Cascade-Siskiyou

National Monument - Oregon

The Cascade–Siskiyou National Monument protects 86,774 acres (35,116 ha) of forest and grasslands at the junction of the Cascade Range and the Siskiyou Mountains in southwestern Oregon and northwestern California, United States.

maps

Visitor Map of Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument (NM) in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Cascade-Siskiyou - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument (NM) in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Motor Vehicle Travel Map (MVTM) of Upper Rogue (south) in the Cooperative Travel Management Area High Cascades Ranger District in Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest (NF) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Rogue River-Siskiyou MVTM - Upper Rogue South 2017

Motor Vehicle Travel Map (MVTM) of Upper Rogue (south) in the Cooperative Travel Management Area High Cascades Ranger District in Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest (NF) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Map of Klamath Falls in the Klamath-Lake Protection District in Oregon. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.Klamath-Lake - Klamath Falls 2014

Map of Klamath Falls in the Klamath-Lake Protection District in Oregon. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

Map of the Ashland Sub-Unit in Southwest Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.Southwest Oregon - Ashland Sub-Unit 2014

Map of the Ashland Sub-Unit in Southwest Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Siskiyou Mountains Ranger District in Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest (NF) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Rogue River-Siskiyou MVUM - Siskiyou Mountains RD 2016

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Siskiyou Mountains Ranger District in Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest (NF) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the High Cascades Ranger District (south) in Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest (NF) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Rogue River-Siskiyou MVUM - High Cascades RD South 2016

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the High Cascades Ranger District (south) in Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest (NF) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

brochures

Brochure of Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument (NM) in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Cascade-Siskiyou - Brochure

Brochure of Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument (NM) in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Monument Guide to Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument (NM) in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Cascade-Siskiyou - Monument Guide

Monument Guide to Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument (NM) in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Day Hikes Near Green Springs at Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument (NM) in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Cascade-Siskiyou - Day Hikes Near Green Springs

Day Hikes Near Green Springs at Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument (NM) in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Brochure of Pilot Rock Trail at Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument (NM) in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Cascade-Siskiyou - Pilot Rock Trail

Brochure of Pilot Rock Trail at Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument (NM) in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Birds at Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument (NM) in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Cascade-Siskiyou - Birds

Birds at Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument (NM) in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Mammals at Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument (NM) in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Cascade-Siskiyou - Mammals

Mammals at Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument (NM) in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Trees and Shrubs at Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument (NM) in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Cascade-Siskiyou - Trees and Shrubs

Trees and Shrubs at Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument (NM) in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of Buck Prairie Winter Recreation Area at Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument (NM) in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Cascade-Siskiyou - Buck Prairie Winter Recreation Area

Map of Buck Prairie Winter Recreation Area at Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument (NM) in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Junior Explorer Activity Book for Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument (NM) in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Cascade-Siskiyou - Junior Explorer

Junior Explorer Activity Book for Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument (NM) in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Cascade-Siskiyou NM https://www.blm.gov/visit/cascade-siskiyou-national-monument https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cascade%E2%80%93Siskiyou_National_Monument The Cascade–Siskiyou National Monument protects 86,774 acres (35,116 ha) of forest and grasslands at the junction of the Cascade Range and the Siskiyou Mountains in southwestern Oregon and northwestern California, United States.
Diverse Habitats To understand the ecological diversity that characterizes the landscape, one must look east to the Great Basin, north to the Cascades, and west to the Siskiyou Mountains. Influences from each of these regions converge in the Monument, resulting in a constantly changing and colorful landscape. Oak woodlands representative of Oregon’s western valleys intermingle with gnarled juniper trees from the eastern basins, creating an unusual plant community. Our Heritage The CSNM is part of the Bureau of Land Management’s National Landscape Conservation System (NLCS), established to protect some of the nation’s most remarkable and rugged landscapes. The NLCS provides opportunities for current and future generations to explore and discover some of our last, great open spaces. CascadeCascadeSiskiyou Siskiyou National Monument The Scarlet Fritillary Oak Woodlands Hardy mountain mahogany and sagebrush on rocky bluffs are reminiscent of the Great Basin, and provide homes for rock wrens, rattlesnakes, and kangaroo rats. Rocky Bluffs Black Bear Great Gray Owl Old Growth Impressive stands of old-growth trees, associated with forests of the western Cascades and coast range, provide habitat for species such as northern spotted owls and northern goshawks. Bureau of Land Management Medford District (541) 618-2200 www.or.blm.gov/csnm BLM/OR/WA/GI-03/007+4800 Bureau of Land Management Crossroads A Wealth of Species A Recipe for Diversity The Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument is the nation’s first monument designated in recognition of an area’s biological diversity. The Monument’s remarkable ecology is a product of its location at the crossroads of two different mountain ranges — the Cascades and the Siskiyous — as well as its proximity to the Great Basin. The Ancient Siskiyou Mountains The western portion of the Monument is part of the Siskiyou Mountains—an ancient range containing some of the oldest rocks known in Oregon at 425 million years old. Their unusual east-west orientation creates an important connection between the Cascades to the east and the coastal ranges to the west. In addition, the Siskiyou Mountains were not heavily glaciated in the last ice age and served as a refuge for species whose habitat disappeared under tons of continental ice. The Volcanic Cascades The Cascades are a relatively young mountain range, built up by volcanic activity beginning approximately 40 million years ago. They run north and south through the central and eastern portions of the Monument. The Great Basin The Monument’s proximity to the Great Basin adds to the area’s biological diversity. Species adapted to this open, arid landscape to the east mingle with species found in the western Cascades and Siskiyous. Kangaroo Rats Typically found in desertlike habitats, kangaroo rats move by hopping on their hind feet, using their very long tail for balance. A Variety of Plants and Animals Share the Landscape Prickly-Pear Cactus Found at the Monument’s southern edge, the prickly-pear cactus illustrates the Great Basin’s influence. The Monument’s diversity depends on other key ingredients such as a wide range of soil types, elevations, moisture levels, and temperatures. Rainfall, for example, ranges from 20 inches at lower elevations to 40 inches at higher elevations. All of these factors directly affect the types of plant and animal habitats found throughout the Monument. Botanical Treasures Unusual Neighbors Different rock types create the foundation for diverse soils, which, in turn, support a stunning variety of plant life. Spring and summer reward the casual hiker and seasoned botanist alike with a colorful display of wildflowers. Many rare and unusual plants are found throughout the Monument. Thanks to the Monument’s location, plants and animals typically found in different geographical regions can find homes in this varied landscape. Species generally found in arid climates, such as kangaroo rats, are neighbors with northern spotted owls and rough-skinned newts, species associated with much wetter western forests. Indicators of Diversity Wetlands Numerous butterfly species provide evidence of the Monument’s ecological diversity. Butterflies are good indicators of plant diversity since the caterpillars of individual species only feed on specific plants, called host plants. The presence of a butterfly indicates that its host plant is nearby. To date, field surveys have identified 111 butterfly species in the Monument, compared with 162 in all of Oregon. A multitude of seeps, springs, and wetlands add to the diverse habitats found in the Monument. Wetlands are a critical water source for many species during summer drought. Some springs are home to tiny snails found only in the Monument. Northern Spotted Owls Mardon Skippers Closely associated with native grasslands, the rare mardon skipper is found in only a few locations in Washington, Oregon and California. Wapato Also known as arrowleaf, this i
Friends of Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument National Monument BLM Monument Guide Cascade-Siskiyou National Conservation Lands Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of the Interior u National monument Cascade-Siskiyou National Landscape Conservation System Official Guide and Map A Recipe for Biodiversity The remnant of an ancient volcano, Pilot Rock stands out as one of the most striking features of Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument. Below Pilot Rock lies a landscape that awakens the senses - a landscape where a short hike leads the explorer from the quiet grandeur of a cool, moss-covered forest to a wildflower and boulder-strewn meadow with hundreds of colorful butterflies. From the meadow, one looks out across the rocky ridges of the Siskiyou Mountains, the wide expanse of the Shasta Valley, and the towering snow-capped volcanic peak of Mount Shasta. The forest and the butterflies, as well as the mountains, volcanoes, and valleys, help tell the ecological story of the area. What’s Inside western coastal ranges. In addition, the Siskiyou Mountains were not heavily glaciated in the last ice age and served as a refuge for species whose habitat disappeared under tons of continental ice. The final ingredients in the recipe for ecological diversity are the sudden changes in elevation and aspect that affect sun exposure, moisture, and temperature throughout the monument. To facilitate your safe, low-impact experience of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument’s vast array of unique places and creatures, you will find in this newspaper a directory of hikes, what weather to expect, and a map. We hope you will enjoy your visit! Ultimately, diversity of habitat provides stability and resiliance. When studied carefully, this remarkable array of plants and animals will provide scientists and visitors with answers to questions about the complex biological and climatic history of Biodiversity - Converging Influences the area. Nature & Education ......2 Science ..........................3 Monument Map .............4 Hiking .............................6 Camping ........................7 Partnerships..................8 CASCADE MOUNTAINS IYOU SISK GREAT BASIN DESER T KLAMATH M OUN TAI NS CSNM Emergency Information Call 911 Fire/Medical/Medical Local dispatch for non-emergency 541-776-7206 ns Another important factor in the ecological makeup of the area is the unusual east-west orientation of the Siskiyou Mountains. The Siskiyous provide species with a critical connection between the Cascade Mountains and the wet forests of the National Conservation Lands are part of an active vibrant landscape where people live,work,and play. They feature exceptional opportunities for recreation, solitude, wildlife viewing and exploration. In keeping with NCL philosophy, visitor services such as visitor centers, lodging and restaurants are located in adjacent communities. This philosophy benefits local communities and their economies while minimizing the environmental impact on the Monument. tai oun da M Neva Sierra The species in the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument are representative of ecologically distinct regions known as ecoregions. Ecologists classify areas as ecoregions based upon unique combinations of topography, geology, soils, climate, and vegetation. In this area, multiple ecoregions meet, creating an ecologically jumbled landscape. Species typically found east of the Cascade Range, such as pygmy nuthatches and kangaroo rats, share habitat with western species such as rough-skinned newts and northern spotted owls. Where is the Visitor Center and the Lodge ? RANGE The monument’s ecology is influenced by the region’s extremely complex geology. A majority of the monument lies within the relatively young, volcanic Cascade Range. The southwest portion of the monument is in the much older Siskiyou Mountains. At 425 million years old, the rocks of the Siskiyou Mountains are the oldest known in Oregon. The differences in rock types and ages provide the foundation for a variety of soil types and habitats. Biodiversity created by the converging influences of the surrounding ecosystems Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument NOT TO SCALE Map Not To Scale M11-07-03 Issue 1_01_2013.2014WEB Nature & Education U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Medford District Office 3040 Biddle Road Medford, Oregon 97504 Monument Designation The Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument (CSNM) was established by the presidential proclamation of William J. Clinton on June 9, 2000, in recognition of its remarkable ecology and to protect a diverse range of biological, geological, acquatic, archeological, and historic objects. The CSNM is part of the BLM’s National Conservation Landscape System, preserving some of America’s most spectacular landscapes. In 2009 the Soda Mountain Wilderness was designated by Congress, enhancing the protection of some 25,000 acres in the southern portion of the monument. Locatio
Did you know ? Since 1942, nine aircraft have crashed into Pilot Rock, usually due to poor visibility and low clouds. NAT I O NAL C O N S E R VAT I O N LAN D S Bureau of Land Management, Medford District Office, 3040 Biddle Road Medford, Oregon 97504 p: 541-618-2200 . http://www.blm.gov/or/resources/recreation/csnm/ Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument, Oregon Cascade-Siskiyou Day Hikes Near Green Springs Welcome! Hiking Situated above 4000 ft., people seek refuge on the Green Springs, an oasis named for its hundreds of fresh water springs, green glades, and lush meadows. The Greens Springs area is also layered with oak savannahs, juniper and sage-dotted hillsides, high elevation meadows, and old growth forests. Green Springs Mountain Loop Trail: 2.2 mile loop. Mainly level, low difficulty. From I-5, take exit 14 and head east on Green Springs Highway for 15.5 miles until you reach the Green Springs Summit. Turn left at Green Springs Summit, following Little Hyatt Road for approximately ¾ of a mile to BLM road 39-3E-32. Turn left on BLM road 39-3E-32; continue on this road until you see a small parking turnout on the left. PCT-Little Hyatt Lake Trail: 3 miles (to lake and back). Low to moderate difficulty. From I-5, take exit 14 and head east on Green Springs Highway for 17.5 miles. Turn left onto East Hyatt Lake Road at the junction across from Green Springs Inn. Continue for 2.9 miles to just before the “Y” at entrance to Hyatt Lake. PCT trailhead is to your left. Tub Springs: 1/8 mi loop trail & picnic area. Low Difficulty. From I-5, take exit 14 and head east on Green Springs Highway for 18.5 miles. Park is on north side of road; 1.5 miles east of Green Springs Inn. Hobart Bluff: 3 Miles (to top of bluff and back). Last part of trail is steep; moderate to high difficulty. From I-5, take exit 14 and head east on Green Springs Highway for 15 miles. Turn right onto Soda Mountain Road 39-3E-32.3; drive 3.8 miles to junction of power line, PCT, and Soda Mountain Road. Take the Pacific Crest Trail north for about a mile to the Hobart trail junction, follow the trail to the top of the bluff. Safety Grizzly Peak: 3 miles one way. Moderate to high difficulty. From I-5, take exit 14 and head east on Green Springs Highway for less than a ¼ mile. Turn left on Dead Indian Memorial Highway; drive for approximately 7 miles and turn left onto Shale City Road 38-2E-27. Follow Shale City Road 38-2E-27 for approximately 3 miles; look for Grizzly Peak trail signs. Turn left onto BLM road 38-2E-9.2. After approximately 1 mile on this road, you will come to a three-way junction. Follow the road leading uphill, which will be the same road you are on. Look for the Grizzly Peak trail signs. Watch for oncoming traffic on narrow unpaved roads. Always carry water and food when hiking. Bring a lightweight flashlight to give yourself the option of hiking out after dark in the event that illness, injury, or enjoyment should slow you down. Always let someone know your itinerary.
BLM Cascade-Siskiyou Pilot Rock BLM archives Rising 570 ft to an elevation of 5910 ft., Pilot Rock is perhaps the most striking feature of CascadeSiskyou National Monument. Visible from much of the Shasta Valley in northern California and parts of Oregon’s Rogue Valley, the Rock serves as a friendly beacon to some five million vehicles and their passengers that travel the I-5 corridor annually. Competing Theories Pilot Rock is part of the Cascade Range, a mountain range notable for its string of volcanic peaks stretching from British Columbia to northern California’s Lassen Peak. The Monument’s proclamation refers to Pilot Rock as “a volcanic plug,” describing it as “a remnant of a feeder vent left after a volcano eroded away, leaving an outstanding example of the inside of a volcano.” Pilot Rock is composed mostly of volcanic andesite and has sheer, vertical faces with classic columnar jointing created by the cooling of its andesite composition. Plug or a Neck or both? Many geologists use the terms “neck” and “plug” interchangeably, while others believe the terms apply to different types of volcanic structures. Some geologists use the different definitions of lava and magma to make the distinction between a volcanic “neck” and a volcanic “plug.” Magma is molten or partially molten rock beneath the earth’s surface. Magma collects inside a volcano’s magma chamber before it erupts. When magma breaches the earth’s surface, the magma becomes lava and a volcano is formed. Geologists who make the distinction between volcanic necks and plugs consider a volcanic “neck” indicative of an actual volcano – a column of igneous rock formed by congelation of lava in the conduit or vent of a volcano and later exposed by the erosion of surrounding rocks. In contrast, these geologists consider a volcanic “plug” to be a structure formed by a body of magma that never reached the earth’s surface. Over time, the softer exterior rocks eroded away, leaving behind the now-cooled magma. Monument Boundary Interstate 5 Siskiyou Summit Elev. 4310 ft Highest elev. on I-5 Pilot Rock Elev. 5910 ft Put simply, a “plug” is an intrusive body formed by magma which cooled underground and was later exposed by erosion. Recent Research Recent research regarding Pilot Rock suggests that 25 million years ago, magma oozed through a weak spot in the earth’s crust, but did not reach the surface. As a result, some geologists refer to Pilot Rock as technically a “volcanic plug,” but NOT as defined in the Monument’s proclamation. (The proclamation evidently uses “plug” and “neck” interchangeably.) However “plugs”and “necks” are defined, what they both have in common is erosion. After the softer rock is eroded, the remaining harder volcanic structure stands up in bold relief to the surrounding landscape as the blockish, irregular, columnar structure you see today. Cousins Ship Rock in New Mexico and Devil’s Tower in Wyoming are considered to be volcanic necks or plugs, which were exposed after the surrounding sedimentary rocks eroded and fell away. Human History The Takelma people called it Tan-ts’at-seniptha, “Stone Standing Up.” In 1841, an enterprising U.S. Navy lieutenant scouting a route from the Columbia River to San Francisco Bay named it for himself: Emmons’ Peak. Today we know it as Pilot Rock, a welcome landmark for weary migrants on the Applegate Trail in the 1850s, and for travelers on I-5 today. Soda Mountain Elev. 6089 ft Did you know? According to local newspaper reports, nine aircraft have crashed into Pilot Rock since 1942, usually due to poor visibility and low clouds. CASCADE SISKIYOU National Monument E G N Climbing to the top of Pilot Rock can be dangerous and is not for the faint of heart. Warning: this climb is steep. Scrambling, care and dexterity are required. Going with someone who has scaled the rock before is recommended. d ia l k di rnt In r voi 39 -4 Ro ser 39 Re 4E -1 8. 1 iri e tt Rd Pra i y Old H k ee E - 35 Rd -3 E 40 n a pi qu D A R oa d C S Pa nip -2 3E Cr e 40-3 E-12 .1 Pilot Rock Randcore Pass 5908 ft 1.1 4 0 -3 E - 2 6093 Ro Boccard Point a Porcupine Mtn 4177 MONUMENT C n ek Kee P ilot Lone 5886 66 Pinehurst State Airport Babbits Saddle Skook um Soda Mtn ay Rd i ll NATIONAL 5630 hw 12.1 40-3E- e ad Ro M 0.9 A 39-3E-32. 3 H ig Lincoln 40 o rk 1.8 Trailhead Parking S p ri n g s k in unt a Mo F en 1.Mill C 6 r d oa 40 - Rd C re ek 39-2 E-34 t an igr uth G re 4E-7 40- So 4 1 -7. 4E 0- Em r ave 5.2 3E-3 40- Round Island 0.75 Former Bean Cabin Be in d EXIT 1 1 40-2E - rs Hobart Bluff Overlook PCT Access P il o t R o ck 40-2E Roa -33 d 2.0 Little Chinquapin Mtn i 5712 Tubb Springs State Wayside Rock Hobart Peak Little Pilot Peak 40 -3 E5 Rd rs Cr 35 4590 Sp ou t h Rd Lakes Little Pilot Rock Joes Rock 6. 2 .3 OldHobart h Bluff S ou t 99 wy 4885 -2 H 3E- -3 -3E 5502 4255 -3
Bird Checklist BLM Cascade-Siskiyou Pileated Woodpecker Welcome Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument (CSNM) was set aside on June 9, 2000, in recognition of its remarkable setting and biologic diversity. The Monument is situated where the Klamath, Siskiyou, and Cascade Mountain ranges converge, setting the stage for a diverse range of plant and animal habitat. The Monument CASCADE contains five distinct ecoregions identified in the SISKIYOU proclamation: grassland and shrubland (including National Monument unusual rosaceous chaparral), Garry and California oak woodlands, juniper scablands, mixed conifer and white fir forests, and wet meadows and riparian forests. In addition, there are areas of old-growth forest which provide required habitat for several species. The mixing of diverse habitats in such close proximity creates an exciting opportunity to observe a wide range of flora and fauna. The CSNM is home to approximately 200 bird species, either as permanent habitat or migratory shelter, including eight species considered “Special Status Species” by the BLM. Family/Common Name Habitat FAMILY GAVIIDAE – Loons Pacific Loon Common Loon Lakes Lakes Ra LC M M FAMILY PODICIPEDIDAE – Grebes Pied-billed Grebe Lakes Eared Grebe Lakes Western Grebe Lakes Clark’s Grebe Lakes C Ra Ra Ra M,S (Br) M M M FAMILY PELICANIDAE – Pelicans American White Pelican - SSS LC M,S FAMILY PHALACROCORACIDAE – Cormorants Double-crested Cormorant Lakes C M,S, Br FAMILY ARDEIDAE – Bitterns and Herons Great Blue Heron Lakes, wetlands Great Egret Lakes, wetlands Green Heron Lakes, creeks C LC LC M,S M M,S (Br) FAMILY ANATIDAE – Swans, Geese, and Ducks Tundra Swan Lakes Greater White-fronted Goose Lakes Ross’s Goose Lakes Snow Goose Lakes Cackling Goose Lakes, wetlands Canada Goose Lakes, wetlands Wood Duck Lakes, creeks Mallard Lakes, creeks Northern Pintail Lakes Gadwall Lakes American Wigeon Lakes Northern Shoveler Lakes Blue-winged Teal Lakes Cinnamon Teal Lakes Green-winged Teal Lakes Lesser Scaup Lakes Greater Scaup Lakes Ring-necked Duck Lakes Canvasback Lakes Redhead Lakes Common Goldeneye Lakes Barrow’s Goldeneye Lakes Bufflehead - SSS Lakes Common Merganser Lakes, creeks Ruddy Duck Lakes Hooded Merganser Lakes, creeks LC LC Ra Ra LC C LC C Ra C C C Ra LC C LC LC C LC LC LC LC C C LC LC M M M M M,S M,S, Br M,S, Br M,S, Br M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M,S, Br M M, S? FAMILY CATHARTIDAE – Vultures Turkey Vulture C M, S (Br) FAMILY ACCIPITRIDAE – Hawks and Eagles Northern Harrier Lakes, creeks Cooper’s Hawk Conifers for nesting Sharp-shinned Hawk Conifers for nesting Northern Goshawk Old-growth conifers Red-shouldered Hawk Riparian forests Red-tailed Hawk Widespread Rough-legged Hawk Grassland, open woodland Osprey Lakes, creeks Golden Eagle Open country for hunting Bald Eagle - SSS Lakes, creeks LC LC LC LC Ra C LC C LC LC M R, (Br) R, (Br) R, (Br) M R, Br M M, S, Br R (Br) M, S, Br FAMILY FALCONIDAE – Falcons American Kestrel Oak woodland Prairie Falcon Cliffs for nesting Merlin Any forest type as migrant Peregrine Falcon - SSS cliffs for nesting C LC LC LC R, Br M,S? M M, S, Br Lakes Widespread Abundance Occurrence Family/Common Name Habitat Abundance Occurrence FAMILY PHASIANIDAE – Grouse, Partridges, and Turkeys Ruffed Grouse Mixed hardwoods, conifers Sooty Grouse Conifers Wild Turkey Oaks LC LC LC R, (Br) R, (Br) R, (Br) FAMILY ODONTOPHORIDAE – Quail Mountain Quail Montane chaparral California Quail Oak, chaparral LC LC R, (Br) R, (Br) FAMILY RALLIDAE – Rails and Coots American Coot Lakes C M, S? Wet meadows, lake margins LC M, S? C M, S, (Br) FAMILY GRUIDAE – Cranes Sandhill Crane FAMILY CHARADRIIDAE – Plovers Killdeer Lakeshores, creeks, rocky flats FAMILY SCOLOPACIDAE – Sandpipers, Phallaropes, and Allies Greater Yellowlegs Lakeshores, creeks LC Lesser Yellowlegs Lakeshores, creeks LC Spotted Sandpiper Lakeshores, creeks LC Dunlin Mudflats LC Western Sandpiper Mudflats LC Least Sandpiper Mudflats LC Pectoral Sandpiper Mudflats LC Long-billed Dowitcher Mudflats Ra Wilson’s Snipe Wet meadows, grassy riparian LC Wilson’s Phalarope Lakes, shores LC M M M, S, Br M M M M M M, S? M FAMILY LARIDAE – Gulls and Terns Ring-billed Gull California Gull Caspian Tern Common Tern Forster’s Tern LC Ra LC LC LC M, S M, S M M M FAMILY COLUMBIDAE – Pigeons and Doves Rock Pigeon Nests in human structures Band-tailed Pigeon Mixed conifer, hardwoods Mourning Dove Short grass, rocky flats, ranches C LC C R, Br M, S R, (Br) FAMILY TYTONIDAE – Barn Owls Barn Owl Nests in human structures LC R, Br FAMILY STRIGIDAE – Typical Owls Flammulated Owl Ponderosa Western Screech-Owl Oaks, riparian, mixed forest Great Horned Owl Widespread Northern Spotted Owl - SSS Old-growth conifers Barred Owl Conifers Northern Pygmy-Owl Oaks, conifers Northern Saw-whet Owl Thick conifer and mixed forest Great Gray Owl High Elevation, Meadows Ra LC LC LC LC LC LC LC M,S? R, Br R, Br R, Br R, (Br) R, (Br
BLM Cascade-Siskiyou Mammals Checklist Yellow-bellied marmot Welcome Thank you for visiting Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument, a unit of the BLM’s National Conservation Lands. The Monument was set aside on June 9, 2000 in recognition of its remarkable setting and biologic diversity. The Monument is situated where the Klamath, Siskiyou, and Cascade Mountain ranges converge, setting the stage for a diverse range of plant and animal habitat. The mixing of diverse habitats in such close proximity to each other creates an exciting opportunity to observe a wide range of flora and fauna. This list is compiled utilizing field observations and the likelihood of presence based on habitat availability. You can help protect the Monument by following a few simple rules. Harassment of wildlife and cross country travel by bicycle or vehicle are prohibited. With limited exceptions, the removal of any monument features or objects is prohibited. Please respect and avoid private property when exploring the Monument. Order & Common Name Scientific Order Insectivora: Insect eaters ______Water shrew ______Trowbridge’s shrew ______Vagrant shrew ______Shrew-mole Order Chiroptera: Bats ______ California myotis ______ Little brown myotis ______ Long-eared myotis ______ Fringed myotis ______ Long-legged myotis ______ Yuma myotis ______ Silver-haired bat ______ Hoary bat ______ Big brown bat ______ Townsend’s big-eared bat ______ Pallid bat ______ Brazilian free-tailed bat Sorex palustris Sorex trowbridgii Sorex vagrans Nuerotrichus gibbsii cold small stream banks with cover, bogs conifer forests and other wooded areas marshes, bogs, wet meadows, forested streams moist-shady areas, along streams Myotis californicus Myotis lucifugus Myotis evotis Myotis thysanodes Myotis volans Myotis yumanensis Lasionycteris noctivagans Lasiurus cinereus Eptesicus fuscus Plecotus townsendii Antrozous pallidus Tadarida brasiliensis hollow trees, mine tunnels, buildings, bridges caves, mine tunnels, hollow trees thinly forested areas around buildings, trees caves, attics buildings, crevices in rock ledges caves, tunnels, buildings, arid areas forested area buildings, caves wooded areas caves, tunnels, crevices, hollow trees, buildings caves, mines, tunnels, buildings for roost crevices in rocks, buildings, trees for roosts caves and building Order Lagomorpha: Hares, Rabbits, and Pikas ______ American pika ______ Brush rabbit ______ Snowshoe hare Habitat Ochotona princeps Sylvilagus bachmani Lepus americanus talus slopes, rockslides near timberline chaparral, thick brush swamps, forests, thickets, mountains CASCADE SISKIYOU National Monument Order & Common Name Scientific Order Rodentia: Gnawing mammals Order Carnivora: Flesh-eating mammals ______ Coyote ______ Red fox ______ Common gray fox ______ Black bear ______ Ringtail cat ______ Common raccoon ______ American marten ______ Fisher ______ Ermine ______ Long-tailed weasel ______ American badger ______ Western spotted skunk ______ Striped skunk ______ Mountain lion ______ Bobcat ______ River otter Canis latrans Vulpes vulpes Urocyon cinereoargenteus Ursus americanus Bassariscus astutus Procyon lotor Martes americana Martes pennant Mustela erminea Mustela frenata Taxidea taxus Spilogale gracilis Mephitis mephitis Felix concolor Felis rufus Lutra canadensis moist areas, dense thickets, forests open conifer forest, chaparral, rocky areas conifer forests and adjacent chaparral rocky, talus slopes-valleys & foothills pastures, slopes with scattered trees mountain areas, mixed conifer forest, chaparral oak and pine-oak forest, fairly open areas conifer forest loamy soils, valleys, mountain meadows grassy prairies, alpine meadows, open pine forest sagebrush, chaparral, pinon pine, yellow pine dry grassy plains, partly open gravely slopes grassland, open desert, weed patches rocky canyons and slopes, old lava areas forests, grasslands, dry land habitats rocky terrain with scattered pinon pines & juniper heavy chaparrel, streamside thickets, mixed woods arid conditions, seasonal creek areas forest floors, log strewn moist areas fir/spruce/hemlock forests marshy ground, wet meadows, hillsides forest, brush, grassy areas, dry slopes near streams, lush grasses, forested areas or brush BLM Aplodontia rufa Tamias amoenus Tamias siskiyou Marmota flaviventris Spermophilus beecheyi Spermophilus lateralis Sciurus griseus Tamiasciurus douglasii Thomomys bottae Thomomys mazama Perognathus parvus Dipodomys californicus Reithrodontomys megalotis Peromyscus crinitus Peromyscus maniculatus Peromyscus truei Neotoma fuscipes Neotoma lepida Clethrionomys californicus Arborimus longicaudus Microtus californicus Microtus oregoni Zapus princeps Erethizon dorsatum Cascade-Siskiyou ______ Mountain beaver ______ Yellow-pine chipmunk ______ Siskiyou chipmunk ______ Yellow-bellied marmot ______ California ground squirrel ______ Golden-mantled squirrel ______ Western Gray squirrel ______ Douglas’ squirrel _
BLM Cascade-Siskiyou Common Trees and Shrubs Welcome Thank you for visiting Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument (CSNM), a unit of the BLM’s National Conservation Lands. Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument, proclaimed by President Clinton on June 9, 2000, was the first monument established for its biodiversity. The Monument contains five distinct ecoregions in the presidential proclamation: grassland and shrubland (including unusual rosaceous chaparral), Garry and California oak woodlands, juniper scablands, mixed conifer and white fir forests, and wet meadows and riparian forests. In addition, there are areas of old-growth forest which provide required habitat for several species. Conifers Family and Common Name Scientific Name Family Cupressaceae Incense-cedar Western juniper (Calocedrus decurrens) (Juniperus occidentalis) Ponderosa Pine Family Pinaceae Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii)* Sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana)* Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa)* Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) White fir (Abies concolor)* Shasta red fir (Abies magnifica var. shastensis) Family Taxaceae Pacific yew Douglas-fir (Taxus brevifolia) *components of “mixed conifer forest” CASCADE SISKIYOU Sugar Pine Where are the Communities? • Sugar pine specimens are easy to find at Tub Springs State Wayside. These trees are easy to identify from their huge cones, which can grow to 20 inches long and can weigh up to 4 pounds when green. • Mixed conifer forests transition to mostly white fir at higher elevations in the Monument. Most forests in the Monument are mixed conifer, especially north of Highway 66. • Oak woodlands are common in the Emigrant Creek area and south of Pilot Rock. • Juniper and sagebrush, characteristic of the Great Basin, occur on thin-soiled rock outcroppings such as Boccard Point and Hobart Bluff. The Great Basin eco-region extends into the Monument through the Klamath River gap southeast of the Monument. • Poison oak and Pacific madrone are characteristic of Cascade Foothills and Eastern Siskiyou eco-regions in the north and west end of the Monument, and are not found in the Great Basin or Shasta Valley plant communities to the south and east. National Monument Broadleaf Trees Family Aceraceae Bigleaf maple Rocky Mountain maple Vine maple (Acer macrophyllum) (Acer glabrum) Acer circinatum) Family Betulacaceae White alder (Alnus rhombifolia) Family Cornaceae Dogwood (Cornus ssp.) Family Ericaceae Pacific madrone (Arbutus menziesii) Family Fagaceae Oregon white oak Brewer’s oak California black oak Chinquapin (Quercus garryana) (Quercus garryana brewerii) (Quercus kelloggii) (Chrysolepis chrysophylla) Family Oleaceae Oregon ash (Fraxinus latifolia) Family Salicaceae Black cottonwood Quaking aspen Willows (Populus balsamifera var. trichocarpa) (Populus tremuloide (Salix ssp.) California Black Oak BLM Scientific Name Cascade-Siskiyou Family and Common Name Big Leaf Maple Pacific Madrone Shrubs Family and Common Name Scientific Name Family Anacardiaceae Poison oak (Toxicodendron diversilobum) Family Asteraceae Sagebrush Rabbitbrush (Artemisia ssp.) (Ericameria ssp.) Family Berberidaceae Oregon-grape (Mahonia ssp.) Family Caprifolicaceae Blue elderberry Honeysuckle Snowberry (Sambucus mexicana) (Lonicera ssp.) (Symphoricarpos ssp.) R Family Ericaceae Manzanita (Arctostaphylos ssp.) S Family Fagaceae Shrubby golden Chinquapin (Chrysolepis sempervirens) Family Rhamnaceae Wedgeleaf ceanothus Cinnamon bush Blue blossom (Ceanothus cuneatus) S (Ceanothus velutinus) (Ceanothus integerrimus) Family Rosaceae Klamath plum Bitter cherry Western chokecherry Oceanspray Western serviceberry Birchleaf mountain-mahogany Curlyleaf mountain-mahogany Thimbleberry Baldhip rose (Prunus subcordata) R (Prunus emarginata) R (Prunis virginiana) R (Holodiscus discolor) R (Amelanchier alnifolia) R (Cercocarpus betuloides) R (Cercocarpus ledifolius) (Rubus parviflorus) (Rosa gymnocarpa) Poison Oak Manzanita Wedgeleaf ceanothus R = Rosaceous chaparral complex (deciduous, soft leaves, mixed with Oregon white oak) found primarily in the Scotch Creek RNA S = Schlerophyllous chaparral complex (hard leaves, drought-tolerant, evergreen), found throughout the southern end of the Monument in dryer areas. Tree or a Shrub? Trees, often defined as plants with one woody stem that grows at least 15 feet tall, can be divided into two general categories: conifer and broadleaf. Shrubs are woody plants with multiple stems that grow to less than 15 feet tall, but the division between trees and shrubs can be fuzzy. Most of the trees in the CSNM are in mixed conifer forests, but there are many broadleaf trees also. A notable and unusual CSNM plant community is the “rosaceous chaparral,” composed of rose family shrubs and Oregon white oaks and found primarily in the Scotch Creek RNA. NAT I O NAL C O N S E R VAT I O N LAN D S Bureau of Land Management, Medford District Office, 3040 Biddle Road Medford, Ore
CASCADE-SISKIYOU NATIONAL MONUMENT Exploring on CASCADE-SISKIYOU NATIONAL MONUMENT The Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Junior Explorer program introduces young explorers like you to the lands and resources the BLM manages. This activity book focuses on the unique geology and biological diversity found within Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument. Rough-Skinned Newt You can work through the activities on your own or invite a sibling, parent, or another adult you know to join you. After you complete the activities, go to page 21 in the book and say the Junior Explorer pledge, sign the certificate, and you’re on your way to exploring and protecting America’s public lands. We hope you have fun exploring and learning about this unique area and the wide variety of plants and animals that call it home. 1 WALK, & PLAY ON DESIGNATED TRAILS. This is helpful in preventing damage to soils needed to grow all the beautiful plants and flowers you see. EVERYTHING ENTHUSIASTICALLY BUT AT A DISTANCE. Remember that Cascade-Siskiyou is home to many unique species and we are the visitors. THE TRAIL. BE KIND AND COURTEOUS TO OTHER HIKERS. The monument is host to more than a hundred thousand visitors each year! That’s a lot of sharing! BE A “PACKER”. IF YOU PACK IT IN - PACK IT OUT. This will help keep the monument clean and beautiful. We love bugs as long as they aren’t litter bugs! THE FLOWERS! LET OTHERS ENJOY THEM AS WELL BY NOT PICKING THEM. Take as many pictures as you want so you can share their beauty . TO DO YOUR PART IN PROTECTING the monument’s biological diversity. This is a very special place where an amazing variety of plants and animals is found. We can all work together to keep it that way. It is fun to share your experiences by taking or drawing pictures, but leaving behind what you find. 2 LEAVE NO TRACE BIGFOOT HAS BEEN DOING IT FOR YEARS You’ve probably heard the words, “be safe, be responsible, be respectful” at school, right? Well, the seven principles of Leave No Trace are very similar. By following these seven simple rules you can help preserve the biodiversity that makes the monument such a special place. The Seven Leave No Trace Principles for Kids • Know Before You Go • Choose the Right Path • Trash Your Trash • Leave What You Find • Be Careful With Fire • Respect Wildlife • Be Kind to Other Visitors To learn more about the Leave No Trace Principles take the LNT interactive online course for kids, go to PEAK Online at https:/lnt.org/teach/peak/peakonline 3 A RECIPE FOR BIODIVERSITY You’re probably wondering, “what is biodiversity?” Well, it is short for biological diversity and is the scientific term for lots of different living things. At Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument, we have an amazing variety of plants and animals! Five different ecoregions come together here. You can think of an ecoregion as a place where certain plants and animals live based on soil-type, temperature, rainfall, and elevation. These five ecoregions are the ingredients in our recipe for biodiversity. • Cascade Range • Great Basin Desert • Sierra Nevada Mountains • Klamath Mountains • Siskiyou Mountains Cascade Range 4 Great Basin Desert Sierra Nevada Mountains Klamath Mountains Siskiyou Mountains BIODIVERSITY WORD SEARCH Listed below are just a few of the plant and animal species that can be found within the monument. Now, see if you can find them! N O R T H E R N G O S H A W K K N T U P P H W S R E D B A N D T R O U T G T F R R R U Z C Y R V F O F D V U F R S T S I M O U N T A I N M A H O G A N Y O S G C T U C R F S R Y E H S N C I X S Q D D K Y G C K A L H L G R E A T G R A Y O W L M H H E W T T R E E F R O G M G M U L Y G S I B Q R T Z G T H B S M R E R G D P S K C L X G E L H Y F L R E G B B L K E A I K A W L K N E E W R P J V R E A A A L N A C E W O P W S L I I W L U A S N R A N D K S H M M I T N E G T R S V F G C M E E B F E N M S U Y A K T I H E I A A A D E E F J F I J E L D K Q U L R R R C N N M A R D O N S K I P P E R D L O O T D E R M A R I P O S A L I L Y K A O U E W K L W J C O L U M B I N E L D M R S R T L I T T L E B R O W N B A T F R A Y Y J E N N Y C R E E K S U C K E R D T Q Q S B O P A C I F I C F I S H E R K R F Y BEAVER JENNY CREEK SUCKER PRICKLY PEAR CACTUS RATTLESNAKE BLACK BEAR KANGAROO RAT REDBAND TROUT LITTLE BROWN BAT ROCK WREN MARIPOSA LILY CHICKADEE MARDON SKIPPER ROUGH-SKINNED NEWT COLUMBINE MOUNTAIN MAHOGANY SAGEBRUSH DOUGLAS FIR NORTHERN GOSHAWK SALAMANDER SCARLET FRITILLARY GREAT GRAY OWL TREEFROG PACIFIC FISHER JUNIPER 5 BIRD IS THE WORD More than 200 bird species have been reported in the monumen

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