Warner Wetlands

Guide and Map

brochure Warner Wetlands - Guide and Map

Guide and Map of Warner Wetlands Area of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC) in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

1 1/2 0 61 3 30 25 26 33 34 35 32 33 31 36 35 34 36 Chan ce Lak 0 H A R N E Y es C O U N T Y L AKE 6 5 4 61 55 -C COUNT Y 3 2 42° 45' 00" 6155-C0 0 4500 6 4 5 2 1 11 12 3 6 1 15 -00 COLLECTION SUNSTONE 8 7 12 10 9 8 7 12 32 7 8 9 10 11 7 0 6155-C 5 27 PUBLIC KILOMETERS Scale 1:63,360 OR 1 Inch = 1 Mile Projection: Albers Equal Area Conic Datum: North American of 1983 0 Central Meridian: -119.75 Elevation Shown in Feet 00 11 31 31 1 2 2 0 -0 95 61 3 4 1 MILES 1 28 30 T 32 S Last 5 0 29 25 RO AD 1 1/2 0 500 26 S 2 1 27 Lakeview District 36 35 34 SUNSTONE 2 28 5-00 33 42° 45' 00" 6 29 500 ST ON E ROA D T 32 S 32 31 36 30 R27E 119°37'30" 619 WARNER WETLANDS 25 26 R26E 119°45'00" 6155-00 35 27 28 29 30 25 R25E 119°52'30" UN 26 R24E 50 5000 00 24 23 12 10 9 Ranch ! 11 Warner Valley and Hart Mountain were formed thousands of years ago when massive faults in the earth’s L C T L 27 28 29 B 30 25 00 50 E 26 Adel 32 31 Lakeview 33 To Denio 31 15 36 00 35 33 32 35 34 36 31 1 6 34 M C 4500 1 FL L RO AD E N 4500 A K E N 19 23 00 00 60 0 U 00 T R A 119°52'30" 60 E 19 6500 00 BLUE SKY 27 25 Cree k Post Meadows BLU SKY E Plush Cottonwood Spring AD RO 2 0 7000 36 Cre ek 35 650 00 34 Cr ee 4 3 R25E 8017 33 32 0 6000 1 6 5 4 37 S J Western Se a Purslane Ring-necked Duck All motorized vehicle use is limited to designated roads and trails, posted as “Designated Route.” During wet years, portions of many of these roads (especially those crossing channels and lake bottoms) may be ooded and impassable. te Boating/Canoeing both seasonally and from year-to-year. Hart Lake is typically available for boating during both low and high-water years. Motorized boating is allowed throughout the wetlands, although personal motorized watercraft (i.e. Jet Skis and WaveRunners) are not allowed. During wet years, experienced paddlers can explore the 10 mile Warner Valley Canoe Trail. The trail follows the channels connecting Campbell, Turpin, and Stone Corral Lakes. Green -winged Teal Sandhill Crane www.avenzamaps.com/a/im0ueac 60 00 18 T 35 S L 24 23 Cr ee k Mallard smartphone or tablet. Use your device’s built-in GPS to track your location on the map. Saved maps do not need a live network connection. 19 BLM Oregon-Map Store R27E 25 26 3-10 6155-00 11 30 Information Rockhounding Wildlife Viewing Blind Primitive Boat Launch Canoe36Trail Put-In 31 Canoe Trail Hiking Trail Back Country Byway Oregon Scenic Bikeway 2 OTHER FEATURES Populated Place Locale 26 27 Summit (Elevation in Feet) BLM managed areas such as The Deschutes Wild & Scenic River or The Oregon Badlands Wilderness can be downloaded for free to your mobile device. Clark’s Grebe https://www.avenzamaps.com/vendor/472/bureau-of-land-management-oregon LEGEND TRANSPORTATION 6 1 Improved Road Unimproved Road (Check Local Conditions) County Road BLM Road Number 12 7 County Line 500 Foot Contour 100 Foot 25 Contour 18 Recreation Opportunities Camping The wetlands White-faced Ibis area is open for dispersed camping. Keep all vehicles on routes posted “Designated Route.” Visitors should bring all necessary camp gear and water with them, pack out all trash and leave areas in better condition than found. Areas exist along the lake shores for both tents and RVs. The nearest developed campgrounds are located on Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge and the Sunstone Public Collection Area. Fishing pastime for late spring and summer anglers. An occasional native Redband Trout will also show 19 30 NOTE TO VISITORS: - All motorized vehicle use is limited to designated roads, shown as “Improved Road” or “Unimproved Road” on map. These roads are signed as “Designated Route” while driving. - During 34wet years, many of35these roads may36be flooded or 31 impassable. Travelers are discouraged from driving on wet roads if surface damage occurs while driving. - Closed routes are not shown, but exist on the ground. T - No cross-country travel is permitted. k 2 119°45'00" 31 600 Warner Peak 28 29 POST MEADOWS er Ranch 30 60 Goa t 75 4500 5 R E 21 20 00 H 33 32 K O P k Ro c Roc k 00 7000 0 650 G 70 7000 75 0 0 00 00 60 00 55 00 65 U 0 550 45 00 31 6 00 3 R24E 24 k Box Cree To Adel & Hwy 140 16.4 Miles F OLD CAMP WARNER to x 1 45 go re O E 36 4 T 36 S GUANO CREEK (541) 947-2177 desert buttes to the west and south, and interpretive panels along a short hike to the overlook. Avenza Maps is a mobile map application that enables you to ADMINISTERED LANDS Bureau of Land Management BLM Area of Critical 14Environmental Concern 13 15 (ACEC) or Special Recreation Management Area (SRMA) BLM Sunstone Rockhounding Area U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service USFWS Proposed Wilderness Area Area of No Hunting 23 24 22 State of Oregon Private or Other 16 7000 Bureau of Land Management 1301 South G Street Lakeview, OR 97630 Wetlands serve as an important stopover site to rest and refuel along their journey. In many years, midMarch and October are peak times for overall abundance of waterfowl. Migration timing varies by species, with some being earlier migrators and others late migrators. Timing of peak numbers may also vary by year depending on weather events throughout the western United States. Some species remain and use Warner Wetlands as a breeding area or are present as year-round resident birds. Warner Wetlands supports several BLM Sensitive Species, such as American White Pelican, Yellow Rail, and Snowy Egret. 7 ADMINISTRATIVE SITES U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Headquarters 17 0 3-10 28 L A K E 34 33 9 00 27 Cr ee Ranch 0 700 8 raptors, waterfowl, shorebirds, secretive marsh birds, and songbirds. Spring and fall however, bring higher numbers and additional species, especially waterfowl (ducks, geese, swans, and coots) and shorebirds. The Warner Wetlands is an integral part of the Southern Oregon – Northeastern California (SONEC) region, a opportunities to experience and enjoy the Warner Wetlands. The Hart Bar Interpretive Site has restrooms, sheltered picnic tables, and interpretive panels. From Hart Bar, visitors can stretch their legs on a 0.8 mile out-and-back hiking trail to a wildlife viewing blind. From the viewing blind, more eager visitors can continue into the wetlands with additional opportunities for bird watching on the 1.5 mile loop trail, returning directly to Hart Bar. The Warner Valley Overlook Region 6 Avenza Maps 13 14 HYDROLOGY 3 Perennial Stream Intermittent Stream Perrennial Lake Intermittent Lake Playa 10 Spring 4 70 600 5 E 18 13 C re e k 6 32 R 22 23 eek Cr 1 31 70 750 Bo T 37 S2 R23E 36 21 00 75 3-13 14 26 k 35 0 Creek n ar W ic n Ou 30 COUNTY PARK Plush EGAN Plush PLUSH-ADEL RD To Lakeview 39 Miles en 0 00 20 29 Hone Bikeway w vie ke a L k tbac Sc To 650 o ade ck Ranch 28 29 ny 00 70 7 50 W 0 0 45 11 Warner Peak 15 H A R T y 25 s een St State P S C 30 Ca 55 00 8017 16 Ranch ek 10 n 17 22 21 nyo 65 12 0 00 23 3-12 00 Mountain 26 5 6 00 3-10 20 re O 70 45 19 L o an Gu HART BAR 19 24 6785 33 AD RO Seasonal Closure Dependent on Local Conditions Ca WARNER WETLANDS BIRDING TRAIL Country 15 er 7687 BAR NH A R DY 13 tt n By High Point 600 N o rton y wa Ranch gh 16 5000 ne y E Adams Butte E IN Hart 12 18 Back Ho 42° 30' 00" DRIVE 8 9 12 RECREATION Campground Primitive Camping Horse Camp Historic Site Day Use Area 35 34 Scenic ViewpointIndian Springs Groceries Restroom Gas Station YL 11 Sl ou 17 T 36 S 23 32 T 1 M 50 10 9 14 18 Springs Bird Watching BLIZZARD RIDGE 119°37'30" 27 00 O D 00 N 65 00 600 e 75 28 k ee Cr A 7 Ranch 13 00 29 60 SK 8 o RT HA Ranch 14 A 0 P 7 N 700 ns ive 12 00 rm a G MOUNTAIN 3 1 G 11 A N o 55 2 A 70 00 0 5 6 15 Z O N E Paiute Res ck Ro 500 3 AD RO 0 4500 00 45 4 -0 1 iz HART MOUNTAIN REFUGE HEADQUARTERS aiu 6500 45 RD R26E P Valet Spring Seaside Heliotrope Facilities The Hart Bar Interpretive Site, Warner Valley Overlook, O TM AR 22 31 36 2 4 O Creek 61 6 35 00 1 5 10 75 2 6 I HOT SPRINGS 34 Ranch 36 H NC RA R 35 W 34 33 C yon yon a n 6500 00 32 - w Can Bl H try NC un RE F Co IN 11 TA UN 21 d 33 Arsenic GL 16 20 30 7000 7000 Mul key Canyon 31 RD 00 r a 25 T Anderson AW DR 32 31 36 26 Lake D A T 19 24 0 25 26 75 35 aw 27 28 N 27 28 61 SNYDER Dr 29 N E GL Lyons Meadow Ba ck EN RD CH Y Bon Spring r 5000 ipe MI NE RS 23 22 500 29 k 55 A 30 00 J un To Luce Reservoir 11.4 Miles s 50 42° 30' 00" r HOG BAC K 25 N 0 re e 19 30 26 EN SK 17 N 00 FR 9 0 700 700 21 R 45 M i n e 00 45 20 18 Willo w ROA D 500 0 A 22 21 20 W A M P L W H E I L ROA D L S O C 00 24 3-10 19 3-12 S I 2 H 13 14 5000 13 14 rC 55 15 Pavement Ends Here ipe 00 55 24 23 16 17 16 Jun T 35 S 18 R E T O Y 13 14 0 45-0 81 - Creek CAMP HART MOUNTAIN T A N 8 7 15 18 17 00 WARNER 12 POND 36 N O - H U N T I N G C re R KE 12 8145 -00 6000 11 10 iew ev ak 50 10 Mo unt ain RT MO UN TA IN 00 R 9 E 8 R 7 00 12 9 3-11 LA N Lakeview District 31 CAUTION! This map is distant from services or fuel. Travelers may not have cellular reception. 3 65 8 U 4 Recreation Opportunities Rdige 11 5500 4500 11 7 O HA 4500 F Mugwump Lake M 5 6 To ST AF 3-11 s WARNER VALLEY OVERLOOK INTERPRETIVE TRAIL 1 5 AG Steen 55 00 2 36 50 4500 2 3 4 00 60 00 3 35 District Contact Information k B RO ywa y AD 6 35 34 Lake Lake Caution! Channel Crossing Petroglyph 32 31 ee 00 4 36 Campbell Cr 33 65 5 conditions and water levels before planning a trip to the Warner Wetlands. rd 6 30 25 26 za 1 however, most of these activities are dependent on water levels which can uctuate dramatically. • Contact the Bureau of Land Management’s Lakeview 5500 2 AD RO 5500 E 36 F AF ST G A FL K AC 00 35 KE 5 To Frenchglen 42 Miles GB HO 50 LA K 45 00 WARN ER 34 A Upper 34 F 33 32 36 33 F 31 36 L A K E T A 35 3-11 27 WILDERNESS Know Before You Go • Numerous recreational opportunities exist for bird 29 S AD RO L 6500 25 26 27 28 6000 28 26 50 -C0 29 3-10 6155 30 25 R T 0 50 Travel on this road for 18 miles to Plush, Oregon. From Plush, travel north for 0.8 miles, and turn east on County Road 3-12. Drive approximately four miles to the Hart Bar Interpretive Site, located at the base of Hart Mountain. • This area is remote and may not have cellular service. 19 30 27 0 F L A G A 24 55 29 450 28 26 00 A M P B E L L 65 COYOTE 00 70 AD RO H 45 30 23 22 21 19 Poker Jim Spring 42° 37' 30" T 34 S 6000 20 22 18 13 14 PROPOSED L a k e Paiut e Cre ek 24 23 21 20 0 550 23 24 19 5000 HILLS 16 BLUE 0 450 0 500 15 Stone Corral C o r r a l 18 L 11 From Lakeview, Oregon, travel north on U.S. Highway 395 for six miles, and turn east on Highway 140 for approximately 15 miles to County 7 12 Poker Jim Lak e L V VAL LEY 22 21 S t o n e I 20 17 ek 00 S 19 24 23 18 0 450 13 A 14 T 50 L L T 34 S I E 10 13 14 15 5-00 500 0 5305 00 16 16 17 E H 17 18 55 7 Directions to the Site POKER JIM 9 S 8 K 15 615 13 S RO AD T 42° 37' 30" 11 N 0 I A 500 B Turp Lak i 12 W B 12 A R A 11 10 10 9 61 55 -C 0 9 50 7 14 L 00 00 American White Pelican n e SO H UT 8 7 50 2 4 00 12 8 5 45 11 00 3-10 B RA T BI 5 RD N SI BA 45 CAUTION! This map is distant from services or fuel. Travelers may not have cellular reception. 6 WARNER VALLEY CANOE TRAIL 2 RD 2 6 3 1 ROAD TURPIN 4 5 6 1 2 3 3 ASIN IT B 4 R23E 1 SOUTH 6115-B0 D 34 B RAB To US-395 13 Miles To Vya, Winnemucca To Alturas Lake I Goose 395 OREGON CALIFORNIA valley with water as much as 200 feet deep. The lakeshore beaches of this event can be seen on the eastern side of the valley below Hart Mountain. The remnants of this ancient lake remain today as a complex chain of lakes approximately 40 miles long that are separated by a unique series of bow-shaped dunes, formed by the prevailing south winds. I 33 32 31 36 L -00 61 55 0 -C 55 61 35 140 Warner Valley was formed when large faults in the earth’s crust moved. Portions of the crust, called grabens, moved down, and others, called horsts, moved up, forming Hart Mountain and the long north-south valley. BLM 36 35 34 Mule Deer Geology 00 50 0 5- 5 61 30 25 0 140 pothole lakes along the base of Hart Mountain. The ACEC was established to protect the Warner Valley’s unique wetland features and restore critical wildlife habitat. The SRMA was established to provide high quality recreation opportunities while protecting other important resource values. Limited development within this sensitive environment allows for recreational use while maintaining the ecological integrity of the area. E U G A 26 27 28 reek Rabbit CPlush Bly 5 61 E D 26 27 Valley Falls 29 30 0 5-C C 00 N 25 24 Y AR W 4500 I 23 22 R NE The Warner Wetlands was designated as both an Area of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC) and a 19 24 23 22 N 20 19 24 21 E C To Klamath Falls S 28 29 WETLANDS 30 25 26 A T 33 S 6000 y Fole re ek B WARNER 13 45 mer Sumke La Lake Abert 14 I 23 20 19 21 31 Paisley 15 16 17 13 O T 21 20 395 14 J I 15 VALLEY B 16 G UL CH ROAD 19 24 B 17 18 13 22 To Burns SummerLake 23 A 14 K C To Bend 15 R T 33 S O 16 17 18 known as the Warner Lakes, a 40 mile chain of lakes that includes the Warner Wetlands. Each spring and fall, thousands of birds visit the wetlands during their annual migrations. This high desert wetland habitat is also critical for many other plant, wildlife, and sh species. Being a closed basin for thousands of years allowed the evolution of some unique sh species in the area, including endemic Warner Sucker and Warner Lakes Redband Trout. 18 Wetlands provide habitat for many aquatic, semi-aquatic, and terrestrial wildlife species. The plant communities and productive nature of wetlands provide nursery / brood-rearing areas, nesting sites, escape cover, and plentiful food for invertebrates, amphibians, reptiles, sh, birds, and mammals. In the arid west, these ecosystems are an exceedingly small percentage of the larger landscape and are therefore, important to maintain for the viability of wildlife populations over the long term. R ER SH L O R E G O N 13 18 A K E AREA 14 Wildlife Visitors can help ensure a safe trip by adequately planning and arriving prepared. Getting around can be challenging as trail junctions are generally unsigned. Visitors are advised to carry a map and compass. No warranty is made by the Bureau of Land Management as to the accuracy, reliability, or completeness of these1data for individual or aggregate 3 2 6 use with other data. Original data were compiled from various sources. This information may not meet National Map Accuracy Standards. This product was developed through digital means and may be updated without notification. M18-03-01 opportunities during dry cycle periods as well as wet. The Warner Sucker, an endangered species endemic to the Warner Valley, must be released if caught. It is the only sucker species in the Warner Valley. Always check state regulations and license requirements before shing. Hunting Waterfowl hunting is a popular activity throughout Warner Wetlands during the fall. Good numbers of Canada geese, mallards, widgeon, pintail and other dabbling ducks can be found throughout the area, with redheads, scaup and other divers concentrated on the larger lakes. Mule deer, pronghorn antelope, and coyotes are also popular species to hunt in the area. Always check state regulations, and license and tag requirements before hunting. Hydrologic Cycle The amount of water in the lakes is determined primarily by the volume of snowmelt and rain (south of Hart Lake) high enough so the over water levels of all the lakes can uctuate widely from one year to the next. Pronghorn ow from Hart Redband Trout

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