Cottonwood Canyon

State Park - Oregon

Cottonwood Canyon State Park is located on the lower John Day River. Park headquarters, about a two-hour drive east of Portland, is adjacent to Oregon Route 206 between Wasco and Condon. The river, which here forms the boundary between Sherman County on the west and Gilliam County on the east, meanders for 16 miles (26 km) through the arid park. The walls of the main canyon reach to 1,920 feet (590 m) above sea level within the park, which also includes four side canyons: Hay Creek, Esau, Rattlesnake, and Cottonwood. These and the main canyon are flanked by grassland, sagebrush shrub-steppe, river bottom, and cliffs composed mainly of basalts of the Columbia River Basalt Group.

maps

Map 4 showing the section from Whistle Point to Cottonwood Canyon of the John Day Wild & Scenic River (WSR) in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).John Day River - 4 Whistle Point

Map 4 showing the section from Whistle Point to Cottonwood Canyon of the John Day Wild & Scenic River (WSR) in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map 5 showing the section from Cottonwood Canyon to Tumwater Falls of the John Day Wild & Scenic River (WSR) in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).John Day River - 5 Cottonwood Canyon

Map 5 showing the section from Cottonwood Canyon to Tumwater Falls of the John Day Wild & Scenic River (WSR) in Oregon. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Brochure and Map at Cottonwood Canyon State Park (SP) in Oregon. Published by Oregon State Parks.Cottonwood Canyon - Brochure and Map

Brochure and Map at Cottonwood Canyon State Park (SP) in Oregon. Published by Oregon State Parks.

Campground Brochure and Map for Cottonwood Canyon State Park (SP) in Oregon. Published by Oregon State Parks.Cottonwood Canyon - Campground

Campground Brochure and Map for Cottonwood Canyon State Park (SP) in Oregon. Published by Oregon State Parks.

Brochure of Horse Camps and Trails in Oregon. Published by Oregon State Parks and Recreation.Oregon State Parks - Horse Camps and Trails

Brochure of Horse Camps and Trails in Oregon. Published by Oregon State Parks and Recreation.

Cottonwood Canyon SP https://oregonstateparks.org/index.cfm?do=parkPage.dsp_parkPage&parkId=195 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cottonwood_Canyon_State_Park Cottonwood Canyon State Park is located on the lower John Day River. Park headquarters, about a two-hour drive east of Portland, is adjacent to Oregon Route 206 between Wasco and Condon. The river, which here forms the boundary between Sherman County on the west and Gilliam County on the east, meanders for 16 miles (26 km) through the arid park. The walls of the main canyon reach to 1,920 feet (590 m) above sea level within the park, which also includes four side canyons: Hay Creek, Esau, Rattlesnake, and Cottonwood. These and the main canyon are flanked by grassland, sagebrush shrub-steppe, river bottom, and cliffs composed mainly of basalts of the Columbia River Basalt Group.
The main stem of the Lower John Day River— about 16 miles of it—curves through the park. Four major side canyons empty into the John Day within the park: Hay Creek Canyon, Esau Canyon, Rattlesnake Canyon and Cottonwood Canyon. More than 10,000 acres of public land surround the park. The climate is arid, with cool winters and hot summers. largely composed of grasslands, sagebrush shrubsteppe, river bottomlands and deep canyons. The highest point within the park is the Canyon Overlook area at 1,920 feet. OPRD thanks the following partners for the time, enthusiasm and funding that allowed Cottonwood Canyon State Park to become a state park: Western Rivers Conservancy, Lower John Day Conservation Work Group, City of Condon Chamber of Commerce, Bureau of Land Management, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Travel Oregon Rural Tourism Studio Program, Sherman County Historical Society, Gilliam County Weed Management, Sherman County Soil-Water Conservation District. 63400-9826 (7/13) This publication is available in alternative formats on request. Call 1-800-551-6949 (for the hearing impaired 1-800-735-2900). www.oregonstateparks.org Local middle-school students took part in designing a “brand” for Cottonwood Canyon State Park. This winning design was submitted by several students. 99989 Highway 206, Wasco, OR 97065 Cottonwood Canyon State Park This is a remote, open place. By design, and in spite of its vastness, Cottonwood Canyon State Park offers a recreation experience that protects the treasured roughness of the place. When its 8,000-plus acres became an Oregon State Park, public consultation reaffirmed that the rugged character of this special place should not be lost. Camping and other development is minimal. How Cottonwood Canyon will be PORTLAND CONDON J.S. Burres MORO Cottonwood Canyon State Park Cottonwood Canyon State Park RECREATION This is Cottonwood Canyon State Park. Visitors should expect an natural experience, a mirror of the landscape. The sprawling 8,000-plus acres is like everything here is larger than life. Cast your eye about, and you see a sweeping, elemental kind of beauty that both beckons and cautions. Vast, near vertical canyons cast deep, black shadows on the river below. Color is everywhere: spectacular summer skies, the burnished golds and browns of the rangelands, the silver, greens and gray of sagebrush, steppe and rocks. Tiny bright wildflowers dot the spring landscape in yellow, orange, red, purple. IT SEEMS Past and Present Hiking Columbia River basalt flows compose much of the geology of Cottonwood Canyon State Park. These famous basalts came from lavas erupting through fissures in the eastern part of the Columbia Plateau over a huge area more than 15 million years ago. Rough, old ranching roads wind through the land, reborn as trails for hikers, horseback riders and serious back country campers. The park offers miles of trails, in canyon, upland and riverside terrain. Horse trails are limited to the Gilliam County side of the river. A short interpretive trail that begins near the park’s west entrance highlights the land’s ranching past. This land has been natural grazing land for centuries. Native peoples grazed horses here hundreds of years ago. The advent of intensive modern farming and ranching, however, has changed the land. Native grasslands in some areas have been crowded out. Controlling weeds and restoring native vegetation, especially in the bottomlands and along the river, will take persistence and time. Camping The park offers 21 primitive sites, 7 hiker-biker sites, a group camping area and a restroom. Potable water is available in the campground. All sites are first come, firstserved. Check in at the information station for more info. Hunting and Fishing Populations of steelhead, catfish, carp and especially the smallmouth bass in the lower John Day attract a wide variety of anglers. The park is also open to hunting outside the developed area; check at the visitor station for information and regs from the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). River Recreation Courtesy Western Rivers Conservancy, Photographer Peter Marbach. The iconic John Day River is a long, remote and relatively intact natural river system. With a free-flowing (undammed) length of 252 miles, the John Day is the longest such reach of river in the Northwest. Wild and Natural Boating the river is popular by raft, kayak, canoe, or driftboat. Visitors may launch at J.S. Burres day-use area, on the south side of the river, just off highway 206. Most commercial outfitters paddle from Clarno to the Cottonwood Bridge. Wildlife abounds. The area boasts the largest herd of California bighorn sheep in Oregon, and the lower John Day River offers one of the best wild spring and fall Chinook runs in northeast Oregon. Visitors could see Rocky Mountain elk, mule deer, pronghorn antelope, coyotes, white-tailed jackrabbit, and all manner of smaller mammals. Courtesy Western
CAMPGROUND Year-round camping The Pinnacles Trail (5 miles) and the Lost Corral Trail (4.3 miles), follow either side of the John Day River downstream. The Lost Corral Trail, leaving from JS Burres, is open to hikers, bikers and equestrians. The Pinnacles Trail, leaving from the end of the campground, is open to bikers and hikers. (max site size is 75 feet). Available first-come, first-served Group tent camp for up to 25 people Four rustic cabins Potable water Flush restroom with showers Hiker/biker camp with seven sites, picnic tables and vault toilets Reservable Day-use Area • Picnic shelter • Shade shelter • Flush restroom J.S. Burres Boat Launch • • River Access Vault toilet River recreation, fishing and hunting Latitude: 45.483785 N Longitude: -120.458778 W 1-800-551-6949 oregonstateparks.org Explore trails by boot, bike or on horseback ottonwood Canyon State Park is rugged and vast, from the vertical cliffs carved by the John Day River to deep canyons and arid, rocky grasslands that extend for miles in all directions. In addition to camping, the park’s 8,000-plus acres are open for hiking, boating, horseback riding, fishing and hunting. Come explore and contemplate the elemental forces that carved this unique landscape. • • • • • Cottonwood Canyon State Park 99989 Highway 206, Wasco, OR 97065 541-394-0002 calling the park at 541-394-0002. C • 21 primitive sites for tents and self-contained RV’s Cottonwood Canyon State Park Park Information: The iconic John Day River is a long, remote, natural river system, with 252 undammed miles. The lower John Day River offers one of the best wild spring and fall steelhead runs in Northeast Oregon. Anglers also come for catfish and smallmouth bass. J.S. Burres, across the river, is a popular boat launch for rafts, kayaks, canoes and drift boats. The park is also open to hunting outside the developed area. It is the responsibility of the hunter to stay current on regulations. Smoking in Oregon State Parks is allowed only in personal vehicles, RVs, campsites and portions of day use parks along state highways that are designated as safety rest areas by the Oregon Department of Transportation. 63400-9844 (4/19) Hikers can enjoy the Hard Stone Trail, which heads upstream 1.5 miles one way. Or, you can strike out on your own along old, unmaintained ranching roads that lead into the back country. Wild and natural Visitors may see Rocky Mountain elk, mule deer, pronghorn antelope, coyotes, white-tailed jackrabbit, big horn sheep, and all manner of smaller mammals. Both migratory and resident bird populations are a treat, especially for raptor lovers. The rocky landscape also invites reptiles, including at least six species of lizards, western rattlesnakes and various nonvenomous snakes. April and May put on a show of wildflowers. Colum Stay safe Cottonwood Canyon is remote, rugged and deliberately undeveloped. A few basic steps can help you stay safe. Have a plan for your day, and tell somebody about it. There is no cell phone coverage anywhere in the park. Carry plenty of water—20 ounces per hour for hiking in hot sun; potable water is available only at the developed day use area and in the campground. The Dalles bi iver a R Cottonwood Canyon State Park Wasco ay Rive John D r Cottonwood Canyon Reserve the picnic shelter nine months to one day in advance by J.S. Burres Condon Rattlesnakes and cougars live here. Leave the snakes alone; they will not bite unless threatened. To avoid cougars, always hike in groups and make noise to announce your presence. Report any cougar sightings to park staff. Ticks are most active in spring and early summer and live in long grass and brush. The best defenses are vigilance and avoidance. Support your parks by becoming a member of the Oregon State Parks Foundation. Free 12-month day-use parking permit with your membership. oregonstateparksfoundation.org. Pinn acl es T rail ( 4  )miles)   12 • Campground quiet hours are between 10 p.m. and 7 a.m., including generator use. Park office and maintenance area To Wasco 15 miles • Vehicles must be parked on the gravel parking pads. • Pets must be physically restrained at all times when not confined in a vehicle or tent. Leashes must be no longer than six feet. All waste must be properly removed. ne Trail Hard Sto 5 (1. es) m il  To Hunting Area To Condon 25 miles 3m il e Check in after 4 p.m., check out by 1 p.m.     Lo st Co l rra Tra il ( 4. J.S. Burres      ) s) s) ile m .3 (4 Co st ver Ri ay D n Joh 206 lT ra   Dog off-leash area     Day-use  Area Barn • Campground fires are banned from late spring to early fall. Check oregonstateparks.org for campfire advisories. il  Experience Center   • Backcountry fires are also banned part of the year and under restriction when allowed. Please check blm.gov/or/permit for more information. es il .2 Tr a l( il m rra ile s) i ra (.7 Lo 5 m 7 W 3
Horse Camps and Trails W hether you ride the trails or spread your bedroll in one of our eight horse camps, an equestrian getaway in an Oregon state Tryon Creek State Natural Area park will give you campfire fodder to last a lifetime. Nehalem Bay State Park Call the State Parks Information Center, 800-551-6949, for additional information on horse trails and horse camping. Follow the 100-mile OC&E Woods Line State Trail east of Klamath Falls, once an early rail line for the timber industry. Combine camping and miles of trail riding at Howard Creek Horse Camp in Silver Falls State Park or at Hares Canyon Horse Camp in L.L. “Stub” Stewart State Park. If you like the sound of waves and purplishblue glow of an ocean sunset, then eight state parks with beach access are for you. Meadows, woodlands and rivers are typical features of parks such as Elijah Bristow, Willamette Mission and Milo McIver. For a look at grasslands, deep canyons and the John Day River, try the Lone Corral Trail at Cottonwood Canyon State Park in eastern Oregon. Check out other Oregon State Parks by visiting oregonstateparks.org Oregon Parks and Recreation Department 725 Summer St. NE, Suite C Salem, OR 97301 Printed on Recycled Paper All information or fees subject to change without notice. This brochure is available in alternative formats upon request. Call 800-551-6949. Oregon Relay for the hearing impaired: dial 711. 63400-8111 (/18) Elijah Bristow State Park Silver Falls State Park Nehalem Bay State Park Trail Rules Banks-Vernonia State Trail Trail Courtesy Ride with a buddy. If you must ride alone, tell someone where you’re going and when you’re returning. Let bicyclists and hikers know the best way to get around your group. Downhill traffic yields to uphill traffic. Ride only on trails designated for horses and other areas open to horses. Be aware of prohibited areas. Cutting switchbacks and taking shortcuts destroy vegetation and encourage others to use the unauthorized route. Please respect private property along trails. Pack it in, pack it out. Tie horses to corrals or horse trailers, not to trees. Please ride single file and in the middle of the trail. Avoid muddy or soggy areas, especially riverbanks. Campground Rules Keep all pets under physical control and on a leash not more than six feet long. Please remove all pet waste from the equestrian campground. Keep corrals free of straw and animal waste. Remove animal waste from parking and hitching post areas and trailheads. Camping and campfires are allowed in designated areas only. Do not camp along trails. Horses are prohibited in main overnight campgrounds and developed day-use areas. L.L. “Stub” Stewart State Park How to Volunteer Many dedicated individuals and organizations volunteer their time and donate material to their favorite riding areas. If you or your organization is interested in adopting a horse trail or camping area, please call the State Parks Volunteer Hotline, 877-225-9803. Campgrounds 15 ASTORIA Del Rey Beach 12 SEASIDE Day-use trails UMATILLA 5 9 6 TILLAMOOK South Jetty 21 NEWBERG SALEM NEWPORT WALDPORT 8 MAUPIN MILTON-FREEWATER Cottonwood Canyon 7 1 WINSTON REMOTE 2 SIXES DETROIT 20 REDMOND 14 MITCHELL DAYVILLE JOHN DAY MT. VERNON PRINEVILLE PAULINA La PINE DIAMOND LAKE UNITY SENECA RILEY FORT ROCK CHEMULT ONTARIO VALE BURNS FORT KLAMATH ASHLAND WAGONTIRE BUCHANAN LAWEN NARROWS JUNTURA Off I-5, 8 miles north of Salem CRANE NEW PRINCETON JORDON VALLEY FRENCHGLEN PAISLEY 3 BEATTY KLAMATH FALLS 18 MERRILL  Horse Camping and Trails Unless noted, sites in horse camps may be reserved. Camping rates vary. To make or cancel a reservation, call 800-452-5687. Go online to oregonstateparks. org or call (800) 551-6949 for more information. Day-use parking fee noted where required. 1 Bullards Beach State Park U.S. 101, 2 miles north of Bandon on Bullards Beach Road Trails: 4 miles of beach riding. 11 miles of designated trails, one leads to Coquille River Lighthouse. Sites: Eight primitive stalls, each 12′ x 12′. Maximum one horse per stall. Three sites have stalls for two horses; five sites have stalls for four horses. All stalls are galvanized tube. Features: Picnic tables, fire rings, drinking water, vault restrooms. Showers/flush toilets in main campground. Other Info: Tethering outside the stall is prohibited. Please clean the site and stalls and dispose of trash and manure in the designated area. Parking and hitching posts available for day-use visitors. One camping unit per site. 2 Cape Blanco State Park Off U.S. 101, 9 miles north of Port Orford Trails: 6 miles of riding trails. 150-acre open riding area. Beach access. Sites: Eight primitive. Six single-horse corrals; two doublehorse corrals; two pull-through sites each with double stalls for four horses. Hitching posts located in the camp. Features: Picnic tables, fire rings, drinking water. Showers/flush toilets in main campground. 3 C

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