Oregon Badlands

Wilderness - Oregon

The Oregon Badlands Wilderness holds a number of remarkable and exciting landforms and geologic features. Most of the area includes the rugged Badlands volcano, which has features of inflated lava. Windblown volcanic ash and eroded lava make up the sandy, light-colored soil that covers the low and flat places in these fields of lava. Dry River, active during each of several ice ages, marks the southeast boundary between two volcanic areas—Badlands volcano and the Horse Ridge volcanoes. Earth movements along the Brothers Fault Zone have faulted and sliced up the old Horse Ridge volcanoes, but not Badlands volcano. The Badlands formed in an unusual way. The flow that supplied lava to the Badlands apparently developed a hole in the roof of its main lava tube. This hole became the source of lava that built a shield volcano that we call the Badlands (technically, a rootless shield volcano). An irregularly-shaped pit crater at the top of the shield marks the site where lava flowed in all directions to create the Badlands.

location

maps

Recreation Map of Oregon Badlands Wilderness in the BLM Prineville District area in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Oregon Badlands - Recreation Map

Recreation Map of Oregon Badlands Wilderness in the BLM Prineville District area in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Trails Map of the BLM Airport Allotment area near Bend in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Airport Allotment - Trails Map

Trails Map of the BLM Airport Allotment area near Bend in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Motor Vehicle Travel Map (MVTM) of Fox Butte in Deschutes National Forest (NF) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Deschutes MVTM - Fox Butte 2022

Motor Vehicle Travel Map (MVTM) of Fox Butte in Deschutes National Forest (NF) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Map of the Sisters Sub-Unit South of the Prineville Unit in the Central Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.Central Oregon - Sisters South 2015

Map of the Sisters Sub-Unit South of the Prineville Unit in the Central Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

Map of Prineville Southwest in the Central Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.Central Oregon - Prineville Southwest 2015

Map of Prineville Southwest in the Central Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

brochures

Brochure and Map of Oregon Badlands Wilderness in the BLM Prineville District area in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Oregon Badlands - Brochure and Map

Brochure and Map of Oregon Badlands Wilderness in the BLM Prineville District area in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Trails Brochure and Map of Oregon Badlands Wilderness in the BLM Prineville District area in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Oregon Badlands - Trails Brochure and Map

Trails Brochure and Map of Oregon Badlands Wilderness in the BLM Prineville District area in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Oregon Badlands Wilderness https://www.blm.gov/programs/national-conservation-lands/oregon-washington/oregon-badlands https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oregon_Badlands_Wilderness The Oregon Badlands Wilderness holds a number of remarkable and exciting landforms and geologic features. Most of the area includes the rugged Badlands volcano, which has features of inflated lava. Windblown volcanic ash and eroded lava make up the sandy, light-colored soil that covers the low and flat places in these fields of lava. Dry River, active during each of several ice ages, marks the southeast boundary between two volcanic areas—Badlands volcano and the Horse Ridge volcanoes. Earth movements along the Brothers Fault Zone have faulted and sliced up the old Horse Ridge volcanoes, but not Badlands volcano. The Badlands formed in an unusual way. The flow that supplied lava to the Badlands apparently developed a hole in the roof of its main lava tube. This hole became the source of lava that built a shield volcano that we call the Badlands (technically, a rootless shield volcano). An irregularly-shaped pit crater at the top of the shield marks the site where lava flowed in all directions to create the Badlands.

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