Malheur

National Antelope Refuge - Oregon

Malheur National Wildlife Refuge is located roughly 30 miles (48 km) south of the city of Burns in Oregon's Harney Basin. The refuge protects habitat for diverse waterfowl and migratory birds. It is a popular site for birding, fishing, hunting and hiking.

brochures

Brochure for Malheur National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Malheur - Brochure

Brochure for Malheur National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Map of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Malheur - Map

Map of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Hiking Trails at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Malheur - Hiking Trails

Hiking Trails at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Brochure of Blitzen Valley Auto Tour Route at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Malheur - Blitzen Valley Auto Tour Route

Brochure of Blitzen Valley Auto Tour Route at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Wildlife at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Malheur - Wildlife

Wildlife at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Hunting at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Malheur - Hunting

Hunting at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Fishing at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Malheur - Fishing

Fishing at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Aquatic Health at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Malheur - Aquatic Health

Aquatic Health at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Malheur NWR https://www.fws.gov/refuge/malheur/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malheur_National_Wildlife_Refuge Malheur National Wildlife Refuge is located roughly 30 miles (48 km) south of the city of Burns in Oregon's Harney Basin. The refuge protects habitat for diverse waterfowl and migratory birds. It is a popular site for birding, fishing, hunting and hiking.
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Malheur National Wildlife Refuge Greater Sandhill Crane Terry Steele A lthough the birds bring me to Malheur, I am also drawn by the place itself, the crisp scent of sage on the air, the crack of a late summer lightning bolt, the golden beauty of slanting sun on rimrock. I have been delighted by chance encounters with a family of coyotes, a badger, a porcupine, and a scorpion. The birds are just one part of the magic. One of my most vivid experiences at Malheur came after a long day of birding, as I contentedly made my way home into the setting sun. I spied a couple of short-eared owls some distance from the car. I stopped to watch. One owl left the group and glided silently in front of me, turning its head and fixing me with a steady gaze. That’s Malheur for you. Even when you think you’ve seen it all, there is always one more surprise waiting around the bend. Noah Strycker; Writer and Photographer Steens Mountain overlooking Benson Pond Doug Dill USFWS Volunteer Refuge Map Introduction One of the crown jewels of the A Protected Oasis inof the crown One jewels of the National Wildlife Refuge System, National Wildlife Refuge System, Oregon’s High Desert O R E G Malheur National Wildlife Refuge Malheur National Wildlife Refuge protects a vast complex of protects a vast complex of habitats in wetlands in Oregon’s high Oregon’s high desert. The Refuge is desert. The refuge is O N famous its tremendous diversity famous for for its tremendous diversity and spectacular and spectacular concentrations of concentrations of wildlife. wildlife. With more than 320 bird Boasting over 320 bird species 60 mammal species, species andand 58 mammal Malheur is a mecca for birdwatchers species, Malheur is a mecca for birdwatchers and wildlifeenthusiasts. enthusiasts. and wildlife People havePeople been drawn Malheur’s havetobeen drawn to Malheur’s abundant wildlife and natural abundant wildlife resources for thousands of years.and natural resources for thousands When unregulated market and plume of years. hunting began to decimate populations When unregulated market and of migratory birds, President plume hunting began to decimate Theodore Roosevelt stepped in to stop populations migratory birds, the slaughter. In 1908, heof designated Malheur a sanctuary birds. PresidentforTheodore Roosevelt stepped in to stop the slaughter. In Today, Malheur National Wildlife 1908,ofhe designated Malheur “as a Refuge consists more than 187,000 preserve breeding ground for acres of prime habitat,and including 120,000 acres of wetlands, native birds.”on the Pacific Flyway. Particularly important to colonial waterbirds, Today, Malheur National Wildlife sandhill cranes, and redband trout, Refuge consists of more than 187,000 the refuge also encompasses upland acres, a tremendously and riparian habitats vital to many important migrating birds andofother wildlife. source wildlife habitat. The Refuge represents a crucial stop along the Malheur is one of over 500 refuges in and as–a resting, the NationalPacific WildlifeFlyway, Refuge System a network ofbreeding lands set aside and specifically nesting area for for wildlife.hundreds Managed by U.S. of the thousands of birds and Fish & Wildlife Service, the System is other wildlife. a living heritage, conserving wildlife and habitat for people today and for generationsMalheur to come. is a part of the National Common yellowthroat ©David Pitkin Great Egret Roger Baker USFWS Volunteer Wildlife Refuge System, a network of over 540 refuges set aside specifically for fish and wildlife. Managed by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, the System is a living heritage, conserving fish, wildlife and their habitats for generations to come. A Year of Wildlife Spring Spring is the most spectacular season at Malheur and in the surrounding areas. Over 130 species of birds arrive to nest on the Refuge, while others stop to rest and refuel for their migration Yellow Warbler further north. In late March Barbara Wheeler USFWS Volunteer or early April, a few spring migrants begin to arrive in large flocks such as swans, Northern Pintails, sandhill cranes, and White-fronted, Snow and Ross’ Geese. During this early spring period, the majority of birds can be found on the Silvies Floodplain and Sage Grouse begin displaying on their strutting grounds. By April, the majority of waterfowl and shorebirds arrive and songbird numbers peak in late May. May is a time to see large variety of birds and most “rare” bird species arrive from mid-May to mid-June. Pronghorn Antelope and Mule Deer fawns are also born at this time. Summer As the flurry of migration settles, most local birds are raising their young and are often quiet. Early summer is a good time to see waterfowl with their broods and many waterbirds such as grebes, American Avocets pelicans, and White-faced Barbara Wheeler USFWS Volunteer Ibises can also be seen foraging in wetlands. Most “rare” bird species and Bobolinks ar
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Malheur Wright’s Point Lawen Lane National Wildlife Refuge Ruh-Red Road To Lava Bed Road 13 miles Historic Sod House Ranch Malheur Field Station Peter French Round Barn Restrooms located at Refuge Headquarters, Buena Vista Ponds and Overlook, Krumbo Reservoir, Historic P Ranch Bridge Creek Trail River Trail Historic P Ranch Auto Tour Rou te Hiking Trail Undeveloped Area East Canal Road (Includes part of Desert Trail on Refuge) Frenchglen Barnyard Springs Footpath East Canal Road Steens Mountain Loop Road Page Springs Campground U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Malheur National Wildlife Refuge Enjoy Your Visit! We hope you enjoy your visit to Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. Please observe and follow all rules and regulations for your safety, and to protect wildlife and their habitat. If you have a question feel free to contact a member of our staff. Day Use Only – The Refuge is open daily from sunrise to sunset. Visitor Center, Nature Store and Museum – Brochures, maps, information, recent bird sightings and interpretive exhibits are located at the Refuge headquarters. The Visitor Center and Nature Store is open Monday through Thursday, 8:00 am to 4:00 pm and staffed with the help of volunteers, most weekends. The George Benson Memorial Museum is open daily from sunrise to sunset. Auto Tour Route – The 42-mile auto tour route along the Center Patrol Road offers prime wildlife viewing and interpretive opportunities on the Refuge. Self-guided, interpretive auto tour brochures and wildlife checklists are available. Refuge Roads – Motorized vehicles and horseback riding are permitted on designated roads shown on the Refuge map. Horseback riding is not permitted on East Canal Road. All other Refuge roads not shown on the Refuge map are closed to the public. Malheur National Wildlife Refuge 36391 Sodhouse Lane Princeton, Oregon 97721 541-493-2612 July, 2019 Trails – Hiking, bicycling, and cross-country skiing are permitted on designated roads and trails shown on Refuge maps. Use caution on the East Canal Road, it is shared with vehicular traffic. Wildlife Viewing – With more than 340 species of birds and 67 species of mammals, the Refuge offers prime wildlife viewing. Wildlife checklists are available. Fishing and Hunting – Fishing and hunting are permitted on Refuge at certain times of the year. Fishing and hunting brochures are available and lists the designated hunting and public fishing areas. Boating – Non-motorized or electric boats are permitted on Krumbo Reservoir for recreational boating and fishing year round, and in designated hunt areas during the Malheur Lake hunt seasons. All other Refuge waters are closed to boating. Pets – Pets must be kept on leash while on the Refuge. Please pick up after your pets. Weapons – Possession of weapons on the Refuge must abide by all Oregon State laws and regulations. Discharge of weapons outside of the hunting seasons are prohibited. Prohibited Activities – All-terrain vehicles (ATVs), camping, fires, swimming, ice fishing, and collecting natural objects such as plants, animals, minerals, antlers, objects of antiquity (including Indian artifacts) are prohibited.
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Refuge Trails cont. Landing Road is actually a driving route; 3 Boat Closed however, it may be most enjoyable to get outdoors to listen for birds on the Blitzen River and the surrounding marsh. At the end of the route, view Tern Island at a distance, observe the mouth of the Blitzen River flowing into Malheur Lake and possibly witness non-native carp stirring up the waters that unfortunately diminishes water quality. Length: 1½ miles one-way Grade: Gentle Surface: Two-track path 4 Buena Vista Overlook Trail is surrounded with years of geological processes and an abundance of wildflowers. Instead of driving to the overlook, stretch your legs and take this short trail. The trail, starting at the restrooms, will lead to an overlook with interpretive panels and an awe-inspiring view of Steens Mountain and a panorama view of the Refuge. The overlook is dedicated to Patrick R. Hickey, a USFWS employee who designed and built the overlook. Length: 1/3 mile one-way Grade: Gentle Surface: Native 5 Crane Pond Overlook Trail provides open terrain that leads to a rim of basalt overlooking seasonal ponds. The ponds may be water-packed allowing one to quietly observe and identify a variety of birds. If not, be rewarded with scenic landscapes and solitude. The trail was developed by Friends of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, a nonprofit organization of volunteers dedicated to support the goals of the Refuge. Length: ½ mile loop Grade: Gentle Surface: Native Other Trails: Auto Tour Route/Center Patrol Road (CPR) showcases the scenic Blitzen River Valley’s outstanding features of historical, geological, and biological interests. The driving route traverses all habitat types of the Refuge – shallow marshes, small ponds, flood irrigated meadows, rimrock, and grass and sagebrush covered hills; it is however, open to hiking, bicycling, cross-country skiing and horseback riding. Be cautious, the route is shared with vehicular traffic. Length: 42 miles one-way Grade: Gentle Surface: Gravel Desert Trail from Page Springs Campground to Diamond Craters is part of the Oregon State Recreational Trails System. Malheur’s section of the trail begins at East Canal Trail and continues toward ‘Dutch Oven’ caldera, Krumbo Reservoir, McCoy and Webb Spring Creeks and ending at Diamond Craters. Guides are available from the Desert Trail Association. Malheur National Wildlife Refuge Refuge Trails ‘…walking is the fresh-air way to view and listen to the birds.’ Malheur National Wildlife Refuge offers an experience to all visitors – a tremendous diversity and spectacular concentrations of wildlife, signs of earlier inhabitants, scenic landscapes and solitude, and some fresh air are all reasons to explore the Refuge. The Refuge offers 12 designated trails for hiking, bicycling and cross-country skiing from sunrise to sunset. Pets must be on a leash and please stay on designated roads and trails shown on this map and observe all regulations to protect wildlife. Refuge brochures, maps, information and interpretive exhibits are available at Refuge Headquarters. The Visitor Center is open Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:00 pm and staff with volunteers, most weekends. Refuge Trails: 1 Overlook Trail goes through sagebrush habitat for an opportunity to view birds in the tree canopies above Refuge Headquarters, for an up close view of one of the four historic lookout towers built by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC, 1935 - 1942), and for a stunning view of Malheur Lake that was established in 1908 to protect migratory and breeding birds although non-native carp have severely depleted food resources on the Lake. Length: 30 miles one-way (Horses and camping not permitted on the Refuge) Grade: Gentle and moderate Surface: Two-track path and native Malheur National Wildlife Refuge 36391 Sodhouse Lane Princeton, OR 97721 Length: 1/10 mile one-way Grade: Moderate Surface: Gravel Telephone: 541/493 2612 U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service 2 Marshall Trail leads to an observation blind overlook- http://www.fws.gov ing Marshall Pond and slightly loops through marsh and sagebrush habitat. The blind was built to replace an Oregon Audubon Society photographic blind and designed with native rock to blend with the natural surroundings. The trail is in memory of David B. Marshall, a dedicated USFWS employee who once lived near the pond and was known for his strong advocate for wildlife and habitat conservation. Visitors with disabilities may be reasonably accommodated upon request and/or receive an alternative format publication. 6 Krumbo Reservoir was created to improve habitat for wildlife and angling. The drive to the Reservoir provides wildlife viewing within the marsh and sagebrush habitat. Along the way, look for a large rock for an opportunity to view the role of rock art of Welcome, enjoy your visit! Spring flowers along Buena Vista Overlook Trail Length: 1/5 mile loop Grade: Gentle Surface: ADA the Northern Paiute
ABOUT THE AUTHOR This interpretive tour was written by Alice Elshoff who has been visiting the Refuge since the 1960s, first birding and then volunteering. She is a retired teacher who enjoys sharing her love of wildlife with visitors of all ages. She believes deeply in the mission of the National Wildlife Refuge System, which sets wildlife conservation as its primary purpose and preservation and restoration of biological diversity and environmental health as its main goal. Alice plays a large role with the Friends of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge (FOMR), a non-profit group whose purpose is to support the goals of the Refuge. With the help of the FOMR, this interpretive tour and the numbered signs for the auto tour were made possible. FRIENDS OF MALHEUR NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE Friends of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge was formed in 1999 and is an independent nonprofit 501(c)(3) corporation. FOMR promotes conservation and appreciation of natural and cultural resources at the Refuge through education, outreach, advocacy and onthe-ground stewardship. To learn more about FOMR, please visit malheurfriends.org. Malheur National Wildlife Refuge 36391 Sodhouse Lane Princeton, OR 97721 541/493-2612 Malheur National Wildlife Refuge www.fws.gov/malheur July 2019 U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Malheur National Wildlife Refuge Blitzen Valley Auto Tour Route Self-Guided Interpretive Tour This 42-mile self-guided auto tour showcases the scenic Blitzen Valley, from the Refuge headquarters of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge south to historic P Ranch. The full tour requires at least two hours to complete, depending on the frequency and length of any stops you make. During the peak of spring bird activity, you should allow at least a half-day to cover both the upper and lower portions of the valley. Wright’s Point Ruh-Red Road The auto tour route primarily follows the historic Center Patrol Road (CPR) built by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) through outstanding features of historical, geological, and biological interest. The diversity and abundance of wildlife you see will depend on the season, the time of day, your speed of travel, and your observation skills. Please take care not to disturb wildlife along the way. TO START Stop #1 begins just above Refuge headquarters. Begin the auto tour by driving up to the signed Malheur Lake Overlook. To Lava Bed Road 13 miles Historic Sod House Ranch Malheur Field Station Peter French Round Barn Restrooms located at Refuge Headquarters, Buena Vista Ponds and Overlook, Krumbo Reservoir, Historic P Ranch Bridge Creek Trail Hiking Trail River Trail Historic P Ranch te Auto Tour Rou Before you begin, please review the map provided in the back of this guide. The auto tour can generally be driven in two sections, the north auto tour route and south auto tour route, and it lies almost entirely on gravel roads. Numbered signs with the symbol below identify the stops and correspond to places of interest described in this interpretive tour, which was made possible with the help of the Friends of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. Lawen Lane INTRODUCTION Undeveloped Area East Canal Road (Includes part of Desert Trail on Refuge) Frenchglen Barnyard Springs Footpath East Canal Road Steens Mountain Loop Road Page Springs Campground STOP #1: Malheur Lake Overlook We begin the tour here at the northwestern corner of the Great Basin, overlooking Malheur Lake with Mud Lake to the west. Harney Lake is just beyond the sand dunes visible on the western horizon. Lake levels can vary dramatically according to the annual winter snowpack in the Blue Mountains to the north and Steens Mountain to the south. At water levels low enough for emergent plants to grow, Malheur Lake becomes one of the largest inland marshes in the west. At high water levels, such as those that occurred in the 1980s, Malheur Lake floods into Mud and Harney Lakes, becoming Oregon’s largest lake. From the overlook, scan Malheur Lake for seasonal concentrations of American white pelicans or tundra swans, and watch overhead for soaring raptors. Brewer’s sparrows and sage thrashers nest in the surrounding sagebrush, and Refuge headquarters below you can be teeming with songbirds during both spring and fall migrations. To continue the auto tour, cross the paved Sodhouse Lane and enter the auto tour route. American White Pelican, Barbara Wheeler USFWS Volunteer STOP #2: Sod House Ranch and Malheur Field Station Looking to the west, you can see the buildings and cottonwood trees of the historic Sod House Ranch. Established and managed by Peter French for Dr. Hugh Glenn in the 1880s, Sod House Ranch was the northern headquarters for this 140,000acre livestock empire. Eight of the original ranch buildings are still standing, including the restored barn. Many of the original corrals also remain intact. The cottonwood trees were planted in the 1890s and provide nesting habitat for colonial waterbirds, espe
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Malheur National Wildlife Refuge Watchable Wildlife Birds of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge Malheur National Wildlife Refuge was originally set aside by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1908 to protect nesting egrets and other waterbirds from unregulated plume hunting. Today, Malheur protects more than 187,000 acres of prime habitat and is famous for its tremendous diversity and spectacular concentrations of wildlife. With its great diversity of habitat, Malheur attracts more than 340 species of birds and other wildlife. The Blitzen Valley, the most accessible portion of the Refuge, is composed of meadows, ponds, and extensive wetlands surrounded by sage uplands and basalt rimrocks. Some of the best sites for viewing wildlife on the Refuge include the Refuge Headquarters, Buena Vista Ponds and Overlook, Krumbo Reservoir, Benson Pond, Knox Ponds, and the Historic Sod House Ranch and P Ranch. Early morning and late evening are the best times to observe wildlife. The abundance of species varies by the seasons, as you will see by the list that follows. We hope you enjoy your birding experience at Malheur! Front cover illustration: Sandhill Cranes ©Ken Morris Season Symbols Species Abundance Symbols Red-tailed Hawk ©Ken Morris Sp - Spring, March - May S - Summer, June - August F - Fall, September - November W - Winter, December - February a - abundant (a common species which is very numerous) c - common (certain to be seen in suitable habitat) u - uncommon (present but not certain to be seen) o - occasional (seen only a few times during a season) r - rare (seen at intervals of 2 to 5 years) * - Birds known to nest (including historically) on the Refuge ✔ - Endangered or Threatened Birds of Malheur NWR Common Name Swans, Geese and Ducks Greater White-fronted Goose Snow Goose Ross’s Goose * Canada Goose * Trumpeter Swan Tundra Swan Wood Duck * Gadwall Eurasian Wigeon * American Wigeon * Mallard * Blue-winged Teal * Cinnamon Teal * Northern Shoveler * Northern Pintail * Green-winged Teal * Canvasback * Redhead Snowy Egret Jean Harrison Sp u a a a u a o a u a a u a a a a c c S r a u r o a u a u a c u u u c F u a c a u a o a r a a u c a a a c c W r r a u u r u r u c r o u u o o Common Name * Ring-necked Duck Greater Scaup * Lesser Scaup Surf Scoter White-winged Scoter Bufflehead Common Goldeneye Barrow’s Goldeneye Hooded Merganser * Common Merganser Red-breasted Merganser * Ruddy Duck Sp S F u r c r a u r c r r c c r o c r a u r c r a u r c o a c c o o c r a u r u W o u r r u c o u u o Gallinaceous Birds * Chukar * Gray Partridge * Ring-necked Pheasant * Greater Sage-Grouse * California Quail Loons Common Loon Grebes * Pied-billed Grebe * Horned Grebe * Eared Grebe * Western Grebe * Clark’s Grebe u r c a o u r c a o c u c c u c u c c u c r c c u u * American White Pelican a a a Cormorants * Double-crested Cormorant c c c r c c c o r c c c o r r r c c c o r r a r u r Pelicans Bitterns, Herons, and Egrets * American Bittern * Great Blue Heron * Great Egret * Snowy Egret * Cattle Egret Green Heron * Black-crowned Night Heron a r Common Name Sp S F * White-faced Ibis c c c New World Vultures * Turkey Vulture c c c Osprey, Kites, Hawks and Eagles * Osprey * Bald Eagle * Northern Harrier Sharp-shinned Hawk Cooper’s Hawk Northern Goshawk Red-shouldered Hawk * Swainson’s Hawk * Red-tailed Hawk * Ferruginous Hawk Rough-legged Hawk * Golden Eagle u c a u u o o u c u c c u u a o u a u u o o u c u c c Falcons and Caracaras * American Kestrel Merlin Peregrine Falcon * Prairie Falcon u o o u u o u u o o u c c a c c a c c a * Sandhill Crane a a a Plovers Black-bellied Plover American Golden-Plover * Snowy Plover * Semipalmated Plover * Killdeer u r u o c u o c u r u o c Stilts and Avocets * Black-necked Stilt * American Avocet c c c c u a W Ibises and Spoonbills r o c o c u c o u o c o c c o r u Rails * Virginia Rail * Sora * American Coot o u Cranes o Common Name Sandpipers and Phalaropes Greater Yellowlegs Lesser Yellowlegs Solitary Sandpiper * Willet * Spotted Sandpiper Whimbrel * Long-billed Curlew Marbled Godwit Ruddy Turnstone Sanderling Western Sandpiper Least Sandpiper Baird’s Sandpiper Pectoral Sandpiper Dunlin Stilt Sandpiper Long-billed Dowitcher * Wilson’s Snipe * Wilson’s Phalarope Red-necked Phalarope Skuas, Jaegers, Gulls, and Terns Parasitic Jaeger * Franklin’s Gull Bonaparte’s Gull * Ring-billed Gull * California Gull Herring Gull * Caspian Tern Common Tern * Forster’s Tern * Black Tern Sp u o o c u r c u r o c c o r u c c c u c o a a r u r a a S c u r c c c o F W u o o c u c o r o a c u o u r a c a u o a a r u u a c r u r u u r u u o o o c r c c u r r Pigeons and Doves * Rock Pigeon Band-tailed Pigeon * Eurasian Collared Dove * Mourning Dove o u u o o u u Barn Owls * Barn Owl o o Common Name Typical Owls Flammulated Owl * We
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Welcome, enjoy your visit! Malheur National Wildlife Refuge is located in the high desert country of southeastern Oregon. The 187,000 acre refuge is a remote, arid land of shallow marshes, lakes, small ponds, flood irrigated meadows, alkali flats, rimrock and grass and sagebrush covered hills. The Refuge is situated at 4,100 feet in elevation. Radical weather changes, including lightening storms and intense heat and cold can occur. Be prepared for weather extremes and traveling long distances over gravel roads. Make sure your vehicle is in good condition and the gas tank is full. The Refuge is open daily from sunrise to sunset. Information about hunting, road conditions and nearby services can be obtained at Refuge headquarters. Office hours are Monday through Thursday, 7:00 am to 4:30 pm and Friday, 7:00 am to 3:30 pm. The Visitor Center is open Monday through Thursday 8:00 am to 4:00 pm, and staffed with volunteers most weekends. Hunting Regulations Hunt Safely and Ethically – Limited sport hunting is authorized in accordance with all applicable Federal and Oregon State laws. Accidents – Injuries or accidents occurring on the Refuge must be reported immediately. Blinds – Temporary blinds may be erected on Malheur Lake hunt areas during the hunt season. Blinds and all private property must be removed daily. Boats – Nonmotorized or boats with electric motors are authorized on Malheur Lake hunt areas during the hunt season. Dogs – The use of trained dogs is strongly encouraged. Dogs must be kept under close control. Gates, Dikes and Road Accesses – Gates, dikes and road accesses may not be blocked by vehicles. Leave all gates as you find them. Roads and Parking – Shooting from or across public roads or road right-of-ways is prohibited. Off road parking must be within one vehicle length from roadways. Vehicle Travel – Motorized vehicles are authorized only on roads shown on this map. All vehicles must have current state registration and be operated by licensed drivers. Accessing roads and areas not shown as permitted on this map is prohibited. Weapons and Ammunition – Possession of weapons follows all State regulations on the Refuge. Discharge of weapons is allowed only on hunt areas shown on this map during the hunt seasons. Only nontoxic shot may be possessed or used. Prohibited Activities/Areas – All-terrain vehicles (ATVs), camping, fires, swimming and collecting natural objects such as plants, animals, minerals, antlers, and objects of antiquity (including Indian artifacts) are prohibited. Y Signs to Follow NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE UNAUTHORIZED ENTRY PROHIBITED This sign delineates the Refuge boundary. You may enter areas only on roads and designated hunt areas shown on this map. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Hunters may enter areas delineated by this sign only in designated hunt areas shown on this map. PUBLIC HUNTING AREA Limited public fishing under Federal and State laws. Consult Manager for current regulations. NONTOXIC SHOT SHOT STEEL ZONE Special Regulations In Effect–Consult Manager NO HUNTING ZONE Used alone or under a Refuge boundary sign. The area behind this sign may be hunted as permitted by Refuge regulations. Hunters may possess or use only nontoxic shot when hunting on the Refuge. The possession or use of lead shot is prohibited. Hunting is not permitted in the areas delineated by this sign, as well as designated no hunting zones indicated on the enclosed map. More Information Malheur National Wildlife Refuge 36391 Sodhouse Lane Princeton, Oregon 97721 541/493 2612 www.fws.gov/malheur/ October 2020 Malheur National Wildlife Refuge Hunting U.S. Fish & Wildlife Lawen 78 Lawen Road Wright's Point 205 Ruh-Red Road North Double O Road Crane Saddle Butte 78 Malheur Lake Double O Road New Princeton Mud Lake Harney Lake Sodhouse Lane Malheur Field Station Paved Roads Gravel Roads Refuge Boundary - NO Hunting Zones North Malheur Lake Hunt Area (22,500 acres) Species: Doves, Geese, Ducks, Coots, Snipe, Pigeons, Pheasant, Quail, and Partridge Season/Limits: Oregon State Seasons and Limits Saddle Butte Blitzen River Lava Bed Road Rattlesnake Butte Diamond Craters Outstanding Natural Area • At low water (<10,000 acres), waterfowl hunting will not be permitted South Malheur Lake Hunt Area (4,600 acres) Species: Doves, Geese, Ducks, Coots, Snipe, and Pigeons 78 Historic Sod House Ranch Auto Tour Route (CPR) Double O Station Buena Vista Ponds and Overlook Season/Limits: 4th Saturday of October to the end of Oregon State Waterfowl Season and Limits Diamond Lane Diamond • Caspian Tern Island is closed to hunting • At low water (<10,000 acres), waterfowl hunting will not be permitted Buena Vista Lake Hunt Area (East of Hwy 205 as posted; 36,000 acres) Krumbo Lane Krumbo Reservoir Upland Game Species: Pheasant, Quail, and Partridge Season/Limits: 4th Saturday of October to the end of Oregon State Pheasan
Welcome, enjoy your visit! Fishing Regulations Cont. Malheur National Wildlife Refuge is located in the high desert country of southeastern Oregon. { Boats - Non-motorized or electric boats are permitted Malheur K National Wildlife Refuge Fishing The 187,000 acre Refuge is a remote, arid land of shallow marshes, lakes, small ponds, flood irrigated meadows, alkali flats, rimrock and grass and sagebrush covered hills. The Refuge is situated at 4,100 feet in elevation. Radical weather changes, including lightening storms and intense heat and cold can occur. Be prepared for weather extremes and traveling long distances over gravel roads. Make sure your vehicle is in good condition and the gas tank is full. Carry mosquito repellent if you visit in the summer. The Refuge is open daily from sunrise to sunset. Information about fishing, road conditions and nearby services can be obtained at Refuge Headquarters. Office hours are Monday through Thursday, 7:00 am to 4:30 pm and Friday, 7:00 am to 3:30 pm. The Visitor Center is open Monday through Friday 8:00 am to 4:00 pm, and staffed with volunteers most weekends. Fishing Regulations Use Only - The Refuge is open daily from  Day sunrise to sunset. l Fish Safely and Ethically - Limited sport fishing is authorized in accordance with all applicable Federal and Oregon State laws. The use of best methods for releasing fish is encouraged and it is unlawful to leave dead fish or any part thereof on the banks or in the water of any stream, lake or other body of water. Ice Fishing - Ice fishing and all public access onto any ice formation is not permitted. À Refuge Roads - Motorized vehicles and horseback riding are allowed on designated roads shown on È this map. Horseback riding is not permitted on East Canal Road. F Hiking, Bicycling and Cross-country Skiing - Hiking, bicycling and cross-country skiing are allowed only G on designated roads and trails shown on this map. on Krumbo Reservoir, except when ice is present at the boat launch. Gates, Dikes and Road Accesses - Gates, dikes and road accesses may not be blocked by vehicles. Leave all gates as you find them. Pets - Pets must be kept on leash while on the Refuge. Please pick up after your pets. © Weapons - Possession of weapons on the Refuge must abide by all Oregon State lawns and regulations. Discharge of weapons outside of the hunting seasons are prohibited. Prohibited Activities - All-terrain vehicles (ATVs), camping, fires, swimming, ice fishing, and collecting natural objects such as plants, animals, minerals, antlers, objects of antiquity (including Indian artifacts) are prohibited. # < # Ò # r # ± # W # Y # K Malheur National Wildlife Refuge 36391 Sodhouse Lane Princeton, OR 97721 541/493 2612 http://www.fws.gov/malheur U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service http://www.fws.gov for Refuge Information 1 800/344-WILD Visitors with disabilities may be reasonably accommodated upon request and/or receive an alternative format publication. August 2019 U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service r ek e d. Auto Tour R 205 Auto To tn . R Open 8/15 through 10/15 eC D onn e Sod House Ranch g Brid ru . S Field Fishing Areas ! D o n n er u n d B lit z e n . R ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! st S id ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Ea ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! al ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Trails ! Gravel Roads n e Ca ! ! Auto Tour Route ! ! Donner und. Blitzen R. ! ! ! ! ! ! Auto Tour Route ! ! ! ! --- Gate 2 Reservoir Fishery – Krumbo Reservoir Species: Rainbowr etrout and largemouth bass k Season/Limits: Year-round and State Limits (see ODFW Sport Fishing Regulations) Fishing Access eC e d. Auto Tour ! ! ! oir ! ! rv zen R . d Blit ! ! ! se r un ! ! ! ! ! g Brid tn . R D onn e ! ! ! d ee ! ! Re R d. Paved Roads ! bo ! ! ! ! op ! ! ! ! m 5! ! _ Steens Mtn. L(paved) Hwy 205 o ! ! y j ! Krumbo Reservoir Rec Site 205 (Includes part of Desert Trail on Refuge) ! ! ! u Kr e ous 5! _! ! i j ! Bridge Creek Trail East Canal Trail Mu Cr _! ! jAuto Tour Route (gravel) ! Refuge Headquarters e ut Mud Creek ! Waterfowl & Upland Game Hunting Benson Pond ! ! @ ! 205 River Trail Brood Pond @P RanchRefuge Headquarters Upland ! ! ! !Game Hunting ! ! ! Gate - Seasonal Closure F! ! [! Z! _! ]! Õ ! ! Select Ponds Krumbo Swamp ! Legend ! . dH o 3 Frenchglen Canal or Stream Buena Vista Ponds & Overlook ! So S Field Open 8/15 through 10/15 Upland Habitat Drive-in access may be closed at gate when road conditions are hazardous. ! Refuge Boundary Irrigated Habitat o l Rd ! i ! Sod House Ranch Pond Refuge Boundary Otter Pond use Ln . R ! Buena Vista Rd. Kru mb o LPonds Buena Vista n. ! ! ! ! ! ! 205 • Artificial flies and lures only • Catch and release for trout • Boats are not permitted ! ! Current Management Darnell r P
Refuge • - In Common carp have negatively impacted the aquatic health ofMalheur National Wildlife Refuge - we need your help to bring the birds back. alheur National Wildlife Refuge is one of the jewels of the National Wildlife Refuge System. It is a premier site for birds and birding as it provides invaluable migratory stopover and breeding habitat along the Pacifi c Flyway. Over the last 60 years, these habitats have been significantly altered by a non-native species, the common carp. As a result, refuge waters can produce only a fraction of the waterfowl and waterbirds they once did. u. s. Fi5h c~ IVj ldl!fo Savicei Duvl! Mmh! Malheur National Wildlife Refuge supports a good number of migratory ruddy ducks on the Pa cific Flyway. Ruddy and other diving ducks rely on sago p ondweed - an abundant subm erged aquatic p lant found on healthy lakes. Malheur, M ud and Harney Lakes are m agnets for colonial nesting waterbirds, or birds that gather in large assemblages during nesting season. Ref uge waters support white-faced ibis, as well as grebes, pelicans and egrets. A Disastrous e The common carp is a member oJ the minnow family with resilient characteristics: it can resist wide temperature ranges, low water clarity and high water turbidity, and has {{ wide-ranging diel and breeds prolifically. Tn the Hamey basin, common carp eat all the same foods as birds and native fish. us. Fish &J VildIife Service ~ ommon carp were introduced in the 1920s ~ as a desirable sustenance fish in many places across North America, and in the 1950s carp became established in Malheur National Wildlife Refuge waters. Since then, carp have severely depleted migratory bird food resources and diminished water quality. With over 7,2 million pounds of carp currently in refuge waters, bird productions numbers will remain dramatically decreased. Why are Carp a Problem? The greatest impact of carp is their bottom feeding behavior: carp eat invertebrates, uproot vegetation and disturb the muddy bottom. As carp populations explode, food staples for waterfowl and waterbirds disappear. The damaging impacts of common carp have seriously handicapped the refuge and its ability to fulfill its mission to provide feeding, nesting and rearing habitat for migratory birds. Currently, the ecological collapse caused by carp has reduced waterfowl production to about 2-7% of its former capability, Malhear is one of the largest lake systems west ofthe Rockies. [t is a very dynamic system with water levels changing every year. The interconnectivity of the lakes and wate/ways makes carp control an on-going battle. For the Birds Historically, Malheur Lake was home to large colonies of nesting waterbi rds, host to tens of thousands of nesting waterfowl and a resting stop for migratory shorebirds. In 1908, President Theodore Roosevelt established the Lake Malheur Reservation "as a preserve and breeding ground for native birds." The reservation encompassed over 80,000 acres around Malheur, Mud and Harney Lakes for migratory waterfowl. Today, it is known as Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, and protects over 187,000 acres of habitat, including wetlands, riparian areas, meadows and uplands. Hi'lOrically, abolll 35% oJ the Pacific Flyway's canvasback duck population used Malhellr Lake. In Jact, the lake produced approximately 400, 000 ducks, 75,000 geese and 3,500 swans, and ranked as One of the most productive waterfowl areas in NOl1h A merica. us.Fjsh &.. IVild/{e Service In 1908, William Finley photographed a white pelican breeding colony on Maiheur Lake. Finley - and his photos - were instrumental in early recognition of the importance of the lakes, riparian streams and marshes in the Hamey basin to shorebirds, warerbirds and wateifowl. A refuge fish biologist and a University of Minnesota researcher place a radio telemetry tag in a carp specimen. With tagging, scielllists can develop population estimates as well as locate carp willlering and spawning areas. u. s. Fish &,. Wildlifi: Serl'ice A Goal for the u ure ~Challenge of carp control is not insurmountable. { National Wildlife Refuge is working to restore the basin's aquatic health in order to fulfill its mission of providing feeding, nesting, and rearing habitat for migratory birds. This will be accomplished by working with partners to develop an efficient and sustainable carp control program for the entire basin using the best available science. ;:;~lheur Current Carp Control Techniques Refuge staff have been conducting carp control treatments since 1955. Since then, ongoing efforts to improve aquatic health on Malheur National Wildlife Refuge have included the use of chemicals, fishscreens, traps and barriers, and water draw downs. While all of these treatments have been effective, carp populations rebound within a few years without a basin-wide solution. In order for carp control to be a success, continuing studies on carp populations and their effect on aquatic food supplies

also available

National Parks
USFS NW