Nestucca Bay

National Wildlife Refuge - Oregon

Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge is located in southern Tillamook County, on the Oregon's northern coast. It is one of six National Wildlife Refuges comprising the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex and supports one tenth of the world's dusky Canada goose population. The refuge contains at least seven types of habitat, including tidal marsh, tidal mudflats, grassland, woodland, pasture, forested lagg—a transition between raised peat bog and mineral soil—and freshwater bogs, including the southernmost coastal Sphagnum bog habitat on the Pacific Coast. The Sphagnum bog provides habitat for many interesting and unusual species, such as the insect-eating sundew plant and the bog cranberry.

maps

Map of the Southern part of the Northwest Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.Northwest Oregon - South 2019

Map of the Southern part of the Northwest Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

Map of Drift Creek Falls Trail #1378 in the Mt. Hebo area in Siuslaw National Forest (NF) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Siuslaw - Drift Creek Falls Trail #1378

Map of Drift Creek Falls Trail #1378 in the Mt. Hebo area in Siuslaw National Forest (NF) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Map of Cascade Head Trail #1310, Hart's Cove Trail #1303 in the Cascade Head area in Siuslaw National Forest (NF) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Siuslaw - Cascade Head

Map of Cascade Head Trail #1310, Hart's Cove Trail #1303 in the Cascade Head area in Siuslaw National Forest (NF) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Hebo Ranger Districts (RD) in Siuslaw National Forest (NF) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Siuslaw MVUM - Hebo 2021

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Hebo Ranger Districts (RD) in Siuslaw National Forest (NF) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

brochures

Map of Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Nestucca Bay - Map

Map of Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Map of Cannery Hill in Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Nestucca Bay - Cannery Hill Map

Map of Cannery Hill in Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Tillamook County Water Trail at Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Nestucca Bay - Tillamook County Water Trail

Tillamook County Water Trail at Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Birds at Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Nestucca Bay - Birds

Birds at Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Nestucca Bay NWR https://www.fws.gov/refuge/nestucca_bay https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nestucca_Bay_National_Wildlife_Refuge Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge is located in southern Tillamook County, on the Oregon's northern coast. It is one of six National Wildlife Refuges comprising the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex and supports one tenth of the world's dusky Canada goose population. The refuge contains at least seven types of habitat, including tidal marsh, tidal mudflats, grassland, woodland, pasture, forested lagg—a transition between raised peat bog and mineral soil—and freshwater bogs, including the southernmost coastal Sphagnum bog habitat on the Pacific Coast. The Sphagnum bog provides habitat for many interesting and unusual species, such as the insect-eating sundew plant and the bog cranberry.
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge Refuge Overview Tillamook County, Oregon R 10 W R 11 W 124°1'0"W 124°0'0"W 123°59'0"W 123°58'0"W 123°57'0"W 123°56'0"W 123°55'0"W 123°54'0"W 123°53'0"W 45°13'0"N sR d r O ld Wo r Sa n d e R es o 45°12'0"N re e sC k Pacific City od Hor nC ee k Haystack Rock R ay n I rt Dr 45°12'0"N Ne s tuc ca r Arstell Cree k e R iv Qu e ens Creek d Je n c k R 45°11'0"N 45°11'0"N Clear C r e e Brooten R d Two Rivers Peninsula Unit k T4 S Nestucca Bay Cannery Hill Overlook T5 S T4 S !! [! ! F! Õ] b! _! i T5 S 45°10'0"N l o u gh 45°10'0"N nS Litt le Riv Rd er Rd Redb erg ca tuc Nes to Up 45°9'0"N Litt 45°9'0"N e le N c ca stu R iv er M e d a Lo o p n I k ee Bra nc h r F a ll C we rs 45°8'0"N Bo 45°8'0"N Refuge Lands K e l lo w Creek Legend Neskowin Marsh Unit Easement k ee _ Restroom ! e Cre k ! 0 i Parking Area ! Miles 5 123°59'0"W 123°58'0"W 123°57'0"W 123°56'0"W 123°55'0"W Neskowin t K 0 Kilometers 5 123°54'0"W Pacific City West Fork Austin Creek Cr k Cr e e ua w B u tt e b Wheelchair Accessible ! 124°0'0"W ! Sq Neskowin Pacific Ocean ] Informational Kiosk ! t K ! ! Hebo ¦ @ 45°7'0"N Austin Creek Õ Interpretive Panels ! Ha wk 45°7'0"N Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge F Hiking Trail ! k n Cr ee Austi [ Wildlife Viewing ! Area of map OREGON 123°53'0"W R 11 W R 10 W PRODUCED IN THE DIVISION OF REFUGE PLANNING PORTLAND, OREGON LAND STATUS CURRENT TO: 02/06/15 MAP DATE: 02/06/15 BASEMAP: 2012 NAIP IMAGERY MERIDIAN: WILLAMETTE FILE: NES_PUBLIC_2015_0206.MXD 0 0 0.5 0.5 1 1 2 2 Kilometers Miles UTM ZONE 10 NAD 83
CLOSED Pacific View Parking Area Features Hiking Trail Wildlife Viewing Interpretive Panels Ch View Tr cific ai Pa l Informational Kiosk ris ten Wheelchair Accessible n se Ro Restroom ad i ra /T Parking Area l Bench Trails Pacific View Trail Length: 0.3 miles 4% Grade Difficulty: Easy Surface: Paved Observation Deck Christensen Road/Trail Length: 0.4 miles 7% Grade Difficulty: Moderate Surface: Gravel Roads Paved Roadways and Parking Areas Gravel Road Roads Closed to Public Access Habitat Forest/Woodland CLOSED Scrub-shrub Pasture Grassland Water Refuge Boundary 101 hway Hig To Boundaries CLOSED 0 0.05 0 0.05 0.1 miles 0.1 kilometers
You have successfully arrived at the Nestucca/ Sand Lake Water Trail online guidebook. Please scroll down for your viewing pleasure. ti llamook cou n t y wat e r t r a i l OREGON Nestucca a nd Sand Lake WAT E R S H E D S F L AT WAT E R & W HIT E WAT E R Produced by the Tillamook Estuaries Partnership WELCOME to the nestucca, Sand lake, & neskowin creek watersheds Tillamook County Water Trail - The Vision The Tillamook County Water Trail encourages the quiet exploration and discovery of the ecological, historical, social, and cultural features of Tillamook County from the uplands to the ocean. The Water Trail is a recreational and educational experience that promotes and celebrates the value of Tillamook County’s waterways with direct benefit to the economic, social, and environmental well-being of the County. The Water Trail enhances the identity of Tillamook County by establishing an alternative, low-impact way to enjoy and appreciate the wonders of all five Tillamook County estuaries and watersheds. A water trail is a path on a waterway connected through signs, maps, and access points providing a scenic and educational experience for non-motorized users. South Tillamook County boasts three impressive watersheds that together span 357 square miles and contain the unassuming hamlets of Beaver, Hebo, Cloverdale, Pacific City, and Neskowin, among others. History establishes these waterways as valued sites for sustenance, trade, and recreation. The waters of the Neskowin, Sand Lake and Nestucca estuaries flow through land dominated by dense forests, serene refuges, and tranquil parks. Bustling dairies dot the banks as you follow the path blazed by many a salmon making their way to and from the sea. Overhead you can spy migrating birds as they circle down to find the perfect spot to land. This guidebook aims to help you explore and experience the superior recreational opportunities this area affords with safety, responsibility, and stewardship in mind. Buckle up your life jacket, place your paddle in the water and set out on your next adventure. Above: Roger Ross Photography Below: Printed with artist permission, Rose Perez © A watershed is a complex and diverse ecosystem. Restoring healthy rivers and bays is also a multifaceted endeavour. Burgeoning awareness of the area’s abundant rivers, sloughs, and bays was the impetus for establishing the Tillamook County Water Trail (TCWT). The Tillamook Estuaries Partnership (TEP) was chosen as lead partner for the TCWT and has shepherded the process since its inception. TEP, a National Estuary Program, was perfectly positioned for this role given their mission - to conserve and restore Tillamook County’s estuaries and watersheds in their entirety. Guy Sievert - Nestucca-Neskowin Watersheds Council The TCWT attracts a broad range of individuals, each adding unique perspectives and ideas that enhance the project. Paddle clean-ups, educational tours, and water quality and invasive species monitoring have been undertaken by users of the TCWT. Utilizing targeted outreach in regional newspaper articles, internet, and personal presentations, the TCWT has proven to be a catalyst for increased interest in paddling throughout Tillamook County, and local waterways in general. The project has moved beyond its original vision to become a valuable tool not only for recreationalists, but for individuals interested in sustaining this region’s vital natural resources. Residents of Oregon have many opportunities to raise their awareness of natural resource issues. One tangible way is to join a local watershed council. Watershed councils are locally organized, voluntary, nonregulatory groups established to improve the conditions of watersheds in their area. Councils represent varied interests in the basin and are balanced in their makeup. Council members collaborate to identify issues, promote cooperative solutions, focus resources, establish goals for enhancement, and foster communication throughout the watershed. There are many ways you can support restoration and conservation efforts in your watershed: volunteer with your local watershed council; use native vegetation in your landscaping and curb the use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides; maintain your septic systems; plant riparian buffers along your riverbank; appreciate the beauty of your surroundings; and as always reduce, reuse, and recycle; contact the Tillamook Estuaries Partnership for more ideas. Aubrey, grade 5 © Community Arts Project www.communityartsproject.net Courtesy of Pacific City Birding & Blues Festival Catalysts for Change Working for healthy watersheds - how you can help. Nestucca, Neskowin & Sand Lake Watershed Council: (503)965-2200 Tillamook Bay Watershed Council: (503)322-0002 Lower Nehalem Watershed Council: (503)368-7424 Upper Nehalem Watershed Council: (503)429-0869 Tillamook County Soil & Water Conservation District: (503)842-2848 Tillamook Estuaries Partnership: (503)322-2222 Roge
Dec Nov Oct Sep Aug July June May Apr Mar Feb Jan Dec Nov Oct Sep Aug July June May Apr Mar Feb Jan Western Wood-Pewee MacGillivray’s Warbler Willow Flycatcher Common Yellowthroat Hammond’s Flycatcher Yellow Warbler Pacific-slope Flycatcher Palm Warbler Black Phoebe Yellow-rumped Warbler Western Kingbird Black-throated Gray Warbler Northern Shrike Townsend’s Warbler Cassin’s Vireo Hermit Warbler Hutton’s Vireo Wilson’s Warbler Warbling Vireo Spotted Towhee Gray Jay Clay-colored Sparrow Steller’s Jay Savannah Sparrow Western Scrub-Jay Fox Sparrow American Crow Song Sparrow Common Raven Lincoln’s Sparrow Purple Martin Swamp Sparrow Tree Swallow White-throated Sparrow Violet-green Swallow White-crowned Sparrow N. Rough-winged Swallow Golden-crowned Sparrow Cliff Swallow Dark-eyed Junco Barn Swallow Western Tanager Black-capped Chickadee Black-headed Grosbeak Chestnut-backed Chickadee Dickcissel Bushtit Red-breasted Nuthatch Brown Creeper House Wren Pacific Wren Marsh Wren Bewick’s Wren Golden-crowned Kinglet Ruby-crowned Kinglet Wrentit Western Bluebird Swainson’s Thrush Red-winged Blackbird Western Meadowlark Brewer’s Blackbird Brown-headed Cowbird Bullock’s Oriole House Finch Purple Finch Red Crossbill Pine Siskin American Goldfinch Evening Grosbeak House Sparrow NESTUCCA BAY National Wildlife Refuge Bird Abundance Chart and Checklist Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1991 to protect wintering habitat for geese as well as diverse coastal wetlands and forest for migratory waterfowl, shorebirds and anadromous fish. Species abundance data for development of this checklist encompasses all units of Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge including Neskowin Marsh. Species Abundance Code Legend ABUNDANT: Occurs in moderate to large numbers, and easily found in appropriate habitat at the right time of year. COMMON: Occurs in small to moderate numbers, and usually easy to find in appropriate habitat at the right time of year. FAIRLY COMMON: Occurs in small numbers, and usually—but not always—found with some effort in appropriate habitat at the right time of year. UNCOMMON: Occurs annually in very small numbers. Not to be expected on any given day, but may be found with extended effort over the course of the appropriate season(s). RARE: Occurs less than annually, but there tends to be a pattern over time at the right time of year in appropriate habitat. ACCIDENTAL: Represents an exceptional occurrence that might not be repeated again for decades. IRREGULAR: Represents an irruptive species whose numbers are highly variable from year to year. There may be small to even large numbers present in one year, while in another year it may be absent altogether. Hermit Thrush European Starling U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 2127 SE Marine Science Drive Newport OR 97365 American Pipit 541-867-4550 American Robin Varied Thrush Cedar Waxwing Orange-crowned Warbler www.fws.gov/oregoncoast oregoncoast@fws.gov Dec Nov Oct Sep Aug July June May Apr Mar Feb Jan Dec Nov Oct Sep Aug July June May Apr Mar Feb Jan Dec Nov Oct Sep Aug July June May Apr Mar Feb Jan Greater White-fronted Goose Pied-billed Grebe Semipalmated Sandpiper Snow Goose Horned Grebe Western Sandpiper Ross’s Goose Red-necked Grebe Short-billed Dowitcher Brant Western Grebe Long-billed Dowitcher Cackling Goose Brandt’s Cormorant Wilson’s Snipe Taverner’s Cackling Goose Double-crested Cormorant Red-necked Phalarope Cackling Cackling Goose Pelagic Cormorant Red Phalarope Aleutian Cackling Goose Brown Pelican Bonaparte’s Gull Canada Goose American Bittern Heermann’s Gull Western Canada Goose Great Blue Heron Mew Gull Lesser Canada Goose Great Egret Ring-billed Gull Dusky Canada Goose Green Heron Western Gull Wood Duck Turkey Vulture California Gull Gadwall Osprey Herring Gull Eurasian Wigeon White-tailed Kite Thayer’s Gull American Wigeon Bald Eagle Glaucous-winged Gull Mallard Northern Harrier Caspian Tern Blue-winged Teal Sharp-shinned Hawk Elegant Tern Cinnamon Teal Cooper’s Hawk Band-tailed Pigeon Northern Shoveler Red-shouldered Hawk Eurasian Collared-Dove Northern Pintail Swainson’s Hawk Mourning Dove Green-winged Teal Red-tailed Hawk Barn Owl Canvasback Rough-legged Hawk Western Screech-Owl Redhead Virginia Rail Great Horned Owl Ring-necked Duck Sora Northern Pygmy-Owl Greater Scaup American Coot Barred Owl Lesser Scaup Black-bellied Plover Northern Saw-whet Owl Surf Scoter Semipalmated Plover Vaux’s Swift White-winged Scoter Killdeer Anna’s Hummingbird Bufflehead Spotted Sandpiper Rufous Hummingbird Common Goldeneye Solitary Sandpiper Belted Kingfisher Barrow’s Goldeneye Wandering Tattler Red-breasted Sapsucker Hooded Merganser Greater Yellowlegs Downy Woodpecker Common Merganser Lesser Yellowlegs Hairy Woodpecker Red-breasted Merganser Whimbrel Northern Flicker Ruddy Duck Marb

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