Oregon Badlands

Wilderness - Oregon

The Oregon Badlands Wilderness holds a number of remarkable and exciting landforms and geologic features. Most of the area includes the rugged Badlands volcano, which has features of inflated lava. Windblown volcanic ash and eroded lava make up the sandy, light-colored soil that covers the low and flat places in these fields of lava. Dry River, active during each of several ice ages, marks the southeast boundary between two volcanic areas—Badlands volcano and the Horse Ridge volcanoes. Earth movements along the Brothers Fault Zone have faulted and sliced up the old Horse Ridge volcanoes, but not Badlands volcano. The Badlands formed in an unusual way. The flow that supplied lava to the Badlands apparently developed a hole in the roof of its main lava tube. This hole became the source of lava that built a shield volcano that we call the Badlands (technically, a rootless shield volcano). An irregularly-shaped pit crater at the top of the shield marks the site where lava flowed in all directions to create the Badlands.

maps

Trails Map of the BLM Airport Allotment area near Bend in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Airport Allotment - Trails Map

Trails Map of the BLM Airport Allotment area near Bend in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of the Sisters Sub-Unit South of the Prineville Unit in the Central Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.Central Oregon - Sisters South 2015

Map of the Sisters Sub-Unit South of the Prineville Unit in the Central Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

Map of Prineville Southwest in the Central Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.Central Oregon - Prineville Southwest 2015

Map of Prineville Southwest in the Central Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

brochures

Brochure and Map of Oregon Badlands Wilderness in the BLM Prineville District area in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Oregon Badlands - Brochure and Map

Brochure and Map of Oregon Badlands Wilderness in the BLM Prineville District area in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Trails Brochure and Map of Oregon Badlands Wilderness in the BLM Prineville District area in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Oregon Badlands - Trails Brochure and Map

Trails Brochure and Map of Oregon Badlands Wilderness in the BLM Prineville District area in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Oregon Badlands Wilderness https://www.blm.gov/programs/national-conservation-lands/oregon-washington/oregon-badlands https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oregon_Badlands_Wilderness The Oregon Badlands Wilderness holds a number of remarkable and exciting landforms and geologic features. Most of the area includes the rugged Badlands volcano, which has features of inflated lava. Windblown volcanic ash and eroded lava make up the sandy, light-colored soil that covers the low and flat places in these fields of lava. Dry River, active during each of several ice ages, marks the southeast boundary between two volcanic areas—Badlands volcano and the Horse Ridge volcanoes. Earth movements along the Brothers Fault Zone have faulted and sliced up the old Horse Ridge volcanoes, but not Badlands volcano. The Badlands formed in an unusual way. The flow that supplied lava to the Badlands apparently developed a hole in the roof of its main lava tube. This hole became the source of lava that built a shield volcano that we call the Badlands (technically, a rootless shield volcano). An irregularly-shaped pit crater at the top of the shield marks the site where lava flowed in all directions to create the Badlands.
OREGON BADLANDS A venture into the Oregon Badlands Wilderness is an experience of ancient junipers, volcanic vistas, and sand underfoot. You can explore cracked volcanic pressure ridges, called tumuli, or walk narrow moat-like cracks in the ground. Traces of human history are visible to the careful observer. At 29,000 acres, the Oregon Badlands Wilderness represents an outstanding example of ancient western juniper woodlands atop Columbia River Basalts. Almost 50 miles of trails offer the visitor many opportunities for hiking or horseback riding loops of various lengths. As a designated wilderness, the Oregon Badlands Wilderness enjoys the highest level of permanent protection, giving visitors the opportunity to experience nature at its wildest, while leaving any mechanized uses behind.
Badlands Rock Trail • In-and-out hike or horse ride • 6.0 miles, round trip • Elevation gain/loss: 75 feet • Trailhead coordinates: 43.95387N, 121.01476W (WGS 84) The Badlands Rock Trail is a wide trail that traverses the Oregon Badlands Wilderness to a large rock outcrop with 360-degree views of Central Oregon. Two longer looping options via either the Castle Trail (7.7 miles) or the Tumulus Trail (12.3 miles) can be used to return to the trailhead. Trailhead access is located at the Badlands Rock Trailhead, approximately 18 miles southeast of Bend, Oregon. From Bend, drive 17.9 miles east on State Highway 20. Turn left at the large gravel piles, cross a cattle guard, and proceed one mile northeast along a paved road. Park at the Bureau of Land Management kiosk and proceed 3 miles north to Badlands Rock. A map is available at the trailhead. Flatiron Rock Trail • In-and-out hike or horse ride with shorter looping options • 5.0-6.0 miles, round trip, depending on route taken • Elevation gain/loss: 60 feet • Trailhead coordinates: 43.95771N, 121.05186W (WGS 84) The Flatiron Trail is a two-track trail that skirts the flank of the relatively nondescript Badlands shield volcano and gently descends to an unusual rock outcrop known as the Flatiron. Here, one can walk in an oblong-shaped moat, or crack for a lunar-like hiking experience. The trail continues to the north boundary of Oregon Badlands Wilderness. Trailhead access is located at the Flatiron Trailhead, 16 miles east of Bend, Oregon on State Highway 20. Trailers are not advised. • In-and-out hike or horse ride with shorter looping options • 5.0-15.0 miles, round trip, depending on route taken • Elevation gain/loss: 75 feet • Trailhead coordinates: 44.04703N, 121.03192W (WGS 84) The heart of the Oregon Badlands Wilderness is reached by travelling the remote Tumulus Trail. This serpentine trail winds around large lava blisters with hidden alcoves, moats and open woodlands. Off trail in this area, it’s easy to get turned around, so sound navigation skills are essential. Trailhead access is located adjacent to a gate along the main area canal. From Alfalfa, drive ¼ mile west on Alfalfa Market Road, turning south on Johnson Ranch Road for 1 mile to the transfer station. Here the pavement ends and you continue along a rough road south along the canal for 1.2 miles. Park at the wide area east of canal; do not block the canal road. Trailers are not advised. Other Activities Target shooting, rock hounding, vending, and the use of paint ball guns are prohibited within the Oregon Badlands Wilderness, as is the cutting of trees or vegetation. Some activities, particularly special events, organized group outings, and those that are commercial in nature, require a Special Recreation Permit. For more information, contact the Prineville Bureau of Land Management District Office. Natural History The Oregon Badlands Wilderness holds a number of remarkable and exciting landforms and geologic features. Most of the wilderness includes the rugged Badlands volcano, which has features of inflated lava. Windblown volcanic ash and eroded lava make up the sandy, lightcolored soil that covers the low and flat places in these fields of lava. Dry River, active during each of several ice ages, marks the southeast boundary between two volcanic areas – Badlands volcano and the Horse Ridge volcanoes. Earth movements along the Brothers Fault Zone have faulted and sliced up the old Horse Ridge volcanoes, but not Badlands volcano. The Badlands formed in an unusual way. The flow that supplied lava to the Badlands apparently developed a hole in the roof of its main lava tube. This hole became the source of lava that built a shield volcano that we call the Badlands (technically, a rootless shield volcano). An irregularly-shaped pit crater at the top of the shield marks the site where lava flowed in all directions to create the Badlands. It is located about 1500 feet northeast of milepost 15 on Highway 20. Highway 20 traverses the shield along a straight, five-mile stretch between the intersections with an old section of Highway 20 (between mileposts 12.6 and 17.5). Soils in the Badlands were largely formed from ash associated with Mt. Mazama, now known as Crater Lake. Oregon Badlands Wilderness A variety of wildlife species inhabit the area including yellow-bellied marmots, bobcat, mule deer, elk, and antelope. The southern portion of the Oregon Badlands Wilderness includes crucial winter range for mule deer. Avian species include prairie falcons and golden eagles. Directions to the Site The Oregon Badlands Wilderness is located about 16 miles east of Bend, Oregon, along State Highway 20. For More Information Prineville District BLM 3050 NE Third Street Prineville, OR 97754 (541) 416-6700 www.blm.gov/or/districts/prineville www.blm.gov/or/resources/nlcs Oregon Badlands Wilderness BLM/OR/WA/GI-10/067+1122.32 Oregon Badlands Wilderness 10 yr Anniversary 10 yr Anniversary National La

also available

National Parks
USFS NW