Ash Meadows

National Wildlife Refuge - Nevada

The Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge is located in the Amargosa Valley of southern Nye County, in southwestern Nevada. It is directly east of Death Valley National Park, and is 90 mi (140 km) west-northwest of Las Vegas. Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge was established to provide and protect habitat for at least twenty-six endemic plants and animals, meaning they are found nowhere else in the world. Four fish and one plant are currently listed as endangered species. The concentration of locally exclusive flora and fauna distinguishes Ash Meadows is the greatest concentration of endemic biota in any local area within the United States.

maps

Official visitor map of Death Valley National Park (NP) in California and Nevada. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Death Valley - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Death Valley National Park (NP) in California and Nevada. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Nevada State Highway Map. Published by the Nevada Department of Transportation (NVDOT).Nevada State - Nevada State Highway Map

Official Nevada State Highway Map. Published by the Nevada Department of Transportation (NVDOT).

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Visitor Map of Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Nevada. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Ash Meadows - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Nevada. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Vicinity Map of Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Nevada. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Ash Meadows - Vicinity Map

Vicinity Map of Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Nevada. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Birds at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Nevada. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Ash Meadows - Birds

Birds at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Nevada. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Plants at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Nevada. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Ash Meadows - Plants

Plants at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Nevada. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Hunting at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Nevada. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Ash Meadows - Hunting

Hunting at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Nevada. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Ash Meadows NWR https://www.fws.gov/refuge/Ash_Meadows/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ash_Meadows_National_Wildlife_Refuge The Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge is located in the Amargosa Valley of southern Nye County, in southwestern Nevada. It is directly east of Death Valley National Park, and is 90 mi (140 km) west-northwest of Las Vegas. Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge was established to provide and protect habitat for at least twenty-six endemic plants and animals, meaning they are found nowhere else in the world. Four fish and one plant are currently listed as endangered species. The concentration of locally exclusive flora and fauna distinguishes Ash Meadows is the greatest concentration of endemic biota in any local area within the United States.
500 Longstreet Spring & Cabin Meters 152 Fairbanks Spring National“Devils Wildlife Refuge Hole 2” gh Sl ou 0.15 mi Longstreet Spring & Cabin so n Devils Ho Leashed pets welcome 0.1Parking 5m i Picnic area Peterson Rd Restrooms Marsh 500 0 Meters 152 Horsehoe Marsh Devils Hole (Death Valley NP) d Feet Spring Meadows Rd West Entrance Crystal Reservoir Lower Crystal Marsh Crystal Boardwalk 0 Feet 0.9-mile loop (1,430 meters) Meters 152 Devils Hole Feet 500 0 Meters 152 0 Feet 600 0 Meters 180 0.15 Death Valley National Park Kings Pool mi Meadows Point ofAshRocks Boardwalk National Wildlife Refuge 0.5-mile loop (775 meters) Ash Meadows Rd Point of Rocks Point o f Roc ks Rd 3 0. 0 500 Point of Rocks Point o f Roc ks Rd Point of Rocks Rd Spring Meadows Rd Visitor Center Spring Meadows Rd 0 “Devils Hole 2” le R 0 Visitor Center & Crystal Spring Ho Spring Meadows Rd Devils Hole High clearance recommended v il s To NV-373, CA-127 Visitor Center & Crystal Spring 60 To Crystal, Pahrump, Las Vegas De Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Spring/stream Longstree t Rd Reservoir Peterson Reservoir Crystal Loop Devils Hole Death Valley National Park Meters Longstreet Boardwalk 525 feet (160 meters) Crystal Reservoir.........1.4 mi (2.3 km) Devils Hole...................3.6 mi (5.8 km) Longstreet Spring........3.4 mi (5.5 km) Peterson Reservoir......3.4 mi (5.5 km) Point of Rocks..............4.1 mi (6.6 km) South Entrance...............6 mi (9.5 km) West Entrance.............2.5 mi (4.0 km) Interpretive trail Refuge boundary 200 0 Longstreet Spring Distances from Visitor Center Ca r le Rd Information kiosk Feet Longstreet Rd Accessible feature 0 Visitor Center Call for hours: 775/372-5435 Rogers Spring Visitor center Paved road Unpaved road Unmaintained road Foot traffic only DevilsBoardwalk Hole Longstreet Cabin Refuge Open Daily Sunrise to Sunset le Rd Ash Meadows 0 Devils Ho Feet 0.15 mi 0 0 Feet 600 0 Meters 180 i m Visitor Center Crystal Spring Crystal Boardwalk 0.9-mile loop (1,430 meters) 0 Miles 0 Kilometers 2 Kings Pool 3.2 To Bell Vista Rd/State Line Rd, Death Valley Jct, Pahrump Point of Rocks Boardwalk 0.5-mile loop (775 meters) South Entrance High clearance recommended 3 0. i m
Beatty 0 Miles 25 0 Kilometers 40 Ash Meadows NWR & Vicinity Nevada National Security Site National Wildlife Refuge Visitor center Death Valley NP Gas station Major highway Lodging Paved road Food Unpaved road State border Amargosa Valley Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge 775/372-5435 Indian Springs Furnace Creek Death Valley National Park Ash Meadows NWR B e ll Distances from Ash Meadows NWR Amargosa Valley..............12 mi (19 km) Beatty, NV....................... 44 mi (71 km) Bishop, CA...................251 mi (404 km) Death Valley NP.............. 31 mi (50 km) Furnace Creek............... 48 mi (77 km) Scotty’s Castle......... 106 mi (171 km) Death Valley Jct., CA..... 13 mi (21 km) Desert NWR.................. 86 mi (138 km) Indian Springs, NV......... 58 mi (93 km) Las Vegas, NV............... 90 mi (145 km) Moapa Valley NWR....157 mi (253 km) Pahranagat NWR.......186 mi (299 km) Pahrump, NV................... 28 mi (45 km) Scotty’s Jct., NV.......... 79 mi (127 km) Shoshone, CA .................43 mi (69 km) Tecopa, CA....................... 58 mi (93 km) Tonopah, NV................ 136 mi (219 km) Death Valley Junction V is t To Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge Desert National Wildlife Refuge Crystal To Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge Spring Mountains National Recreation Area a Rd Pahrump Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area CA Las Vegas LIF NE OR VA D A NI A Lake Mead National Recreation Area Henderson Shoshone Tecopa Boulder City
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Birds As the largest oasis in the Mojave Desert, Ash Meadows is a rare desert haven. Ash trees gleam like a beacon to migrant songbirds in the spring, while mesquite bosque shelter breeding warblers against summer's deadly heat. During migration, hosts of waterfowl and shorebirds flock to the open waters of alkali marshes and springs. Rock wrens sing from their rocky hillside perches, while quail and roadrunners traverse the salt-laden landscape below. Introduction Welcome Enjoying the Refuge's Birds Using this Bird Checklist Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, established in 1984, is the largest oasis in the Mojave Desert, supporting an incredible diversity of birds and other wildlife year-round. Located between two major flyways, over 23,000 acres of alkali seeps, springs, and other unique habitats make Ash Meadows a stopping point for migratory birds—to the delight of novice and expert bird watchers alike. Birds are most visible during the spring and fall migration (March through May, September through November), when regular migrants, including many exciting rarities, visit the wetlands. Sufficient migration overlap into the summer months assures that even the hottest days can yield interesting birds as well. Walk around the springs and marshes in the winter to see large numbers and variety of waterfowl. Throughout the year, the Point of Rocks area is the best place to see roadrunners, Gambel's quail, Phainopepla, and other typical desert residents. For more detailed information on birding at Ash Meadows, contact the refuge office at 775/372 5435. This list includes over 275 species of birds that have been seen at Ash Meadows to date. Regular bird monitoring is necessary to keep this list current, particularly as many habitats are in the process of restoration. If you believe that you have new information to add to this list, or would like to assist further with our bird monitoring efforts, please contact the refuge office at 775/372 5435. Bird List Key Season Symbols Sp - Spring, March through May S - Summer, June through August F - Fall, September through November W - Winter, December through February Abundance Symbols a - abundant, likely to be seen in large numbers c - common, seen on the majority of visits to proper habitat u - uncommon, seen on less than half of visits to proper habitat r - rare, rarely seen ca - casual, accidental to very rare occurence # - indicates a Threatened/ Endangered Species > - introduced species/subspecies * - bird species known to nest locally + - bird species thought to nest locally General Habitat Symbols 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Credits The hard work of many dedicated individuals made this project possible. Deserving of special recognition are Carl Lundblad, Cristi Baldino, Darrick Weissenfluh, Sharon McKelvey, Cyndi Souza, Jim & Marian Cressman, Craig Fosdick, Paul Lehman, Martin Meyers, Greg Scyphers, Beth & David St. George, Carolyn Titus, Paul van Els, Ken Voget, Mark James, and Alyson Mack. - marsh/reservoirs - springs and streams - mesquite/ash riparian - mesquite/saltbush - creosote bush - saltbush - widespread - rocky slope - sand dune - agricultural fields - caves - buildings Birds of Ash Meadows NWR Common Name Habitat Sp S F W Waterfowl Greater White-fronted Goose Snow Goose Ross’s Goose Brant Cackling Goose Canada Goose Trumpeter Swan Tundra Swan Wood Duck Gadwall* Eurasian Wigeon American Wigeon Mallard* Blue-winged Teal Cinnamon Teal* Northern Shoveler Northern Pintail* Green-winged Teal Canvasback Redhead* Ring-necked Duck Greater Scaup Lesser Scaup White-winged Scoter Long-tailed Duck Bufflehead Common Goldeneye Barrow’s Goldeneye Hooded Merganser Common Merganser 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1,2 1 1 1 1,2 1 1,2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1,2 1 r u u ca u u u u r u ca c c r c u u c u c u r u u r r u r u u u u r c r r r u c c r c u c c c c u r u ca u r u r r u r u u u ca u ca r u u u r u u c c c u r u ca u u ca r u Gambel's Quail © Aaron Ambos Common Name Habitat Sp S F W Red-breasted Merganser Ruddy Duck* 1 1 u c c r c r c Pheasants, Grouse & Partridges Chukar* 3,4,8 r r u r New World Quail Gambel’s Quail* 3,4,6 c c c c Loons Pacific Loon Common Loon Yellow-billed Loon 1 1 1 r r ca ca u r ca Grebes Pied-billed Grebe* Horned Grebe Eared Grebe* Western Grebe Clark’s Grebe 1,2 1 1 1 1 c c c u r c r r Pelicans American White Pelican Brown Pelican 1 1 r r u ca Cormorants Double-crested Cormorant 1 u r u r Bitterns & Herons American Bittern* Least Bittern+ Great Blue Heron Great Egret Snowy Egret Cattle Egret Green Heron* Black-crowned Night-Heron* 1,2 1,2 1,2 1 1 1 1,2 1,2 c u c u u r u u c u u u u r r u c u c u u r u u c r u r Ibis White-faced Ibis 1,10 c u c r New World Vultures Turkey Vulture 7 u u u Osprey Osprey 1 u c r c u r r c r u r r r Common Name Habitat Sp S F W Kites, Hawks & Eag
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Plants I perhaps owe having become a painter to flowers. -Claude Monet Introduction Welcome Enjoying the Refuge's Plants Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, established in 1984, is the largest oasis in the Mojave Desert, supporting an incredible diversity of plants and wildlife year-round. Over 24,000 acres of alkali seeps, springs and other unique habitats make Ash Meadows a biological wonder for everyone to enjoy and protect. With such rare habitats, Ash Meadows has some of the most unique plant communities in the world. Unlike some desert areas where flowers bloom simultaneously in spectacular spring-time displays, the blooms at Ash Meadows are much more subtle and span the entire year. Natural fluctuations in weather can affect bloom times as well. In any season, something is blooming for insects and birds to eat, and people to admire. Look carefully and tread lightly—you will be amazed by what you discover! Plant Guide Key Refuge Symbols Refuge location where plant can be most commonly seen: Crystal Spring boardwalk Point of Rocks boardwalk Longstreet boardwalk Peterson Reservoir Devils Hole Conservation Status Symbols * an Ash Meadows endemic plant (only grows in the Ash Meadows area) † an endangered species ‡ a threatened species ▲ a non-native or invasive species Alkali mariposa lily. Cyndi Souza/USFWS Using this Plant Guide This list includes over 40 of the approximately 340 plant species at Ash Meadows. Each of the plants listed are used by culturally affiliated American Indians for both food and medicines. These tribes have revealed select information and caution visitors not to collect, eat or prepare plants, possibly harming an individual or the land. While collecting plants is strictly prohibited, observation and photography are encouraged. For more information, contact the refuge office at 775/372 5435. Credits Many dedicated individuals made this project possible. Deserving of special recognition are the Nuwuvi/ Newe Working Group, Cyndi Souza, Cristi Baldino, Christina Nalen, Sharon McKelvey, Wendy Smith and Alyson Mack. Trees & Shrubs Alkali Rabbitbrush Chrysothamnus albidus Desert Holly Atriplex hymenelytra This perennial shrub is commonly seen growing in alkaline flats throughout the refuge. Its small, highly resinous leaves help reduce water loss in an intensely hot and dry environment. A member of the aster family, it is covered by bright white or yellow flowerheads in late summer and fall. Native peoples use it as building material and a chewing gum. Size: 1-4' tall Blooms: Aug.-Nov. Size: 1-3' tall Blooms: Jan.-April Arrow Weed Desert Mistletoe Pluchea sericea Phoradendron californicum This tall, willow-like shrub grows in thickets around springs, streams and other wetlands on the refuge. Its pink flowers provide a welcome burst of color in spring and summer. For Native peoples, arrow weed uses include making arrow shafts, shelters, shades, granaries and roasting pit liners from the straight shoots and branches. Size: 3-16' tall Blooms: Mar.-July Size: 1-3' tall Blooms: Jan-March Creosote Bush Dodder Larrea tridentata Size: 2-10' tall Blooms: Apr-May The jagged leaves of this evergreen shrub resemble Christmas holly, though they are not related. Dormant in the summer, the leaves lose moisture, making it appear shriveled and dead. The leaves turn on edge to reduce sun exposure and their silver scales reflect light. This plant grows and flowers in the winter, pollinated not by insects but by wind. All these adaptations allow the desert holly to survive the hottest season. This reddish, parasitic plant is commonly found growing on mesquite trees. Technically, it is a hemiparasite—it relies on its host for water and nutrients, but produces some sugars through photosynthesis. Its leaves and flowers are tiny and scale-like which, like the spines on a cactus, help it to conserve water. Inedible to humans, the white-pink berries are eaten by Phainopepla birds, which help spread the mistletoe seeds from tree to tree. Cuscuta sp. A characteristic shrub of the Mojave Desert, creosote is well-adapted to its harsh environment. Resins on its small leaflets slow water loss— it also drops some leaves during periods of drought. It can continue to photosynthesize despite very dry soil conditions. Through self-cloning, a single plant can survive for hundreds, or even thousands, of years. This important plant is used by American Indians for firewood, arrows, shades, tool handles and other useful items. Size: vinelike Blooms: Mar-May This yellow-orange twining plant has thread-like stems resembling spaghetti. Lacking chlorophyll, leaves, and roots, the mature dodder plant survives through parasitism— obtaining all its sugars and water from a host plant. Its small flowers produce seeds in the spring that need a suitable host plant. The young plant twines in a counter-clockwise direction, then event
Restrictions and Prohibited Activities No hunting animals allowed in or over any springs or stream channels, except for incidental entry to retrieve game. No carcasses or offal in trash cans. No predator hunting. No shooting from or across maintained refuge roads. Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge is home to over 26 species of plants and animals that exist nowhere else on earth. The refuge was established and is managed to protect threatened and endangered plants, animals and their habitats. The information in this pamphlet supports the refuge management plan. Fishing, off highway vehicles (OHVs), horseback riding, and collecting of antiquities, artifacts, plants, wildlife, or other natural objects is not allowed. No fires, fireworks, or smoking outside vehicles or outside designated smoking areas. No use or possession of alcoholic beverages while hunting. No overnight parking or camping. Private Property and Multiple Uses Visitors, staff, and private landowners are always present on the refuge and will not be wearing orange safety vests. Always use caution! Do not enter private lands or restricted areas for any reason. Vehicle Use and Refuge Roads Vehicles must be street legal and stay on public roads. Speed limit is 25 mph if not posted. Refuge staff is not allowed to remove or service vehicles. Contact local towing services for assistance. Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge 610 E. Spring Meadows Road Amargosa Valley, NV 89020 775/372 5435 www.fws.gov/refuge/ash_meadows Refuge Open Daily: Sunrise to Sunset Visitor Center Open Daily: 9:00am–4:30pm (Spring-Fall) 8:30am-4:00pm (Winter) *Winter hours begin when Daylight Savings Time ends U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service www.fws.gov Nevada Department of Wildlife www.ndow.org August 2018 U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Hunting Longstreet Rd Crystal Loop Warm Springs Complex CLOSED Marsh Parking Private Property Information Kiosk West Entrance Kiosk Visitor Center Horseshoe Marsh Crystal Reservoir Lower Crystal Marsh Point of Rocks Rd Ash Meadows Rd Waterfowl hunting is allowed only at Crystal Reservoir, Peterson Reservoir, Horseshoe Marsh, and Lower Crystal Marsh. Decoys may be used but cannot be left overnight. Non-motorized and electric motor boats and float tubes are allowed only in Crystal Reservoir and Peterson Reservoir and must be thoroughly cleaned prior to entry. Dogs may be used to retrieve waterfowl, but must be under voicecommand at all times and leashed when not hunting. 0 Miles 0 Kilometers Foot Traffic Only Boardwalk Devils Hole Spring Meadows Rd Hunting dogs Restroom To Crystal Spring Meadows Rd Hunters are responsible for picking up litter, including discharged shells. Boats Reservoir * 500 foot no-hunting buffer around all boardwalks No hunting over or in springs To All firearms must be unloaded and dismantled or cased while in vehicles. Waterfowl hunting Visitor Center Hol e Rd Peterson Reservoir Shotguns are the only firearms permitted and must be used in regulation with state hunt program. Only non-toxic shot may be possessed by hunters in the field. No Hunting Zone* Refuge Boundary Paved road Unpaved road Peterson Rd Firearms and ammunition National Wildlife Refuge Longstreet Boardwalk During the appropriate season, as outlined in Nevada hunt guide, hunting for the following is allowed: quail, geese, ducks, coots, moorhen, snipe, dove, cottontail and jackrabbits. Hunting of jackrabbits is permitted only during the state cottontail season. Hunting is allowed daily according to the state and refuge hunt regulations except for when the refuge is closed to hunting one week prior to the the annual Christmas Bird Count. Visit the website or contact the refuge for the exact dates. Ash Meadows Rogers Spring v il s Season and approved species Hunters must adhere to all state hunt regulations for the current year, except where federal regulations differ to protect visitors, staff or natural resources. Hunters must follow state regulations in regards to time of day that hunting may commence and must stop. De Hunting Regulations 2 2 To Vi Death Valley Bell sta Rd Junction South Entrance Kiosk To Pahrump Point of Rocks Boardwalk

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