Oswald West

State Park - Oregon

Oswald West State Park is located about 10 miles (16 km) south of the city of Cannon Beach, on the Pacific Ocean. The park has many miles of hiking trails both inside the park grounds and linking to other parks and landmarks beyond. The state park also contains Neahkahnie Mountain, Short Sand Beach, Short Sand Creek, Necarney Creek, Cape Falcon, Smugglers Cove and the Oregon Coast Trail. The cove is a popular surf destination and is known as "Short Sands".

maps

Map of the Northern part of the Northwest Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.Northwest Oregon - North 2019

Map of the Northern part of the Northwest Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

brochures

Brochure and Map of Oswald West State Park (SP) in Oregon. Published by Oregon State Parks and Recreation.Oswald West - Brochure and Map

Brochure and Map of Oswald West State Park (SP) in Oregon. Published by Oregon State Parks and Recreation.

Brochure about the Western Snowy Plover at the Oregon Coast. Published by Oregon State Parks.Oregon State Parks - Western Snowy Plover

Brochure about the Western Snowy Plover at the Oregon Coast. Published by Oregon State Parks.

Brochure about Whale Watching at the Oregon Coast. Published by Oregon State Parks.Oregon State Parks - Whale Watching

Brochure about Whale Watching at the Oregon Coast. Published by Oregon State Parks.

Tide Tables for the Oregon Coast. Published by Oregon State Parks.Oregon State Parks - Tide Tables 2021

Tide Tables for the Oregon Coast. Published by Oregon State Parks.

Oswald West SP https://oregonstateparks.org/index.cfm?do=parkPage.dsp_parkPage&parkId=139 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oswald_West_State_Park Oswald West State Park is located about 10 miles (16 km) south of the city of Cannon Beach, on the Pacific Ocean. The park has many miles of hiking trails both inside the park grounds and linking to other parks and landmarks beyond. The state park also contains Neahkahnie Mountain, Short Sand Beach, Short Sand Creek, Necarney Creek, Cape Falcon, Smugglers Cove and the Oregon Coast Trail. The cove is a popular surf destination and is known as "Short Sands".
Stay Safe, Hike Happy • Trails are for walking or hiking only. Please help prevent erosion and damage to native vegetation by staying on developed trails. Oswald West State Park • Anytime your pet is not confined to a vehicle, you must hold on to it physically, whether by the collar or on a six foot leash. Waste must be properly removed; pet waste removal bags are placed throughout the park. Trail Guide • Bring plenty of water and wear sturdy hiking boots or shoes. Oswald West State Park Hwy 101, 2 miles north of Manzanita Information: 800-551-6949 oregonstateparks.org Printed on Recycled Paper All information or fees subject to change without notice. This brochure is available in alternative formats upon request. Call 1-800-551-6949. Oregon Relay for the hearing impaired: dial 711. 63400-8902 (3/18) S tretching along 4 miles of coastline in dense, old growth forest between Arch Cape and Neah-Kah-Nie Mountain, 2,484 acre Oswald West State Park has a beautifully secluded sandy beach and miles of trails leading to breathtaking views of the Pacific Ocean. This sprawling, scenic treasure is without a doubt one of the most spectacular parks in Oregon, and arguably, in the United States. Short Sand, Big Fun Popular with surfers and boogie boarders, Short Sand Beach is always alive. Think surfing, picnicking, tide pooling. Cape Falcon to the north and Neah-Kah-Nie Mountain to the south flank this short beautiful beach. What’s Close By To the north: Hug Point, Arcadia Beach and Tolovana Beach. All gorgeous! Continue north and take in the beauty of Ecola State Park. To the south, you can enjoy the beaches and camping at Nehalem Bay State Park. Visit www.oregonstateparks.org for more. Oregon’s Visionaries The park, nicknamed “Shorty’s” by the locals, is here in no small measure because of two men: Sam Boardman, Oregon’s first State Park Superintendent, and Governor Oswald West, for whom the park was eventually named. In 1931, 118 acres were donated to the State of Oregon under the name of Short Sand Beach State Park. A patchwork of donations and purchases followed, thanks largely to the dogged pursuit of land acquisition by Sam Boardman, who believed that coastal lands in particular should be set aside for public ownership and care. The park was renamed in 1958, in honor of Governor Oswald West. This remarkable one-term Governor (1911-1915) opened nearly 400 miles of Oregon shoreline for public access by declaring the beaches a public highway. Baby Harbor Seal Trillium Necarney Creek Explore the Trails! Neah-Kah-Nie Mountain P ark in one of four parking lots along Highway 101 and follow the trails into one of the best preserved coastal rainforests in Oregon. Low-growing ferns, salal, and salmonberry are shaded by massive western red cedar, western hemlock, and Sitka spruce trees that form the basis of the temperate coastal rainforest ecosystem that exists only in the Northwest. Oswald West does not offer camping. South Neah-Kah-Nie Trail: Located just outside of the park’s southern boundary off Highway 101. Follow the hiker sign up a gravel road ¼ mile until you reach a small parking lot. Begin at either the northern or southern trailheads. Hike up through beautiful old growth forests until you emerge at the summit for a breathtaking view south all the way to Cape Lookout. In the spring, watch for wildflowers, such as Oregon iris, harsh paintbrush and nodding onion. Other Trails North Neah-Kah-Nie Trail: Located where the OCT crosses Highway 101 at a gravel pullout. Look for the OCT hiker sign. Hike north from Cape Falcon on a beautiful 6½ mile section of the OCT up to Arch Cape. Or, take the short walk out to the Devil’s Cauldron overlook from Hwy 101. Short Sand Beach Trail Ar This short, ½ mile walk leads through the woods to the beach. From the main parking lot, walk under Highway 101 and down the trail, following the contours of Short Sand Creek. Cross the creek on a railroad-style bridge and you’ll find yourself at a beautiful picnic area overlooking the beach. Trails and Distances c h Cape C r eek 1 South Neah-Kah-Nie Mountain Trail - 1.3 miles 2 North Neah-Kah-Nie Mountain Trail - 2 miles 3 Devil’s Cauldron Overlook Trail - 0.1 miles 4 Elk Flats Trail - 1.3 miles 400 60 0 5 Necarney Creek Trail - 0.3 miles 500 6 South Beach Access Trail - 0.1 miles 14 7 Cedar Crossing Trail - 0.1 miles 0 50 400 8 Sitka Spruce Trail - 0.2 miles 0 70 9 Old Growth Forest Trail - 0.2 miles 14 10 Short Sand Beach Trail - 0.5 miles 1000 900 101 12 Upper Short Sand Creek Trail - 0.1 miles 500 0 30 11 Kramer Memorial Trail - 0.2 miles 600 Old Growth Forest Trail 13 Cape Falcon Trail - 2.3 miles The Old Growth Forest Trail and its several offshoots are located between Necarney and Short Sand Beach Trails. This trail system is easily accessible. 14 Arch Cape to Cape Falcon Trail - 6.5 miles Key 400 14 500 Moderate to Difficult Hiking Trails 0 70 0 60 Restroom Approximate Park Bou
W e know that Oregon’s 362 miles of shoreline and beaches are a magnet for happy dogs and their people. Dogs are welcome at (almost) all times and places on Oregon’s beaches. But please keep in mind that all dogs, even well-behaved ones, can be a threat to birds and wildlife. Some beaches are part of protected nesting grounds of the western snowy plover. During its spring and summer nesting season (March 15-Sept. 15), certain recreation activities may be restricted or prohibited. The Bird The western snowy plover is a tiny shorebird that lives and breeds along some west coast beaches from Washington to southern California. It is a threatened species under the federal government’s Endangered Species Act (ESA). Plovers nest in dry open sand, in tiny, shallow scrapes that are very well camouflaged. Not only are nests easy to miss (or step on), but the bird will abandon its eggs if repeatedly disturbed by activities it considers a threat—activities we may see as harmless, like walking a dog, throwing a ball and flying a kite. For more info, go to bit.ly/wsplover The Law Oregon State Parks is legally responsible for managing recreation on Oregon’s ocean shore. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) oversees the ESA and thus the status of the western snowy plover. What is a management area? Management areas are stretches of beach that are either known to be occupied by breeding plovers, or places where their presence is significant and the habitat attractive. Not all management areas have recreation restrictions. What does this mean for beachgoers? It means that visitors need to watch for special signs or fences during nesting season and follow the rules. Generally, where plovers are nesting, dogs, vehicles, bicycles, camping and fires are prohibited. Pedestrians and equestrians need to stay on wet sand. Potential nesting areas may call for dogs to be leashed and driving to be curtailed. Beach Behavior We Love • Walk around birds instead of through their flocks. • Leash your dogs before they chase birds. • Respect restricted areas set aside for endangered or nesting species. • Stay away from birds and marine mammals that look sick or unable to get away from humans. Western Snowy Plover North Coast Beaches Places to Play with your Dog • Always clean up after your dog. • Always keep your dog on a leash or under voice control. Watch for restrictions during nesting season March 15- Sept. 15 Oregon Parks and Recreation Department 725 Summer St. NE, Suite C Salem OR 97301 All information or fees subject to change without notice. This brochure is available in alternative formats upon request. Call 1-800-551-6949. Oregon Relay for the hearing impaired: dial 711. 63400-9879 (4/18) “MIKE” MICHAEL L. BAIRD, FLICKR.BAIRDPHOTOS.COM Oswald West State Park Plover Management Areas Western Snowy 1 Columbia River Fort Stevens Watch for Seasonal Restrictions State Park Neahkahnie-Manzanita During nesting season, March 15 - Sept. 15 Warrenton State Park Columbia River AstoriaFort Stevens Astoria State Park Warrenton 2. Nehalem Spit 1. Clatsop Spit 30 Nehalem Garey St. Rd . Manzanita Lot C Neca me y Ci t y 202 Clatsop Spit Gearhart Lot D Gearhart Seaside Nehalem Bay Lot B Nehalem Bay State Park Seaside Ecola State Park State Park 26 d. yR Jett Ecola Trestle Bay 26 Wheeler Cannon Military Museum and Batteries Lot A 53 Cannon 26 Beach Beach rm Bu d. aR NehalemFort Stevens Bay State Park 104 Hammond Oswald West Battery Russel Garibaldi Manhattan Beach State Recreation Site State Park Manzanita Manzanita 53 Bay 4. SouthNehalem Sandlake State Park State Natural Area at Whalen Island Rockaway Beach Rockaway Beach 101B 3 Rockaway Beach Cape Meares Tillamook Bay Cape Meares State Scenic Viewpoint 6 Rd Sa n an .N Rd Twin Rocks State Park Cape Lookout State Park Cape Lookout State Park To Pacific City Oregon State Parks – leashes required Oregon Coast Trail Road NOTE: Restricted areas not to scale. Some restrictions may be lifted early; watch for signs. Plover management area (March 15 - Sept. 15) Leashes required Leash optional, Cape Kiwanda with voice control State Natural Area No dogs, kites, bikes, vehicles, camping or fires. Pacific Pedestrians, equestrians: stayCity on wet sand. Garibaldi Tillamook 6 e Sitka Sedge Tillamook State Scenic Viewpoint . 104S State Natural Area W Tillamook Bay ak ce Bayo To Tillamook Bayocean Spit dl Rockaway Bay Beach City 2 Warrenton Clay Myers Sandlake Bayocean Spit Estuary Tillamook Bay 53 Nehalem Bay State Park e Rd Barview da r Ire Pete d. le R Ridg 3. Bayocean Spit Oswald West State Park 4 Cape Kiwanda State Natural Area Pacific City
Oregon Coast Whale Watching W hale watching is one of the most popular activities on the coast, enjoyed by tens of thousands of visitors per year. Oregon has more than two dozen excellent whale watching spots on the coast; many are in or near state parks. When is the best time to see whales? Park staff are ready to answer your questions and help you spot Gray whales at the Whale Watching Center in Depoe Bay. Perched on the seawall with expansive ocean views, the center is a perfect spot to see whales. Gray whales are the most commonly sighted whales on the coast. Their seasonal migration patterns bring more than 20,000 of them past the coast each year. In the winter, from mid-December through mid-January, the whales travel south to the warm lagoons of Baja Mexico. Spring watching begins with a surge in late March as the gray whales travel north to Alaska. Whales are northbound through May. About 200 Gray whales remain in Oregon’s coastal waters every year. Summer and fall you may see them feeding closer to shore. The central coast is a hot-spot for whales from May through October. Whale Watch Week Oregon State Parks celebrates the migrations twice per year with Whale Watch Week during late December and late March. Volunteers are stationed at more than 20 of the best whale watching sites along the coast, ready to help visitors spot whales and offer fun facts about the marine mammals. For Whale Watch Week dates and locations, visit whalespoken.org. Hours: Daily, 10am – 4pm (call ahead for winter hours) Address: 119 SW Hwy. 101, Depoe Bay Information: 541-765-3304 Be a volunteer The Whale Watching Spoken Here program places volunteers at great whale watching sites during the two official whale watch weeks. Volunteers help visitors see and learn about migrating and resident Gray whales. Are whales your passion, too? Visit whalespoken.org to sign up. oregonstateparks.org Whale Watch Week, Dec. 2018. Printed on Recycled Paper This brochure is available in alternative formats on request. Write to OPRD, 725 Summer St. NE, Suite C, Salem, OR 97301; or call 1-800-551-6949 (for the hearing impaired 1-800-735-2900). 63400-8109 (08/19) Minke (30') Gray (45') Humpback (50') Sperm (60') Fin (90') Blue (100') Lewis and Clark Center Fort Stevens State Park The Blow Gray whales usually surface every 20 seconds as they swim, but will often stay under for 3 to 5 minutes when they are eating. If they have been down for 5 minutes they usually blow 5 times when they surface to replenish their oxygen supply. The blow, or spout, shoots nearly 12 feet high and expels 400 liters of air in a single blast. The whales take a few breaths at the surface then dive again. If they are frightened they can stay down for 30 minutes, hiding on the bottom or traveling great distances. The Breach The Spyhop Whales are intelligent and curious, and are often seen “spyhopping,” or lifting their heads above the surface of the water. They like to rise out of the water to get a better sense of their surroundings. During the summer, Gray whales have been known to spyhop regularly, especially when local tour boats are near. Perhaps this means the whales enjoy watching us as much as we enjoy watching them? 20 seconds Diving Pattern Swimming Pattern Seaside Cannon Beach The Best Whale Watching Sites The Dive Other Species Humpback whales are the second most common whale on the coast; the best time to spot them is August and September. Orcas, also known as killer whales, can also be sighted. Look for them April - June. Neahkahnie Mountain Nehalem Bay State Park Portland Garibaldi Cape Meares Lighthouse Tillamook Cape Lookout State Park Cape Kiwanda Inn at Spanish Head Boiler Bay State Park Whale Watching Center Rocky Creek State Park Cape Foulweather Devil’s Punch Bowl State Park Yaquina Head Lighthouse Don Davis Kiosk Pacific City Lincoln City D River Salem State Recreation Site Depoe Bay Beverly Beach State Park Newport South Beach State Park Alsea Bay Interpretive Center Waldport Yachats Cape Perpetua Center Cooks Chasm Sea Lion Caves Pacific Ocean Eugene Florence Jessie M. Honeyman Memorial State Park Reedsport Umpqua Lighthouse State Park Shore Acres State Park Coos Bay 300 to 400 yards 3 to 5 minutes Astoria Ecola State Park A deep dive, also known as sounding or fluking, happens when a whale lifts its tail flukes out of the water. This helps propel the whale downward at a steep angle to the bottom, where they feed on zooplankton and amphipods. After the flukes disappear under the water, the turbulence of the dive will cause a circle of smooth water, known as a fluke-print. The ultimate in whale sightings is a breach: a whale launches itself out of the water in a spectacular show of power and grace. Scientists aren’t sure why whales breach. Possibly they do it to remove parasites, communicate with each other or maybe it’s just for fun. Gray whales aren’t known for breaching nearly as often as
TIDE TABLES 2021 OREGON NORTH COAST Tide Tables are predictions and are least accurate during storms and extreme high and low tide periods. ★Monthly tide data taken from Tillamook Bay, North Jetty. Tide height and times will be slightly different depending on your North Coast location. Astoria Fort Stevens 101 Seaside OC EA N PA C I F I C PAC I F I C O C E A N Ecola Cannon Beach Oswald West Nehalem Bay Nehalem Wheeler ★ Cape Meares Cape Lookout Garibaldi Tillamook Netarts 101 Cape Kiwanda Neskowin Beach Pacific City Neskowin Lincoln City D River 2021 TIDE TABLES, TILLAMOOK BAY, NORTH JETTY Fogarty Creek Gleneden Oregon State Parks Information: 800-551-6949 Reservations: 800-452-5687 stateparks.oregon.gov Information printed from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov Mt. Ang Silver PAGE 1 Aumsville 214 StationId: 9437585 Source: NOAA/NOS/CO-OPS Station Type: Primary Time Zone: LST_LDT Datum: MLLW NOAA Tide Predictions JETTY, TILLAMOOK BAY, ,2021 OREGON, NORTHNORTH COAST Times and Heights of High and Low Waters January Time Height February Time h m 02:20 AM 07:13 AM 01:02 PM 08:04 PM ft 7.3 3.9 8.8 -0.8 cm 223 119 268 -24 h m 02:53 AM 16 08:12 AM Sa 02:07 PM 08:47 PM 2 03:00 AM 07:58 AM Sa 01:43 PM 08:43 PM 7.3 3.8 8.4 -0.6 223 116 256 -18 3 03:41 AM 08:50 AM Su 02:31 PM 09:25 PM 7.4 3.7 7.9 -0.2 4 04:22 AM 09:49 AM M 03:28 PM 10:09 PM Height Time Height March Time ft 7.7 3.2 8.3 -0.2 cm 235 98 253 -6 h m 03:00 AM 1 08:37 AM M 02:33 PM 08:59 PM ft 7.9 2.3 8.0 0.1 cm 241 70 244 3 h m 03:19 AM 16 09:15 AM Tu 03:21 PM 09:17 PM 03:34 AM 17 09:02 AM 7.6 3.2 Su 02:54 PM 7.6 09:25 PM 0.5 232 98 232 15 2 03:37 AM 09:32 AM Tu 03:30 PM 09:39 PM 8.1 1.9 7.3 0.9 247 58 223 27 226 113 241 -6 04:15 AM 18 09:55 AM 7.5 3.1 M 03:45 PM 6.8 10:03 PM 1.2 229 94 207 37 3 04:17 AM 10:33 AM W 04:38 PM 10:24 PM 8.2 1.6 6.6 1.8 7.5 3.4 7.3 0.4 229 104 223 12 04:55 AM 19 10:53 AM 7.4 3.0 Tu 04:45 PM 6.1 10:42 PM 2.0 226 91 186 61 4 5 05:06 AM 10:56 AM Tu 04:39 PM 10:57 PM 7.7 3.0 6.6 1.2 235 91 201 37 05:37 AM 20 11:55 AM 7.4 2.7 W 05:58 PM 5.6 ◐ 11:24 PM 2.7 226 82 171 82 6 7.9 2.3 6.2 1.9 241 70 189 58 06:21 AM 21 01:01 PM 226 73 165 1 F 05:53 AM 12:08 PM W 06:06 PM ◑ 11:51 PM 7 06:42 AM 8.3 01:20 PM 1.5 Th 07:37 PM 6.0 8 7.4 2.4 Th 07:18 PM 5.4 253 22 12:14 AM 07:08 AM 46 183 F 02:05 PM 08:35 PM Height Time Height Time Height ft 7.6 2.0 6.8 1.6 cm 232 61 207 49 h m 01:43 AM 1 07:33 AM M 01:43 PM 07:53 PM ft 8.3 0.9 8.4 -0.1 cm 253 27 256 -3 h m 02:57 AM 16 09:03 AM Tu 03:21 PM 09:06 PM 03:50 AM 17 10:02 AM 7.4 2.0 W 04:12 PM 6.2 09:50 PM 2.4 226 61 189 73 2 02:17 AM 08:21 AM Tu 02:34 PM 08:31 PM 8.5 0.5 7.9 0.7 259 15 241 21 250 49 201 55 04:23 AM 18 10:54 AM 7.3 2.0 Th 05:15 PM 5.6 10:26 PM 3.1 223 61 171 94 3 02:53 AM 09:13 AM W 03:32 PM 09:12 PM 8.6 0.3 7.2 1.6 8.3 1.3 6.0 2.7 253 40 183 82 05:02 AM 19 11:55 AM 7.2 2.0 F 06:36 PM 5.3 ◐ 11:12 PM 3.8 219 61 162 116 4 03:34 AM 10:11 AM Th 04:39 PM 09:57 PM 5 05:56 AM 8.4 12:54 PM 0.9 07:31 PM 5.9 256 27 180 05:51 AM 20 01:04 PM 7.1 1.9 Sa 08:00 PM 5.4 216 58 165 5 6 12:18 AM 06:57 AM Sa 02:08 PM 08:54 PM 3.5 8.5 0.5 6.1 107 259 15 186 12:16 AM 21 06:54 AM 4.2 7.2 Su 02:13 PM 1.5 09:12 PM 5.7 128 219 46 174 6 4.4 7.4 1.0 6.1 05:03 AM 11:41 AM Th 06:01 PM ◑ 11:16 PM F 3.4 7.5 1.9 5.5 104 229 58 168 01:32 AM 7 08:03 AM Su 03:16 PM 10:02 PM 4.0 8.7 -0.1 6.5 122 265 -3 198 01:34 AM 22 07:59 AM M 03:13 PM 10:07 PM ft 7.7 0.9 7.1 1.6 cm 235 27 216 49 03:24 AM 17 09:40 AM 7.6 0.9 W 04:03 PM 6.7 09:36 PM 2.2 232 27 204 67 262 9 219 49 03:49 AM 18 10:20 AM 7.5 1.0 Th 04:50 PM 6.2 10:07 PM 2.9 229 30 189 88 8.5 0.3 6.5 2.6 259 9 198 79 04:17 AM 19 11:05 AM 223 37 174 107 8.4 0.4 6.0 3.4 256 12 183 104 04:50 AM 20 12:00 PM 7.1 1.4 Sa 07:02 PM 5.4 11:28 PM 4.0 216 43 165 122 05:19 AM 8.1 12:31 PM 0.5 Sa 07:26 PM 5.9 247 15 180 05:36 AM 21 01:06 PM 6.8 1.5 Su 08:26 PM 5.4 207 46 165 134 226 30 186 7 12:04 AM 06:31 AM Su 01:49 PM 08:46 PM 4.0 7.9 0.4 6.1 122 241 12 186 12:36 AM 22 06:46 AM 4.4 6.7 M 02:19 PM 1.3 09:36 PM 5.7 134 204 40 174 F 04:20 AM 11:16 AM 05:59 PM 10:52 PM ◑ F 7.3 1.2 05:48 PM 5.7 10:42 PM 3.5 ◐ 12:50 AM 07:34 AM 02:27 PM 08:57 PM 2.7 8.7 0.7 6.3 82 265 21 192 01:13 AM 23 07:56 AM 3.9 7.7 Sa 03:01 PM 1.4 09:40 PM 5.8 119 235 43 177 8 02:48 AM 09:05 AM M 04:14 PM 10:57 PM 4.1 8.9 -0.5 6.9 125 271 -15 210 02:47 AM 23 08:58 AM 4.3 7.7 Tu 04:02 PM 0.4 10:50 PM 6.5 131 235 12 198 8 4.4 6.7 Tu 03:26 PM 0.9 10:29 PM 6.1 134 204 27 186 3.2 9.1 -0.2 6.6 98 277 -6 201 4.2 8.0 Su 03:50 PM 0.8 10:33 PM 6.2 128 244 24 189 3.9 9.1 -0.9 7.3 119 277 -27 223 03:46 AM 24 09:50 AM 128 241 3 198 01:54 AM 08:26 AM Sa 03:28 PM 10:05 PM 9 4.2 7.9 0.1 6.5 02:06 AM 23 08:13 AM 02:15 AM 24 08:44 AM 01:31 AM 07:49 AM M 03:01 PM 09:50 PM 3.9 8.1

also available

National Parks
USFS NW