"Yukon-Charley Rivers Scenic, 2003" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Yukon-Charley Rivers

National Preserve - Alaska

Yukon–Charley Rivers National Preserve is located in east central Alaska along the border with Canada. The preserve encompasses 115 miles (185 km) of the 1,800-mile (3,000 km) Yukon River and the entire Charley River basin. The preserve protects the undeveloped Charley River and a significant portion of the upper Yukon. The interior Alaskan region experiences extremes of weather, with temperatures that can vary from −50 °F (−46 °C) in winter to 97 °F (36 °C) in summertime. The Yukon provided a means of access to the region, which is entirely roadless, during the late 19th century and early 20th centuries. Gold rushes in Alaska brought prospectors, who operated gold dredges to recover significant quantities of placer gold from area creeks. Today the preserve includes part of the route of the annual Yukon Quest dogsled race, which runs every February. During the summer float trips are popular on the Yukon and Charley Rivers.

maps

Visitor Map of Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve (NPRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yukon-Charley Rivers - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve (NPRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail Map of Slaven’s Roadhouse area in Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve (NPRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Yukon-Charley Rivers - Slaven’s Roadhouse

Detail Map of Slaven’s Roadhouse area in Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve (NPRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/yuch/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yukon%E2%80%93Charley_Rivers_National_Preserve Yukon–Charley Rivers National Preserve is located in east central Alaska along the border with Canada. The preserve encompasses 115 miles (185 km) of the 1,800-mile (3,000 km) Yukon River and the entire Charley River basin. The preserve protects the undeveloped Charley River and a significant portion of the upper Yukon. The interior Alaskan region experiences extremes of weather, with temperatures that can vary from −50 °F (−46 °C) in winter to 97 °F (36 °C) in summertime. The Yukon provided a means of access to the region, which is entirely roadless, during the late 19th century and early 20th centuries. Gold rushes in Alaska brought prospectors, who operated gold dredges to recover significant quantities of placer gold from area creeks. Today the preserve includes part of the route of the annual Yukon Quest dogsled race, which runs every February. During the summer float trips are popular on the Yukon and Charley Rivers. Located in Interior Alaska, Yukon-Charley Rivers offers exploration in a largely untouched landscape. Whether you float the mighty Yukon River or paddle the Charley River's whitewater, your memories will last a lifetime. Geology, cultural history, gold rush remnants, wildlife, and vast scenery will be a part of your experience. But, the strongest element will be solitude. Your adventure awaits. Although there is no direct highway connection to Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve, visitors are able to access the preserve by either air travel from Fairbanks, or water or air travel from two small towns on the road system(Eagle and Circle), near the preserve boundaries. Eagle Visitor Center Located along the mighty Yukon River in Eagle, Alaska, this visitor center is the welcome center for those ready to explore Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve. Speak with a ranger, receive a backcountry orientation, and finalize the details of your trip in the preserve. The Eagle Visitor Center is located at the north edge of the town of Eagle, on 1st Avenue. Eagle is located at the end of the Taylor Highway, and is only accessible via road during the summer months. Regular flight service is also available. Fairbanks Alaska Public Lands Information Center Explore world-class exhibits, watch a free informative movie, and receive assistance on your trip planning needs while at the Alaska Public Lands Information Center, located inside of the Morris Thompson Cultural & Visitors Center in Fairbanks, Alaska. In downtown Fairbanks, at the corner of Wendell and Dunkel Street. Aerial view of the Yukon River Aerial view of the Yukon River during fall colors The Yukon River is a vast body of water that has carved its path into the landscape over millions of years. Coal Creek Dredge Historic Coal Creek Dredge The historic Coal Creek Dredge sits nonoperational at its original site, near Slaven's Roadhouse Eagle Visitor Center Eagle Visitor Center in front of Eagle Bluff The Eagle Visitor Center sits atop a small bluff overlooking the Yukon River. Slaven's Roadhouse during fall colors Slaven's Roadhouse during fall colors A historic roadhouse and public use cabin on the Yukon River Calico Bluff and the Yukon River Calico Bluff rising above the Yukon River that also winds into the distance behind the bluff Calico Bluff, showing 4 million years of rock layers, rises above the Yukon River and is one of many bluffs along the 130 miles of river in the preserve The Wild and Scenic Charley River Aerial view of the Charley River winding through the tundra and mountains The 105 mile-long Wild and Scenic Charley River's watershed is completely protected within the preserve boundary. Rust in the Wilderness: The Story of Mining Machines in Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve Today visitors to Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve can explore mining camps that look as if the miners simply dropped their tools, turned off their machines, and walked away. The 1930s-era gold dredge at the Coal Creek mining camp in the heart of Yukon-Charley Rivers National Park Getaway: Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve Just shy of the Arctic Circles lies a land literally frozen in time—Yukon Charley Rivers National Preserve. Come retrace the routes of ancient nomadic hunters, dog-team mail carriers, and supply-laden steamboats through one of the great North American geologic faults that bore the 1890s gold rush. Solitude awaits. Aerial view of the Yukon River during fall colors Fire and Ice, Birds and Burns, Lakes and Streams National Park Service ecologists join forces to survey data within the 2018 Andrew Creek Fire in Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve. YUCH provided an ideal location to investigate the short and long-term impacts of fire and climate change. A woman paddles in a red inflatable raft on a lake in Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve. Snowshoe Hare Snowshoe hares live in the boreal forests of North America and are active year-round. They gain their curious name from their very large hind feet form a snowshoe, supporting their weight on the surface of the snow. Hares greatly influence the world around them, including the vegetation, predators, and other herbivores and omnivores that live in the same habitats. a white colored hare under a shrub in snow Night Skies over Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve The sky over Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve has played a role in how people have navigated, interpreted, and lived in the region throughout the year. The extended sunlight hours of summer marked a busy season of gathering and preserving for indigenous Han Athabascans and long hours of gold seeking for miners in the early 1900s. The dark skies of winter bring the glow of constellations, the dancing colors of the aurora, and the lights of cabins. Green light of the aurora streak through a dark sky over a log cabin in snowy woods. Wolf Denning in Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve Read the abstract and summary and get the link to a recently published article of wolf denning: Joly, K., M. S. Sorum, and M. D. Cameron. 2018. Denning ecology of wolves in east-central Alaska, 1993-2017. Arctic Institute of North America 71(4). A close up of a young wolf's face. Peregrine Falcon The American peregrine falcon is one of the best known raptors in North America. For years, American peregrine populations declined due to problems with egg-shell thinning caused by persistent organic pollutants such as DDT. The American peregrine is one of three peregrine species found throughout North America, from northern Mexico all the way to Alaska. brown and tan bird perched on a rock Abandoned Mine Lands in Alaska National Parks—An Overview From the thousands of mining claims that existed at when Congress created most national parks in Alaska, around 750 still remain. These are mainly abandoned sites and features, in various stages of disrepair and failure. Since 1981, the NPS has worked to quantify the number and type of hazards posed by these sites and has pursued a variety of solutions to mitigate the issues, such as visitor safety hazards, presented by relic mining features. dilapidated wood building in a mountainous setting Subsistence The study of subsistence resources in parks has been a mix of long-term work and projects instigated by issues facing the Federal Subsistence Board. Winter hunting is an important subsistence activity in many Alaska communities and park areas. Red Fox Despite the name, red foxes come in a variety of colors. They're found throughout the United States and are not uncommon sightings in many national parks. two red foxes Science in Wilderness Marine Reserves ANILCA establishes the largest scientific laboratory...ever! A spawning salmon struggles to get back into the water. A Tribute: Dave Spirtes, 1948-2004 A tribute to a lost colleague and friend, Dave Spirtes. Dave Spirtes holds an award presented to him by Ron Arnberger, Alaska Regional Director (retired). ANILCA and the Western Arctic Caribou Herd Cooperative Management Plan The Western Arctic Caribou Herd at 450,000 animals is only one of about 32 herds in Alaska but is by far the largest, comprising about half of the caribou in the state (and about 10% of the world total of 5 million animals). Lush green tundra cut by thousands of caribou tracks. Mining in the Parks Resource protection goals, resource data, the study areas and other decisions made in the environmental impact state-ment process held up under public scrutiny and federal appeals court review, and became an integral part of evaluating new mining plans of operations in parks. A semi-truck hauling two trailers filled with ore on a gravel road. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve, Alaska Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] sunset over river High-latitude Peregrine Falcons Read the abstract and get the link to an article recently published in Plos One: Talbot, S. L., G. K. Sage, S. A. Sonsthagen, M. C. Gravley, T. Swem, J. C. Williams,J. L. Longmire, S. Ambrose, M. J. Flamme, S. B. Lewis, L. Phillips, C. Anderson, and C. M. White. 2017. Intraspecific evolutionary relationships among peregrine falcons in western North American high latitudes. Plos One 12(11):e0188185. A peregrine falcon on the nest with chicks. In Celebration of ANILCA Former President, Jimmy Carter, offers a sentimental introduction to the 25th Anniversary Edition of Alaska Park Science and the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA). Black and white photo of six white men standing in front of an old National Park Service Building. A History of Science in Alaska's National Parks National park units in Alaska precede the establishment of the National Park Service in 1916. The first park unit, Sitka National Monument, was conceived in 1908, and by the mid-1920s four national monuments along with Alaska’s first national park were part of the growing park system. Discover how the early 1900s and observations of a few helped to establish the National Park Service in Alaska. Black and white photo of Arno Cammerer sitting at his desk looking through papers. Old is Getting Older In the last 25 years, persistent archaeological survey and improved scientific techniques have resulted in new data which confirms that Alaska sites are actually much earlier than we once believed. NPS archaeologist works at Amakomanak site in Noatak National Preserve. No Structures Too Far for NPS Wildland Firefighters The NPS manages approximately 52.5 million acres in Alaska across 24 different NPS units. While much of the NPS land in Alaska is remote and unpopulated, there are nearly 4,000 individual structures spread throughout the parks and preserves in Alaska. Of that total, 2,756 are NPS structures. These structures can range from large groups of road-accessible buildings in headquarters areas to remote backcountry cabins accessible only by aircraft, but that doesn't stop NPS WLF! Two firefighters in bright yellow shirts and blue hardhats survey a tiny cabin amidst tall trees. Bonanza Venture at Historic Coal Creek Mine Assigned to a remote Alaskan coal camp, Student Conservation Association crews gained new fireline skills, enhanced understanding of fire ecology and fire management, and an appreciation for the importance of historic site conservation efforts. three people looking at log while one person stands in the background Fire Communication and Education Grants Enhance Fire Interpretation and Outreach in the National Parks in 2015 and Beyond The 2015 National Park Service Fire Communication and Education Grant Program provided funding for projects, programs, or tasks in twelve parks around the country. A woman studies a small coniferous tree while a younger woman looks on. Land Ownership in National Park System Units in Alaska and Possibilities for Mining and Other Developments There are over 54 million acres of National Park System units in Alaska, which is 65 percent of the entire National Park System. Although most of those lands are in federal ownership and are managed by the NPS, there are over two million acres of non-federally owned lands within those units. These non-federal lands are in private, state, borough, or municipal ownership. The existence of these lands creates the possibility of mining and other developments within the boundaries rustic buildings near a creek, hills and mountains in the distance When is a Fire Likely to Start? Fires, Fire Ecology, and Education Learn what makes the conditions right for burning in Yukon-Charley National Preserve and when a fire is likely to start. Wildland fire personnel en route to the Andrew Creek Fire by boat on the Yukon River. Spring Breakup on the Yukon: What Happens When the Ice Stops Spring breakup can create flooding and ice-scouring hazards for communities along major rivers in Alaska. This article gives examples of recent flood events along the Yukon River and describes the conditions that created them. Alaska Park Science 18(1):2019. The ice-covered Yukon River. Fire Ecology Annual Report 2018 Fire Season Despite the relatively quiet fire season in Alaska in 2018, the National Park Service saw 24 wildfires spanning over 36,000 acres burning within and adjacent to park boundaries. Six of those fires were in Cape Krusenstern National Monument. An anvil-shaped smoke plume rises above the tree line on the Yukon River. Building PIO capacity in Alaska National Park Service Public Information Officers were in short supply last fire season. To help bolster the numbers, NPS Alaska recruits 12 new staff members to assist with all hazard and wildfire incidents. A fire public information officer highlights updates on a fire to members of the public. Aurora Borealis: A Brief Overview A brief overview of how Northern Lights occur. two ribbons of greenish light in a dark blue sky, over a very dark forest Hunting and Subsistence Use of Dall Sheep Learn about the two ways humans harvest sheep - for subsistence use and in sport hunting. a male sheep 2013 Microgrant Recipients The Murie Science and Learning Center (MSLC) funds numerous outreach projects through the Microgrant program. These grants help MSLC partner parks pay for science education outreach projects. Funding for the Microgrant program is provided by Alaska Geographic. Read about the 2013 Microgrant recipients and their outreach projects. A Ranger stands with two junior rangers 2014 Microgrant Recipients The Murie Science and Learning Center (MSLC) funds numerous outreach projects through the Microgrant program. These grants help MSLC partner parks pay for science education outreach projects. Funding for the Microgrant program is provided by Alaska Geographic. Read about the 2014 Microgrant recipients and their outreach projects. Two students kneel in grassy field taking notes while looking at pink flagged marked locations Wolverines Wolverine. The name alone stirs up visions of northern wilderness. Wolverines belong to the mustelidae family along with weasels, mink, marten, and otters. The family mustelidae makes up most of the order Carnivora (carnivores). a wolverine on a snow-covered river digging at something partially buried 2019 Science Education Grants The Murie Science and Learning Center (MSLC) funds numerous outreach projects through the Science Education Grant program. These grants help MSLC partner parks pay for science education outreach projects. Funding for the Science Education grant program is provided by Alaska Geographic. Read about the 2019 Science Education Grant recipients and their outreach projects. a park ranger and kids standing in shallow lake water Bat Projects in Parks: Alaska Region Parks Bats in Alaska? Find out! A scenic view of Alaska, mountains in the distance and a grizzly in front of a lake in the front. Mining and Mitigation: The Coal Creek Remediation Project With the transfer of the Coal Creek claims to the National Park Service in 1986, the National Park Service assumed the responsibility for the cleanup of the contaminants. Men work outside to remove mercury contaminants from the soil. Fire Ecology 2018 Annual Report Summary, Monitoring & Inventory During the 2018 field season, the NPS Alaska fire ecology program conducted monitoring in Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve. This article provides a brief summary about the Yukon-Charley Rivers results, research projects, and fire ecology program activities. Lichens growing toward the sun years after a wildfire. Jeff Rasic - Archaeologist Jeff Rasic, an archaeologist by training, is a program manager for natural and cultural resources at Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve and Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve in Alaska. Jeff Rasic Sam Creek Cabin still stands thanks to quick response Frequent lightning, dry and windy conditions made for a challenging fire season for Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve this summer. The Andrew Creek Fire can be seen in the near distance as it races towards a historic cabin. Wolf Monitoring Read the abstract and link to the monograph resulting from more than 22 years of monitoring; one of the four longest-running studies in North America. Schmidt, J. H., J. W. Burch, and M. C. MacCluskie. 2017. Effects of control on the dynamics of an adjacent protected wolf population in Interior Alaska. Wildlife Monographs 198:1-30. A lone wolf trots through the snow. Peregrine Falcon Recovery Read the abstract and get the link to an article published in the Journal of Wildlife Management: Ambrose, S., C. Florian, R. J. Richie, D. Payer, and R. M. O’Brien. 2016. Recovery of American peregrine falcons along the upper Yukon River. Journal of Wildlife Management. A pair of Peregrine Falcons fly from the top of a spruce tree. 2018 Science Education Grants The Murie Science and Learning Center (MSLC) funds numerous outreach projects through the Science Education Grant program. These grants help MSLC partner parks pay for science education outreach projects. Funding for the Science Education grant program is provided by Alaska Geographic. Read about the 2018 Science Education Grant recipients and their outreach projects. an instructor and a camper work on a carving National Park Service, Native Crew Join Forces to Protect Values at Risk The Tanana Chiefs Conference Fire Crew, which consists mostly of Alaskan Natives tribal members, joined with the NPS Alaska Region Eastern Area Fire Management Program to complete a fuels project in Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve during summer 2014 as part of NPS efforts to create fire-adapted human communities. Wolf Dispersal in Alaskan Parks Wildlife biologists have long known that wolves occasionally travel enormous distances in search of new mates and ranges. However, the advent of GPS-based wildlife tracking has allowed researchers to follow in the very footsteps of wolves as they travel across vast and wild landscapes. Alaska National Park scientists have witnessed some surprisingly intimate and breathtaking interconnections between wolves, parks and people by using this technology over the last few years. Close up of a wolf standing and facing the camera 2017 Science Education Grants The Murie Science and Learning Center (MSLC) funds numerous outreach projects through the Science Education Grant program. These grants help MSLC partner parks pay for science education outreach projects. Funding for the Science Education grant program is provided by Alaska Geographic. Read about the 2017 Science Education Grant recipients and their outreach projects. two girls sit in a kayak out on the water 2015 Microgrant Recipients The Murie Science and Learning Center (MSLC) funds numerous outreach projects through the Microgrant program. These grants help MSLC partner parks pay for science education outreach projects. Funding for the Microgrant program is provided by Alaska Geographic. Read about the 2015 Microgrant recipients and their outreach projects. Students kneel in a wetland and examine a net Jillian Richie - Archaeologist Jillian Richie is an archaeologist for Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve and Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve, Alaska. Jillian in the field, preparing an archaeological field site. Amy Larsen - Aquatic Ecologist/Pilot Amy Larsen is an aquatic ecologist and pilot for Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve and Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve in Alaska. Amy Larsen collecting field data on shallow lakes. Fire, Topography, and Climate Drive Variation in Alaska's Boreal Forests Read the abstract and link to the peer-reviewed article about drivers of change in high-latitude boreal forests in Alaska. Roland, Carl A., Joshua H. Schmidt, Samantha G. WInder, Sarah E. Stehn, and E. Fleur Nicklen. 2019. Regional variation in interior Alaskan boreal forests is driven by fire disturbance, topography, and climate. Ecological Monographs. Boreal forest in Alaska; a monitoring plot. Donna DiFolco - Biological Technician Donna DiFolco is a biological technician for Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve and Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve, Alaska. Donna releasing a hare during field work. Dall Sheep Dall sheep are unmistakable, looking like pure-white bighorn sheep. Like bighorn sheep, they have large, curled horns, but Dall sheep horns are longer and skinnier than their southern counterparts. They inhabit mountain ranges in Alaska and Canada and are often visible from quite far away. Close up of sheep face and horns Magnetic Detection of Archaeological Hearths in Alaska Read the abstract and link to a recent article on archaeological research using magnetic detection of hearths: Urban, Thomas M., Jeffrey T. Rasic, Claire Alix, Douglas D. Anderson, Linda Chisholm, Robert W. Jacob, Sturt W. Manning, Owen K.Mason, Andrew H. Tremayne, Dale Vinson (2019). Magnetic detection of archaeological hearths in Alaska: A tool for investigating the full span of human presence at the gateway to North America. Quaternary Science Reviews 211: 73-92. An archaeologist searches for hearths using a magetometer Understanding what Drives Plant Diversity in Alaska Read the abstract and get the link to a peer-reviewed article on the environmental conditions that impact plant diversity in Alaska: Roland, Carl A., Giancarlo Sadoti, E. Fleur Nicklen, Stephanie A. McAfee, and Sarah E. Stehn. 2019. A structural equation model linking past and present plant diversity in Alaska: A framework for evaluating future change. Ecosphere 10(8): e02832. An infographic showing the relationships between plant diversity, climate, and physical factors. Mapping Lichen in Caribou Ranges Read the abstract and link to a recent peer-reviewed article on mapping lichen in caribou ranges of interior Alaska: Macander, M. J., E. C. Palm, G. V. Frost, J. D. Herriges, P. R. Nelson, C. Roland, K. L. M. Russell, M. J. Suitor, T. W. Bentzen, K. Joly, S. J. Goetz, and M. Hebblewhite. 2020. Lichen cover mapping for caribou ranges in interior Alaska and Yukon. Environmental Research Letters 15: 055001 A caribou antler in a bed of reindeer lichen. Moose: Did You Know? Did You Know factoids about moose in Interior Alaska National Parks Bull moose bedded in vegetation Research Fellowship Recipients (2015) Learn about 2015 Research Fellowship recipients a man sitting in a forest Monitoring Seasonal and Long-term Climate Changes and Extremes in the Central Alaska Network Climate is a primary driver of ecological change and an important component of the Central Alaska Inventory and Monitoring Network (CAKN). By monitoring seasonal and long-term climate patterns in the region, we can correlate climate changes and extremes to other variations in the ecosystem, such as changes in permafrost extent or vegetation composition. rain squall over a mountain landscape Climate-related Vegetation Changes in the Subarctic The vast landscapes of interior Alaska are changing: Large glaciers are melting and rapidly receding up valleys, ancient permafrost is degrading and turning frozen soils into soupy gelatin, woody vegetation is spreading dramatically into open areas, and boreal ponds and wetlands are shrinking. composite of two aerial images of a river, with one containing substantially more trees in the image Beringia from a Cretaceous Perspective This article explores fossils and rocks found in the Beringia region and what can be learned from these discoveries. The content and makeup of these rocks and fossils are discussed which leads to drawing conclusions on the ecosystem in Beringia. Map of Beringia with NPS units highlighted in green. The Social Structure of Dall Sheep Dall sheep employ a sophisticated social structure. A ewe and two lambs stand on a rocky cliff Looking Back—A Heady Time for National Park Service Science in Alaska Spurred by Alaska gaining statehood and the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA), the 1970s saw a spurt of scientific activity that gave experienced Alaska investigators additional access to remote field study sites and introduced investigators new to Alaska to exciting and challenging opportunities for conducting field study in remote places. mist on forested mountains Monitoring Dall Sheep Discovery how and why scientists monitor Dall sheep in national parks throughout Alaska. A group of three dall sheep walk down a dirt road Dall Sheep and Climate Change How might climate change impact the world's northernmost wild sheep population? ewe and lamb on a rocky outcropping Moose Surveys Science Summary (2012) - By estimating moose numbers, wildlife managers can understand if the local population of animals can be considered 'natural and healthy.' The information is also used in crafting hunting regulations. Moose populations also indicate the biological integrity of an area. a moose cow and calf in brush Using Ethics Arguments to Preserve Naturalness: A Case Study of Wildlife Harvest Practices on NPS Lands in Alaska The NPS responsibility to maintain natural wildlife populations is inherently challenging. For example, many animals migrate out of parks either seasonally or long-term. Typically, we collect and analyze data, and then publish our work. However, the answer rarely, if ever, lies solely in the data. Often the question is not even one of biology, but one of values. In these cases, nonscientific tools such as rigorous and transparent argument analyses are appropriate. bear eating a fish in shallow water Fire vs Ice: Revolutionizing the Thawing Process at Coal Creek Gold mining is as much a part of the cultural and natural history of Alaska’s national parks as any other resource. In the enabling legislation of several Alaska park areas, gold mining is identified as one of the reasons that Congress deemed these areas worthy of protection. pile of rusted metal pipes and hoses Alaska Aviation Safety In Alaska, small planes are often the best way to get around but flying has its risks. Aviation safety requires more than just a pilot’s skill–it takes all of us. Learn more about aviation to increase the safety of your next park flight. An NPS pilot in a plane cockpit flying over a turquoise lake Matthew Cameron - Wildlife Biologist Matthew Cameron is a wildlife biologist at Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve and Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve. Matt Cameron portrait. Adam Freeburg - Archaeologist Adam Freeburg is an archaeologist for Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve and Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve. An archaeologist hikes a ridgeline to a survey site in the Yukon-Tanana uplands. Wolf denning dates stay constant as the climate warms Read the abstract and get the link to an article that looks at wolf denning timing related to the onset of spring and the effects of seasonal weather on den success: Mahoney, P. J. K. Joly, B. L. Borg, M. S. Sorum, T. A. Rinaldi, … B. Mangipane, et al. 2020. Denning phenology and reproductive success of wolves in response to climate signals. Environmental Research Letters 15(12): 125001. An adult wolf with pups. Kyle Joly - Wildlife Biologist Kyle Joly is a wildlife biologist in Alaska. He works with the Arctic Inventory and Monitoring Network, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, and Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve. Wildlife biologist Kyle Joly with a young caribou. Mathew Sorum - Wildlife Biologist Mathew Sorum is a wildlife biologist for Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve and Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve. Mat rows a raft across an Arctic lake. The 19th Amendment, Elizabeth Peratrovich, and the Ongoing Fight for Equal Rights In Alaska, women's suffrage passed in 1913—seven years prior to the 19th Amendment—and antidiscrimination legislation passed nearly 20 years prior to the major national civil rights bills of the 1960s. In the 1940s, Elizabeth Peratrovich—a Tlingit woman who was Grand President of the Alaska Native Sisterhood—led the charge to end discrimination against Alaska Natives. gold coin of a raven, a woman's face, and words elizabeth peratrovich anti-discrimination law Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 16 Issue: Science in Alaska's Arctic Parks The National Park Service manages five parks that fall partially or entirely within the Arctic tundra biome. These five parks encompass 19.3 million acres of land and constitute approximately 25% of the land area managed by the National Park Service nationwide. These are undeveloped places, with free-flowing rivers and wilderness at a massive scale. a group of muskox running across a field Series: Dall Sheep in Alaska's National Parks Discover the importance of Dall Sheep in Alaska's National Parks Two sheep rest on a snowy mountain Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 13 Issue 2: Mineral and Energy Development There’s no denying that energy and mineral extraction have been and will continue to be important across the North for a long time. Mining and energy-related industries provide direct and indirect employment for thousands of people, taxes and other revenues. Our need is for science, engineering, and scholarly research; to develop safe, effective, and affordable technologies; to protect, preserve, and restore the natural and human environment; and to record and communicate our history. aerial view of buildings and a pier sticking out into the ocean Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 13 Issue 1: Wilderness in Alaska This issue includes: * Economics of Wilderness * Using Ethics Arguments to Preserve Naturalness * Busing Through the Wilderness: "Near-Wilderness" Experiences in Denali ... and more! mountains reflecting into a calm lake, the words 'alaska park science' Series: Denali Fact Sheets: Biology Discover the secret lives of animals in Denali! a beaver Series: The Legacy of ANILCA The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act impacts the National Park Service in many ways. ANILCA stipulates the designation of wilderness, subsistence management, transportation in and across parklands, use of cabins, mining, archaeological sites, scientific research studies and more. Two men drag a harvest seal from icy blue waters across frozen ice. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: Copper River Basin Symposium - Wrangell-St Elias National Park and Preserve February 2020: With a theme of Tradition, Science, and Stewardship, the two-day symposium included keynote speakers, 26 short presentations, and a poster session. A panel discussion delved into opportunities in working with indigenous communities. Ahtna elders provided wisdom in daily welcomes, and there was a presentation by Copper River Stewardship Youth. Topics ranged widely from fisheries to archaeology to geology. As well as sharing knowledge, participants shared meals, stories, and ideas. Copper River Basin Symposium logo by Lindsay and Elvie Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Alaska Park Science, Volume 18, Issue 1, Understanding and Preparing for Alaska's Geohazards Alaska is the most geologically active part of North America. Much of the awe-inspiring landscapes of Alaska's parks are created by geologic processes. But sometimes, these processes can be hazardous. This issue explores the state of the science to understand geohazards in Alaska national parks. Alaska Park Science 18(1): 2019. A man jumps down a dune of volcanic ash. Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 6 Issue 2: Crossing Boundaries in a Changing Environment This issue covers the proceedings of the Central Alaska Park Science Symposium, held in Denali National Park. Topics include climate change monitoring, landscape and wildlife ecology, physical sciences, fisheries, subsistence, and using science as a tool for park management. person in a canoe on a misty lake Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 14 Issue 2: Birds of Alaska's National Parks This issue includes articles exploring birds throughout national parks in Alaska. Particular emphasis is on the changing ways to study birds, and the increasing importance not just on the summer homes of birds in Alaska, but the routes between their wintering and summer breeding grounds. a great horned own and two large owlets in a nest Series: Alaska Park Science: Volume 8, Issue 2: Park Science in the Arctic This symposium, the third in a series focused on science and scholarship in and around Alaska’s national parks, is a joint effort with the Beringia Days International Conference. Our theme “Park Science in the Arctic – the Natural and Cultural Heritage of Greater Beringia” is focused on very special places deliberately set aside by nations to preserve their exceptional, natural, cultural, historic, and inspirational significance. dozens of sled dogs curled up in snow near a handful of people talking to each other After the Andrew Creek Fire The 2018 Andrew Creek Fire was distinct from the many and frequent fires in the preserve in that it burned an area underlain with yedoma—an organic-rich, Pleistocene-age permafrost with high ice content. Because yedoma affects so many other physical and ecological factors, the Andrew Creek Fire burn area created an interdisciplinary opportunity to monitor and study its recovery compared to other burn sites. A burned landscape showing erosion and gullies. Devonian Period—419.2 to 358.9 MYA The Devonian is part of the “Age of Fishes.” Fish fossils from Death Valley National Park shed light on the early evolution of fish in North America. Tilted Devonian rocks in Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park attest to continued Appalachian Mountain formation. fossil brachiopod Cambrian Period—541 to 485.4 MYA The flat layers of rock exposed in Grand Canyon National Park encompass much of the Paleozoic, beginning in the Cambrian where they record an ancient shoreline. rock with fossil burrow tracks The Precambrian The Precambrian was the "Age of Early Life." During the Precambrian, continents formed and our modern atmosphere developed, while early life evolved and flourished. Soft-bodied creatures like worms and jellyfish lived in the world's oceans, but the land remained barren. Common Precambrian fossils include stromatolites and similar structures, which are traces of mats of algae-like microorganisms, and microfossils of other microorganisms. fossil stromatolites in a cliff face Proterozoic Eon—2.5 Billion to 541 MYA The Proterozoic Eon is the most recent division of the Precambrian. It is also the longest geologic eon, beginning 2.5 billion years ago and ending 541 million years ago fossil stromatolites in a cliff face Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Patterns of Pathogen Exposure in Gray Wolves Read the abstract and link to a new published article on wolf pathogens across North America: Brandell, E. E., P. C. Cross, M. E. Craft, D. W. Smith, E. J. Dubovi, ...B. L. Borg, M. Sorum, ... et al. 2021. Patterns and processes of pathogen exposure in gray wolves across North America. Scientific Reports 11: 3722. Aerial view of a wolf pack in the snow. Fire in Ecosystems: Boreal Forest The boreal forest, also called taiga, is the largest forested habitat in the world, making up one third of the earth’s total forested area. In North America, the boreal forest spreads from Alaska, across Canada, and into the Great Lakes region of the United States. Boreal forests have burned naturally for thousands of years creating a variety of landscapes, or mosaic, with young and old trees living on the landscape. Aerial view of flaming front in coniferous trees putting off a lot of smoke. A New Resource for Researching America's Elephants Mammoths, mastodons, and other proboscideans are among the most familiar fossil organisms. An inventory complied by Jim Mead and others documents the occurrences of these animals in 63 National Park Service units. photo-illustration of a ranger standing next to a mammoth Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 13, No. 1, Spring 2021 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> park ranger in uniform Borealization and its Discontents Read the abstract and link to a recently published article on the drivers of biodiversity in high-latitude, high-elevation boreal forests in: Roland, C., J. H. Schmidt, S. E. Stehn, C. J. Hampton-Miller, and E. F. Nicklen. 2021. Borealization and its discontents: Drivers of regional variation in plant diversity across scales in interior Alaska. Ecosphere 12(5): e03485.  boreal forest in Denali Using Aquatic Invertebrates to Measure the Health of Stream Ecosystems: New Bioassessment Tools for Alaska’s Parklands Aquatic insects are good indicators of stream ecosystem health because they are common, reasonably well understood, easy to collect and analyze, and sensitive to the environment in which they live. We can determine the relative health of a stream by comparing what insects we find to what we would expect to find in a similar healthy stream. This straightforward approach can be used in all kinds of settings and compared across a region. Alaska Park Science 20(1), 2021 A man stands with an insect collection net with Denali in the background. Series: Alaska Park Science Volume 20 Issue 1 - Parks as Proving Grounds Parks in Alaska pose special challenges to researchers: they are large, remote, and less is known about them. This makes it all the more important that tools and techniques we use here are practical, effective, and impactful. While researchers often focus on sharing the findings from their work, here we shine a light on the devices and approaches used by researchers with attention to the innovation needed to work in Alaska. Alaska Park Science 20 (1), 2021 A scientist uses a probe on the top of a mountain. A Tale of Two Spruce Read the abstract and get a link to a recently published paper: Nicklen, E. F., C. A. Roland, R. W. Ruess, T. Scharnweber, and M. Wilmking. 2021. Divergent responses to permafrost and precipitation reveal mechanisms for the spatial variation of two sympatric spruce. Ecosphere 12(7): e03622. A boreal forest landscape. Strong Partnerships Help Protect Significant Historical and Scientific Sites in Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve The Cultas Creek Fire #223 began with a lightning strike and was detected by National Park Service fire ecologists working in the Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve on June 17th. By early July 2021, the fire was burning within one mile of the Sam Creek Cabin, one of the oldest log structures in the preserve. Four Alaska Fire Service smokejumpers parachuted with supplies into the area. Their mission was to clear brush and set up sprinkler systems around the structure. A small log cabin in the woods surrounded by hoses and fire protection equipment. Bumble Bees of Alaska: A Field Guide This field guide to bumble bees will help you identify these abundant and conspicuous pollinators, which are found across most of Alaska. They are well-adapted to cold, harsh climates and live in every habitat where there are flowers offering up pollen and nectar, including forests, shrublands, tundra, wetlands, riparian areas, beaches, and gardens. a bumble bee perched on tiny pink flowers Charley's Village Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve is named for the two great rivers that are in many ways the focal points of the preserve. Upstream of the Charley River, the Kandik River, once called Charley Creek, flows into the Yukon. Near this confluence there was once an important village site, the historic home of Chief Charley and his Han Gwich'in Athabaskan followers. First known photo of Chief Charley (center); chief of what is known as Charlie's Band, 1882 How climate changes the timing of wood frog calls Read the abstract and get the link to a published article on what we learned from monitoring the timing of wood frog calls: Larsen, A. S., J. H. Schmidt, H. Stapleton, H. Kristenson, D. Betchkal, and M. F. McKenna. 2021. Monitoring the phenology of the wood frog breeding season using bioacoustic methods. Ecological Indicators 131: 108142. Wood frog.

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