Tualatin River

National Antelope Refuge - Oregon

The Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge ia a wetlands and lowlands sanctuary in the northwestern part of the U.S. state of Oregon. Habitats in the refuge include forested areas, wetlands, oak and pine grassland, and meadows, with mixed deciduous and coniferous forests common to Western Oregon. The refuge is home to nearly 200 bird species and more than 70 other animal species. A visitor center with exhibits and information about the refuge was opened in 2008 off of Oregon Route 99W near Sherwood in the Portland metropolitan area. Next to the center is the refuge's headquarters and an observation deck overlooking seasonal ponds. The refuge has nearly five miles of wildlife interpretive trails open to the public. Up to 50,000 waterfowl can be seen at the refuge during the winter months when officials flood portions of the refuge.

maps

Map of the Southern part of the Northwest Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.Northwest Oregon - South 2019

Map of the Southern part of the Northwest Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

brochures

Map of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Malheur - Map

Map of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Hiking Trails at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Malheur - Hiking Trails

Hiking Trails at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Wildlife at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Malheur - Wildlife

Wildlife at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Oregon. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Tualatin River NAR https://www.fws.gov/refuge/tualatin_river https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tualatin_River_National_Wildlife_Refuge The Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge ia a wetlands and lowlands sanctuary in the northwestern part of the U.S. state of Oregon. Habitats in the refuge include forested areas, wetlands, oak and pine grassland, and meadows, with mixed deciduous and coniferous forests common to Western Oregon. The refuge is home to nearly 200 bird species and more than 70 other animal species. A visitor center with exhibits and information about the refuge was opened in 2008 off of Oregon Route 99W near Sherwood in the Portland metropolitan area. Next to the center is the refuge's headquarters and an observation deck overlooking seasonal ponds. The refuge has nearly five miles of wildlife interpretive trails open to the public. Up to 50,000 waterfowl can be seen at the refuge during the winter months when officials flood portions of the refuge.
Refuge Map Tigard SW Roy Rogers Road SW Scholls Ferry Road i ve r Riverboat Unit ad end Ro ef B SW Be nR King City ti a la u T Tualatin River Unit SW Scholls-Sherwood Road Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge Onion Flats Unit Atfálat´i Unit Refuge Acquisition Boundary Road ad wood Ro er latin-Sh SW Tua Open to Public Use Visitor Information Restroom Bus stop Wildlife Photo Blind Education Study Sites 0 Miles 0 Kilometers 1 1 N Sherwood Cedar C re ek Walking trail 99W Rock Creek Unit eek ck i Ch Refuge Office k Cr Roc Cr en Private Land SW Elwert Road k ee Refuge Sanctuary
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Courtesty Guide River Trail Ridgetop Trail Refuge Unit Boundary Wildlife Sanctuary Wetland Trail Photo Blind Open year round - 5% grade or less For the protection of wildlife, and the safety and enjoyment of all visitors, please observe the following rules: Open year round - 20-25% grade • Stay on the trails. Visitor Info Restroom and Trash Cans Drinking Water Area permanently closed Open May 1 to Sept. 30 Uneven loose gravel surface Tualatin River Exploration Site By reservation only National Wildlife Refuge Trail Map • Walk only. Do not bike or jog. Tualatin River • No fires, fireworks, or hunting. • Do not fly drones anywhere on the Refuge. Wetland Observation Deck Visitor facilities, including the River Trail and overlooks, are designed to be accessible to all visitors. .7 m Ridgetop Overlook Photo Blind Wayside ile s River Overlook (Historic channel) Refuge Headquarters .5 miles Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge 19255 SW Pacific Hwy Sherwood, Oregon 97140 Headquarters: 503/625 5944 Visitor Center: 503/625 5945 fws.gov/refuge/tualatin_river/ Education Shelter Chicken Creek Call for more info. Visitor Center Channel .5 miles Bus Stop i ck en Cre ek Water Deliver y Ch September 2017 les iles iles Tuesday through Sunday 10am to 4pm mi 5 % G r ade .2 .3 m VISITOR CENTER HOURS .9 m Area Closed for W ild The Refuge is open from dawn to dusk Roy Rogers Road REFUGE HOURS s life Sanctuary • Leave plants, animals, and feathers where they are. i le 2 0 -2 1.1 m • Pets are not allowed anywhere on the Refuge. S ta Area Closed for W ildlife Sanctuary te H ay igh w 99W
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge Watchable Wildlife Welcome to Tualatin River NWR Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge means different things to different creatures. For some it's a place where they raise their young, and others just a stopover during migration. It's also a place that some only spend the winter, and to others, it is a year-round home. Established in 1992, the Refuge is located within the floodplain of the Tualatin River basin near Sherwood, Oregon. Refuge habitats are varied and include rivers and streams, seasonal and forested wetlands, riparian areas, grasslands, and forested uplands. An important breeding area for neotropical migratory songbirds, the Refuge also supports a significant breeding population of wood ducks and hooded mergansers. There is something to experience in every season. From thousands of waterfowl in the winter to breeding songbirds in summer, the Refuge is ever changing. Enjoying the Refuge's Wildlife We encourage you to explore the beauty of this area and stop, look, and listen to the abundant wildlife that call it home. The Refuge is a place where wildlife comes first so think of yourself as a visitor to their home. You will be a more successful wildlife observer if you: move slowly, talk softly, use binoculars, and leave only footprints behind. The wildlife species in this brochure have been grouped into four categories: birds, mammals, amphibians, and reptiles. Red-tailed hawks can be seen and heard soaring the open spaces over the Refuge Enjoying the Refuge's Birdlife Getting the Most from Your Visit Numbers and species of birds you will see here varies according to season, with the greatest numbers present from October to May. Heavy migrations of waterfowl occur during fall and winter. They come here to feed on wetland plants when their northern breeding grounds freeze over. Then, as water levels in the wetlands are drawn down in the spring, a wide variety of shorebirds are attracted to our invertebrate filled mudflats. When the wetlands dry out in spring and summer, songbirds arrive to breed and take shelter on the Refuge. Binoculars or spotting scopes are helpful for observing birds and a good field guide will help you identify what you see. You will see more birds if you time your visit for early morning or evening hours. Sit quietly and wait for the birds to come to you. When looking at a bird, pay close attention to characteristics such as color, size, shape, wing, and head markings. Always observe first and then refer to your identification book, because the bird may move out of sight quickly. This is especially true of perching birds. Also, be sure to listen for their calls and sounds. Take note of the type of habitat in which you see the bird, and where in the habitat they are likely to be found – canopy, tree trunk, brushy areas, open water, or ground area. You Can Help Seasons Sp - Spring, March through May S - Summer, June through August F - Fall, September through November W - Winter, December through February Seasonal Abundance Codes a - Abundant – species very numerous and easily seen or heard in suitable habitat. c - Common – species likely to be seen or heard in suitable habitat. u - Uncommon – usually present but may not be seen or heard in suitable habitat. o - Occasional – seen or heard only a few times a season in suitable habitat. r - Rare – may not be seen or heard every year in suitable habitat. Notes e t s b - Endangered Threatened Special of concern Breeding – confirmed or presumed to breed and/or nest on the Refuge. x - Accidental The following list of birds contains species that have been recorded on Tualatin River NWR. The common name and taxonomic order used in this list follows that appearing in the 7th edition of the American Ornithologist's Union Check List of North American Birds, published in 1998, and subsequent revisions. Since the establishment of the Refuge, the number of bird species seen here has quadrupled. We are still discovering species that are returning to the area. Keep notes – you may help us record the return of a species to the Tualatin River Valley! Northern pintail Birds of Tualatin River NWR Common Name Common Name Sp S F W N Grebes Pied-billed Grebe c c c c Horned Grebe r Red-necked Grebe r Eared Grebe r Western Grebe r Cormorants Double-crested Cormorant u c u Ibises and Spoonbills White-faced Ibis u u x c Bitterns, Herons and Egrets American Bittern o o Great Blue Heron c c c c Great Egret u u u u Snowy Egret Green Heron u New World Vultures Turkey Vulture b b x sx u Swans, Geese and Ducks Greater White-fronted Goose o o o Tule White-fronted Goose Snow Goose r r Ross’s Goose r Black Brant r Aleutian Canada Goose Cackling Canada Goose u a a Taverner's Canada Goose u c a Western Canada Goose c c a a Dusky Canada Goose o o u Lesser Canada Goose u c c Tundra Swan u u Wood Du

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