Boyd Big Tree

Preserve Conservation Area - Pennsylvania

Boyd Big Tree Preserve Conservation Area is located in Lower Paxton and Middle Paxton Townships, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. It is a sanctuary for mature trees and an environment education study area. The large mature trees and thick woods of Boyd Big Tree Preserve Conservation Area make it and ideal habitat for a large variety of woodland creatures. The park is home to white-tailed deer, black bear, wild turkeys, ruffed grouse and eastern gray squirrels. Bluebirds and warblers can also be observed. There is an observation area on Blue Mountain where bird watchers can see the annual migration of hawks.

maps

Visitor Map of Boyd Big Tree Preserve Conservation Area (SPres) in Pennsylvania. Published by Pennsylvania State Parks.Boyd Big Tree - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Boyd Big Tree Preserve Conservation Area (SPres) in Pennsylvania. Published by Pennsylvania State Parks.

brochures

Brochure of Boyd Big Tree Preserve Conservation Area (SPres) in Pennsylvania. Published by Pennsylvania State Parks.Boyd Big Tree - Brochure

Brochure of Boyd Big Tree Preserve Conservation Area (SPres) in Pennsylvania. Published by Pennsylvania State Parks.

Boyd Big Tree SPres https://www.dcnr.pa.gov/StateParks/FindAPark/BoydBigTreePreserveConservationArea/Pages/default.aspx https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boyd_Big_Tree_Preserve_Conservation_Area Boyd Big Tree Preserve Conservation Area is located in Lower Paxton and Middle Paxton Townships, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. It is a sanctuary for mature trees and an environment education study area. The large mature trees and thick woods of Boyd Big Tree Preserve Conservation Area make it and ideal habitat for a large variety of woodland creatures. The park is home to white-tailed deer, black bear, wild turkeys, ruffed grouse and eastern gray squirrels. Bluebirds and warblers can also be observed. There is an observation area on Blue Mountain where bird watchers can see the annual migration of hawks.
Boyd Big Tree Preserve The 1,025-acre Boyd Big Tree Preserve Conservation Area straddles Blue Mountain. The large trees of the area are home to deep forest birds, especially warblers. Summer through autumn, the old field blooms with wild flowers, especially butterfly weed. In late July and early August, butterflies and field birds like sparrows flock to the field. There are many opportunities to see wildlife, but please observe from a safe distance and do not feed wildlife. The conservation area’s many trails offer good chances for seeing white-tailed deer, wild turkeys, squirrels, grouse, black bears, and a variety of songbirds depending on the season. Nest boxes in the field are homes to bluebirds and tree swallows. Please enjoy viewing the birds, but do not disturb the boxes. Tiger swallowtail butterfly on butterfly weed Directions GPS: Lat. 40.35907 Long. -76.86732 From US 322 take the PA 443/Fishing Creek Exit. Turn east onto Fishing Creek Valley Road, PA 443. The conservation area is 2.6 miles on the right. Learn, Experience, Connect The Boyd Big Tree Preserve Conservation Area offers educational programs year round. Many programs feature wildlife, forest, and field ecology. Contact the Little Buffalo State Park office or explore the online calendar of events, https://events.dcnr.pa.gov, for more information on programs and other learning experiences. HIKING: 10.8 miles The Boyd Big Tree Preserve Conservation Area boasts an extensive trail system, with most trails forested and some quite steep. Pond Loop Trail: 1.2 miles, pink blazes, easiest hiking This trail skirts the spring-fed pond which is a popular watering hole for wildlife. The pond is a haven for a number of amphibian species during the early spring and summer months. What is a Conservation Area? This designation is for land donated to the Bureau of State Parks and managed for the purposes of preserving open space, conserving natural resources, and providing opportunities for passive, non-motorized, low density outdoor recreation and environmental education activities. A conservation area is characterized as a large area with few improvements and no through roads. Recreational facilities and development are minimal. Conservation areas are used for low impact recreation, serve as outdoor classrooms, and act as examples of proper stewardship and resource management. What is a Restrictive Covenant? A restrictive covenant is a condition that is written into a deed, either by the seller or person donating the property, that must be adhered to by the person or organization that assumes possession of the property. Some of the restrictive covenants placed on the transfer of this property include: • The land is intended for use, enjoyment, and education of all citizens of the commonwealth. Environmental, outdoor, and forest resource management education will be emphasized. • Only passive outdoor recreational activities will be allowed. Horseback riding, biking, and motorized equipment, with the exception of official use equipment and accommodations for disabled people, are prohibited. • Acceptable forestry practices will govern resource management. Generally, only dead and downed trees should be harvested, except on forest demonstration areas. Research and educational programs such as warm season grasses, butterfly trails, sugar maple plantation, and aspen management have been suggested for consideration in the field portion of the preserve. Lower Spring Trail: 1.1 miles, lavender blazes, easiest hiking A great trail for cross-country skiing, Lower Spring Trail passes through the heart of the conservation area. East Loop Trail: 1.9 miles, lime green blazes, more difficult hiking This trail runs toward the eastern end of the conservation area and follows the power line for about 0.3 mile. Coach Trail: 0.9 mile, yellow blazes, easiest hiking A great trail to watch and listen for warblers in the spring and early summer, Coach Trail follows the base of the ridge and loops at the conservation area’s western edge. Tell us about your hike at: www.ExplorePAtrails.com HUNTING AND FIREARMS: About 800 acres are open to hunting, trapping, and the training of dogs during established seasons. Common game species are black bears, deer, turkeys, grouse, rabbits, and squirrels. Hunting woodchucks, also known as groundhogs, is prohibited. Dog training is only permitted from the day following Labor Day through March 31 in designated hunting areas. The Department of Conservation and Natural Resources and the Pennsylvania Game Commission rules and regulations apply. Contact the Little Buffalo State Park Complex office for ADA accessible hunting information. Use extreme caution with firearms at all times. Other visitors use the park during hunting seasons. Firearms and archery equipment used for hunting may be uncased and ready for use only in authorized hunting areas during hunting seasons. In areas not open to hunting or during non-hunting seasons, firearms an

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