Table Rocks

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Rising dramatically above the Rogue Valley, these two prominent, lava-capped mesas offer outstanding hiking opportunities and access to an incredible array of biological diversity. Just a short climb—2.5 miles round trip on Upper Table Rock Trail or 3.5 miles round trip on Lower Table Rock Trail—results in panoramic views of the Rogue Valley and the surrounding Cascade and Siskiyou Mountains. The 0.5-mile wheelchair accessible Oak Savannah Loop Trail on Lower Table Rock provides a less strenuous alternative. Spring wildflowers on both Table Rocks are spectacular with up to 75 species of wildflowers on display!

maps

Map of the Trail Sub-Unit in Southwest Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.Southwest Oregon - Trail Sub-Unit 2014

Map of the Trail Sub-Unit in Southwest Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

brochures

Brochure and Map of Table Rocks in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Table Rocks - Brochure and Map

Brochure and Map of Table Rocks in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Junior Explorer booklet for Table Rocks in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Table Rocks - Junior Explorer

Junior Explorer booklet for Table Rocks in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Table Rocks https://www.blm.gov/programs/recreation/recreation-activities/oregon-washington/tablerocks Rising dramatically above the Rogue Valley, these two prominent, lava-capped mesas offer outstanding hiking opportunities and access to an incredible array of biological diversity. Just a short climb—2.5 miles round trip on Upper Table Rock Trail or 3.5 miles round trip on Lower Table Rock Trail—results in panoramic views of the Rogue Valley and the surrounding Cascade and Siskiyou Mountains. The 0.5-mile wheelchair accessible Oak Savannah Loop Trail on Lower Table Rock provides a less strenuous alternative. Spring wildflowers on both Table Rocks are spectacular with up to 75 species of wildflowers on display!
WILD ROGUE Welcome to TABLE ROCKS! Rising dramatically above the Rogue Valley, these two prominent, lava-capped mesas offer outstanding hiking opportunities and access to an incredible array of biological diversity. Just a short climb—2.5 miles round trip on Upper Table Rock Trail or 3.5 miles round trip on Lower Table Rock Trail—results in panoramic views of the Rogue Valley and the surrounding Cascade and Siskiyou Mountains. The 0.5-mile wheelchair accessible Oak Savannah Loop Trail on Lower Table Rock provides a less strenuous alternative. Spring wildflowers on both Table Rocks are spectacular with up to 75 species of wildflowers on display! Know before you go open year round. Day use only. No Fees. trails are open to hiking only. Dogs are not allowed on the trails. Trails may be muddy, icy, and slippery in the winter. Be aware of ticks, poison oak, rattlesnakes, and unstable cliff edges. restrooms are available at trailheads. No drinking water is available. No trash cans; pack out trash. use the weed stations at the trailheads before and after your hike to avoid spreading noxious weeds. directions Lower Table Rock: From Interstate 5, take Exit 33 (Central Point). Travel east 1 mile; turn left on Table Rock Road. After 7.7 miles, turn left on Wheeler Road. The trailhead is 0.5 mile on the left. Upper Table Rock: From Interstate 5, take Exit 33 (Central Point). Travel east 1 mile; turn left on Table Rock Road. After 5.5 miles, turn right on Modoc Road. The trailhead is 1.5 miles on the left. Contact info point of interest 3040 Biddle Rd Medford, OR 97504 541-618-2200 BLM_OR_MD_Mail@blm.gov The BLM and The Nature Conservancy cooperatively manage the Table Rocks and offer guided educational hikes for school groups and the public in the spring.
Exploring the Table Rocks on BLM’s Medford District The BLM Junior Explorer program helps introduce young explorers like you to the lands and resources the BLM manages. This “Table Rocks Activity Book” focuses on plant and wildlife communities found in the Table Rocks Management Area. There are four different communities or habitats found on the Table Rocks and this book will take you through each of them. They are as follows: 1. Oak Savanna habitat 2. Chaparral habitat 3. Mixed woodland habitat 4. Mounded prairie/vernal pools habitat You can work through the activities on your own or invite a sibling, parent, or an adult you know to join you. After you complete the activities, go to the last page in the book and say the Junior Explorer pledge, sign the certificate, and you’re on your way to exploring and protecting America’s public lands. We hope you have fun exploring and learning about this unique area that is home to so many plants and animals! 1 2 PUblic lands belong To YoU! The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is a federal government agency that takes care of more than 245 million acres of land. Most of these lands are in the western part of the United States. These lands are America’s public lands, and they belong to all Americans. The BLM manages public lands for many uses. The lands supply natural resources, such as timber, coal, oil, natural gas, and other minerals. The lands provide habitats for plants and animals. People enjoy the big open spaces on the lands. The lands also contain evidence of our country’s past, ranging from fossils to Native American artifacts to ghost towns. The Upper and Lower Table Rocks are two of the most prominent topographic features in the Rogue River Valley. The Table Rocks are designated as an Area of Critical Environmental Concern to protect the special plants and animal species, unique geologic and scenic values, and provide educational opportunities. This area is managed by the BLM and The Nature Conservancy in partnership with the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde, and the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians – all working together to protect the Table Rocks for present and future generations. UN, WALK, & PLAY ON DESIGNATED TRAILS. This is helpful in preventing damage to soils needed to grow all the beautiful plants and flowers you see. XPLORE EVERYTHING ENTHUSIASTICALLY BUT AT A DISTANCE. Remember that the Table Rocks are home to many unique species and we are the visitors. HARE THE TRAIL. BE KIND AND COURTEOUS TO OTHER HIKERS. The Table Rocks are visited by over 40,000 people each year! That’s lots of sharing! LEASE BE A “PACKER”. IF YOU PACK IT IN - PACK IT OUT. This will help keep the Table Rocks clean and beautiful. We love bugs as long as they aren’t litter bugs! NJOY THE FLOWERS! LET OTHERS ENJOY THEM AS WELL BY NOT PICKING THEM. Take as many pictures as you want so you can share their beauty . AREFUL OF SNAKES. The Table Rocks have many different types of snakes that play an important role in keeping the ecosystem healthy. The Western Rattle Snake is the only one that is venomous in Oregon. While it’s rare to see this shy creature act agressively, OR keeping your distance NOT TO TOUCH? POISON OAK will keep you safe from harm. If you IS A PLANT YOU WON’T WANT encounter a rattlesnake, TO TOUCH unless you like having remain calm and ease your way around it. O TO UCH itchy, painful skin rashes! Remember:“Leaves of 3, Let them be!” 4 Table Rocks bingo When you are out exploring the Table Rocks, play Table Rocks Bingo! When you find something that matches a box below, cross out that box. Play until you have five in a row crossed out, whether up and down, left to right, or diagonal. Each of the four habitats are represented within the Bingo game. Give yourself extra points if you can identify the habitat where the plant or animal is found. HIKER BEE FROG BALSAMROOT FLOWER SNAG SQUIRREL BUTTERFLY BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER WOODPECKER DWARF WOOLY MEADOWFOAM any wildflower MOSS OAK GALL MISTLETOE see page 14 for reference BLACK OAK LEAF TURKEY VULTURE ANIMAL TRACKS LICHEN LIZARD CAMAS INDIAN PAINTBRUSH BLUEBIRD WHITE OAK LEAF PINECONE SNAKE Table Rocks WoRd seaRch The Table Rocks are thought to be about 7 million years old. They were made when lava flowed out of a volcano and cov­ ered a large area that included the present day Table Rocks. Since then, erosion from moving water, weather and freez­ ing/thawing activity has carved away at the lava flow and left only the Table Rocks standing. What happened when the land around the Table Rocks eroded away? They became… 5 oak saVanna habiTaT � 6 This plant community is well known for its colorful wildflowers. Have fun coloring all these flowers and drawing your own Southern Oregon Buttercup. (see the inside cover for an example of this beautiful flower) SOUTHERN OREGON BUTTERCUP Draw buttercup flower below. DEATH CAMAS Zigadenus venenosus Flower are alway

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