Archbald Pothole

State Park - Pennsylvania

Archbald Pothole State Park is located in Archbald, Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania. The focal point of the park is Archbald Pothole. The pothole is a remnant of the Wisconsin Glacial Period, 38 feet (11.6 m) deep with a largest diameter of 42 feet (12.8 m) by 24 feet (7.3 m). It has drawn tourists since just after it was discovered in 1884.

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Brochure of Archbald Pothole State Park (SP) in Pennsylvania. Published by Pennsylvania State Parks.Archbald Pothole - Brochure

Brochure of Archbald Pothole State Park (SP) in Pennsylvania. Published by Pennsylvania State Parks.

Archbald Pothole SP https://www.dcnr.pa.gov/StateParks/FindAPark/ArchbaldPotholeStatePark/Pages/default.aspx https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archbald_Pothole_State_Park Archbald Pothole State Park is located in Archbald, Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania. The focal point of the park is Archbald Pothole. The pothole is a remnant of the Wisconsin Glacial Period, 38 feet (11.6 m) deep with a largest diameter of 42 feet (12.8 m) by 24 feet (7.3 m). It has drawn tourists since just after it was discovered in 1884.
Archbald Pothole State Park A Pennsylvania Recreational Guide Archbald Pothole State Park is a 150-acre park in northeastern Pennsylvania. The park is named for Archbald Pothole, a geologic feature that formed during the Wisconsin Glacial Period, around 15,000 years ago. The pothole is 38 feet deep and has an elliptical shape. The diameter of the pothole decreases downward. The largest diameter is 42 feet by 24 feet. At the bottom it is 17 feet by 14 feet. The pothole has a volume of about 18,600 cubic feet, so could hold about 140,000 gallons. It would take 35 fire truck tankers to fill the pothole. Directions Archbald Pothole is in Lackawanna County, nine miles north of Scranton. The park is easily reached from Interstate 81. Take Exit 191A to US 6 east towards Carbondale. The park entrance is six miles on the right. GPS DD: Lat. 41.51305 Long. -75.5757 More Information Archbald Pothole State Park c/o Lackawanna State Park 1839 Abington Road North Abington Township, PA 18414 570-945-3239 email: lackawannasp@pa.gov An Equal Opportunity Employer www.visitPAparks.com Information and Reservations Make online reservations at www.visitPAparks.com or call toll-free 888-PA-PARKS (888-727-2757), 7:00 AM to 5:00 PM, Monday to Saturday, for state park information and reservations. facebook.com/visitPAparks twitter.com/visitPAparks N 107 347 BUS 632 632 6 EXIT 194 Ken Dri nedy ve in Salem St. et tre S Ma 6 EXIT 476 191B on ARCHBALD POTHOLE Je rm Rd yn . 247 on Main St. S. ingt sh e. Wa Av d Ol ge Rd. Rid Mi ll Rd er . r Rd. cke EXIT 197 81 EXIT 202 438 EXIT 199 Ey n De 407 6 BUS 6 EXIT 191A 347 247 Recreational Opportunities Nearby Attractions Information on nearby attractions is available from the Northeast Pennsylvania Convention and Visitors Bureau. www.visitnepa.org Built on reclaimed strip-mined lands, Ed Staback Park has tennis and basketball courts, baseball fields, and a playground. Pennsylvania’s first heritage park, the Lackawanna Heritage Valley, tells the story of the important role that the Lackawanna Valley played in America’s Industrial Revolution--supplying over 80 percent of the nation’s anthracite coal that fueled the growth of American industry. www.lhva.org Nearby Glacial Attractions At Hickory Run State Park, Boulder Field is 14 acres of jumbled stone caused by severe weather of the last glacial period. The glacier end moraine crosses the park. Hickory Run State Park can be reached at Exit 274 off of I-80. Follow PA 534 east to the park. 570-443-0400 Glacial meltwater eroded the bedrock and created a series of potholes in an area now called Whirlpool Valley. Owned by the Bureau of Forestry, the Seven Tubs Natural Area can be reached at Exit 164 off I-81. Follow PA 115 south for 2.5 miles. The park is on the right. 570-477-5467 The 150-acre Tannersville Cranberry Bog is the southernmost low altitude boreal bog on the eastern seaboard. The wetland contains carnivorous plants, rare orchids, and other plants. The bog is owned by the Nature Conservancy and can only be visited during scheduled tours. 570-629-3061 The eastern side of the park has undergone strip mine reclamation and has athletic fields in Ed Staback Park. HIKING: A small loop trail starting at the wayside follows an old coal mine tram road passed rock ledges and through a forest. HUNTING AND FIREARMS: Over 100 acres are open to limited hunting, trapping and the training of dogs during established seasons. Common game species are deer, squirrel, and turkey. Use extreme caution with firearms at all times. Be sure to read and follow all hunting and firearms rules and regulations posted on the Bureau of State Parks’ website. www.visitPAparks.com 1/2017 Access for People with Disabilities This symbol indicates facilities and activities that are Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accessible for people with disabilities. This publication text is available in alternative formats. If you need an accommodation to participate in park activities due to a disability, please contact the park you plan to visit.  In an Emergency Call 911 and contact a park employee. Directions to the nearest hospital are posted on bulletin boards. NEAREST HOSPITAL Geisinger Community Medical Center 1800 Mulberry Street Scranton, PA 18510 570-703-8000 History Archbald Pothole was discovered in 1884 by coal miner Patrick Mahon while extending a mine shaft. Mr. Mahon fired a blast of explosives and water and stones came rushing down. The miners fled fearing that the mountain was falling on them. Edward Jones, the manager of the mining company, investigated and ordered the area cleared of debris. About 800 to 1,000 tons of small rounded stones were removed and Mr. Jones realized that the vertical tunnel was a large pothole. About 1,000 feet north of Archbald Pothole, another pothole was found, but it was thought to be larger than the first pothole and was not excavated because of the excessive cost. Archbald Pothole was

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