, and hours of operations for different facilities and services at Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

The April 2021 Yosemite Guide with information about trip planning, activities, scheduled events, and hours of operations for different facilities and services at Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yosemite Guide - March 30, 2021 - May 11, 2021

The April 2021 Yosemite Guide with information about trip planning, activities, scheduled events, and hours of operations for different facilities and services at Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

The February 2021 Yosemite Guide with information about trip planning, activities, scheduled events, and hours of operations for different facilities and services at Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yosemite Guide - February 3, 2021 - March 30, 2021

The February 2021 Yosemite Guide with information about trip planning, activities, scheduled events, and hours of operations for different facilities and services at Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

The January 2021 Yosemite Guide with information about trip planning, activities, scheduled events, and hours of operations for different facilities and services at Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yosemite Guide - December 2, 2020 - February 2, 2021

The January 2021 Yosemite Guide with information about trip planning, activities, scheduled events, and hours of operations for different facilities and services at Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of hiking trails in the Yosemite Valley in Yosemite National Park (NP) with trail descriptions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Hiking - Valley hiking map

Map of hiking trails in the Yosemite Valley in Yosemite National Park (NP) with trail descriptions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of hiking trails in the Wawona area in Yosemite National Park (NP) with trail descriptions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Hiking - Wawona hiking map

Map of hiking trails in the Wawona area in Yosemite National Park (NP) with trail descriptions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of hiking trails in the Glacier Point area in Yosemite National Park (NP) with trail descriptions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Hiking - Glacier Point area hiking map

Map of hiking trails in the Glacier Point area in Yosemite National Park (NP) with trail descriptions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of winter trails in the Glacier Point area in Yosemite National Park (NP) with trail descriptions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Hiking - Glacier Point Road winter trails

Map of winter trails in the Glacier Point area in Yosemite National Park (NP) with trail descriptions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of hiking trails in the Crane Flat & White Wolf area in Yosemite National Park (NP) with trail descriptions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Hiking - Crane Flat & White Wolf area hiking map

Map of hiking trails in the Crane Flat & White Wolf area in Yosemite National Park (NP) with trail descriptions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of winter trails in the Crane Flat area in Yosemite National Park (NP) with trail descriptions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Hiking - Crane Flat area winter trails

Map of winter trails in the Crane Flat area in Yosemite National Park (NP) with trail descriptions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of trails in Tuolumne Meadows area in Yosemite National Park (NP) with trail descriptions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Hiking - Tuolumne Meadows Map and Area Information

Map of trails in Tuolumne Meadows area in Yosemite National Park (NP) with trail descriptions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of Picnic Areas in Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Hiking - Picnic Areas in Yosemite National Park

Map of Picnic Areas in Yosemite National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure of Pioneer Yosemite History Center. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Miscellaneous - Pioneer Yosemite History Center

Brochure of Pioneer Yosemite History Center. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure of Hetch Hetchy Valley. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Miscellaneous - Pioneer Yosemite History Center

Brochure of Hetch Hetchy Valley. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Yosemite Accessibility Guide. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Miscellaneous - Yosemite Accessibility Guide

Yosemite Accessibility Guide. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/yose https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yosemite_National_Park Yosemite National Park is in California’s Sierra Nevada mountains. It’s famed for its giant, ancient sequoia trees, and for Tunnel View, the iconic vista of towering Bridalveil Fall and the granite cliffs of El Capitan and Half Dome. In Yosemite Village are shops, restaurants, lodging, the Yosemite Museum and the Ansel Adams Gallery, with prints of the photographer’s renowned black-and-white landscapes of the area. Not just a great valley, but a shrine to human foresight, the strength of granite, the power of glaciers, the persistence of life, and the tranquility of the High Sierra. First protected in 1864, Yosemite National Park is best known for its waterfalls, but within its nearly 1,200 square miles, you can find deep valleys, grand meadows, ancient giant sequoias, a vast wilderness area, and much more. You can drive to Yosemite year-round and enter via Highways 41, 140, and 120 from the west. Tioga Pass Entrance (via Highway 120 from the east) is closed from approximately November through late May or June. Hetch Hetchy is open all year but may close intermittently due to snow. Please note that GPS units do not always provide accurate directions to or within Yosemite. Big Oak Flat Information Station The Big Oak Flat Information Station has an information desk, wilderness permit desk, and Yosemite Conservancy Bookstore. In the winter, self-registration wilderness permits for the Crane Flat area and Tioga Road trailheads only, are available on the front porch. You must bring your own bear canister when the information station is closed. Wilderness permits are required for overnight stays in Yosemite's Wilderness. Designated accessible parking spaces are available in front of the facility. The Big Oak Flat Information Station is located inside the park near the Big Oak Flat Entrance, on Big Oak Flat Road (Highway 120 from the west). Tuolumne Meadows Visitor Center The Tuolumne Meadows Visitor Center has an information desk, Yosemite Conservancy Bookstore, and an exhibit area detailing the area's geology, plant and animal life, and history. A designated accessible parking space and entrance are available. From the main parking lot, drive up the service road to the visitor center. Park in the designated accessible parking space, and follow the paved path in front of the visitor center to the rear entrance. Accessible restrooms are adjacent to the main parking lot. Located along Tioga Road, approximately 50 miles from Yosemite Valley. Wawona Visitor Center at Hill's Studio The Wawona Visitor Center has an information desk, Wilderness permit desk, and Yosemite Conservancy bookstore. In winter, self-registration wilderness permits for the Wawona trailheads are available on the porch. You must bring your own bear canister when the information station is closed. Wilderness permits are required for overnight stays in Yosemite's Wilderness. Accessible parking is available, and a lift for wheelchair access is available at the rear of the building (use intercom for assistance). Walk from the lodge or park at the Wawona Store and Pioneer Gift Shop parking area, located on the Wawona Road (Highway 41), and follow the marked path up the hill. Yosemite Valley Visitor Center The Yosemite Valley Visitor Center staff are ready to help answer your questions, provide directions, and hand out maps and brochures. There is also an information desk, bookstore, a theater, and an exhibit hall. Pay them a visit before heading out to your wild adventure. Wilderness permits for Yosemite Valley trailheads and bear canister rentals are available in winter. Located in Yosemite Village at shuttle stop 5 and 9, or by a 10-minute walk from Yosemite Village Parking. The visitor center is between Yosemite Museum and The Ansel Adams Gallery. Bridalveil Creek Campground The Bridalveil Creek Campground is located along the Glacier Point Road near Bridalveil Creek and is surrounded by a beautiful forest of red fir and lodgepole pine. At an elevation of 7,200 feet (2,200m) the campground is located 7 miles west of Glacier Point, 9 miles east of the Wawona Road turnoff, and is approximately 45 minutes from Yosemite Valley. The spectacular views from Glacier Point are nearby, and numerous hiking trails are located along the Glacier Point Road. There are no services nearby. Bridalveil Creek Campground Reservation Fee - Non-Group Site 36.00 Bridalveil Creek Campground Reservation Fee - Non-Group Site/night Bridalveil Creek Campground Group Site Fee - Group Site 75.00 Bridalveil Creek Campground Group Site Fee - Group Site/night Bridalveil Creek Campground Stock Site Fee - Stock Site 50.00 Bridalveil Creek Campground Stock Site Fee - Stock Site/night Bridalveil Campground A wood sign at the entrance to a campground reads, Bridalveil Campground. The entrance to Bridalveil Campground Camp 4 Campground Camp 4 is located in Yosemite Valley near the base of granite cliffs close to Yosemite Falls. Yosemite Valley is centrally located in the park and boasts some of Yosemite’s most iconic features. This campground is located at 4,000 feet (1,200 m) elevation and can be accessed from all park roads. Camp 4 is within biking and walking distance of many services in Yosemite Valley and is located near the free shuttle route. There are food and grocery services nearby at Yosemite Valley Lodge and Yosemite Village. Camping Fee 10.00 Fee is per person, per night. Lottery Fee 10.00 When reservations are required, there is a non-refundable lottery fee of $10 per application (up to 6 people). The camping fee (only charged with a successful lottery application) is $10 per person per night. Camp 4 Kiosk Area Camp 4 kiosk building and bulletin board Camp 4 Kiosk Building and Bulletin Board Camp 4 Bear/Vehicle Sign An exhibit of a bear reaching into a car window and holding food, is set up near a parking lot. A 'Keep Bears Wild' message on the outskirts of Camp 4 Camp 4 Campground with Tents Tents in sites within Camp 4. Camp 4 with tents Crane Flat Campground Crane Flat Campground is located in breathtaking Yosemite National Park in Central California's rugged Sierra Nevada Mountain Range. The campground is located along the Big Oak Flat Road (Highway 120) just west of Crane Flat, about 30 minutes northwest of Yosemite Valley, at 6,200 ft (1,900 m) elevation. Within Yosemite, visitors can gaze upon waterfalls, sheer granite cliffs, deep valleys, grand meadows, ancient giant sequoias, vast wilderness areas and much more. Crane Flat Campground Reservation Fee – All Sites 36.00 Crane Flat Campground Reservation Fee – All Sites/night Crane Flat Campground A wood sign at the entrance to a campground reads, Crane Flat Campground The entrance to Crane Flat Campground Hodgdon Meadow Campground Hodgdon Meadow Campground is located in breathtaking Yosemite National Park in Central California's rugged Sierra Nevada Mountain Range. The campground is 25 miles from Yosemite Valley at an elevation of 4,875 feet. Within Yosemite, visitors can gaze upon waterfalls, sheer granite cliffs, deep valleys, grand meadows, ancient giant sequoias, vast wilderness areas and much more. Hodgdon Meadow Campground Reservation Fee - Non-Group Site 36.00 Hodgdon Meadow Campground Reservation Fee - Standard Sites (RV or Tent) and Tent Only Sites/night Hodgdon Meadow Campground First-Come, First-Served Fee - Non-Group Site 26.00 Hodgdon Meadow Campground First-Come, First-Served Fee - Non-Group Site/night Hodgdon Meadow Campground Group Site Fee - Group Site 75.00 Hodgdon Meadow Campground Group Site Fee - Group Site/night Hodgdon Meadow Campground A wooden sign reads Hodgdon Meadow Campground. A kiosk is located at the entrance to the campground. The entrance to Hodgdon Meadow Campground Hodgdon Meadow Campground Kiosk Small wooden building at entry to campground Hodgdon Meadow Campground Kiosk Hodgdon Meadow Entrance Sign and Bulletin Board Campground entrance sign and nearby bulletin board Hodgdon Meadow Entrance Sign and Bulletin Board Lower Pines Campground Lower Pines is located along the Merced River in Yosemite Valley. Yosemite Valley is centrally located in the park and boasts some of Yosemite’s most iconic features. This campground is located at 4,000 feet (1,219 m) elevation and can be accessed from all park roads. Lower Pines is within biking and walking distance of many services and trailheads in Yosemite Valley and is located on the free shuttle route. There are food and grocery services nearby at Curry Village and Yosemite Village. Lower Pines Campground Reservation Fee – Non-Double Sites 36.00 Lower Pines Campground Reservation Fee – Non-Double Sites Lower Pines Campground Reservation Fee – Double Sites 60.00 Lower Pines Campground Reservation Fee – Double Sites Lower Pines Campground A cleared campsite shows a picnic table and fire pit. A view of Half Dome can be seen through trees. A great view of Half Dome from a campsite in Lower Pines Campground. Lower Pines Campground Amphitheater Empty amphitheater in campground with benches and a screen and stage Lower Pines amphitheater where summer evening ranger programs may take place. Lower Pines Campsites Campsites with tents and cars in Lower Pines A variety of campsites in Lower Pines Campground North Pines Campground North Pines is located along the Merced River in Yosemite Valley. Yosemite Valley is centrally located in the park and boasts some of Yosemite’s most iconic features. This campground is located at 4,000 feet (1,219 m) elevation and can be accessed from all park roads. North Pines is within biking and walking distance of many services and trailheads in Yosemite Valley and is located on the free shuttle route. There are food and grocery services nearby at Curry Village and Yosemite Village. North Pines Campground Reservation Fee - All Sites 36.00 North Pines Campground Reservation Fee - All Sites/night North Pines Campground A wood sign at the entrance of a campground reads, North Pines Campground. The entrance to North Pines Campground Porcupine Flat Campground Porcupine Flat Campground is located in breathtaking Yosemite National Park in Central California's rugged Sierra Nevada Mountain Range. The campground is along the Tioga Road about 1 hour and 15 minutes northeast of Yosemite Valley, at 8,100 feet (2,500 m) elevation (which means it's cooler, and can get cold at night). Within Yosemite, visitors can gaze upon waterfalls, sheer granite cliffs, deep valleys, grand meadows, ancient giant sequoias, vast wilderness areas and much more. Porcupine Flat Campground Fee - All Sites 20.00 Porcupine Flat Campground Fee - All Sites Porcupine Creek Campground A wood message board reads Porcupine Creek Campground and has several pieces of papers stapled to it A message board in Porcupine Creek Campground Tamarack Flat Campground Tamarack Flat Campground is located in breathtaking Yosemite National Park in Central California's rugged Sierra Nevada Mountain Range. The campground is along the Tioga Road about 45 minutes north of Yosemite Valley, at 6,300 feet (1,900 m) elevation. Within Yosemite, visitors can gaze upon waterfalls, sheer granite cliffs, deep valleys, grand meadows, ancient giant sequoias, vast wilderness areas and much more. Tamarack Flat Campground Fee - All Sites 20.00 Tamarack Flat Campground Fee - All Sites Tamarack Flat Campground A wood sign at the entrance of a campground reads, Tamarack Flat Campground. The entrance to Tamarack Flat Campground Tuolumne Meadows Campground Tuolumne Meadows Campground is Yosemite’s largest, and is located along the Tioga Road, with some areas located along the Tuolumne River. At 8,000 feet (2,600 m) this campground is open seasonally and has wonderful summer access to many hikes, lakes, and prominent viewpoints. The campground is located approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes from Yosemite Valley but a small store, grill, and post office are located nearby in Tuolumne Meadows. Tuolumne Meadows Campground Fee - Non Group Site 36.00 Tuolumne Meadows Campground Reservation Fee - Standard Sites (RV or Tent) and Tent Only Sites (non-group site)/night Tuolumne Meadows Campground Group Site Fee - Group Site 75.00 Tuolumne Meadows Campground Group Site Fee - Group Site/night Tuolumne Meadows Campground Stock Site Fee - Stock Site 50.00 Tuolumne Meadows Campground Stock Site Fee - Stock Site/night Tuolumne Meadows Campground A female park ranger leans out of a kiosk window to help a visitor who is in their car. The entrance to Tuolumne Meadows Campground Tuolumne Meadows Campground Bulletin Board Bulletin Board in Tuolumne Meadows Campground Tuolumne Meadows Campground bulletin board Tuolumne Meadows Campground Kiosk Tuolumne Meadows Campground Kiosk with ranger Tuolumne Meadows Campground Kiosk Tuolumne Meadows Horse Camp sign Tuolumne Meadows Horse Camp sign Tuolumne Meadows Horse Camp sign at entrance to camp Tuolumne Meadows Campground sign Tuolumne Meadows Campground sign indicating where people show go Tuolumne Meadows Campground sign indicating where people show go depending on reservation status. Upper Pines Campground Upper Pines is located near the Merced River in Yosemite Valley. Yosemite Valley is centrally located in the park and boasts some of Yosemite’s most iconic features. This large campground is located at 4,000 feet (1,219 m) elevation and can be accessed from all park roads. Upper Pines is within biking and walking distance of many services and trailheads in Yosemite Valley and is located on the free shuttle route. There are food and grocery services nearby at Curry Village and Yosemite Village. Upper Pines Campground Reservation Fee - All Sites 36.00 Upper Pines Campground Reservation Fee - All Sites/night Upper Pines Campground A campsite nestled in the trees includes a picnic table, firepit, and metal bear storage locker. A campsite in Upper Pines Campground. Upper Pines Campground Road Sign road and sign indicating Upper Pines Campground Sign for Upper Pines as you approach the campground. Upper Pines Campground with Tent Tent in campsite in Upper Pines Upper Pines campsite with tent and others in background. Wawona Campground The Wawona Campground is located along the South Fork Merced River close to historic Wawona. At an elevation of 4,000 feet (1,219 m), the campground is located in the southern end of the park, 27 miles and approximately 45 minutes from Yosemite Valley. The majestic Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias is just a short drive away and the Pioneer History Center is in nearby Wawona where you can see some of the park’s oldest structures. Wawona offers a visitor center and a market. Wawona Campground Reservation Fee - Non-Group Site 36.00 This fee is for reserved sites (RV or Tent). Wawona Campground First-Come, First-Served Fee - Non-Group Site 26.00 This fee is for first-come, first-served sites (available mid-October through mid-April in Loop A). Wawona Campground Group Site Fee - Group Site 75.00 This fee is for the group site located in Loop A; reservations required. Wawona Horse Camp Fee - Stock Site 50.00 This fee is for a site in the Wawona Horse Camp; reservations required. Wawona Campground Sign Wooden Wawona Campground sign located along the Wawona Road Wawona Campground sign located along the Wawona Road. Wawona Campground A car is stopped at a small kiosk at the entrance to a campground. The entrance to Wawona Campground White Wolf Campground White Wolf Campground is located in breathtaking Yosemite National Park in Central California's rugged Sierra Nevada Mountain Range. The campground is along the Tioga Road about 1 hour northeast of Yosemite Valley, at 8,000 feet (2,400 m) elevation (which means it's cooler, and can get cold at night). Within Yosemite, visitors can gaze upon waterfalls, sheer granite cliffs, deep valleys, grand meadows, ancient giant sequoias, vast wilderness areas and much more. White Wolf Campground Fee - All Sites 26.00 White Wolf Campground Fee - Standard Sites (RV or Tent) and Tent Only Sites White Wolf Campground A wood sign on the side of a road reads White Wolf Campground. The entrance to White Wolf Campground Yosemite Creek Campground Yosemite Creek Campground is located in breathtaking Yosemite National Park in Central California's rugged Sierra Nevada Mountain Range. The campground is along the Tioga Road about 1 hour north of Yosemite Valley, at 7,700 feet (2,300 m) elevation (which means it's cooler, and can get cold at night). Within Yosemite, visitors can gaze upon waterfalls, sheer granite cliffs, deep valleys, grand meadows, ancient giant sequoias, vast wilderness areas and much more. Yosemite Creek Campground Fee - All Sites 20.00 Porcupine Flat Campground Fee - All Sites Yosemite Creek Campground A wood sign at the entrance of a campground reads, Yosemite Creek Campground. The entrance to Yosemite Creek Campground Upper Yosemite Fall and Merced River in spring Upper Yosemite Fall and Merced River in spring Upper Yosemite Fall and Merced River in spring Yosemite Valley from Tunnel View Glaciated valley with vertical cliffs. Tunnel View is perhaps one of the most photographed views in the park. Rainbow over Half Dome A rainbow over a mountain in the distance. A hike up to Sentinel Dome rewards people with great views of the landscape around them. Cathedral Peak and Lake in Autumn A mountain reflecting in a lake. Cathedral Peak is one of the most recognizable peaks in the Yosemite Wilderness. Lower Yosemite Fall A waterfall flowing down a granite cliff. The walk to Lower Yosemite Fall is a popular and easy hike. Yosemite Falls on a Winter Morning Two tall waterfalls flowing down snow covered granite walls. Yosemite Falls will sometimes only trickle at the end of summer, but wet winters can rejuvenate the flow. Glen Aulin Mountains reflecting in water Glen Auilin is one of five High Sierra Camps, located in the Yosemite high country. Giant Sequoia Trees in the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias Cluster of tall trees with cloudy sky. Yosemite National Park's massive giant sequoias (Sequoiadendron giganteum) live in three groves in the park. The most famous of these is the Mariposa Grove, which contains about 500 mature giant sequoias. Tenaya Lake at Sunset Mountains surrounding a lake. Tenaya Lake is a favorite place to stop along the Tioga Road in summer. Half Dome Granite dome with trace amounts of snow. Half Dome is one of the most recognizable granitic formations in the world. El Capitan El Capitan and reflection in Merced River with some low clouds El Capitan rises over 3,000 feet above the floor of Yosemite Valley. California Tortoiseshell Clouds of California Tortoiseshells sometimes appear in the park during populations burst or mass migrations. An orange and black Buffalo Soldiers Before the establishment of the National Park Service in 1916, the U.S. Army was responsible for protecting our first national parks. Soldiers from the Presidio of San Francisco spent the summer months in Yosemite and Sequoia. Their tasks included blazing trails, constructing roads, creating maps, evicting grazing livestock, extinguishing fires, monitoring tourists, and keeping poachers and loggers at bay. Buffalo Soldiers in Yosemite Clear Waters Story Map Sierra Nevada lakes provide habitat for wild plants and animals and supply fresh water to downstream farms and communities. Their rugged settings and clear blue water make them popular hiking destinations. But the condition of these lakes is affected by deposition of air pollutants, warming temperatures, and non-native species. In this story map, readers join Sierra Nevada Network field scientists as they travel to remote areas and study lake ecosystems. Two women scientists wearing backpacks and smiling, standing in front of a mountain lake. Explorers for Bats Most scientists are not rock climbers, and vice-versa, but the two groups work together to study a unique type of animal: bats! As white-nose syndrome spreads across the United States and impacts bat populations, rock climbers who visit national parks are becoming key members of the research teams tasked with protecting threatened and endangered bat species. View a 13-minute video which highlights these efforts. person climbs sheer rock face River Hydrology Monitoring The Sierra Nevada national parks contain the headwaters of seven major watersheds, and the gradual spring melt of the winter snowpack provides water to park ecosystems as well as rural and urban areas throughout California. Learn more about the Sierra Nevada Network river hydrology project, monitoring the quantity and timing of streamflow in a subset of major rivers. Two women wearing raincoats and waders in the middle of a river taking measurements of flow levels. 2010 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2010 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards 2009 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2009 Environmental Achievement Awards 2011 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2011 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards 2008 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2008 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Science for Bats National parks serve as excellent laboratories for scientific research. Find out what scientists are learning about bats in Yosemite National Park. The Civilian Conservation Corps As part of the New Deal Program, to help lift the United States out of the Great Depression, Franklin D. Roosevelt established the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1933. The CCC or C’s as it was sometimes known, allowed single men between the ages of 18 and 25 to enlist in work programs to improve America’s public lands, forests, and parks. CCC men lined up in front of a building and looking at a flag pole with an american flag. Chinese Immigrant Past in Yosemite Yosemite Park Ranger uncovers Chinese immigrant history at the park. Her research and history discovery events have excited and involved new audiences. A group of people smiling The Ahwahnee, A Collaborative Model for the Future Challenges were many in updating the historic Ahwahnee Hotel in Yosemite to correct hazards to guests’ safety and facility protection from fire. Questions included how to continue work while accommodating guests, and how to minimize closure time. Everyone had the same goal--to preserve and maintain the hotel. This successful project exemplifies the challenges of fire protection in our iconic places and what can be achieved through collaboration. NPS Structural Fire Program Highlights 2014 Intern Accomplishments Monitoring Wetlands Ecological Integrity Wetlands occupy less than 10 percent of the Sierra Nevada, but they are habitat for a large diversity of plants and animals. They provide nesting and foraging habitat for birds, play an important role in the life cycle of many invertebrate and amphibian species, and are a rich source of food for small mammals and bears. They store nutrients and sediment and control flooding. Learn more about monitoring of plant communities, groundwater dynamics, and macroinvertebrates. Biologists examine a soil profile in a meadow to evaluate the type of wetland. Monitoring Birds in Sierra Nevada Network Parks More than 60 percent of the vertebrate species in Sierra Nevada Network parks are birds. These parks provide critical breeding, stopover, and wintering habitats for birds, but there are numerous stressors such as climate change and habitat loss that cause declines in some bird populations. Learn more about why birds are good indicators of ecosystem change and how they are being monitored. Western Tanager perched on a tree branch Monitoring Lakes in Sierra Nevada Network Parks Sequoia & Kings Canyon and Yosemite national parks protect over 1,200 lakes that have some of the highest water quality in the Sierra Nevada. High-elevation lakes are critical components of the parks’ ecosystems, popular visitor destinations, and habitat for aquatic and terrestrial organisms. However, these lakes are affected by air pollution, climate change, and non-native species. Learn more about these lakes and how the Sierra Nevada Network monitors their water quality. Lake monitoring crew member paddles out for a mid-lake sample 2019 Connecting with our Homelands Awardees Hopa Mountain, in partnership with the National Park Service, is pleased to announce the 2019 awardees of the Connecting with our Homelands travel grants. Twenty-one Indigenous organizations, schools, and nonprofits have been awarded travel funds for trips to national park units across 12 states/territories within the United States. An elder and young student talk while sitting on a rock. National Parks Pitch In to Help Save Monarch Butterflies As scientists and citizen scientists have noted, insect populations are plummeting across the globe. Monarch butterfly populations are no exception. Recent counts show that the western population has experienced a precipitous drop. As of 2018, the population of monarchs overwintering along the California coast stands at just 0.6% of what it was in the 1980s. Monarch butterflies among eucalyptus leaves, viewed through a scope America's Best Idea: Featured National Historic Landmarks Over 200 National Historic Landmarks are located in national parks units. Some historical and cultural resources within the park system were designated as NHLs before being established as park units. Yet other park units have NHLs within their boundaries that are nationally significant for reasons other than those for which the park was established. Twenty of those NHLs are located in parks featured in Ken Burn's documentary, The National Parks: America's Best Idea. watchtower against blue sky Cascade Fire: Right Fire, Right Place, Right Time The Cascade fire, started by lightning in a wilderness area of Yosemite in June 2012, was not actively suppressed. It would lightly burn for five months and become the right fire, in the right place, at right time. The only action that firefighters took was to construct a half-mile check line. Park staff took advantage of educational opportunities as smoke was visible from several locations. The fire burned 1,705 acres, and cost approximately $200/acre to manage. firefighter working with a hoe to dig a fireline on a slope with lots of vegetation. Historic Ashes: Glacier Point Hotel 1969 There may have never been a better balcony view than that from the historic Glacier Point Hotel (YOSE). In winter 1968–1969 the hotel was damaged by heavy snow pack and was closed for business that summer. On July 10, 1969 an electrical fire completely destroyed the hotel and nearby Mountain House. Structure fire response was 28 miles away by mountain road. Use this look back at the losses of our NPS heritage to inspire and direct our efforts to protect what still remains. historic image of Glacier Point Hotel PARKS...IN...SPAAAACE!!! NASA astronauts have quite literally an out-of-this-world view of national parks and take some pretty stellar pictures to share. Travel along with the space station on its journey west to east getting the extreme bird’s eye view of national parks across the country. And one more down-to-earth. View of Denali National Park & Preserve from space Fire Communication and Education Grants Enhance Fire Interpretation and Outreach in the National Parks in 2015 and Beyond The 2015 National Park Service Fire Communication and Education Grant Program provided funding for projects, programs, or tasks in twelve parks around the country. A woman studies a small coniferous tree while a younger woman looks on. Tent Cabins and Grand Lodges – Memories of Family Vacations in Yosemite What is our obligation for providing fire and life safety in concessions operations? Generally, it is no different from our obligations in any building. We are as responsible for the buildings that are under contract to concessions operators as we are for buildings used solely for NPS operations. But how we accomplish the goal of making a building safe differs. We use contracts, operations plans, annual assurance inspections, and action when requirements are not followed. National Park Service Staff Explore Strategies for Success at Leadership Conference With a goal of creating better leaders and promoting gender balance, the 2016 Women and Leadership Conference introduced influential policy and business leaders who shared their insights and offered tools to help participants become leaders in their respective fields. A group of men and women stand in front of a blue curtain and an Andrus Center banner. Historic Visibility Studies in National Parks Haze can negatively impact how well people can see and appreciate our national parks across the country. This article summarizes the visibility studies from the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s aimed at identifying the sources of haze causing pollution at specific parks and improving visibility monitoring methods. Big bend national park river Using Lake Superior parks to explain the Midcontinent Rift Explaining the spectacular scenery around Lake Superior resulting from the 1.1 billion–year–old Midcontinent Rift System gives park interpreters an opportunity to discuss some of the most important processes that shape our planet and influenced the region’s settlement and growth. Kayakers paddle past sandstone rocks at Apostle Islands National Lakeshore (Seth Stein) 2012 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients In 2012, seven rangers were awarded the national and region Freeman Tilden Awards for innovative and exciting interpretive programs. Learn their stories and more about their award-winning programs. Renee Albertoli World War II Plane Crashes in National Parks During WWII, more than 7,100 air crashes involved US Army Air Force (USAAF) aircraft occurred on American soil. Collectively these crashes resulted in the loss of more than 15,599 lives (Mireles 2006). Many of these military aircraft accidents occurred in remote, often mountainous, areas managed by the National Park Service. plane crash at base of grassy hill The Sounds of Spring When the weather warms, national parks across the country rouse from winter’s sleep. The sounds you hear in parks reflect this seasonal change. They contribute to the unique soundscape of these special places, and are among the resources that the National Park Service protects. Sandhill cranes dance in a courtship ritual in flooded grasslands at Great Sand Dunes NP. Wildland Fire in Douglas Fir: Western United States Douglas fir is widely distributed throughout the western United States, as well as southern British Columbia and northern Mexico. Douglas fir is able to survive without fire, its abundantly-produced seeds are lightweight and winged, allowing the wind to carry them to new locations where seedlings can be established. Close-up of Douglas fir bark and needles. NPS Branch of Structural Fire and Yosemite National Park Announce New Training Class The NPS Firefighter I program (Defensive Firefighter) was beta tested in Yosemite in 2011. NPS fire instructors put wildland firefighters from several national parks through 40 hours of intense classroom and fire suppression exercises, including structure, vehicle, and dumpster fire extinguishment. The training was designed to instill the skill sets to allow defensive firefighters to operate safely and competently, and helps address the problem of limited resources. two women discuss fire training outside Recipe for Mountain Lake Conservation After a long hike through the mountains, nothing compares to the inspiring beauty of a healthy, colorful mountain lake. But airborne nitrogen pollution threatens the health and function of these alpine oases. man sits by mountain lake Helicopter Rappel Program Gets New Start A US Forest Service helicopter rappeller was killed in 2009, so USFS and NPS helicopter rappel operations were halted while the program was reviewed. Given the terrain of some parks, there remained a strong need for the program. A working group exhaustively reviewed procedures and equipment and implemented needed updates. The new program came back online with live training in May 2012. A person being hoisted by a helicopter Yosemite's World War II Hospital The “U.S. Naval Convalescent Hospital Yosemite National Park, California” was commissioned on June 25, 1943. Originally thought of a the perfect recovery spot for those suffering from shell-shock or battle fatigue (now known as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder). Treatments at the later-renamed Yosemite Special Hospital experiment focused physical and mental health. It proved to be a watershed event in the development of U.S. military medical rehabilitation techniques. B&W; Sailors with bicycles look out on Yosemite Valley 2002 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2002 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards 2006 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2006 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards 2018 Harry Yount National Park Ranger Award Park Ranger Jack J. Hoeflich from Yosemite National Park is the recipient of the 2018 National Harry Yount Award. His incredible intellect, physical fitness, stamina, climbing prowess, and passion for helping others is a perfect fit for the unique challenges of providing assistance to visitors in Yosemite’s rugged landscape. Ranger Jack Hoeflich sitting above a canyon Tracking One of California's Rarest Mammals In the winter of 2018, researchers captured one male and two female Sierra Nevada red foxes in and around Lassen Volcanic National Park. These three foxes are the first of the subspecies captured in over a decade and offer hope of better understanding this state-listed threatened species. A man crouches behind a woman kneeling who is releasing a red fox into a snow-covered forest. Park Air Profiles - Yosemite National Park Air quality profile for Yosemite National Park Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Yosemite NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Yosemite NP. Half Dome formation Walking With Wildflowers: Monitoring Pacific Crest Trail Plant Communities as Climate Changes Walking with Wildflowers is a citizen science program dedicated to monitoring plant phenology along the Pacific Crest Trail using observations from hikers and backpackers. Its main goal is to determine whether plant species are able to respond to changing climatic conditions and better understand how plants use seasonal cues to time flowering. Trail through a meadow surrounded by trees, with mountains beyond Multiyear Prescribed Fire Treatments Protect Community during Rim Fire Past hazardous fuels reduction treatments and prescribed fire have created defensible space for the Hodgdon Meadow area in Yosemite NP. The Rim fire of August 2013 put this theory to the test, and the treatments worked to protect this wildland urban interface. The fuels treatments and prescribed fire align with the NPS goal of creating fire-adapted human communities. Park entrance station with a large plume of smoke in the distance. Fire Prevention Success--What’s Being Accomplished in the National Parks Sam Zuckerman Sam Zuckerman worked on the Sierra Nevada Network forest monitoring crew in 2017, and while he enjoyed the field work, this experience helped him decide he wanted to get involved with all the steps of carrying out a research project. He is pursuing a PhD in Natural Resources at the University of New Hampshire, where his research focuses on tree responses to drought in northeastern forests. Click on the article title to learn more. Field biologist uses meter tape to set up a forest monitoring plot in foxtail pine stand. Pile Burning Protects Landscapes at Yosemite National Park Crews in Yosemite National Park successfully burned an estimated 300 piles over the winter of 2020. The piles were created from debris left over from large-scale landscape restoration projects in the park. Pile burning has been an efficient and effective way for reducing excessive fuel build-up on the landscape, reducing hazardous fuels in the wildland urban interface, and opening some of the most iconic viewsheds. Firefighter tends to a pile of logs and debris burning in a field near a vertical rock face. National Park Service Finds Success at Hiring Event The National Park Service Fire and Aviation Program participated in a hiring event sponsored by the Department of Interior. The special hiring event was held in Bakersfield, CA and was a collaboration of all four natural resource management bureaus to hire open wildland fire positions in 2020. Employees talk to potential job candidates in front of a large promotional panel. Landscape Conservation Near Yosemite with Sierra Foothill Conservancy Sierra Foothill Conservancy (SFC) is a land trust established in 1996 and rooted in the local community outside of Yosemite National Park. With volunteer time and donations, SFC works with the affected community and its board members to preserve special places for future generations. With an operating budget of just over $1.8 million, SFC owns thousands of acres and works to protect thousands more. (July 2020) drawing of map of the Sierra Mountains in California Megan Mason Megan Mason worked in Sierra Nevada national parks monitoring lake water chemistry and stream hydrology for two summer seasons. Her work in the Sierra inspired her to go on to graduate school in Geophysics, studying snow science - especially annual and seasonal snow depth patterns and how this information can improve forecasting of streamflow and snowmelt patterns. Learn more about her work and why she decided to pursue graduate research. Woman standing in snow pit holding metal triangular scoop for sampling snow density. Wildland Fire in Ponderosa Pine: Western United States This forest community generally exists in areas with annual rainfall of 25 inches or less. Extensive pure stands of this forest type are found in the southwestern U.S., central Washington and Oregon, southern Idaho and the Black Hills of South Dakota. Recently burned ponderosa pine forest. Zehra Osman Zehra Osman has been a Landscape Architect with the National Park Service since 2001. Through her work at a variety of parks around the country, Zehra explores how cultural landscape documentation and research contributes to historic preservation and planning projects. A smiling woman in a green NPS uniform with arms crossed History of the Panoramic Lookout Project Most documentation of the panoramic lookout photos project, which began about 1930 to document areas seen from the lookout system, comes from the US Forest Service. The NPS project began in 1934. Lester Moe worked for the Forest Service taking photos in 1933 and 1934, and later worked for NPS. Several innovations came about from this project: the Osborne photo-recording transit and “special emulsion infra-red sensitive film” not affected by smoke and haze. sample of the panoramic lookout project Gary Fellers Leaves Legacy of Scientific Inquiry in California National Parks Few individuals have shaped our understanding of terrestrial species in the San Francisco Bay Area and California national parks like Dr. Gary Fellers, who passed away in November. Gary worked at Point Reyes National Seashore from 1983 until his retirement in 2013, first as a National Park Service scientist, and later as a researcher for the USGS Western Ecological Research Center. Dr. Gary Fellers Women of Yosemite: The Concessioners Women have played an important—though often hidden—part in Yosemite. In the 1800s, women were expected to play a traditional role in the private world of the family and the home. With the birth of the railroad and as the Gold Rush drew people to California in the late 1800s, pioneering women found ways to broaden traditional roles. Learn about the women concessioners at Yosemite. Portrait of Bridget Degnan Women of Yosemite: The Adventurers Women have played an important—though often hidden—part in Yosemite. In the 1800s, women were expected to play a traditional role in the private world of the family and the home. With the birth of the railroad and as the Gold Rush drew people to California in the late 1800s, pioneering women found ways to broaden traditional roles. Read about the women who adventured in Yosemite. Two women in long skirts dance on a rock outcrop high above the ground Women of Yosemite: Artists and Writers Women have played an important—though often hidden—part in Yosemite. In the 1800s, women were expected to play a traditional role in the private world of the family and the home. With the birth of the railroad and as the Gold Rush drew people to California in the late 1800s, pioneering women found ways to broaden traditional roles. Learn about early women artists and writers at Yosemite. portrait of Constance Cummings Women of Yosemite: The Employees Women have played an important—though often hidden—part in Yosemite. In the 1800s, women were expected to play a traditional role in the private world of the family and the home. With the birth of the railroad and as the Gold Rush drew people to California in the late 1800s, pioneering women found ways to broaden traditional roles. Read about the early women who worked as NPS employees at Yosemite. Enid Michael dances with a bear 1935 Vladimir Kovalenko Vladimir (Vlad) Kovalenko worked on the Sierra Nevada Network forest monitoring crew in 2015 and 2016, and this work inspired him to go on to graduate school at the University of Montana in 2020. He is pursuing a Master's Degree in Systems Ecology, and his research will focus on Clark's Nutcracker ecology in the whitebark pine ecosystem in Glacier National Park. Click on the title of this article to learn more. Four scientists wearing backpacks with a scenic view of Sierra Nevada mountains in background. Yosemite: On the Homefront After the attacks on Pearl Harbor, Yosemite National Park joined the war effort with the rest of the nation. In addition to its military hospital, Yosemite National Park hosted the United States Army Signal Corps for a training camp, visiting army units, and victory gardens in the employee housing areas. Military group in front of large valley Pollinators - Monarch butterfly More than beautiful, monarch butterflies contribute to the health of our planet. While feeding on nectar, they pollinate many types of wildflowers, yet one of the greatest threats to Monarch populations is loss of habitat. A Monarch clings to an orange flower Yosemite National Park Develops New Helicopter Rappel Program Is the Fate of Whitebark Pine in the Beak of Clark's Nutcracker? Clark’s nutcrackers favor the seeds of whitebark pines, which they cache in great numbers. Whitebark pines are largely dependent on nutcrackers for seed dispersal; many cached seeds are not retrieved and go on to germinate. The tree is in decline due to native bark beetles, a non-native fungus, and climate change. Will the bird turn to other food sources? A recent study analyzes data on both species from the Cascades and Sierra to understand the risk to this mutualism. Gray and black bird with beak open perched in a conifer High-elevation Forest Monitoring Whitebark pine and foxtail pine occupy high-elevation Sierra Nevada treeline and subalpine habitats, environments often too harsh for other tree species to thrive. These forests can have a large influence on key ecosystem processes and dynamics, such as regulating snowmelt and streamflow and providing habitat and food for birds and mammals. Learn more about the threats these trees face and a monitoring program to track changes in their condition. Whitebark pine in Yosemite National Park with scenic granite peaks in background Series: Panoramic Project Shows How National Parks Change Over Time In the 1930s, panoramic photographs were taken from lookout points. Comparing these images to present-day photographs allows us to understand change over time. Viewing photographs of different eras in the national parks can give many insights on ecosystem processes, as well as simply change over time. The panoramic lookout photographs provide a window on the past and an opportunity to compare to the present with changes to landforms and land cover. Lester Moe documenting park landscapes in the 1930s Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Mesozoic Era The Mesozoic Era (251.9 to 66 million years ago) was the "Age of Reptiles." During the Mesozoic, Pangaea began separating into the modern continents, and the modern Rocky Mountains rose. Dinosaurs, crocodiles, and pterosaurs ruled the land and air. As climate changed and rapid plate tectonics resulted in shallow ocean basins, sea levels rose world-wide and seas expanded across the center of North America. fossil dinosaur skull in rock face Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Yosemite National Park, California Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. waterfall and half dome Cretaceous Period—145.0 to 66.0 MYA Many now-arid western parks, including Chaco Culture National Historical Park and Mesa Verde National Park, were inundated by the Cretaceous Interior Seaway that bisected North America. Massive dinosaur and other reptile fossils are found in Cretaceous rocks of Big Bend National Park. dinosaur footprint in stone Mesozoic Era The Mesozoic Era (251.9 to 66 million years ago) was the "Age of Reptiles." During the Mesozoic, Pangaea began separating into the modern continents, and the modern Rocky Mountains rose. Dinosaurs, crocodiles, and pterosaurs ruled the land and air. As climate changed and rapid plate tectonics resulted in shallow ocean basins, sea levels rose world-wide and seas expanded across the center of North America. fossil dinosaur skull in rock face Wildland Fire in Lodgepole Pine The bark of lodgepoles is thin, which does not protect the trunks from scorching by fire. They die easily when a fire passes through. However, the serotinous cones give lodgepole pine a special advantage for spreading seeds for the next generation. Close-up of the needles of a lodgepole pine. Rangers, Not Rangerettes In spite of the United States entering World War I in April 1917, visitation to national parks increased by 36 percent in 1917 over the previous year. With more park roads, increased railroad and automobile touring, and improved hotels and other services—and despite the outbreak of the Spanish Flu pandemic that spring—the NPS expected another record summer in 1918. Studio Photo of Clare Hodges The Unisex Uniform R. Bryce Workman’s book National Park Service Uniforms: Breeches, Blouses, and Skirt 1918-1991, published by the NPS in 1998, has been the go-to resource for the history of women’s uniforms. Although it contains much useful information and photographic documentation, some of his assumptions must be challenged if we are to fully understand how the uniform reflects women’s history in the NPS. The 1920 official ranger uniform coat was similar to the authorized 1917 pattern. More Than “Just” A Secretary If you’re only familiar with modern office practices, you may not recognize many of jobs necessary to run an office or national park over much of the past hundred years. Today, typewriters have given way to computers, photocopy machines have replaced typing pools, stenographers are rarely seen outside of courtrooms, and callers are largely expected to pick extensions from digital directories. Women skiing The Odd “Man” Out? Studies of NPS women’s uniforms often begin in 1918 with Clare Marie Hodges—and the statement (accepted as fact) that she didn’t wear a uniform. But which uniform are they referring to? While it’s true that Hodges didn’t wear the iconic green-and-gray uniform we know today, her clothes do reflect the accepted “riding uniform” worn by most early park rangers. Clare Marie Hodges, 1918. (Yosemite National Park photo) The Authority of the Badge Following the success of Clare Marie Hodges as the first women ranger in 1918, Yosemite National Park hired at least five more women rangers in the 1920s. Using his discretion as superintendent, W.B. Lewis didn’t designate them as uniformed positions. His reasons are unknown. It could be that he didn’t support women wearing uniforms. Given that he hired the women rangers, however, he should perhaps be given the benefit of the doubt on that issue until proven otherwise. 1906 Ranger Badge A Family Affair Yosemite National Park hired a handful of women as temporary rangers in the 1920s. Like those at Yellowstone National Park, most had family connections to the park that made them well suited to work in remote areas. Enid Michael (right) with visitors at her wildflower display. (Yosemite National Park photo) Two for the Price of One Companion, assistant, confidant, ambassador, host, nurse, cook, secretary, editor, field technician, wildlife wrangler, diplomat, and social director are some of the many roles that people who marry into the NPS perform in support of their spouses and the NPS mission. Although the wives and daughters of park rangers were some of the earliest women rangers in the NPS, many more women served as “park wives” in the 1920s–1940s. Three members of a family Did You Know We Never Hire Women? In 1920, as Ranger Isabelle Bassett Wasson arrived at Yellowstone, Dr. Harold C. Bryant and Dr. Loye Holmes Miller launched the new NPS education program with the Free Nature Guide Service at Yosemite National Park. Female Ranger talks to a crowd Protecting the Ranger Image In 1926, five women rangers worked in Yellowstone National Park. Marguerite Lindsley was the only permanent ranger and supervised the museum at Mammoth. Frieda B. Nelson and Irene Wisdom were temporary park rangers. Wisdom worked at the entrance station, while Nelson did clerical duties in the chief ranger’s office and worked in the information office. Ranger dancing with a bear The Women Naturalists Only two early women park rangers made the transition to park naturalists. Having resigned her permanent ranger position after her marriage, Marguerite Lindsley Arnold returned to Yellowstone National Park under the temporary park ranger (naturalist) title from 1929 to 1931. Yosemite rehired Ranger Enid Michael as temporary naturalist each summer from 1928 to 1942. A handful of other parks hired a few new women under the newly created ranger-naturalist designation. Ranger showing a plant to a visitor Who Wears the Pants Around Here? After a promising start in the early 1920s, only a handful of women were hired as park rangers and naturalists in the late 1920s and early 1930s. Carlsbad Caverns National Park and the national monuments of the Southwest became the new hot spots for women in uniformed positions in the 1930s. Women in skirts and pants The Job is His, Not Yours In the early 1950s, park wives continued to function as they had from the 1920s to the 1940s. The NPS still got Two For the Price of One, relying on women to keep monuments in the Southwest running, to give freely of their time and talents, to build and maintain park communities, and to boost morale among park staffs. With the creation of the Mission 66 Program to improve park facilities, the NPS found new ways to put some park wives to (unpaid) work. Man and woman with telescope NPS mentors Chinese-Tibetan community rangers The NPS Office of International Affairs mentors park colleagues across the world as they strive to manage the natural and cultural resources in their countries. One example is the partnership work at a new national park in China. Climate Smart Conservation Planning for the National Parks In response to climate change, park managers are having to rethink how they plan for the future. Climate Smart Conservation is a process that can help managers achieve goals in the face of coming changes. Under this framework, scientists and managers use their collective knowledge to anticipate problems and be proactive, rather than reactive. Pika with a mouthful of grass Become a Yosemite B.A.R.K. Ranger For many, pets are an important member of our families. If you are planning to bring a furry family member on your trip to Yosemite, make sure you are prepared to follow the B.A.R.K. Ranger code. The code helps protect you, your pet, and the park. If the activities you have planned for your visit do not allow for pets or are unsafe, consider leaving them at home. Small dog on leash on a boardwalk next to a ranger hat Geologic Type Section Inventory for Sierra Nevada Network Parks A recent NPS Geological Resources Division report for Sierra Nevada Network parks highlights geologic features (or “stratotypes”) of parks that serve as the standard for identifying geologic units. Stratotypes are important because they store knowledge, represent important comparative sites where past knowledge can be built up or re-examined, and can serve as teaching sites for students. Learn more about Sierra Nevada geology and the stratotypes that help characterize it. View of sheer cliffs on northeast side of Mount Whitney, Sequoia National Park. Sandy Hernandez: No Us and Them in Nature Although Sandy Hernandez connected to the natural world at an early age, she’s also been made to feel “out of place” there. Her Latinx family faced criticism during their first visit to Yosemite National Park, where she was about to become an employee. Since then, she has worked to make sure that People of Color have a place in outdoor spaces and the NPS workforce. Her leadership philosophy rests on making stewardship a team effort and gathering diverse voices at the table. Sandy Hernandez in NPS uniform holds the edges of her flat hat, standing outside. Fat Book Week You've heard of #FatBearWeek...now get ready for #FatBookWeek! In honor of the 10,000+ books in the Longfellow family collection, we called on other literary-minded sites to submit the fattest book in their museum collections for a tournament-style bracket of 10 heavyweight tomes. Check out the bracket, then visit @LONGNPS on Instagram each morning from October 6-12 to vote for your favorite bulky book! Graphic of a bear with a paw on a stack of books. Text reads "Fat Book Week October 6-12, 2021"
Yosemite Guide Yosemite Guide September 29, 2021 - November 30, 2021 @YosemiteNPS UPDATE Wearing a face mask is required in federal buildings regardless of vaccination status. Check local resources, area signage, and our park website for updates, www. nps.gov/yose. Day-use reservations are required through September 30, 2021: go.nps.gov/covid Left: Chiura Obata, untitled original artwork, YOSE 109522, Yosemite National Park. Bottom Right: Chiura Obata, “El Capitan; Yosemite National Park U.S.A.,” YOSE 109528, Yosemite National Park. Upper Right: Chiura Obata, “Before Thunder Storm, Tuolumne Meadow, High Sierra, Calif., U.S.A.,” YOSE 109529, Yosemite National Park. All Obata art reproduced with permission by the Estate of Chiura Obata. Experience Your America Yosemite National Park Yosemite Guide September 29, 2021 - November 30, 2021 Experience Your America Yosemite National Park Yosemite Guide September 29, 2021 - November 30, 2021 Yosemite Area Regional Transportation System Yosemite Valley Map Campground Valley Visitor Center Parking Upper Yosemite Fall Picnic Area Restroom Hetch Hetchy Walk-In Campground Yosemite Village Lower Yosemite Fall i te ai Tr ll Fa Yo Mirror Lake seasonal Sentinel Dr. Yosemite Valley Lodge Camp 4 Yosemite Falls Parking Swinging Bridge Housekeeping Camp Yosemite Village Parking il Sentinel Beach ra T te r i le wi n n cl o ur se M d 1 mile Lower Pines North Pines Half Dome 8836 ft 2693 m Campground Reservations Curry Village Curry Village Parking Upper Pines Happy Isles Loop is closed to vehicles except for motorists with an accessibility placard Trailhead Parking i Fo El Capitan Picnic Area Chapel Yosemite Conservation Heritage Center (YCHC) Wawona 1 km The Ahwahnee se U p p er Yosemite Valley Map 0 Medical Church Bowl Clinic Picnic Area (Do Not Enter) m Yosemite Valley Area in inset: N The Ansel Adams Gallery l Tuolumne Meadows Glacier Point Happy Isles Art and Nature Center closed in winter Vernal Fall 72I4 ft 2I99 m Cathedral Beach & oo Mist Trail r ai l pT Bridalveil Fall Merc ed R iver Nevada Fall The Yosemite Valley Shuttle System will not operate during the 2021 season. il ve al id Br na wo Wa ad Ro l Va L le y Cree k Winter Weather Driving and Chain Control Information: Illilouette Fall Winter road conditions through Yosemite can vary widely and may require tire chains. Chain requirements are strictly enforced. For updated 24-hour road and weather conditions for Yosemite National Park, please call 209/3720200. Signs will indicate when chains are required. Here is a summary of chain control signs on Yosemite roads: R1 - All vehicles without mud and snow tires are required to install chains/cables. Vehicles with mud and snow tires do not, but must still carry chains. See chain control regulations on www.nps.gov/yose for vehicles towing trailers. R2 - Chains/cables must be installed on ALL vehicles except 4-wheel/all-wheel drive vehicles with mud and snow tires. Fourwheel drive vehicles must have 4-wheel drive engaged. R3 - ALL vehicles are required to install chains/cables, regardless of having mud and snow tires or 4-wheel/all-wheel drive capability, NO EXCEPTIONS. *“M+S” will be on the side of your tires if they are mud and snow tires. i Experience Your America Yosemite National Park Yosemite Guide September 29, 2021 - November 30, 2021 Things to Do Summer in Yosemite SAFETY ALERT THINGS TO DO IN YOSEMITE VALLEY Wearing a face mask is required in federal Join a Yosemite Conservancy naturalist guide buildings regardless of vaccination status. or art instructor for a customized experience Thank you for helping to keep yourself and that fits your interests and schedule. Custom Yosemite Experiences others safe and healthy. Check local resources, area signage, and our park website for updates, Custom Adventures: Experience the park www.nps.gov/yose. on personalized day hikes, birding walks, stargazing programs and backpacking trips. WELCOME yosemite.org/custom-adventures. Ask A Ranger Custom Art Classes: Explore nature through Drop by the visitor contact station located in drawing, painting, sketching and journaling. front of Yosemite Valley Visitor Center to ask We also offer creative activities for kids! your Yosemite-related questions and to get yosemite.org/custom-art. park information and updates. Follow signs to park in Visitor Parking then follow signs Want to connect with Yosemite from home? to the Yosemite Valley Visitor Center. Open Schedule a virtual adventure or art class: 9am to 5pm. adventures@yosemite.org or art@yosemite.org. Yosemite Mountaineering School (YMS) YMS offers world-class rock climbing and Park App instruction, private guided climbs, custom Download the National Park and group hikes, guided backpacking trips and Service app for an interactive cross-country skiing. YMS guides, recognized map, hiking trails, and park as
Yosemite Guide Yosemite Guide August 25, 2021 - September 28, 2021 @YosemiteNPS UPDATE Wearing a face mask is required in federal buildings regardless of vaccination status. Check local resources, area signage, and our park website for updates, www. nps.gov/yose. Day-use reservations are required: go.nps.gov/covid B.A.R.K. Ranger Jack reporting for duty. Jack loves Yosemite and follows the B.A.R.K. Ranger Code to protect the park when he visits. Read more about the B.A.R.K. Ranger Program on Page 11. NPS Image Experience Your America Yosemite National Park Yosemite Guide August 25, 2021 - September 28, 2021 Experience Your America Yosemite National Park Yosemite Guide August 25, 2021 - September 28, 2021 Yosemite Area Regional Transportation System Yosemite Valley Map Campground Valley Visitor Center Parking Upper Yosemite Fall Picnic Area Restroom Hetch Hetchy Walk-In Campground Yosemite Village Lower Yosemite Fall The Ansel Adams Gallery l Tuolumne Meadows i te ai Tr ll se m Yosemite Valley Area in inset: Fa U p p er Yo 2 Yosemite Valley Map Yosemite Valley Lodge Yosemite Falls Parking Chapel Swinging Bridge il ra T te r i le wi n n cl o ur se M d 1 mile Lower Pines North Pines Half Dome 8836 ft 2693 m Campground Reservations Curry Village Curry Village Parking Upper Pines Happy Isles Loop is closed to vehicles except for motorists with an accessibility placard Trailhead Parking i Happy Isles Art and Nature Center Fo El Capitan Picnic Area Housekeeping Camp Yosemite Village Parking Sentinel Beach 1 km Mirror Lake seasonal Yosemite Conservation Heritage Center (YCHC) Wawona 0 The Ahwahnee (Do Not Enter) Sentinel Dr. Camp 4 N Medical Church Bowl Clinic Picnic Area Glacier Point closed in winter 3 Vernal Fall 72I4 ft 2I99 m Cathedral Beach l Va L le y oo Mist Trail r ai l pT Merc ed R iver 4 & Bridalveil Fall Large vehicles longer than 30 feet are not permitted on Sentinel Drive. Also, expect traffic re-routes and delays through Summer 2021. See park website for more information. il ve al id Br The Yosemite Valley Shuttle System will not operate during the 2021 season. Cree 1 na wo Wa ad Ro Nevada Fall k DRIVE, WALK, or BIKE to some of Yosemite Valley’s most scenic attractions! 1 2 Tunnel View Lower Yosemite Fall Trailhead 3 El Capitan Illilouette Fall 4 Valley View i Experience Your America Yosemite National Park Yosemite Guide August 25, 2021 - September 28, 2021 Things to Do Summer in Yosemite SAFETY ALERT THINGS TO DO IN YOSEMITE VALLEY Wearing a face mask is required in federal Join a Yosemite Conservancy naturalist guide buildings regardless of vaccination status. or art instructor for a customized experience Thank you for helping to keep yourself and that fits your interests and schedule. Custom Yosemite Experiences others safe and healthy. Check local resources, area signage, and our park website for updates, Custom Adventures: Experience the park www.nps.gov/yose. on personalized day hikes, birding walks, stargazing programs and backpacking trips. WELCOME yosemite.org/custom-adventures. Ask A Ranger Custom Art Classes: Explore nature through Drop by the visitor contact station located in drawing, painting, sketching and journaling. front of Yosemite Valley Visitor Center to ask We also offer creative activities for kids! your Yosemite-related questions and to get yosemite.org/custom-art. park information and updates. Follow signs to park in Visitor Parking then follow signs to the Looking for ways to connect with Yosemite Yosemite Valley Visitor Center. Open 9am to from home? Contact us to schedule a virtual 5pm. Look for visitor contact stations near other adventure or art class at adventures@ visitor centers in Tuolumne Meadows, Wawona, yosemite.org or art@yosemite.org. and Big Oak Flat. The Ansel Adams Gallery Photography Excursions Park App Download the National Park Service app for an interactive map, hiking trails, and park updates. See page 11. Reservations Required to Enter Yosemite Sign up for 2-4 hour photography classes, B.A.R.K. Ranger June is a Corgi and resides in Yosemite Valley. She loves walking in B.A.R.K. approved locations such as the meadow boardwalks. NPS Image your permit on your dashboard at all times while inside the park. Permits are valid for three consecutive days for unlimited entries and are not valid for overnight use. Yosemite Conservation Heritage Center The Sierra Club’s Yosemite Conservation Heritage Center (formerly Le Conte Memorial Lodge) will not open this season, from May 1 through September 30, 2021, due to COVID-19. All evening programs have been cancelled for the season due to social distancing requirements. The Yosemite Conservation Heritage Center will reopen on May 1, 2022. Call 209/347-7300 for information and updates. Entering a National Park Yosemite is a place where wilderness prevails. Prepare yourself for a wi
Yosemite Guide Yosemite Guide July 21, 2021 - August 24, 2021 @YosemiteNPS UPDATE If you are not fully vaccinated, wearing a mask is required in federal buildings and in crowded outdoor spaces on federal land. Check local resources, area signage, and our park website for updates, www.nps.gov/yose. Day-use reservations are required: go.nps.gov/covid Yosemite Field School leads a retreat to Vogelsang, 1935. Read more about the history of field seminars in Yosemite on page 14. Image A_02254 Experience Your America Yosemite National Park Yosemite Guide July 21, 2021 - August 24, 2021 Experience Your America Yosemite National Park Yosemite Guide July 21, 2021 - August 24, 2021 Yosemite Area Regional Transportation System Yosemite Valley Map Campground Valley Visitor Center Parking Upper Yosemite Fall Picnic Area Restroom Hetch Hetchy Walk-In Campground Yosemite Village Lower Yosemite Fall The Ansel Adams Gallery l Tuolumne Meadows i te ai Tr ll se m Yosemite Valley Area in inset: Fa U p p er Yo 2 Yosemite Valley Map Yosemite Valley Lodge Yosemite Falls Parking Chapel Swinging Bridge il ra T te r i le wi n n cl o ur se M d 1 mile Lower Pines North Pines Half Dome 8836 ft 2693 m Campground Reservations Curry Village Curry Village Parking Upper Pines Happy Isles Loop is closed to vehicles except for motorists with an accessibility placard Trailhead Parking i Happy Isles Art and Nature Center Fo El Capitan Picnic Area Housekeeping Camp Yosemite Village Parking Sentinel Beach 1 km Mirror Lake seasonal Yosemite Conservation Heritage Center (YCHC) Wawona 0 The Ahwahnee (Do Not Enter) Sentinel Dr. Camp 4 N Medical Church Bowl Clinic Picnic Area Glacier Point closed in winter 3 Vernal Fall 72I4 ft 2I99 m Cathedral Beach l Va L le y oo Mist Trail r ai l pT ho rse s on l y Merc ed R iver 4 & Bridalveil Fall Large vehicles longer than 30 feet are not permitted on Sentinel Drive. Also, expect traffic re-routes and delays through Summer 2021. See park website for more information. il ve al id Br The Yosemite Valley Shuttle System will not operate during the 2021 season. Cree 1 na wo Wa ad Ro Nevada Fall k DRIVE, WALK, or BIKE to some of Yosemite Valley’s most scenic attractions! 1 2 Tunnel View Lower Yosemite Fall Trailhead 3 El Capitan Illilouette Fall 4 Valley View i Experience Your America Yosemite National Park Yosemite Guide July 21, 2021 - August 24, 2021 Things to Do Summer in Yosemite SAFETY ALERT THINGS TO DO IN YOSEMITE VALLEY If you are not fully vaccinated, wearing a mask Join a Yosemite Conservancy naturalist guide is required in federal buildings and in crowded or art instructor for a customized experience outdoor spaces on federal land. Check local that fits your interests and schedule. Custom Yosemite Experiences resources, area signage, and our park website for updates, www.nps.gov/yose. Custom Adventures: Experience the park on personalized day hikes, birding walks, WELCOME stargazing programs and backpacking trips. Ask A Ranger yosemite.org/custom-adventures. Drop by the visitor contact station located in Custom Art Classes: Explore nature through front of Yosemite Valley Visitor Center to ask drawing, painting, sketching and journaling. your Yosemite-related questions and to get We also offer creative activities for kids! park information and updates. Follow signs to yosemite.org/custom-art. park in Visitor Parking then follow signs to the Yosemite Valley Visitor Center. Open 9am to Looking for ways to connect with Yosemite 5pm. Look for visitor contact stations near other from home? Contact us to schedule a virtual visitor centers in Tuolumne Meadows, Wawona, adventure or art class: adventures@yosemite. and Big Oak Flat. org or art@yosemite.org. The Ansel Adams Gallery Park App Download the National Park Service app for an interactive map, hiking trails, and park updates. See page 11. Reservations Required to Enter Yosemite Photography Excursions Yosemite Conservancy (YC) Outdoor Adventures Naturalist Guide Pete Devine points at a trail sign on the John Muir Trail, 2017. On page 14, read more about how the YC Outdoor Adventures program came to be as we celebrate 50 years of learning in Yosemite with the Yosemite Conservancy. Image courtesy of Roy Williams Photography your permit on your dashboard at all times while inside the park. Permits are valid for three consecutive days for unlimited entries and are not valid for overnight use. Yosemite Conservation Heritage Center The Sierra Club’s Yosemite Conservation Heritage Center (formerly Le Conte Memorial Lodge) will not open this season, from May 1 through September 30, 2021, due to COVID-19. All evening programs have been cancelled for the season due to social distancing requirements. The Yosemite Conservation Heritage Center will reopen on May 1, 2022. Call 209/347-7300 for information and updates. Entering a Natio
Yosemite Guide Yosemite Guide June 16, 2021 - July 20, 2021 @YosemiteNPS UPDATE If you are not fully vaccinated, wearing a mask is required in federal buildings and in crowded outdoor spaces on federal land. Check local resources, area signage, and our park website for updates, www.nps.gov/yose. Day-use reservations are required: go.nps.gov/covid Tuolumne Meadows, Reflections - NPS Image/Christine Loberg Experience Your America Yosemite National Park Yosemite Guide June 16, 2021 - July 20, 2021 Experience Your America Yosemite National Park Yosemite Guide June 16, 2021 - July 20, 2021 Yosemite Area Regional Transportation System Yosemite Valley Map Campground Valley Visitor Center Parking Upper Yosemite Fall Picnic Area Restroom Hetch Hetchy Walk-In Campground Yosemite Village Lower Yosemite Fall The Ansel Adams Gallery l Tuolumne Meadows i te ai Tr ll se m Yosemite Valley Area in inset: Fa U p p er Yo 2 Yosemite Valley Lodge Camp 4 Yosemite Falls Parking Chapel Swinging Bridge Yosemite Village Parking il Sentinel Beach ra T te r i le wi n n 1 mile cl o ur se M d 1 km Mirror Lake Lower Pines North Pines Half Dome 8836 ft 2693 m Campground Reservations Curry Village Curry Village Parking Upper Pines Happy Isles Loop is closed to vehicles except for motorists with an accessibility placard Trailhead Parking i Happy Isles Art and Nature Center Fo El Capitan Picnic Area Housekeeping Camp Yosemite Conservation Heritage Center (YCHC) Wawona 0 The Ahwahnee (Do Not Enter) seasonal Yosemite Valley Map N Medical Church Bowl Clinic Picnic Area Glacier Point closed in winter 3 Vernal Fall 72I4 ft 2I99 m Cathedral Beach l Va L le y oo Mist Trail r ai l pT ho rse s on l y Merc ed R iver 4 & Bridalveil Fall Large vehicles longer than 30 feet are not permitted on Sentinel Drive. Also, expect traffic re-routes and delays through Summer 2021. See park website for more information. il ve al id Br The Yosemite Valley Shuttle System will not operate during the 2021 season. Cree 1 na wo Wa ad Ro Nevada Fall k DRIVE, WALK, or BIKE to some of Yosemite Valley’s most scenic attractions! 1 2 Tunnel View Lower Yosemite Fall Trailhead 3 El Capitan Illilouette Fall 4 Valley View i Experience Your America Yosemite National Park Yosemite Guide June 16, 2021 - July 20, 2021 Things to Do Summer in Yosemite SAFETY ALERT THINGS TO DO IN YOSEMITE VALLEY If you are not fully vaccinated, wearing a mask Join a Yosemite Conservancy naturalist guide is required in federal buildings and in crowded or art instructor for a customized experience outdoor spaces on federal land.Check local that fits your interests and schedule. Custom Yosemite Experiences resources, area signage, and our park website for updates, www.nps.gov/yose. Custom Adventures: Experience the park on personalized day hikes, birding walks, WELCOME stargazing programs and backpacking trips. Ask A Ranger yosemite.org/custom-adventures. Drop by the visitor contact station located in Custom Art Classes: Explore nature through front of Yosemite Valley Visitor Center to ask drawing, painting, sketching and journaling. your Yosemite-related questions and to get We also offer creative activities for kids! park information and updates. Follow signs yosemite.org/custom-art. for the Yosemite Valley Visitor Center. Open 9am to 5pm. Look for visitor contact stations Looking for ways to connect with Yosemite near other visitor centers in Tuolumne Meadows, from home? Contact us to schedule a virtual Wawona, and Big Oak Flat. adventure or art class: adventures@yosemite. Join a Photography Class with The Ansel Adams Gallery, see page 4 for details. Image courtesy of The Ansel Adams Gallery org or art@yosemite.org. Walking and Hiking Park App How Will My Visit Be Impacted? Download the National Park The COVID-19 pandemic will continue to affect park operations in 2021. Visitation to the park Service app for an interactive will be managed in accordance with recommendations from public health officials. Visit the park map, hiking trails, and park website, www.nps.gov/yose for more updates and safety information. outdoor visitor contact station in front of the Day-Use Reservations Required to Visit Yosemite and updated weather and trail conditions. updates. See page 11. A reservation is required to drive into Yosemite through September 30, 2021. You must display your day-use permit on your dashboard at all times while inside the park. Permits are valid for Explore Like A Junior Ranger! Become a Yosemite Junior Ranger by purchasing this self-guided handbook and completing the activities that are the best fit for you. When you are done, share your booklet with a park ranger at any Yosemite visitor center during operating hours to receive your badge and patch. three consecutive days for unlimited entries and are not valid for overnight use. Currently open and av
Yosemite Guide Yosemite Guide May 12, 2021 - June 15, 2021 @YosemiteNPS UPDATE Wearing a mask is required in federal buildings and outdoors on federal land when social distancing cannot be maintained. Check local resources, area signage, and our park website for updates, www. nps.gov/yose. Please follow CDC guidance to reduce the spread of COVID-19. • Maintain 6 feet of distance between you and others. • Wear a face covering when social distancing is not possible. • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. • Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze. • Stay home if you feel sick. • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth. Day-use reservations may be required: go.nps.gov/covid NPS Image Experience Your America Yosemite National Park Yosemite Guide May 12, 2021 - June 15, 2021 Experience Your America Yosemite National Park Yosemite Guide May 12, 2021 - June 15, 2021 Yosemite Area Regional Transportation System Yosemite Valley Map Campground Valley Visitor Center Parking Upper Yosemite Fall Picnic Area Restroom Hetch Hetchy Walk-In Campground Yosemite Village Lower Yosemite Fall i te ai Tr ll Fa se m Yosemite Valley Area in inset: U p p er Yo Yosemite Valley Map The Ahwahnee Yosemite Valley Lodge Yosemite Falls Parking Swinging Bridge il ra T te r i le wi n n 1 mile cl o ur se M d 1 km Housekeeping Camp Lower Pines North Pines Half Dome 8836 ft 2693 m Campground Reservations Curry Village Curry Village Parking Upper Pines Trailhead Parking i Happy Isles Art and Nature Center Fo El Capitan Picnic Area Chapel Yosemite Village Parking Sentinel Beach Mirror Lake seasonal 2 Yosemite Conservation Heritage Center (YCHC) Wawona 0 Medical Church Bowl Clinic Picnic Area 3 Camp 4 N The Ansel Adams Gallery l Tuolumne Meadows Glacier Point closed in winter Vernal Fall 72I4 ft 2I99 m Cathedral Beach l Va L le y oo Mist Trail r ai l pT ho rse s on l y 4 & Bridalveil Fall il ve al id Br Large vehicles longer than 30 feet will not be permitted on Sentinel Drive. Also, expect traffic re-routes through Summer 2021. See park website for more information. ed R iver Nevada Fall The Yosemite Valley Shuttle System will not be operating during the Spring 2021 season. Cree 1 na wo Wa ad Ro Merc k DRIVE, WALK, or BIKE to some of Yosemite Valley’s most scenic attractions! 1 2 Tunnel View Cook’s Meadow 3 Lower Yosemite Fall Trailhead Illilouette Fall 4 Valley View i Experience Your America Yosemite National Park Yosemite Guide May 12, 2021 - June 15, 2021 Things to Do Winter in Yosemite THINGS TO DO IN YOSEMITE VALLEY Custom Yosemite Experiences Join a Yosemite Conservancy naturalist guide or art instructor for a customized experience SAFETY ALERT that fits your interests and schedule. For your safety and the safety of other visitors and employees, we encourage you to follow Custom Adventures: Experience the park CDC guidance to reduce the spread of on personalized day hikes, birding walks, COVID-19. stargazing programs and backpacking trips. yosemite.org/custom-adventures. Practice social distancing. Maintain Custom Art Classes: Explore nature through a distance of at least 6 feet between drawing, painting, sketching and journaling. you and others. We also offer creative activities for kids! yosemite.org/custom-art. Wash hands using soap and water or use hand sanitizer frequently. Looking for ways to connect with Yosemite from home? Contact us to schedule a virtual Wear a facecovering when social adventure or art class: adventures@yosemite. istancing cannot be maintained. Fern Spring, west Yosemite Valley, along Valley Loop Trail. NPS Image Walking and Hiking Cover your mouth and nose when How Will COVID-19 Impact My Visit? you cough or sneeze. Following guidance from federal, state, and local public health authorities and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we are increasing access and services in a phased approach at Yosemite Additionally, avoid touching your eyes, nose, National Park. Visit the park website, www.nps.gov/yose, for more updates and safety information. and mouth, and most importantly, stay home if you feel sick. Currently open and available Park App Download the National Park Service app for an interactive map, hiking trails, and park updates. See page 11. WELCOME Ask A Ranger Not open or available at this time org or art@yosemite.org. Unavailable in early 2021 An outdoor visitor contact station is located behind Yosemite Valley Visitor Center. Visitor Centers are closed until further notice. All shuttles and tours are canceled during this time Most roads and trails are open. Some trails may be closed or re-routed. Some campgrounds are currently closed. Yosemite Theater and Yosemite Museum will be closed during this time. Campgrounds in Yosemite Valley are open, reservations required, see page 7. Most programs are canceled until furt
Yosemite Guide Yosemite Guide March 31, 2021 - May 11, 2021 @YosemiteNPS UPDATE Wearing a mask is required in federal buildings and outdoors on federal land when social distancing cannot be maintained. Check local resources, area signage, and our park website for updates, www.nps.gov/yose. Please follow CDC guidance: • Maintain 6 feet of distance between you and others. • Wear a face covering when social distancing is not possible. • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. • Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze. • Stay home if you feel sick. • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth. See page 10 to read reflections on making art from the manager of Yosemite Conservancy’s art programs, and learn how you can get creative during your visit to Yosemite. Yosemite Conservancy Image / Kristin Anderson Experience Your America Yosemite National Park Yosemite Guide March 31, 2021 - May 11, 2021 Experience Your America Yosemite National Park Yosemite Guide March 31, 2021 - May 11, 2021 Yosemite Area Regional Transportation System Yosemite Valley Map Campground Valley Visitor Center Parking Upper Yosemite Fall Picnic Area Restroom Hetch Hetchy Walk-In Campground Yosemite Village Lower Yosemite Fall i te ai Tr ll Fa The Ahwahnee se U p p er Yo Yosemite Valley Lodge Camp 4 Yosemite Falls Parking Swinging Bridge Housekeeping Camp Yosemite Village Parking il Sentinel Beach Lower Pines North Pines ra T te r i le wi n n Curry Village 8836 ft 2693 m Curry Village Parking Upper Pines Trailhead Parking i d cl o Fo Half Dome Campground Reservations se ur M 1 mile El Capitan Picnic Area Chapel Yosemite Conservation Heritage Center (YCHC) Wawona 1 km Mirror Lake seasonal Yosemite Valley Map 0 Medical Church Bowl Clinic Picnic Area m Yosemite Valley Area in inset: N The Ansel Adams Gallery l Tuolumne Meadows Glacier Point Happy Isles Art and Nature Center closed in winter Vernal Fall 72I4 ft 2I99 m Cathedral Beach & oo Mist Trail r ai l pT Bridalveil Fall ho rse s on l y Merc ed R iver Nevada Fall The Yosemite Valley Shuttle System will not be operating during the Spring 2021 season. il ve al id Br na wo Wa ad Ro l Va L le y Cree k Winter Weather Driving and Chain Control Information: Illilouette Fall Winter road conditions through Yosemite can vary widely and may require tire chains. Chain requirements are strictly enforced. For updated 24-hour road and weather conditions for Yosemite National Park, please call 209/3720200. Signs will indicate when chains are required. Here is a summary of chain control signs on Yosemite roads: R1 - All vehicles without mud and snow tires are required to install chains/cables. Vehicles with mud and snow tires do not, but must still carry chains. See chain control regulations on www.nps. gov/yose for vehicles towing trailers. R2 - Chains/cables must be installed on ALL vehicles except 4-wheel/all-wheel drive vehicles with mud and snow tires. Fourwheel drive vehicles must have 4-wheel drive engaged. R3 - ALL vehicles are required to install chains/cables, regardless of having mud and snow tires or 4-wheel/all-wheel drive capability, NO EXCEPTIONS. *“M+S” will be on the side of your tires if they are mud and snow tires. i Experience Your America Yosemite National Park Yosemite Guide March 31, 2021 - May 11, 2021 Things to Do Winter in Yosemite THINGS TO DO IN YOSEMITE VALLEY Custom Yosemite Experiences Join a Yosemite Conservancy naturalist guide or art instructor for a customized experience SAFETY ALERT that fits your interests and schedule. For your safety and the safety of other visitors and employees, we encourage you to follow Custom Adventures: Experience the park CDC guidance to reduce the spread of on personalized day hikes, birding walks, COVID-19. stargazing programs and backpacking trips. Learn more: yosemite.org/customadventures. Practice social distancing. Maintain a distance of at least 6 feet between Custom Art Classes: Explore nature through you and others. drawing, painting, sketching and journaling. Wash hands using soap and water or use hand sanitizer frequently. We also offer creative activities for kids! Learn Wear a facecovering when social Looking for ways to connect with Yosemite more: yosemite.org/custom-art. Pacific Dogwood, Yosemite Valley. NPS Image / Christine Loberg distancing cannot be maintained. adventure or art class. Cover your mouth and nose when How Will COVID-19 Impact My Visit? you cough or sneeze. Following guidance from federal, state, and local public health authorities and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we are increasing access and services in a phased approach at Yosemite Additionally, avoid touching your eyes, nose, National Park. Visit the park website, www.nps.gov/yose, for more updates and safety information. and mouth, and most importantly, stay home if you feel sick. Dow
Yosemite Guide Yosemite Guide February 3, 2021 - March 30, 2021 @YosemiteNPS UPDATE Due to the ongoing impact of COVID-19, visitor services and access may be affected. Check local resources, area signage, and our park website for updates, www.nps.gov/yose. Please follow CDC guidance to reduce the spread of COVID-19. • Maintain 6 feet of distance between you and others. • Wear a face covering when social distancing is not possible. • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. • Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze. • Stay home if you feel sick. • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth. Day-use reservations may be required: go.nps.gov/covid Park scientists have determined that the Lyell Glacier in Yosemite’s high country has shrunk by more than 80 percent since it was first mapped in the late 1880’s. Glacier loss is one of the many signals of a warming climate that scientists are tracking across the park. See feature story on page 10 to learn more. NPS Image / Greg Stock Experience Your America Yosemite National Park Yosemite Guide February 3, 2021 - March 30, 2021 Experience Your America Yosemite National Park Yosemite Guide February 3, 2021 - March 30, 2021 Yosemite Area Regional Transportation System Yosemite Valley Map Year-round Route: Valley Visitor Center Valley Shuttle Upper Yosemite Fall Campground Hetch Hetchy Parking Picnic Area Lower Yosemite Fall Tr ll ai i te Walk-In Campground The Ahwahnee se U p p er Yo Yosemite Valley Lodge Yosemite Falls Parking Swinging Bridge Housekeeping Camp Yosemite Village Parking il Sentinel Beach Lower Pines North Pines ra T te r i le wi n n Curry Village 8836 ft 2693 m Curry Village Parking Upper Pines Trailhead Parking i d cl o Fo Half Dome Campground Reservations se ur M 1 mile El Capitan Picnic Area Chapel Yosemite Conservation Heritage Center (YCHC) Wawona 1 km Mirror Lake seasonal Camp 4 0 Medical Church Bowl Clinic Picnic Area m Yosemite Valley Area in inset: Fa Yosemite Valley Map N The Ansel Adams Gallery l Tuolumne Meadows Restroom Yosemite Village Glacier Point Happy Isles Art and Nature Center closed in winter Vernal Fall 72I4 ft 2I99 m Cathedral Beach & oo Mist Trail r ai l pT Bridalveil Fall ho rse s on l y Merc ed R iver Nevada Fall The Yosemite Valley Shuttle System will not be operating during the Spring 2021 season. il ve al id Br na wo Wa ad Ro l Va L le y Cree k Winter Weather Driving and Chain Control Information: Illilouette Fall Winter road conditions through Yosemite can vary widely and may require tire chains. Chain requirements are strictly enforced. For updated 24-hour road and weather conditions for Yosemite National Park, please call 209/3720200. Signs will indicate when chains are required. Here is a summary of chain control signs on Yosemite roads: R1 - All vehicles without mud and snow tires are required to install chains/cables. Vehicles with mud and snow tires do not, but must still carry chains. See chain control regulations on www.nps. gov/yose for vehicles towing trailers. R2 - Chains/cables must be installed on ALL vehicles except 4-wheel/all-wheel drive vehicles with mud and snow tires. Fourwheel drive vehicles must have 4-wheel drive engaged. R3 - ALL vehicles are required to install chains/cables, regardless of having mud and snow tires or 4-wheel/all-wheel drive capability, NO EXCEPTIONS. *“M+S” will be on the side of your tires if they are mud and snow tires. i Experience Your America Yosemite National Park Yosemite Guide February 3, 2021 - March 30, 2021 Things to Do Winter in Yosemite THINGS TO DO IN YOSEMITE VALLEY Custom Yosemite Experiences Join a Yosemite Conservancy naturalist SAFETY ALERT guide for a Custom Adventure designed to fit For your safety and the safety of other visitors snowshoe outings, day hikes, birding walks, and employees, we encourage you to follow stargazing programs, backpacking trips, and CDC guidance to reduce the spread of more. Contact adventures@yosemite.org, COVID-19. or visit yosemite.org/custom-adventures for your interests and schedule. Options include details. Practice social distancing. Maintain a distance of at least 6 feet between Walking and Hiking you and others. Yosemite Valley has plenty of year-round walking and hiking possibilities. Stop by the Wash hands using soap and water or use hand sanitizer frequently. outdoor visitor contact station behind the Yosemite Valley Visitor Center for trail maps and updated weather and trail conditions. Wear a facecovering when social NPS Image distancing cannot be maintained. Crane Flat Snow Play Area Cover your mouth and nose when How Will COVID-19 Impact My Visit? you cough or sneeze. Following guidance from federal, state, and local public health authorities and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we are increasing access and services in a phased approach at Yosemite
Yosemite Guide Yosemite Guide December 2, 2020 - February 2, 2021 @YosemiteNPS UPDATE Due to the ongoing impact of COVID-19, visitor services and access may be affected. Check local resources, area signage, and our park website for updates, www.nps.gov/yose. Please follow CDC guidance to reduce the spread of COVID-19. • Maintain 6 feet of distance between you and others. • Wear a face covering when social distancing is not possible. • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. • Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze. • Stay home if you feel sick. • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth. Rangers club, for architectural study. Copy Neg: L. Radanovich, 5/99 Experience Your America Yosemite National Park Yosemite Guide December 2, 2020 - February 2, 2021 Experience Your America Yosemite National Park Yosemite Guide December 2, 2020 - February 2, 2021 Yosemite Area Regional Transportation System Yosemite Valley Map Year-round Route: Valley Visitor Center Valley Shuttle Upper Yosemite Fall Campground Hetch Hetchy Parking Picnic Area Lower Yosemite Fall Tr ll ai i te Walk-In Campground The Ahwahnee se U p p er Yo Yosemite Valley Lodge Yosemite Falls Parking Swinging Bridge Housekeeping Camp Yosemite Village Parking il Sentinel Beach Lower Pines North Pines ra T te r i le wi n n Curry Village 8836 ft 2693 m Curry Village Parking Upper Pines Trailhead Parking i d cl o Fo Half Dome Campground Reservations se ur M 1 mile El Capitan Picnic Area Chapel Yosemite Conservation Heritage Center (YCHC) Wawona 1 km Mirror Lake seasonal Camp 4 0 Medical Church Bowl Clinic Picnic Area m Yosemite Valley Area in inset: Fa Yosemite Valley Map N The Ansel Adams Gallery l Tuolumne Meadows Restroom Yosemite Village Glacier Point Happy Isles Art and Nature Center closed in winter Vernal Fall 72I4 ft 2I99 m Cathedral Beach & oo Mist Trail r ai l pT Bridalveil Fall ho rse s on l y Merc ed R iver Nevada Fall The Yosemite Valley Shuttle System will not be operating during the 2020 season. il ve al id Br na wo Wa ad Ro l Va L le y Cree k Winter Weather Driving and Chain Control Information: Illilouette Fall Winter road conditions through Yosemite can vary widely and may require tire chains. Chain requirements are strictly enforced. For updated 24-hour road and weather conditions for Yosemite National Park, please call 209/3720200. Signs will indicate when chains are required. Here is a summary of chain control signs on Yosemite roads: R1 - All vehicles without mud and snow tires are required to install chains/cables. Vehicles with mud and snow tires do not, but must still carry chains. See chain control regulations on www.nps. gov/yose for vehicles towing trailers. R2 - Chains/cables must be installed on ALL vehicles except 4-wheel/all-wheel drive vehicles with mud and snow tires. Fourwheel drive vehicles must have 4-wheel drive engaged. R3 - ALL vehicles are required to install chains/cables, regardless of having mud and snow tires or 4-wheel/all-wheel drive capability, NO EXCEPTIONS. *“M+S” will be on the side of your tires if they are mud and snow tires. i Experience Your America Yosemite National Park Yosemite Guide December 2, 2020 - February 2, 2021 Things to Do Winter in Yosemite THINGS TO DO IN YOSEMITE VALLEY Custom Yosemite Experiences Join a Yosemite Conservancy naturalist guide SAFETY ALERT for a Custom Adventure designed to fit your For your safety and the safety of other visitors hikes, birding walks, stargazing programs, and employees, we encourage you to follow backpacking trips, and more. For more CDC guidance to reduce the spread of information, contact adventures@yosemite. COVID-19. org, or visit yosemite.org/custom-adventures. interests and schedule. Options include day Practice social distancing. Maintain The Ansel Adams Gallery a distance of at least 6 feet between Photography Excursions you and others. Sign up for 2-4 hour photography classes, private guided tours, or camera walks led by Wash hands using soap and water or use hand sanitizer frequently. resident staff photographers. Call ahead for reservations 209/372-4413 or visit anseladams. com/photography-education. See page 4. Wear a facecovering when social NPS Image distancing cannot be maintained. Yosemite Valley has a wide range of yearround walking and hiking possibilities. Cover your mouth and nose when How Will COVID-19 Impact My Visit? you cough or sneeze. Following guidance from federal, state, and local public health authorities and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we are increasing access and services in a phased approach at Yosemite Additionally, avoid touching your eyes, nose, National Park. Visit the park website, www.nps.gov/yose, for more updates and safety information. and mouth, and most importantly, stay home if you feel sick. Currently open and available Park A
Yosemite National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Yosemite Valley Hiking Map k alve ( I.7 Do el mi in nt C km ) I i( m 2 Te na mi ( 2 .7 ) km .4 ble s) To Clouds Rest 4.2 mi 6.8 km I.2 m (summer only) rs e e s ( 1 . 9 km ) tr ai l o n ly il Mist Tra 2 I . 5 mi l e s ( 2 . 4 in t e r Clark Point C lo P an 4. Liberty Cap 7076 ft 2I57 m 5044 ft I538 m C lo se d i n w o r am ) km Mt. Broderick 6706 ft 2044 m sed i ( 2. 9 km) i n wi a Trail nter M m il ho I.9 To Tuolumne Meadows I6.0 mi 25.7 km Happy Isles Art and Nature Center Vernal Fall i( ced er R iver Little Yosemite Valley Wilderness Permit Required 6I00 ft 1859 m Nevada Fall 5907 ft I80I m ) km Illilouette Fall Stanford Point Tr ai l k I. 0 m i (I . 6 km) I.I Se il re e (Closed in winter) Washburn Point Illilouette Ridge B rid Taft Point 7503 ft 2287 m Cathedral Spires 0 . 5 mi ( (1 8I22 ft 2476 m (c a 8836 ft 2693 m [Permit Required] Grizzly Peak Sentinel Dome me m i ( I . 9 km ) Glacier Point km km) 3 . 4 mi ( 5. 5 m Half Dome i( in Sentinel Falls ek Roosevelt )Point k m in 4035 ft I230 m I Trail . nt k i (2 I .3 m ) I km 16 72I4 ft 2I99 m .2 6 Se ve 0.8 Arch R oyal er Ri v .I M i Half Dome Village os ur River ri e D 2.0 mi (3 I.8 m Sou id t hs Upper Pines m) a il i (2. 4 k Tr ram a I.5 m Pa n o ) ) ek Cre ) k 3 m 4. Road open ONLY to bicycles and cars with valid disability placards 17 15 [Formerly Curry Village] Cl Fo er 18 1. 2 ced 2 km Cathedral Rocks Leaning Tower nt 19 ) er m i ( 4. El Capitan Bridge I .2 m Inspiration Point 5450 ft I66I m wi Campground Reservation Offce I. 6 0k Staircase Falls 20 14 i( (I . I . 2 mi 4k 13 0. North Pines Lower Pines m M Bridalveil Fall Pohono Bridge [Formerly LeConte Memorial Lodge] Cre 4409 ft I343m il ya i 9m .0 2. 6 one-way m) el Tunnel View Yosemite Conservation Heritage Center 7038 ft 2145 m k Tunne l To Glacier Point and Wawona (7. Sentinel Rock ee Wawo na a Tr Royal Arches (4. 0 km ) 12 4 . 8 mi ) mi Washington Column ed le Cr To Big Oak Flat Road and Tuolumne Meadows Housekeeping Camp i (2 m I. 3 Ribbon To El Portal i I .8 m km 5 1 Yosemite Valley Lodge Sentinel Beach Horsetail Fall (spring only) N o r t hs id e D r i v e k (2 .9 on Cree km) 6 11 rce d [Formerly The Ahwahnee] 2. m) 2k ( 3. mi 2.0 0 . 2 mi ( Me 4094 ft I248 m The Majestic Yosemite Hotel 2. ) I. Mirror Lake m i ( 1 . 4 k m) Lower Brother 7525 ft 2294 m 3 km 0.9 Swinging Bridge 0.3 k ) 10 2 6 ) 7569 ft 2307 m (I. 4 m El Capitan mi 9 8 7 Middle Brother m 5 .9 ) I.0 North Dome Royal Arch Cascade Snow Creek Falls m Columbia Rock Camp 4 Ribbon Fall Medical Clinic Lower Yosemite Fall Trail 7779 ft 237I m m Eagle Peak ) ) Wilderness Center/ Bookstore/ Museum/ Theater km ) km k (5 .I 2. i( 2m 5 3. m) 0. 3 m i (0. 5 k Ribbon Meadow m Yosemite Valley Visitor Center Lower Yosemite Fall m i Yosemite Falls Trail ) .I Yosemite Point 6936 ft 2II4 m I Mile To Tamarack Flat Campground 3.5 mi 5.6 km m i k ) Upper Yosemite Fall 3. 2 To Tioga Road 5.0 mi 8.0 km (2 ee km I Kilometer Store To Tioga Road 3.6 mi 5.9 km .6 k I .0 Waterfall I.3 Cr te i( Some trail mileages are approximate. Hiking Trail i Yose m 0.6 m (paved) I ndi an C a ny North Campground Bicycle / Foot Path Creek m) 7k ( 4. Walk-in Campground (may be closed seasonally due to snow and ice) mi Shuttle Route / Stop 2.9 18 (year round) To Tioga Road 3.I mi 5.0 km w Cr eek Day Use Parking Sno Shuttle Route / Stop i (2 I.6 m To Tioga Road 6.9 mi II.I km 10 Crocker Point I.3 mi (2 . 9 k m P o h ono ) Dewey Point 7385 ft 2250 m Po Glacier Point Road (Closed in winter) For Glacier Point Area trails and information, please request a Glacier Point Area Hiking Map. To Taft Point 5.5 mi hon 8.9 km oT ra i l B r i dal v ei l To Glacier Pt. Road 1.7 mi 2.7 km Creek Mt. Starr King 9092 ft 277I m Hiking ValleyPark YosemiteNational Yosemite Map Easy (fat and short) Bridalveil Fall 0.5 miles/0.8 km round-trip; 20 minutes Begin at the Bridalveil Fall parking area A paved trail leads from the parking area to the base of the waterfall, which fows all year. Walk back to the parking area via the same trail. Expect lots of spray in spring and early summer. Trail is icy in winter. Lower Yosemite Fall 1.1 miles/1.7 km loop trail; 30 minutes Begin at the Lower Yosemite Fall Trailhead (shuttle stop #6) This short, easy walk rewards visitors with spectacular views of Upper and Lower Yosemite Falls. This waterfall may be dry in late summer and early fall. Expect lots of spray in spring and early summer. Cook’s Meadow Loop 1 mile/1.6 km; 30 minutes Begin at shuttle stop #6 This short walk offers stunning views of Half Dome, Glacier Point, and the Royal
Wawona Area Hiking Map Yosemite National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior For your safety, always carry plenty of water and be prepared for changing conditions. To Chilnualna Falls Trailhead and The Redwoods in Yosemite Trail to Alder Creek This map should not be used for Wilderness trips. Please visit a park visitor center or wilderness center for more information. Alder Fall All overnight stays in Wilderness require a permit. Alde ree rC Chilnualna Falls k 6,200 ft / 1,890 m V i te iv dR South Fork Merce ite Big Trees Lodge Trail to Mariposa Grove (6 miles) Va ll Golf Shop Wa won a Road (Hwy. 41) ek re Ald er Cr ee k Wawona Campground Ch ilnua The Redwoods in Yosemite (cabin rentals) Trai l l Fal d oa sR Meadow Loop Trail i Dr st 6 rove osa G Marip one wa .6 km y i/9 6m Pioneer Yosemite History Center i 4.75 m ng Brid ge L i/7.6 km r oop oun dt ri p ek ve re rC l de F or e rC ld e to A To South Entrance & Mariposa Grove Swing mi / 9. 6 km o ne w ay Wawona Visitor Center at Hills Studio a Wawon Lodging Road Wawona Meadow 4,012 ft / 1,223 m W awona M eadow 6 km round 3 .5 mi/5. trip Lo o p See inset, above right Books and Souvenirs Mariposa Grove Welcome Plaza Post Office No Grizzly Giant S Fo ierr re a N st a t Wawona Grocery Store io na l Gas Station Trail Store Gift Shop Post Office ito Cre ek lna qu (Summer only) Golf Course rive oop ge L Brid ey Mo s YARTS Stop Stables D est For ging win To S Wawona Visitor Center at Hill's Studio er em Grove Shuttle Stop Picnic Area Pioneer Yosemite History Center Covered Bridge To Yo s to A Parking for vehicles displaying a valid disabled placard Stable d oa ls R Wawona Dome Restroom Parking aln nu hil al aF 6,899 ft / 2,103 m ey all Key Campground Reservation Office Wawona C To Yosem Alder Creek Trailhead Grove Arrival Area rth South Entrance 41 To Fresno Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias See inset, on reverse Wawona Area Hiking Map Easy Wawona Meadow Loop 3.5 miles (5.6 km) round trip 1.5 to 2 hours Strenuous Begin at the Big Trees Lodge Walk on the paved road across the Wawona Golf Course. Once across the golf course, take a left at the sign-posted trailhead. The trail is an unpaved fire road which loops around the meadow and returns to the Wawona Road. A relaxing and scenic stroll, this trail offers views across Wawona Basin and opportunities to see wildlife and wildflowers. Horses, bikes, and leashed pets are allowed on the trail. Big Trees Loop (easy) Begin at Mariposa Grove Arrival Area 0.3 mile (0.5 km) round trip Winding through a forest with many giant sequoias, this trail features 30 to 45 minutes the Fallen Monarch and interpretive panels on the life and ecology of wheelchair accessible giant sequoias. This loop is relatively flat and is wheelchair accessible. Grizzly Giant Loop Trail 2.1 miles (3.4 km) round trip 1.5 to 2 hours 500 feet (150 m) elevation gain Yosemite National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Begin at Mariposa Grove Arrival Area. Hike past notable trees such as the Bachelor and Three Graces, the Grizzly Giant, and the California Tunnel Tree. Visitors with a valid disaboled placard can drive as far as the Grizzly Giant parking and enjoy the grove via a section of trail that is wheelchair accessible. Chilnualna Falls 8.2 miles (13 km) round trip 5 to 6 hours (2,400 ft / 732 m elevation gain) Begin at Chilnualna Falls Trailhead parking area located two miles up Chilnualna Falls Road The trail leads from the parking area across the road and along Chilnualna Creek for 1/2 mile (.8 km). A series of switchbacks lead away from the creek into the open forest. The falls are comprised of five large cascades sliding through and over rock formations above the Wawona Basin—water here is fullest in spring and early summer. Carry lots of drinking water in the summer, when temperatures can be extreme. Mariposa Grove Trail to Wawona Point 7.75 miles (12.4 km) round trip 3 to 5 hours 1,200 feet (366 m) elevation gain Begin at Mariposa Grove Arrival Area This wide and relatively smooth trail follows a route that people have used to access the grove for generations. See famous sequoias such as the Bachelor and Three Graces, the Faithful Couple, and the Clothespin Tree along this somewhat strenuous route to the upper reaches of the grove. Continue to historic Wawona Point, an overlook with panoramic views. Guardians Loop Trail 6.5 miles (10.4 km) 4-6 hours 1,000 feet (300 m) Begin at Mariposa Grove Arrival Area From the tranquil upper portion of the grove, a 1.5-mile (2.4 km) loop takes hikers past many unique features such as the fallen Wawona Tunnel Tree, the Telescope Tree, and the Mariposa Grove Cabin. WAWONA POINT Mariposa Grove Area ELEV. 6,800 ft. (2,073 m) Map not to scale 0.5 ete rT ra il Pe rim 0.1 k .16 i (0 m 6 km) mi (1.4 0.91 Mariposa Tree 0.25 m i km) .72 ) i (
Yosemite National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Glacier Point Area Hiking Map k Flat Road 1. 1.4 mi (2.3 km) 1. 6 m .4 km ) i (5 k ) m) 1. 3 m i( 2. 1k 0.9 m i 1.4 km i 0.6 m 1.0 k m E m p i r e M e a d o w mi ( 1 .4 k m ) i (4 .5 km e • This map should not be used for wilderness trips; use a detailed trail map or topographic map instead. mi (2.1 k • Always be prepared for sudden changes in weather and carry plenty of water. Treat all water obtained from natural sources. i (2.6 km) u • Stay on the trail; taking a shortcut causes trail erosion and can be dangerous. ) tt e Cre ek • Never feed or approach wildlife! Mono Meadow Trailhead 7. 5 m i( Grayling Lake 8692ft 2650m e d g R i 1 m 6k i m 0.6 m k 1.0 ( 9. 41 ) L o s t B e a r M e a d o w i( mi 4 3. 1 Kilometer n z o r i H o W e s t f a l l M e a d o w 5. 7 Wawona 0.9 km) i (3.9 i Ostrander Lake Trailhead km 2. Restrooms ) km .1 12 0.8 Campground Store M o n o M e a d o w Bridalveil Creek Campground Open July−early Sep. m Wa wo 2.4 m d Roa rced Me 2. 5 km) (3.0 mi 1 .9 m Ranger Station Telephone e 0.7 mi 1.1 km Yosemite Ski and Snowboard Area Chinquapin 9092ft 2771m .7 2. 8 m 0.5 Parking Area Mt. Starr King km Illilo McGurk Meadow Trailhead Glacier Point Road closed November−May east of the ski area. Trail 1 Mile (4 mi G Road North 1.6 m la M Illilouette Fall o Tr a i l int Ro r Po ad cie m) 0.7 mi 1.1 km ek M c G u r k M e a d o w Bunnell Point c er 6100ft 1859m 0.4 0.6 k mi m 2.9 hon 8k 1.0 m 1.6 k i m i) i (3.5 m 2.2 m Cre 6. 7 m i ( 1 0 . 2. R i d g e se ek ou i km ) Po Gr ve re d al Washburn Point Sentinel Dome & Taft Point Trailhead C Roa na 0 4. i( m 1.1 mi (1.8 km) l 2.1 mi (3 .4 El Portal 140 km) 7385ft 2251m 8122ft 2476m m) .2 k i (4 m m) 4k 3. i( m mi (2 .1 Dewey Point ) km km 1 Crocker Point id 1 .3 Br River Stanford Point Sentinel Dome ) 7503ft 2287m mi m) Little Yosemite Valley Nevada Fall km (2.3 Taft Point Vernal Fall i I l l i l o u e t t e Inspiration Point 3.7 m i (6 .0 ) km El Portal Bridalveil Fall Tunnel View m i 1.4 m Wawona Tunnel 0.8 ) km .6 i (1 m 1.0 Happy Isles Trailhead km 120 0 6 7380ft 2250m Crane Flat m) 1 .3 1. Roosevelt Point 7214ft 2199m 2.6 ak mi (7.7 km ) 4.8 Four Mile Trailhead Big O Glacier Point (3.1 mi 1.9 .0 k r For Yosemite Valley trails and information, please see the Yosemite Valley Hiking Map. 0.5 ve 8836ft 2693m ) km m) 4.8 km) mi ( 3.0 Edson Lake 8145ft 2483m Ostrander Lake 8500ft 2590m Hart Lakes 8717ft 2657m Lower Merced Pass Lake 8820ft 2688m mi it rm d) (pe uire req i (5 m 1.1 k ca 3.1 m 0.7 s ble Half Dome Ri ) m To Clouds Rest 3.8 mi 5.8 km d 2.0 mi (3.2 Yosemite National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Glacier Point Area Hiking Map* Easy Glacier Point 300 yards one way. 5 minutes. Begin at Glacier Point parking area Come for the sunrise or stay for the sunset—the view from Glacier Point is spectacular any time of day. Start at the Glacier Point parking area and enjoy a leisurely wheelchair-accessible stroll to the Glacier Point railing, where you look down on Yosemite Valley (3,200 below!) and east toward Half Dome and the High Sierra. McGurk Meadow 1.6 miles (2.5 km) round-trip. 1–2 hours; 150 ft (50 m) elevation change Begin at McGurk Meadow trailhead The trail leads downhill 0.8 mile (1.3 km) to McGurk Meadow and the site of an old cabin that belonged to shepherd John McGurk. During early summer, look for a tremendous show of wildflowers. You can continue along the trail an additional mile (1.6 km) to reach the Pohono Trail, which runs west to Dewey Point and Tunnel View and east to Bridalveil Creek, Taft Point, and Glacier Point. Moderate Dewey Point 8.2 miles (13.2 km) round-trip. 4–6 hours; 750 ft (225 m) elevation change Begin at McGurk Meadow trailhead Begin by following the McGurk Meadow trail as described above. Continue one mile (1.6 km) past the meadow to reach an intersection with the Pohono Trail. Follow the Pohono Trail west (left) to Dewey Point, 4.1 miles (6.6 km) from the trailhead. Enjoy the unique views of El Capitan, Cathedral Rocks, Half Dome, and the Yosemite high country. Return the same way, or you can continue on the Pohono Trail west to more viewpoints and eventually the Tunnel View parking area 5.5 miles (8.9 km) beyond Dewey Point. 2.2 miles (3.5 km) round-trip. 2 hours (200 ft (60 m) elevation change) Taft Point & The Fissures Begin at Sentinel Dome/Taft Point trailhead Begin with an easy walk through the forest past a wildflower-filled meadow (seasonal), the trail leads to an expanse on the south rim of Yosemite Valley. Taft Point is marked by a small railing at the cliff’s edge. Enjoy magnificent views of Yosemite Valley, including El Capitan and Yosemite Falls. Near Taft P
Glacier Point Road Yosemite National Park SOME TRAIL OPTIONS Glacier Point Road: Because ski tracks are set by machine, this is the best trail for beginners or those wanting an easier ski. A skating lane is also provided. Go out as far as you like (Glacier Point itself is 10.5 miles, 16.9 km, one way), but remember, on the return trip the last few miles are uphill. Spectacular vistas of the Clark Range and large meadows for lunch stops make this trip even more enjoyable. Glacier Point Road Winter Trails Yosemite National Park Old Glacier Point Road (3.3 mi., 5.3 km, one way to Bridalveil Creek Campground): This trail follows the old road, traveling uphill approximately 1/3 mile (.5 km), then dropping down into the Bridalveil/ Peregoy Meadow area. Although the grade is not extremely steep, it can be a challenging run in icy conditions. Connect with the “new” Glacier Point Road for a nice 6-mile (9.7 km) round trip. Dewey Point via Meadows #18 (3.5 mi., 5.6 km, one way from Badger): Follow the Glacier Point Road to the east end of Summit Meadow to start this trail. The trail winds through a series of meadows, continues on to some more difficult hills, and ends at a popular vista of Yosemite Valley. This trail is crowded on weekends and holidays, and can present quite difficult skiing in old snow or icy conditions. Not recommended for beginners after the first mile through the meadows. Dewey Point via Ridge #14 (4 mi., 6.4 km, one way from Badger): This trail starts off the Glacier Point Road to the west of Summit Meadow. This is a more challenging and difficult trail out to the valley vista mentioned above. It takes skiers along a winding up-anddown course among red fir and lodgepole pine forests. Ostrander Lake (9 -10.3 mi., 14.5 -16.6 km, one way): Nestled in a bowl below Horse Ridge at 8,600 feet (2,621 m) elevation, Ostrander Lake is a popular overnight destination (see “Facilities” section). Of the three main trails to the lake, Bridalveil Creek is the easiest (intermediate). Merced Crest is the hardest and very difficult to follow (expert skiers only!). Reservations are recommended for Ostrander Ski Hut and a wilderness permit is required. Ghost Forest Loop (11.5 mi., 18.5 km, round trip from Badger): Follow the Glacier Point Road to the Bridalveil Creek/Ostrander Lake trailhead (#21). Follow trail #21 across rolling terrain to the junction with the Ghost Forest Trail #19 (1.7 miles, 2.7 km). Two more miles of moderate skiing on trail #19 will bring you back to Bridalveil Campground, where you can take either the old or new Glacier Point Road back to Badger Pass. Trail Rating Legend: Easiest More difficult Most difficult Skiers and snowshoers, please make and maintain separate, parallel trails. If you are walking, please stay off the ski trails. Footsteps create holes in the snow, which can make skiing difficult and create hazards. 50¢ BEFORE YOU START Glacier Point Road Yosemite National Park Ski or snowshoe touring in Yosemite can be a magnificent experience, or it can be a disaster if certain simple preparations are ignored. Park rangers have assembled a set of suggestions which, when observed, can help ensure a safe trip even if you encounter stormy weather or unforeseen problems. KNOW THE RULES Plan your trip sensibly, keeping in mind your experience and physical condition. Remember that winter days are short and you may not be able to travel as far as you expect. Before you leave on a trip, let someone know where you’re going and when you’ll return. Keep track of others in your party. Always carry a map and compass and know how to use them. Unless you’re an expert with map and compass, stay on trails, which are indicated by markers on trees. Consider carrying a GPS unit, if you know how to use one. Get a weather forecast (209/372-0200)—then be prepared for the unexpected. Even on short trips, carry proper gear and food for an unplanned bivouac. Always carry and drink plenty of water. If you are thirsty, you are already dehydrated. Clothing and equipment suggestions: Wear wool, fleece, or polypropylene—a wool or synthetic hat is essential. These fabrics retain some warmth even when wet. Pack a waterproof jacket. Carry quickenergy food, water, waterproof matches, a flashlight, and protection from the sun. If you become lost or must bivouac unexpectedly, THINK! Stop early to prepare for the night. Don’t thrash around or panic; save your energy. Build a fire, if possible. Avoid wind and insulate your body from snow. Drink warm liquids, if possible; eat often and huddle together. Stay dry! Keep an eye on members of your party. Hypothermia can be recognized by unusually slow movements, unintelligible speech, and peculiar behavior. If a member of your party appears hypothermic, take quick action to keep him or her as warm as possible. If you have informed someone of your expected return and are overdue, remember that help probably is on the way. Maintain the attitude that you can and will
Yosemite National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Crane Flat & White Wolf Area Hiking Map s Hetch Hetchy Reservoir ea do w 3,796 ft / 1,157 m m km 2. 1k m 1.3 1. 7 m i/ m i/ 2.7 km .2 mi / 4 2.6 Porcupine Flat km 4 / 2. mi 1. 5 Gro 3.1 mi / 4.5 km to Yosemite Valley North Dome 7,542 ft / 2,299 m .2 k m /4 Shuttle Bus Stop mi 2.1 km ed Tamarack Flat mi / 4.2km mi/1. i/ m km Crane Flat Gas Station 1.1 3 1. mi .6 1 km 41 erc oM / 2.4 Trail t 1.5 mi Sierra National Forest .5 mi .8 km Wawona Sierra National Forest Campground Store 2. 6 km i/ 4. 8 5,727 ft / 1,745 m 3m .6 km i/1 m Inyo National Forest 140 Restrooms 2. 6 To Merced Indian Rock km Yosemite Valley Nature Trail 0. 0.5 3 mi d oa Flat R . Rd Tuolumne Grove of Giant Sequoias k 2.1 mi/3 km .4 Big l at kF Crane Flat Ranger Station 8 km 120 km emite Falls ad to Yos Trail Oa 2 3.7 mi / 6 km Big 7. Ro 1 ve Merced Grove of Giant Sequoias Area of hiking map Tuolumne Meadows Oa 5,350 ft / 1,630 m 1.2 mi / 2 km 2. 1 m i/ 3. 4 10,850ft 3,307m Hiking trail Trail to May Lake Mt. Hoffmann Yosemite Creek 120 Oak Fla t i/ m 9,329 ft / 2,843 m Porcupine Creek trailhead Hetch Hetchy m 1m i/1.6 k May Lake Hodgdon Meadow 4. 5 Grant Lakes km ad 120 Old B ig m .6 m i 1 km ) tc hH et chy Aspen Valley 5k i/ 2.2 km m ns Lak e g Tio o aR 3. 5 km Lukens Lake Luke 8,230 ft / 2,508 m / mi STANISLAUS NATIONAL FOREST .0. 9m i/1.4 k m Trail to Lu e k ns Lake il to Tra Ev 0.8 mi/1.3km This map should not be used for backcountry trips. Please visit a park visitor center or wilderness center for more information. k 6.1 m 3.8 White Wolf 2.2 Road (to He e n ee gr er km L ak m r de n k .9 Ha 4. 8 5. lt For your safety, always carry plenty of water and be prepared for sudden changes in weather. 1. 8m i/2 i/ m 8 2. i/ m i Tra o 3 .4 m Ten Lak es m k l to 1.5 .4 i/2 Tra i 7,484 ft / 2,281 m 0.6 mi / 1k Bald Mountain 7,261ft 2,213m Ten Lakes 1.4 Harden Lake i/ mi / 3.4 k 4 Miles m 26 to m i/ 0 4 Kilometers m M m 0 k .8 41 ne lum Tuo 2 .1 North Wolf Area Hiking Map & White FlatNational Crane Yosemite Park Easy Lukens Lake from Tioga Road 1.6 miles (2.6 km) round trip. 200-foot (61-m) elevation gain. 1-2 hours. Begin at Lukens Lake Trailhead on Tioga Road 2 miles east of White Wolf Road The trail winds through a mixed conifer forest, then over a saddle and down to a small mountain lake surrounded by a meadow. Shooting stars and dozens of other species of wildflowers abound, often through July. Please stay on designated trails to protect the meadow. The trail is wet and muddy until early August. Moderate Tuolumne Grove & Nature Trail 2.5 miles (4 km) round trip; 500foot (152-m) elevation gain on the return trip. 1-2 hours. To Hodgdon Meadow (4.5 mi) (7.24 km) Begin at Tuolumne Grove parking lot at Crane Flat on Tioga Road Follow the Old Big Oak Flat Road—one of the first roads into Yosemite Valley—steeply down 0.8 mile (1.3 km) through sugar pines and white firs to the “Entering the Tuolumne Grove of Giant Sequoias” sign. The first sequoia is 0.2 mile (0.3 km) past the sign. To see more sequoias, follow established trails through the grove. Take a 0.5-mile (0.8-km) nature trail through the grove to learn more about these giant trees. Begin the trail at the Tunnel Tree, then bear left down the road, and cross the bridge at the right side of the picnic area. To return to the parking area, take the road uphill. The road downhill continues 4.5 miles (7.2 km) to the Hodgdon Meadow area. End of the grove To Hodgdon Meadow (4.5 mi) (7.24 km) Creek Yosemite National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Merced Grove 3 miles (4.8 km) round trip; 520foot (158-m) elevation gain on return. 1-3 hours. Begin at Merced Grove parking lot on Big Oak Flat Road This trail follows an old road that curves down into the Merced Grove, the smallest and most secluded of Yosemite’s three sequoia groves. Follow the trail for 0.6 miles (1 km), then bear left at the junction. An old cabin, the former summer retreat of park superintendents, is part of the grove’s history. Look for dogwoods blooming here in the spring. Lukens Lake from White Wolf 4.6 miles (7.4 km) round trip; 400foot (122-m) elevation gain. 2-3 hours. Begin across from White Wolf Lodge Follow the trail through a mixed conifer forest to Lukens Lake, a small mountain lake surrounded by a meadow. The trail crosses the Middle Fork of the Tuolumne River and is wet and muddy until early August. At the lake, shooting stars and dozens of other species of wildflowers abound, often through July. Please stay on designated trails to protect the meadow. Harden Lake 5.8 miles (9.3 km) round trip; 355foot (122-m) elevation gain on the return trip. 2-4 hours. Begin across from White Wolf Lodge Hike along a gravel road—part of the
Crane Flat Yosemite National Park TRAIL DESCRIPTIONS Trails are not groomed in the Crane Flat area. Note that trail ratings are for average conditions. Icy or crusty conditions, or deep snow can make trails much more difficult. Crane Flat Winter Trails Yosemite National Park #1 Crane Flat Lookout Trail (1.5 mi., 2.4 km, one way): This trail is an uphill, rolling climb most of the way to the fire lookout, where the 360 degree views of Yosemite are spectacular. #2 Tuolumne Grove Trail (1 mi., 1.6 km, one way): This trail descends from the trailhead the entire way to the majestic giant sequoias. This is a popular trail both with snowshoers and hikers and is an arduous return ski. #3 Gin Flat Loop Trail (6.25 mi., 10.1 km, roundtrip): Start at the gate on the Tioga Road and go .25 mile (.4 km). From there you can continue up the Tioga Road or take the old Gin Flat Loop Trail up to Gin Flat. Either way, it’s about a 3-mile (4.8 km) climb, but then a nice ski down. Skiing back to the trailhead via the road is considerably easier than skiing back via the trail. #4 Crane Flat Campground Trail (1.75 mi., 2.8 km, roundtrip): Wind your way through and around Crane Flat Campground, then cross a meadow to join the Clark Range View trail. Turning north takes you back to the trailhead. #5 Clark Range View Trail (2 mi., 3.2 km, one way): This trail follows an old logging road with beautiful views of the Merced River Canyon and the Clark Range. #6 South Landing Road Trail (2.25 mi., 3.6 km, one way): This trail follows an old logging road with views of the Merced River Canyon and El Portal to the south. Rockefeller Grove Trail (2.25 mi., 3.6 km, one way): Park at the Merced Grove parking lot and walk across the road to pick up the old trail to the Rockefeller Grove. It’s a gradual 2-mile (3.2 km) climb to this grove of sugar pines. The trail is entirely wooded. In low snow years this trail may not be skiable. Merced Grove Trail (1.5 mi., 2.4 km, one way): The first half mile is level and easy, providing a good warm-up for the steep 1 mile (1.6 km) descent into this grove of giant sequoias. This trail requires heavy snowfall from a cold, lower-elevation storm to be skiable Trail Rating Legend: Easiest More difficult Most difficult Skiers and snowshoers, please make and maintain separate, parallel trails. If you are walking, please stay off the ski trails. Footsteps create holes in the snow, which can make skiing difficult and create hazards. 50¢ BEFORE YOU START Crane Flat Yosemite National Park Ski or snowshoe touring in Yosemite can be a magnificent experience, or it can be a disaster if certain simple preparations are ignored. Park rangers have assembled a set of suggestions which, when observed, can help ensure a safe trip even if you encounter stormy weather or unforeseen problems. KNOW THE RULES Plan your trip sensibly, keeping in mind your experience and physical condition. Remember that winter days are short and you may not be able to travel as far as you expect. Before you leave on a trip, let someone know where you’re going and when you’ll return. Keep track of others in your party. Always carry a map and compass and know how to use them. Unless you’re an expert with map and compass, stay on trails, which are located by orange markers. Consider carrying a GPS unit, if you know how to use one. Get a weather forecast (209/372-0200)—then be prepared for the unexpected. Even on short trips, carry proper gear and food for an unplanned bivouac. Always carry and drink plenty of water. If you are thirsty, you are already dehydrated. Clothing and equipment suggestions: Wear wool, fleece, or polypropylene—a wool or synthetic hat is essential. These fabrics retain some warmth even when wet. Pack a waterproof jacket. Carry quickenergy food, water, waterproof matches, a flashlight, and protection from the sun. If you become lost or must bivouac unexpectedly, THINK! Stop early to prepare for the night. Don’t thrash around or panic; save your energy. Build a fire, if possible. Avoid wind and insulate your body from snow. Drink warm liquids, if possible; eat often and huddle together. Stay dry! Keep an eye on members of your party. Hypothermia can be recognized by unusually slow movements, unintelligible speech, and peculiar behavior. If a member of your party appears hypothermic, take quick action to keep him or her as warm as possible. If you have informed someone of your expected return and are overdue, remember that help probably is on the way. Maintain the attitude that you can and will survive. If someone in your party needs ranger assistance and you can safely ski out, go to the Crane Flat gas station or the Tuolumne Grove parking lot and call 911. Certain National Park Service regulations must be observed by winter backcountry users; these protect the park as well as visitors. • A wilderness permit for an overnight trips can be obtained at the Valley Visitor Center, Wawona Information Station, Badger Pa
Yosemite National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Tuolumne Meadows Map and Area Information Take the Tuolumne Meadows shuttle bus along Tioga Road! See schedule posted at stops. To Yosemite Valley 12 Olmsted Point Pothole Dome May Lake Trailhead 11 10 Sunrise Tenaya Lakes Trailhead (west end of Tenaya Lake) lor Gay kes La Tioga Pass/ Gaylor Lakes Trailhead * see enlarged map below Lake 8 9 Tenaya Lake East End Lembert Dome Parking and 5 Picnic Area Visitor Center 7 6 Cathedral Lakes Trailhead Campground and Store 4 Tuolumne Lodge Wilderness Center Dog Lake Parking 3 Mono Pass Trailhead * 1 2 To Lee Vining * limited schedule to these stops Close-up of Tuolumne Meadows Area (not to scale) Area Information to Young Lakes to Young Lakes Parsons Lodge Pothole Dome Stables to Tenaya Lake 8 8 Ti o uo ga Ro ad 7 7 lu m n Please use the trail (across the road) to return to your vehicle when completing this loop.Do not walk along the roadway. Dog Lake Parking Lembert Dome Parking/Picnic Area Soda Springs T U O L U M N E T Dog Lake Lembert Dome 4 M E A D O W S ess Wildernnter Ce Da e R iver 5 Visitor Center Post Office, Grill & Store Ly For safety while hiking, carry water and be prepared for sudden weather changes. Please walk on official trails to protect fragile meadow ecosystems. Dogs, bicycles, and strollers are only allowed on roads open to vehicles. Day-hikers and backpackers must go to the bathroom at least 100 feet away from water, trail, and camp areas; bury human waste six inches deep; pack out toilet paper and all other trash. Parking: Park only in designated areas. Drive only on established roadways. Parking is very limited. Please walk or take the shuttle bus whenever possible. Food lockers are located at most parking areas. All food, trash and scented items should be removed from vehicles and placed in food lockers (this is required by law at night). Keep empty coolers out of sight. Ranger programs include nightly campfires and daily walks; see Yosemite Guide or postings for times and locations. Parsons Memorial Lodge: Exhibits and Summer Series programs are free and open to the public. See Yosemite Guide or postings for schedule. Food service is available at the Grill and Lodge. Groceries can be purchased at the store. to Glen Aulin und o gr amp C el na Fo r 1 2 3 Tuolumne Meadows Lodge John Muir Trailhead k l F ork “Twin Bridges” Dana Campfire Circle 6 to Cathedral Lakes to Elizabeth Lake Trail Information 7 Shuttle Stop Picnic Area Parking Restrooms to Lyell Canyon and Vogelsang 06/2016 Yosemite National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Tuolumne Area Day Hikes * RT=roundtrip Easy (mostly flat) Moderately Strenuous (moderate elevation gain) Tuolumne Meadows: Soda Springs/Parsons Memorial Lodge Cathedral Lakes 1.5 miles (2.4 km) RT* 1 hour Lyell Canyon via the John Muir Trail 8 miles (12.8 km) 200-ft. elevation gain Plan on ~2 miles/hour depending on how far you go. Begin at Lembert Dome parking area (shuttle stop #4). Walk along the gravel road and pass the locked gate (signed Glen Aulin and Soda Springs). Soda Springs—carbonated, cold water bubbling out of the ground—is protected within a log enclosure. Historic Parsons Memorial Lodge offers exhibits (limited hours— see Yosemite Guide for schedule). A path to the bridge below the lodge continues to the Tuolumne Visitor Center. Begin across the road from Dog Lake parking area (shuttle stop #2). This trail passes through Lyell Canyon, along the Lyell Fork of the Tuolumne River. Early in the season, the trail can be muddy in places. There are several creek crossings, including Rafferty Creek (bridged) and Ireland Creek (unbridged). Spectacular Kuna Creek cascades down the side of the east canyon wall near the eight-mile mark. For a shorter trip, walk 1/2 hour each way to the Lyell Fork and “Twin Bridges.” 7 miles (11.3 km) RT* 4 - 6 hours 1,000-ft. elevation gain Glen Aulin 11 miles (17.7 km) RT* 6 - 8 hours, 800-ft. elevation gain on return Mono Pass 8 miles (12.9 km) RT* 4 - 6 hours 1,000-ft. elevation gain Moderately Strenuous (moderate elevation gain) Dog Lake or Lembert Dome 2.8 miles (4.5 km) RT* 3 hours, 600-ft. elevation gain to Dog Lake or 850-ft. to Lembert Dome Begin at the Dog Lake parking area (shuttle stop #2, just west of Tuolumne Lodge). The trail rises steeply for 0.75 mile to a signed junction. Turn left to reach the top of Lembert Dome for a spectacular view of Tuolumne Meadows and surrounding peaks. To reach Dog Lake, continue straight at the junction. Allow four hours for a leisurely four mile (6.4 km) roundtrip visit to both Dog Lake and Lembert Dome. Stay off domes during thunderstorms! Elizabeth Lake 4.8 miles (7.7 km) RT* 4 - 5 hours 1,000-ft. elevation gain Begin at Tuolumne Meadows Campground. The trail begins in the B loop of the campground and climbs steadily to a glacier-
Yosemite National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Picnic Areas in Yosemite National Park Unless otherwise noted, all picnic areas in Yosemite have picnic tables, vault toilets, garbage and recycling receptacles. All picnic areas have grills except Cascades, Yosemite Creek, and Lembert Dome. No picnic areas have potable water. EXPERIENCE YOUR AMERICA 9/07 Yosemite National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior To Tioga Road 3.I mi 5.0 km To Tioga Road 6.9 mi II.I km Picnic Areas in Yosemite Valley North All picnic areas in Yosemite Valley have picnic tables, vault toilets, garbage and recycling receptacles. All picnic areas except Lower Yosemite Fall and Church Bowl have grills. Keep Wildlife Wild Yosemite is home to black bears, mule deer, mountain lions, and hundreds of other species. Bears are quick learners, have a powerful sense of smell, and seek out food where it can easily be found. If a bear obtains human food, it may learn to return for more. For your safety and that of wildlife •• Keep your distance from animals, even if they approach you. •• Never feed wild animals. •• Dispose of trash in bear-proof trash cans or dumpsters. •• While enjoying your picnic, keep your food, trash, and other scented items within arm’s reach. •• If a bear approaches, make loud noises to scare the bear away. Yosemite Village Visitor Center Yosemite Falls Medical Clinic Church Bowl Lower Yosemite Fall North Lower Pines Pines Swinging Bridge Yosemite Lodge Upper Pines Day visitors may not picnic in the campgrounds. Sentinel Beach Curry Village El Capitan Northside Drive one -way El Capitan Bridge To Hwys 120 & 140 Pohono Bridge Bridalveil Fall To Hwy 41 Cathedral Beach rive e Dy hsinde-wa t u So o The Ahwahnee
The Pioneer Yosemite History Center BACK TO THE FUTURE Issues such as preservation versus use, overcrowding, automobile traffic, and private land ownership in the park confounded the pioneers. Solutions to some issues elude us today. What is the future of Yosemite National Park? What role will you play in its preservation? How will you change Yosemite? How will Yosemite change you? The Pioneer Yosemite History Center The Pioneer Yosemite History Center Yosemite National Park 50¢ Yosemite National Park The scenery of Yosemite is world-renowned. Each year, millions of people are drawn to its thundering waterfalls, towering giant sequoias, unique geologic features, and magnificent high country. Many visitors are less aware of the stories of individuals that have both changed and been changed by Yosemite. At the Pioneer Yosemite History Center, the National Park Service commemorates the efforts of people, the events they experienced, and the issues they faced during the establishment of this great park. GREY BARN & COVERED BRIDGE The Pioneer Yosemite History Center consists of historic structures from different eras of Yosemite history. Originally constructed in different locations throughout Yosemite, they were moved to Wawona in the 1950s and 1960s. As you walk among them, it is important to remember that the area does not represent a village. Instead, each building represents a different chapter in the Yosemite story. Allow Yosemite history to come to life as you travel back in time to an era of horse-drawn wagons, covered bridges, and log cabins. This project made possible through a gift from the Jeangerard Foundation. Printed on recycled paper. © 2006. This brochure is dedicated to the memory of Rod Collier, whose love for Yosemite history and concern for environmental preservation influenced thousands of young people. Cover Photo Courtesy of Bob Roney; Sketches by Dov Bock. A place of pioneers who profoundly influenced the birth and growth of the national park idea. In the late 1800s, Wawona was the largest stage stop in Yosemite. After hours of bouncing and bumping along uneven dirt roads, inbound stages stopped for the night at the Wawona Hotel before making the eight-hour trip to Yosemite Valley. If a stage needed a repair before the sixteen-hour roundtrip journey, the grey barn was the place to visit. The Washburns, proprietors of the Wawona Hotel, used this barn for repairing stages. All Yosemite-bound traffic through this area crossed the covered bridge, which was built in 1857 by Galen Clark. Clark opened the first waystation for visitors in Wawona and later became the first guardian of the Yosemite Grant. He sold his land along the river to the Washburns, and they covered the bridge in the style of their native Vermont. Its restoration was the first step in the creation of the Pioneer Yosemite History Center. As you cross the bridge, listen for the low rumble of an oncoming stage and allow your imagination to return to the days of Yosemite’s pioneers. The Pioneer Yosemite History Center ARTIST CABIN Yosemite National Park HOMESTEAD CABIN Explorers, writers, and early tourist parties of the 1850s returned from Yosemite with stories of spectacular beauty. Artists were drawn to Yosemite, where they found inspiration in the magnificent scenery. Paintings, drawings, sketches, and photographs publicized and popularized Yosemite. Consequently, many people chose to travel the arduous route to Yosemite and experience the beauty firsthand. Thus, artists played a key role in increased awareness, tourism, and protection of Yosemite National Park. Painter Christian Jorgensen constructed this building on the banks of the Merced River near Sentinel Bridge in Yosemite Valley. ANDERSON CABIN Tourist parties provided business for local residents. George Anderson, a miner and blacksmith, worked as a guide in the late 1800s, and escorted visitors on expeditions in Yosemite. In 1875, he was the first person to climb Half Dome. He spent his winters in this building at Big Meadow (now called Foresta), and his summers in Yosemite Valley. Much of the high country around Yosemite Valley had been claimed by individuals in the late 1800s. The Hodgdon family, ranchers from the San Joaquin Valley, built this cabin on their homesteaded land in Aspen Valley and grazed cattle there each summer. In the late 1880s, John Muir and other preservationists grew concerned that the damage caused by cattle and sheep in the high country would impact the watershed and Yosemite’s waterfalls. Muir led the movement to preserve the high country, and helped establish the expanded boundaries of Yosemite National Park in 1890. Although Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa Grove had been set aside by the federal government for protection by the State of California in 1864, prior claims to the land caused legal battles between residents and the government. Land claims would be fought for many years — the cabin represents such disputes.
Yosemite National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Yosemite National Park Hetch Hetchy Valley Hetch Hetchy Valley on August 11, 1911. Photo by Matt Ashby Wolfskill, courtesy of the Library of Congress. Introduction Hidden in Yosemite National Park’s peaceful northwest corner, Hetch Hetchy Valley is a treasure worth visiting in all seasons. In spring, two of North America’s tallest waterfalls plummet spectacularly over thousand-foot granite cliffs. The dramatic cliffs surrounding these waterfalls add to the grandeur that John Muir compared to the more well known Yosemite Valley. In 1870, Muir called Hetch Hetchy Valley “a wonderfully exact counterpart of the great Yosemite.” In the early spring through late fall, visitors have easy access to a vast wilderness filled with high-country lakes, streams, and wildlife. A rare snowy winter day gives adventuresome visitors a chance to explore on skis or snowshoes. Early History People have lived in Hetch Hetchy Valley for more than 6,000 years. American Indian cultures were prominent before the 1850s when the first Euro-Americans came looking for gold and a place to graze livestock. The valley name probably derived from the Miwok word, hatchhatchie, which means “edible grasses.” Miwok names are still used for features, including Tueeulala Fall, Wapama Fall, and Kolana Rock. The lifestyle of first inhabitants depended on the natural resources of the land. They would gather seeds and plants, hunt, and trade. Meadow plants were particularly valuable resources to these tribes. Today, descendants of these people still use milkweed, deergrass, bracken fern, willow, and other plants for a variety of uses including baskets, medicines, and string. Modern History As early as 1882, Hetch Hetchy Valley had been considered a potential site for a new reservoir. development. Until the early 1900s, Americans viewed wilderness as something to conquer and natural resources as infinite. Preservationists, led by John Muir, wanted the valley to remain untouched. They maintained that a dam could be secured outside “our wild mountain parks.” Muir and his followers launched a campaign to praise the virtues of Hetch Hetchy. For the first time in the American experience, a national audience considered the competing claims of wilderness versus The eight mile long Hetch Hetchy Reservoir and O’Shaughnessy Dam as seen today (photo by Greg Lawler) Flora and Fauna Hetch Hetchy is home to a diverse array of plants and animals. Gray pine, incensecedar, and California black oak grow in abundance. The distinctive manzanita bush is common, and many beautiful examples of this red-barked shrub are seen along the road. Spring and early summer bring brightly colored wildflowers including Dam supporters were convinced that a reservoir could offer tremendous social and economic benefits. The fastest growing city in the West, San Francisco was facing a chronic water and power shortage. In 1906, an earthquake and fire devastated San Francisco, adding urgency and public sympathy to the search for an adequate water supply. Congress passed the Raker Act in 1913, authorizing the construction of a dam in Hetch Hetchy Valley as well as another dam at Lake Eleanor. The first phase of construction on the O’Shaughnessy Dam (named for the chief engineer) was completed in 1923 and the final phase, raising the height of the dam, was completed in 1938. Today the 117-billion-gallon reservoir supplies pristine drinking water to 2.4 million Bay Area residents and industrial users. It also supplies hydro-electric power generated by two plants downstream. The reservoir is eight miles long and the largest single body of water in Yosemite. lupine, wallflower, monkey flower, and buttercup. Seventeen species of bats inhabit this area of the park, including the largest North American bat, the western mastiff. This large bat is only one of two bats in Yosemite whose echolocation can be heard by the human ear. Also, be alert to sightings of rattlesnakes and black bears. Exploring Hetch Hetchy Hetch Hetchy’s relatively low elevation provides for one of the longest hiking seasons in Yosemite, and the varied trails include something for everyone. Carry plenty of water and sunscreen and watch for rattlesnakes and poison oak. Overnight backpackers need a wilderness permit, which can be obtained at the Hetch Hetchy Entrance Station at no cost. Bear canisters are required for backcountry food storage for overnight hikers. • Wapama Fall is reached via a five-mile, round-trip hike that follows the shoreline of the reservoir with moderate up and downhill hiking. The trail includes spectacular views of Tueeulala and Wapama Falls. To begin the trail, cross the dam and pass through the tunnel. • The Lookout Point Trail begins at the entrance station. This two-mile hike involves moderate climbing and brings hikers to a rocky outcropping overlooking Hetch Hetchy. • The trail to Rancheria Falls continues past Wapama Fal
Yosemite National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Photo by Dan Horner Yosemite Accessibility Guide January 2015 Welcome to Yosemite National Park! The park strives for full and equal participation for all visitors and continually upgrades facilities, programs and services to improve accessibility. This guide outlines a variety of accessible services, facilities, and activities available in Yosemite. Within each area, it describes ways for people with sight, hearing, and mobility impairments to enjoy Yosemite. If you do not need this guide after your visit, please return it to any visitor center or entrance station. The Yosemite Accessibility Guide is available at entrance stations, visitor centers and online at www.nps.gov/yose/planyourvisit/upload/access.pdf. For general park information and descriptions of services, programs and activities, see the Yosemite Guide, available at entrance stations, visitor centers or online at www.nps.gov/yose/planyourvisit/guide.htm. We welcome your comments and suggestions on ways to improve accessibility for visitors to Yosemite National Park. Discrimination on the basis of disability in federally conducted programs or activities of the Department of the Interior is prohibited. Contact Information: Accessibility Coordinator 209‐379‐1035 yose_accessibility@nps.gov United States Department of the Interior NATIONAL PARK SERVICE Yosemite National Park P.O. Box 577 Yosemite, California 95389 IN REPLY REFER TO: P4215 (YOSE‐PM) Message from the Superintendent: Yosemite National Park is a wonderful and beautiful place with towering trees, thundering waterfalls and massive granite formations. Set aside as a National Park in 1890, Yosemite is a place visited by almost four million visitors a year. Yosemite’s goal is to provide the highest level of accessibility to our visitors as possible. Each year has shown marked improvements in both physical and programmatic accessibility at Yosemite. The staff at Yosemite is working hard to correct and resolve accessibility deficiencies throughout the park. By using principles of universal design, Yosemite is committed to providing physical access to the greatest number of individuals. From designing and building new facilities to the rehabilitation of older buildings, accessibility has become a key component of all projects. The park also offers a free fully accessible shuttle bus service in Yosemite Valley to all park visitors. Yosemite has won the following Accessibility Awards: 2010 National Park Service Sustained Park Achievement – Provision and Improvement of Accessibility over a Sustained Period of Time, 2009 National Park Service National Accessibility Achievement Award for Programmatic Achievement – Improving Access to the National Park Service Programs and 2008 Programmatic Accessibility Achievement Award – Deaf Services Program. Yosemite provides American Sign Language (ASL) interpreters for visitors and has added captioning or provides ASL interpreters at all public films shown in the park. Additionally, we have available audio descriptions, podcasts and multiple publications in large print or Braille for visitors with visual impairments. During the last several years, the park has added accessible campsites in Yosemite Valley, Wawona, and the Tioga Road area. The campgrounds where these sites have been added now include accessible restroom facilities, paths of travel, and some campsites with raised tent platforms. Future plans include the addition of more accessible campsites each year until we meet or exceed the required number of accessible campsites. Many picnic areas parkwide have been rehabilitated to include accessible paths of travel, picnic tables, and grills. As Yosemite continues to address current accessibility issues it is important to remember that accessibility is an integral part of our mission. Providing accessible programs and facilities to the broadest population of our visitors is everyone’s task and responsibility. Don L. Neubacher Superintendent Accessibility Guide Yosemite National Park January 2015 Table of Contents 2 General Information 2 2 3 3 3 4 5 5 5 5 6 6 Access Passes Temporary Accessible Parking Placard Parking Service Animals Wheelchairs and Mobility Devices Rules for Use of OPDMDs Wheelchair and Bicycle Rental Shuttle Buses YARTS – Bus Service to Yosemite Telephones, Video Phone & TTYs Deaf Services Program Requesting a Sign Language Interpreter 7 Services 7 7 7 8 8 Sightseeing by Car Tours Trail Rides Gas Post Offices 8 Health Concerns & Medical Facilities 9 9 9 9 Weather Elevation Smoke & Fire Medical Facilities ‐ In & Around Yosemite 10 Learning About Yosemite 10 10 11 11 12 Ranger Interpretive Programs Films about Yosemite at Visitor Center On‐Line Resources, Videos & Webcams Publications Environmental Education 13 Lodging, Camping & Picnic Facilities 13 Lodging Information 14 Campground Reservations 15 Picnic Areas 16 Places of Interest in Y

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