Kinzua Bridge

State Park - Pennsylvania

Kinzua Bridge State Park is located near Mount Jewett, in Hamlin and Keating Townships, McKean County, Pennsylvania. The park lies between U.S. Route 6 and Pennsylvania Route 59, along State Route 3011 just east of the Allegheny National Forest. The park is noted as the site of the Kinzua Bridge spanning Kinzua Creek, original bridge built in 1882, subsequent bridge built in 1900 and destroyed in 2003 by a tornado. At the time it was built, the original (c. 1882) Kinzua Bridge was the highest, at 301 feet (92 m), and longest, at 2,053 feet (626 m), railway bridge in the world.

brochures

Brochure of Kinzua Bridge State Park (SP) in Pennsylvania. Published by Pennsylvania State Parks.Kinzua Bridge - Brochure

Brochure of Kinzua Bridge State Park (SP) in Pennsylvania. Published by Pennsylvania State Parks.

Kinzua Bridge SP https://www.dcnr.pa.gov/StateParks/FindAPark/KinzuaBridgeStatePark/Pages/default.aspx https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinzua_Bridge_State_Park Kinzua Bridge State Park is located near Mount Jewett, in Hamlin and Keating Townships, McKean County, Pennsylvania. The park lies between U.S. Route 6 and Pennsylvania Route 59, along State Route 3011 just east of the Allegheny National Forest. The park is noted as the site of the Kinzua Bridge spanning Kinzua Creek, original bridge built in 1882, subsequent bridge built in 1900 and destroyed in 2003 by a tornado. At the time it was built, the original (c. 1882) Kinzua Bridge was the highest, at 301 feet (92 m), and longest, at 2,053 feet (626 m), railway bridge in the world.
Kinzua Bridge State Park History Located in McKean County, 339-acre Kinzua Bridge State Park is home to the reinvented skywalk. The viaduct, once the longest and tallest railroad structure at 2,053 feet long and 301 feet high, was partially destroyed by a tornado in 2003. Reinvented as a pedestrian walkway in 2011, visitors can walk out 600 feet on the remaining support towers, gaze into the Kinzua Creek Valley, and look down through the partial glass platform at the end of the skywalk. The visitor center and park office features great views, self-guided exhibits, and information on the surrounding area. Construction of the iron viaduct began in 1881, starting with the placement of the stone piers. When completed in 1882, the Kinzua Bridge Viaduct was the highest railroad viaduct in the world. It was constructed as an alternative to laying an additional eight miles of track over rough terrain along the line leading to McKean County’s coal, timber, and oil lands. Built of iron, the original viaduct was approximately 301 feet high, 2053 feet long, and weighed 3,105,000 pounds. The towers were a patented design called Phoenix Columns. The columns were lighter in weight and had greater strength than cast iron columns of similar shape and size. Skywalk Advisory: The skywalk will be closed when weather conditions are unsafe due to frost and ice in late fall through winter. Contact park for current conditions. Directions Kinzua Bridge State Park is four miles north of US Route 6 at Mount Jewett on SR 3011. Use the following address for GPS devices: 1721 Lindholm Drive, Mount Jewett 16740 GPS DD: Lat. 41.75953 Long. -78.58702 Seasons and Hours The park is open every day of the year, sunrise to sunset. Day use areas close at dusk. Contact the park office for seasonal visitor center and park office hours. There is no charge to enter the park, walk on the skywalk, or view the exhibits in the visitor center and park office. Recreational Opportunities RECREATION ADVISORY: Due to unsafe conditions around the downed towers, visitors are prohibited from walking near the downed towers and debris field as indicated on the map. SCENIC VIEWS: The skywalk gives close-up views of the viaduct and wide views of the Kinzua Creek Valley. The overlook is excellent for viewing both the skywalk and valley. Both locations are ideal for viewing fall foliage, which usually peaks in the first two weeks of October. PICNIKING: An ADA accessible pavilion that can accommodate up to 60 people is located across the parking lot from the visitor center. The pavilion may be reserved up to 11 months in advance for a rental fee. Unreserved picnic pavilions are free and may be used on a first-come, firstserved basis. This area also contains picnic tables, many of which are in full to partial shade. HUNTING AND FIREARMS: Approximately 275 acres of Kinzua Bridge State Park are open to hunting, trapping, and the training of dogs during established seasons. Common game species are bear, deer, turkey, grouse, rabbit, and squirrel. Hunting woodchucks, also known as groundhogs, is prohibited. Dog training is only permitted from the day following Labor Day through March 31 in designated hunting areas. The Department of Conservation and Natural Resources and the Pennsylvania Game Commission rules and regulations apply. Contact the park office for ADA accessible hunting information. Use extreme caution with firearms at all times. Other visitors use the park during hunting seasons. Firearms and archery equipment used for hunting may be uncased and ready for use only in authorized hunting areas during hunting seasons. In areas not open to hunting or during nonhunting seasons, firearms and archery equipment shall be kept in the owner’s vehicle or enclosed trailer. Exceptions include: law enforcement officers and individuals with a valid Pennsylvania License to Carry Firearms are authorized to carry a firearm concealed on their person while they are within a state park. SNOWSHOEING: Snowshoes in a variety of sizes are available at the visitor center and park office for use on hikes through the park. If you are interested, please call the visitor center and park office to reserve a pair of snowshoes. A valid Pennsylvania driver’s license is required. Snowshoes are available on a first come, first served basis when there is sufficient snow covering (at least 5 inches). Park staff offer visitors a brief beginner lesson and a program on the history of snowshoeing. Current winter conditions can be found at www.dcnr.state.pa.us/stateparks/winter-report. Environmental Education and Interpretation Kinzua Bridge State Park offers year-round environmental education, recreational, and interpretive programs. Through hands-on activities, guided walks, impromptus, and evening programs, participants gain appreciation, understanding, and develop a sense of stewardship toward natural and cultural resources. TEACHER TRAINING: A variety of natural history and curricula wo

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