by Alex Gugel , all rights reserved

Zion

National Park - Utah

Zion National Park is a southwest Utah nature preserve distinguished by Zion Canyon’s steep red cliffs. Zion Canyon Scenic Drive cuts through its main section, leading to forest trails along the Virgin River. The river flows to the Emerald Pools, which have waterfalls and a hanging garden. Also along the river, partly through deep chasms, is Zion Narrows wading hike.

location

maps

Official visitor map of Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Zion - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of Gooseberry Mesa Trail System near Zion National Park (NP) in the BLM St. George Field Office area in Utah. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Gooseberry Mesa - Trail System

Map of Gooseberry Mesa Trail System near Zion National Park (NP) in the BLM St. George Field Office area in Utah. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of Colorado City Travel Management Area (TMA) in the BLM Arizona Strip Field Office area in Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Arizona Strip - Colorado City

Map of Colorado City Travel Management Area (TMA) in the BLM Arizona Strip Field Office area in Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Visitor Map of the southern part of the BLM Kanab Field Office area in Utah. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Kanab - Visitor Map South 2017

Visitor Map of the southern part of the BLM Kanab Field Office area in Utah. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of the Daily Lottery Permit Application Geofence Perimeter for Coyote Buttes North (The Wave) in the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument (NM), Arizona Strip BLM Field Office area and Kanab BLM Field Office area in Utah and Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Coyote Buttes North (The Wave) - Daily Lottery Permit Application Geofence Perimeter

Map of the Daily Lottery Permit Application Geofence Perimeter for Coyote Buttes North (The Wave) in the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument (NM), Arizona Strip BLM Field Office area and Kanab BLM Field Office area in Utah and Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Winter 2021/2022 Information Sheet for Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Zion Maps and Guides - Winter 2021/2022

Winter 2021/2022 Information Sheet for Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Fall 2021 Information Sheet for Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Zion Maps and Guides - Fall 2021

Fall 2021 Information Sheet for Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Summer Information Sheet for Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Zion Maps and Guides - Summer 2021

Summer Information Sheet for Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Spring Information Sheet for Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Zion Maps and Guides - Spring 2021

Spring Information Sheet for Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

The official 2009 Centennial Newspaper of Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Zion Maps and Guides - 2009 Centennial Newspaper

The official 2009 Centennial Newspaper of Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

The Wilderness Guide is designed to answer most of the common questions about wilderness use in the park and includes a map, Subway and Narrows information, and details about the permit system. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Wilderness - Wilderness Guide 2021

The Wilderness Guide is designed to answer most of the common questions about wilderness use in the park and includes a map, Subway and Narrows information, and details about the permit system. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

This map is given to overnight hikers that have a permit for camping in the Southwest Desert part of Zion. It is useful to have a map that helps locate the campsites. It may also be useful for day trips. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Wilderness - Southwest Desert Campsites

This map is given to overnight hikers that have a permit for camping in the Southwest Desert part of Zion. It is useful to have a map that helps locate the campsites. It may also be useful for day trips. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

This map is for visitors with permits to hike the Narrows top-down. This information is useful for finding the Narrows campsites. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Wilderness - Narrows Campsites

This map is for visitors with permits to hike the Narrows top-down. This information is useful for finding the Narrows campsites. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

This handout is for visitors with a permit to do the Pine Creek technical slot canyon. This information helps visitors prevent erosion at the entrance to the canyon, located near tunnel east. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Wilderness - Pine Creek Canyon

This handout is for visitors with a permit to do the Pine Creek technical slot canyon. This information helps visitors prevent erosion at the entrance to the canyon, located near tunnel east. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

This handout is for visitors with a permit to do the Spry Canyon technical slot canyon. This information helps prevent erosion at the sandy exit slope after you come out of the slot section. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Wilderness - Spry Canyon

This handout is for visitors with a permit to do the Spry Canyon technical slot canyon. This information helps prevent erosion at the sandy exit slope after you come out of the slot section. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

This handout is for visitors with a permit to do the Keyhole technical slot canyon. This information helps prevent erosion at the entrance slope when accessing the canyon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Wilderness - Spry Canyon

This handout is for visitors with a permit to do the Keyhole technical slot canyon. This information helps prevent erosion at the entrance slope when accessing the canyon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure of Birds at Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Zion - Birds

Brochure of Birds at Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure of Mammals at Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Zion - Mammals

Brochure of Mammals at Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure of Plants at Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Zion - Plants

Brochure of Plants at Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure of Reptiles and Amphibians at Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Zion - Reptiles and Amphibians

Brochure of Reptiles and Amphibians at Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/zion https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zion_National_Park Zion National Park is a southwest Utah nature preserve distinguished by Zion Canyon’s steep red cliffs. Zion Canyon Scenic Drive cuts through its main section, leading to forest trails along the Virgin River. The river flows to the Emerald Pools, which have waterfalls and a hanging garden. Also along the river, partly through deep chasms, is Zion Narrows wading hike. Follow the paths where native people and pioneers walked. Gaze up at massive sandstone cliffs of cream, pink, and red that soar into a brilliant blue sky. Experience wilderness in a narrow slot canyon. Zion’s unique array of plants and animals will enchant you as you absorb the rich history of the past and enjoy the excitement of present day adventures. Zion National Park is located on State Route 9 in Springdale, Utah. You may drive yourself on all open park roads except the Zion Canyon Scenic Drive. During most of the year, the Scenic Drive is accessed by shuttle bus only. Shuttles are free and can be found at the Zion Canyon Visitor Center. Human History Museum Indoor exhibits focus in the human history of Zion National Park. A 22-minute orientation film highlights the dramatic landscapes of the park and examines the history of the canyon. Rotating art exhibits feature regional artists. Visit the bookstore for maps, book, and gifts. There are dramatic views of the Towers of the Virgin and Bridge Mountain outside. Kolob Canyons Visitor Center This is the entry point to the Kolob Canyons area of the park. It is located 45 miles north of Springdale and 17 miles south of Cedar City at Exit 40 on Interstate 15. Park rangers are available to answer questions. Exhibits explore the geology, vegetation, and wildlife of this unique landscape. This is the entry point to the Kolob Canyons area of the park. It is located 45 miles north of Springdale and 17 miles south of Cedar City at Exit 40 on Interstate 15. Zion Canyon Visitor Center Located near the South Entrance of the park, the Zion Canyon Visitor Center is an excellent place to begin your exploration of Zion Canyon. Park rangers and outdoor exhibits will help you plan your visit and make the most of your time. Inquire at the Zion Canyon Wilderness Desk about permits for backpacking, canyoneering, and other trips into the wilderness. Visit the bookstore for maps, books, and gifts. By Car Zion National Park is located on State Route 9 in Springdale, Utah. All mileages below represent the distance from the Zion Canyon Visitor Center. From Las Vegas, Nevada (163 miles), Mesquite, Nevada (80 miles), and Saint George, Utah (40 miles): Interstate 15 North Exit 16 - Right on State Route 9 East (33 miles) Right to stay on State Route 9 East in La Verkin, Utah (20 miles) Stay on State Route 9 East into Zion National Park, the Zion Canyon Visitor Center is ahead on the right. Lava Point Campground This campground is typically open May through September, as weather allows. Situated at 7890 feet above sea level, it is off the Kolob Terrace Road, 25 miles (45 minutes) north of the town of Virgin. It takes approximately one hour and 20 minutes to drive to the campground from the South Entrance of Zion Canyon. There are 6 primitive campsites available first come, first serve. The campground has pit toilets and trash cans, but no water. Vehicles longer than 19 feet are not permitted. South Campground South Campground is located near the Zion Canyon Visitor Center, ½ mile from the South Entrance at Springdale, Utah. Tent, dry RV, and group campsites are available by reservation from March through October. All sites include a place for a tent or RV, a picnic table, and a fire ring. Reservations may be made 14 days in advance of your stay. Reservations are needed because the campground is full nearly every night during the reservation season. Tent Campsites 20.00 Tent Campsites Group Campsites 50.00 Group Campsites South Campground South Campground South Campground Watchman Campground Watchman Campground is located next to the Zion Canyon Visitor Center, ¼ mile away from the South Entrance in Springdale, Utah. Tent and electric campsites are available year-round and group campsites are available from March through November. All sites include a place for a tent or RV, a picnic table, and access to a fire ring. All campsites in Watchman Campground require reservations year-round. Reservations may be made six (6) months in advance. Electric Campsites 30.00 Generators are not permitted, but 95 campsites have electrical hookups. Reserve an electric campsite if you need power. Tent Only Campsites 20.00 There are 69 campsites that are for tents only with combined vehicle length less than 19' (5.8 m). There are 18 Tent Only, Walk-in campsites. These sites are a short walking distance Group Campsites 50.00 There are 6 group campsites that are limited to one site per affiliated group at a time with a seven day per stay limit. The sites can accommodate from 9 to 40 campers. The group campsites are tent only. RVs, camping trailers, and pop-up campers are not permitted. Cost $50.00 per night for 7-12 people, $90.00 per night for 16-25 people and $130.00 per night for 26-40 people. Accessible Sites 10.00 2 wheelchair accessible sites Watchman Campground Watchman Campground Watchman Campground Watchman Campground Restroom Watchman Campground Restroom Watchman Campground Restroom Temples and Towers of the Virgin A towering sandstone rock formation. The Temples and Towers can be seen from the back patio of the Human History Museum. Zion Canyon Visitor Center Zion Canyon Visitor Center with a sandstone peak in the background The Zion Canyon Visitor Center sits near the sandstone peak known as the Watchman Mountain of the Sun A white and pink sandstone peak, lit up in the sunlight. The Mountain of the Sun in Zion Canyon. The Zion Narrows A narrow canyon with a gentle river flowing in the bottom The Zion Narrows is a challenging wilderness experience. Kolob Arch A large red sandstone arch high up on a cliff. Deep in Zion's Wilderness sits Kolob Arch, one of the largest free-standing arches in the world. 2009 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2009 Environmental Achievement Awards 2011 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2011 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards The Civilian Conservation Corps As part of the New Deal Program, to help lift the United States out of the Great Depression, Franklin D. Roosevelt established the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1933. The CCC or C’s as it was sometimes known, allowed single men between the ages of 18 and 25 to enlist in work programs to improve America’s public lands, forests, and parks. CCC men lined up in front of a building and looking at a flag pole with an american flag. Jolley Gulch Fire Spread Limited by Prior Prescribed Fires Jolley Gulch Fire, July 23, 2017 Jolley Gulch Fire, July 23, 2017 California Condor Species description of the California Condor (Gymnogyps californianus). An adult condor with the wing tag label number 80 stands over a juvenile condor. Wildland Fire: Clear Trap Prescribed Fire The Clear Trap prescribed fire in Zion National Park will benefit both the park and the landowners and residents of the East Zion area. The burn will lower the risk from wildland fire, and also benefit the plants and animals of the fire-adapted ecosystem. The policy of using fire as a management tool will help decrease risks to life, property, and resources and will perpetuate the values for which the park was established. Cooperation of local interagency partners was vital. Fire burns vegetation near a barbed wire fence. Geologic Maps in Action—Identify Hazards <strong>Zion National Park, Utah</strong><br> Example of the application of geologic map data to analyze rockfall hazard potential. large boulder on top of crushed truck The Civilian Conservation Corps at Cedar Breaks In 1934, on July 4th, the CCC made their first appearance at Cedar Breaks, “acting as traffic directors, assisting in getting many of the stalled cars up to the Breaks and serving a barbecue to some 3,000 people” at the official dedication ceremony and celebration for the new national monument. That, of course was just the beginning of the Cs’ involvement at Cedar Breaks National Monument. Civilian Conservation Corps crew at Cedar Breaks Arches National Park’s Free-Flowing Waters Visitors to Arches National Park experience natural free-flowing waters and have water to quench their thirst, thanks to an agreement between the National Park Service and the State of Utah. The sun sits just below the horizon behind Delicate Arch. Landbird Monitoring in Northern Colorado Plateau Network Parks, 2018 Because birds can be sensitive to habitat change, they are good indicators of ecosystem integrity. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network partners with the University of Delaware to assess breeding-bird species trends in three different habitats: low-elevation riparian, pinyon-juniper, and sage shrubland. Find out which species were increasing and declining at network parks as of 2018. Small, bright-orange bird with yellowish underfeathers. SW CA Condor Update - 2013-01 (January) From January 2013: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. Survival of the Southern Paiute The Paiutes have overcome insurmountable challenges and devastation as a people. Their long struggle to preserve the Paiute way and flourish continues. But they will not give up. Instead, they celebrate their achievements, promising that while “[t]he struggle is long and difficult… the Paiute will survive.” Native American man in ceremonial dress with orange cliffs in the background. California Condor Reintroduction & Recovery A tagged California condor flies free. NPS Photo/ Don Sutherland A wing-tagged California condor flying in the blue sky. Traits, Tradeoffs, and Pivot Points: How Climate, Plant, and Soil Properties Affect Vegetation Growth on the Northern Colorado Plateau As the northern Colorado Plateau heads into a hotter, drier future, there will be ecological winners and losers. Figuring out how different vegetation communities will fare is tricky. A recent study aimed to identify which vegetation communities might come out ahead, which might lag behind, and what might make the difference. Desert grassland in red rock setting. Pink wildflowers grow in foreground as storm brews in the sky. The Sounds of Spring When the weather warms, national parks across the country rouse from winter’s sleep. The sounds you hear in parks reflect this seasonal change. They contribute to the unique soundscape of these special places, and are among the resources that the National Park Service protects. Sandhill cranes dance in a courtship ritual in flooded grasslands at Great Sand Dunes NP. Wildland Fire in Douglas Fir: Western United States Douglas fir is widely distributed throughout the western United States, as well as southern British Columbia and northern Mexico. Douglas fir is able to survive without fire, its abundantly-produced seeds are lightweight and winged, allowing the wind to carry them to new locations where seedlings can be established. Close-up of Douglas fir bark and needles. Module Conducts Wildland-Urban Interface Projects Throughout the Intermountain Region In 2013, the Saguaro Wildland Fire Module (WFM) managed multiple projects simultaneously in AZ, TX, and NM. WFMs are highly skilled and versatile fire crews that provide expertise in long-term planning, ignitions, holding, prescribed fire preparation and implementation support, hazardous fuels reduction, and fire effects monitoring. With their help, fire fulfills its natural or historic role to meet resource and management objectives and create fire-adapted communities. 2006 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2006 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards 2005 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2005 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards 2004 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2004 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Contaminants of Emerging Concern in Northern Colorado Plateau Park Waters Pesticides, antibiotics, and personal care products are all being found in streams and rivers. But would you expect to find them in a national park? On the northern Colorado Plateau, scientists found that even in isolated areas, these "contaminants of emerging concern" are not uncommon. Find out what we found where--and how you can help. Ripples in cave water About The Southern Paiute “Paa” ute means water ute, and explains the Southern Paiute preference for living near water sources. The Spanish explorer Escalante kept detailed journals of his travels in the Southwest and made notes concerning Southern Paiute horticulture, writing in 1776, that there were “well dug irrigation ditches” being used to water small fields of corn, pumpkins, squash, and sunflowers. Southern Paiute boy by wickiup shelter. Park Air Profiles - Zion National Park Air quality profile for Zion National Park. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Zion NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Zion NP. Welcome sign at Zion National Park SW CA Condor Update - 2017-01 (January) From January 2017: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2015-11 (November) From November 2015: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2015-02 (February) From February 2015: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2014-11 (November) From November 2014: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2015-07 (July) From July 2015: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2016-04 (April) From April 2016: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2014-07 (July) From July 2014 : An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2019-09 (September) An update on the Southwest California Condor Meta-Population for September 2019 from Grand Canyon National Park. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2017-04 (April) An update on the status of the Arizona/ Utah population of the California condor. A condor flying. Zion Lodge/Birch Creek Cultural Landscape Zion Lodge and Birch Creek, though not contiguous, represent one unified phase of development by the historic concessionaire, the Utah Parks Company, within Zion National Park. Construction of the buildings and landscape features within the area began in 1924 and continued through 1937. On a regional scale, the Zion Lodge/Birch Creek cultural landscape is significant for its association with the rise of tourism in southern Utah and northern Arizona. Zion Lodge (NPS) Zion National Park Welcomes New Fire Management Officer Zion National Park Welcomes New Fire Management Officer SW CA Condor Update - 2012-10 (October) From October 2010: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. Wildland Fire in Ponderosa Pine: Western United States This forest community generally exists in areas with annual rainfall of 25 inches or less. Extensive pure stands of this forest type are found in the southwestern U.S., central Washington and Oregon, southern Idaho and the Black Hills of South Dakota. Recently burned ponderosa pine forest. World CA Condor Update - 2018 An update on the world California Condor population for 2018. A close-up of the pink bald head of a California condor with a ruffle of black feathers. World CA Condor Update - 2016 Population Status An update on the world California Condor population for 2016. A close up of the pink bald head of a California condor with a ruffle of black feathers. World CA Condor Update - 2017 An update on the world California Condor population for 2017. A close-up of the pink bald head of a California condor with a ruffle of black feathers. SW CA Condor Update - 2014-03 (March) From March 2014: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2013-10 (October) From October 2013: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW Ca Condor Update - 2013-04 (April) From April 2013: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2013-07 (July) From July 2013: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2018-04 (April) Update on the AZ/UT population of California condors in April of 2018. A condor flying wild and free. World CA Condor Update – 2019 An update on the world California Condor population for 2019. A close-up of the pink bald head of a California condor with a ruffle of black feathers. SW CA Condor Update – 2020-02 An update on the Southwest California Condor Meta-Population for 2019 from Grand Canyon National Park (updated February 2020). A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2012-06 (June) From June 2016: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2012-04 (April) From April 2012: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2012-07 (July) From July 2012: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2011-03 (March) From March 2011: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. Read more A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2011-12 (December) From Decmeber 2011: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2010-12 (December) From December 2010: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2011-11 (November) From November 2011: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2011-07 (July) From July 2011: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. Read more A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2011-01 (January) From January 2011: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2009-11 (November) From November 2009: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2010-03 (March) From March 2010: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2010-05 (May) From May 2010: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2010-10 (October) From October 2010: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2009-07 (July) From July 2009: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. Pollinators - Monarch butterfly More than beautiful, monarch butterflies contribute to the health of our planet. While feeding on nectar, they pollinate many types of wildflowers, yet one of the greatest threats to Monarch populations is loss of habitat. A Monarch clings to an orange flower The Adverse Effects of Climate Change on Desert Bighorn Sheep Climate change has and will continue to have a negative impact on the population of desert bighorn sheep. For the remaining herds to survive, management may always be necessary. Protecting wild lands is key to the survival of these amazing animals. Desert bighorn sheep, NPS/Shawn Cigrand What We’re Learning and Why it Matters: Long-Term Monitoring on the Northern Colorado Plateau Knowing which key natural resources are found in the national parks, and whether they're stable or changing, helps decisionmakers make sound choices. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network is building that knowledge. After more than ten years of monitoring, we've learned a lot about park ecosystems, how they're changing, and what they may look like in the days to come. Find out what we’ve learned and how it’s being used to help managers plan for the future. Man stands in a stream, looking down at a handheld gauge. Landbird Population Trends in the Northern Colorado Plateau Network, 2019 Because birds can be sensitive to habitat change, they are good indicators of ecosystem integrity. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network partners with the University of Delaware to assess breeding-bird species trends in three different habitats: low-elevation riparian, pinyon-juniper, and sage shrubland. Find out which species were increasing and declining at network parks as of 2019. Bald eagle Water Quality in the Northern Colorado Plateau Network: Water Years 2016–2018 Once a month, ecologists collect water samples at dozens of monitoring sites in and near ten National Park Service units across Utah and Colorado. This consistent, long-term monitoring helps alert managers to existing and potential problems. Find out the results for 2016-2018 in this brief from the Northern Colorado Plateau Network. A monitoring crew of three samples a clear river flowing over brown rock and sand Invasive Exotic Plant Monitoring in Zion National Park, 2018 Invasive exotic plants are one of the most significant threats to natural resources in the national parks today. To provide early warning of weed invasions, the Northern Colorado Plateau Network monitors target plants in park areas where they are likely to first establish: along roads, trails, and waterways. Find out what we learned at Zion National Park in 2018. Red and white cliffs against a blue sky, green trees and shrubs at lower elevations. Water Quality Trends in Zion National Park, 2006–2016 “Is it safe to go in the water?” It’s a pretty basic question—and a really important one. In Zion National Park, the Northern Colorado Plateau Network helps park managers know the answer. A report examined 10-year trends in water quality in the North Fork Virgin River, North Creek, and La Verkin Creek from 2006 to 2016--and the news was mostly good. Man crouches at edge of La Verkin Creek with sonde and sampling bottles. Grand Canyon National Park Centennial Briefings: California Condor Management During the summer of Grand Canyon National Park’s 2019 centennial, scientists and resource managers briefed fellow staff and the public about how they are helping to enable future generations to enjoy what is special about Grand Canyon. This article is from a transcript of a June 5, 2019 briefing about California condor management in Grand Canyon. Its conversational quality reflects the passion and personalities of the people behind the park. A black bird with its wings out sits perched on a tan rock, with a numbered tag visible on its wing. Series: Grand Canyon National Park Centennial Briefings During the summer of Grand Canyon National Park’s 2019 centennial, scientists and resource managers briefed fellow staff and the public about how they are helping to enable future generations to enjoy what is special about Grand Canyon. Black winged California Condor with a red head sits with its wings spread out. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Mesozoic Era The Mesozoic Era (251.9 to 66 million years ago) was the "Age of Reptiles." During the Mesozoic, Pangaea began separating into the modern continents, and the modern Rocky Mountains rose. Dinosaurs, crocodiles, and pterosaurs ruled the land and air. As climate changed and rapid plate tectonics resulted in shallow ocean basins, sea levels rose world-wide and seas expanded across the center of North America. fossil dinosaur skull in rock face Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: Park Uses of Geologic Information Geologic maps are critical to understanding a national park. Park staff use geologic maps for many purposes. These are just a few examples. colorful section of a geologic map of bryce canyon Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Zion National Park, Utah Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. rock fomations Triassic Period—251.9 to 201.3 MYA The brightly colored Triassic rocks of Petrified Forest National Park yield not only the petrified trees but many other plant and animal fossils. fossil footprint on stone Mesozoic Era The Mesozoic Era (251.9 to 66 million years ago) was the "Age of Reptiles." During the Mesozoic, Pangaea began separating into the modern continents, and the modern Rocky Mountains rose. Dinosaurs, crocodiles, and pterosaurs ruled the land and air. As climate changed and rapid plate tectonics resulted in shallow ocean basins, sea levels rose world-wide and seas expanded across the center of North America. fossil dinosaur skull in rock face Landbird Population Trends in the Northern Colorado Plateau Network, 2020 Because birds can be sensitive to habitat change, they are good indicators of ecosystem integrity. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network partners with the University of Delaware to assess breeding-bird species trends in three different habitats: low-elevation riparian, pinyon-juniper, and sage shrubland. Find out which species were increasing and declining at network parks as of 2020. Small beige bird with black beak and feet, brown back. The Women Naturalists Only two early women park rangers made the transition to park naturalists. Having resigned her permanent ranger position after her marriage, Marguerite Lindsley Arnold returned to Yellowstone National Park under the temporary park ranger (naturalist) title from 1929 to 1931. Yosemite rehired Ranger Enid Michael as temporary naturalist each summer from 1928 to 1942. A handful of other parks hired a few new women under the newly created ranger-naturalist designation. Polly Mead, a woman park ranger-naturalist is giving a talk outdoors to a group of visitors. 1931 Who Wears the Pants Around Here? After a promising start in the early 1920s, only a handful of women were hired as park rangers and naturalists in the late 1920s and early 1930s. Carlsbad Caverns National Park and the national monuments of the Southwest became the new hot spots for women in uniformed positions in the 1930s. Women in skirts and pants Zero-Emissions Shuttle Buses Join the Zion National Park Fleet Visitors to Zion National Park will soon be able to explore the park by way of their new, battery-electric transit buses. Zion Shuttle Bus at Zion National Park World CA Condor Update – 2020 An update on the world California Condor population for 2020, compiled by our partners at the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service as of December 31, 2020. A close-up of the pink bald head of a California condor with a ruffle of black feathers. Monitoring From Space: Using Satellite Imagery to Measure Landscape Conditions on the Ground Scientists from the Northern Colorado Plateau Network travel thousands of miles each year to collect data on plants, soils, and water across network parks. But it would be impossible to cover every square inch of the Northern Colorado Plateau with boots on the ground. Instead, we simultaneously monitor the parks with boots in space—satellite data that provide information at a much broader scale. Satellite and Earth in space Localized Drought Impacts on Northern Colorado Plateau Landbirds Birds of the desert southwest, a climate-change hotspot, are among the most vulnerable groups in the US. To help park managers plan for those changes, scientists evaluated the influence of water deficit on landbird communities at 11 national parks in Utah and Colorado. The results will help land managers to focus conservation efforts on places where certain species are most vulnerable to projected climate changes. A man wearing a clipboard looks through binoculars at dawn in field of sagebrush Fossil Footprints Across Our Parks / Huellas Fósiles a Través de Nuestros Parques Join us on a virtual hike to see fossil footprints across our national parks! As we travel back in time, we’ll discover stories of fantastic pasts and learn that fossil footprints are worthy of protection for the future. <br><br> ¡Únase a nosotros en una caminata para ver huellas fósiles en nuestros parques nacionales! Mientras viajamos a través del tiempo, descubriremos historias de pasados fantásticos y aprenderemos que las huellas fósiles merecen ser conservadas para el futuro. Two primitive tetrapods, looking something like giant lizards walking through desert sand dunes. Resilience in a Time of Change: the CCC can Teach us How to Handle the Climate Crisis The Civilian Conservation Corps gave this country a capacity to respond and adapt during a crisis, and that is worth learning from as we face the future of human-caused climate change. Men working planting trees in a park housing area. Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Dare to Imagine: Shauna Ertolacci Meet Shauna Ertolacci, an Environmental Protection Specialist at Zion National Park who had to forsake the fear of the unknown to pursue her passion of preserving the environment. Read her story to find out what made this journey worth it. This article is part of a National Park Foundation funded project called the Dare to Imagine project dedicated to highlighting women in parks who are breaking barriers and showing what a scientist looks like. graphic of a young woman in the field. Text reads Shauna Ertolacci Zion National Park Water in the Desert: A Grassroots Movement to Protect the Virgin River Nestled against the southern border of Zion National Park, the community of Springdale, Utah is inextricably connected to the Virgin River. It is their source of drinking water, the foundation of their tourism economy, and a reminder of their pioneer history. With rapid commercial development encroaching on the river corridor, residents of this desert town, with help from the National Park Service, established conservation strategies via the Virgin River Management Plan. The Virgin River flowing through Zion National Park. Cinder Cones Cinder cones are typically simple volcanoes that consist of accumulations of ash and cinders around a vent. Sunset Crater Volcano and Capulin Volcano are cinder cones. photo of a dry grassy field with a cinder cone in the distance Women in Landscape-Scale Conservation: Cheryl Decker Cheryl Decker works hard to keep invasive plants from moving across boundaries. woman smiles at camera with rows of daffodils behind her A 20-year Partnership between the Utah Geological Survey and the National Park Service to Inventory and Monitor Fossil Resources in Utah's National Parks The Utah Geological Survey has worked in partnership with the National Park Service to document the fossils of Utah’s national parks for 20 years, helping to bring to light and protect a wide variety of fossils. photo of a person pointing at trace fossils in rock above on an over hanging rock World CA Condor Update – 2021 Population Status An update on the world California Condor population for 2021. The pink bald head of a California condor with a ruffle of black feathers by Don Sutherland Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 14, No. 1, Spring 2022 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> photo of 2 people kneeling in shallow water at the base of a steep slope Pauline Mead Pauline "Polly" Mead fell in love with the Grand Canyon as a botany student. Her knowledge of the plants at the canyon, together with a connection to National Park Service (NPS) Director Stephen T. Mather, got her a job as the first woman ranger-naturalist at Grand Canyon National Park in 1930. Mead's formal NPS career was short because she married the park's assistant superintendent in 1931. As a "park wife" she continued to live and research in parks for another 25 years. Polly Mead in her NPS uniform examining a plant.

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