Devils River

Birds Trans-Pecos

brochure Devils River - Birds Trans-Pecos

Birds of the Trans-Pecos at Devils River State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE BIRDS of the TR A NS-PECOS a field checklist Black-throated Sparrow by Kelly B. Bryan Birds of the Trans-Pecos: a field checklist the chihuahuan desert Traditionally thought of as a treeless desert wasteland, a land of nothing more than cacti, tumbleweeds, jackrabbits and rattlesnakes – West Texas is far from it. The Chihuahuan Desert region of the state, better known as the Trans-Pecos of Texas (Fig. 1), is arguably the most diverse region in Texas. A variety of habitats ranging from, but not limited to, sanddunes, desert-scrub, arid canyons, oak-juniper woodlands, lush riparian woodlands, plateau grasslands, cienegas (desert springs), pinyon-juniper woodlands, pine-oak woodlands and montane evergreen forests contribute to a diverse and complex avifauna. As much as any other factor, elevation influences and dictates habitat and thus, bird occurrence. Elevations range from the highest point in Texas at 8,749 ft. (Guadalupe Peak) to under 1,000 ft. (below Del Rio). Amazingly, 106 peaks in the region are over 7,000 ft. in elevation; 20 are over 8,000 ft. high. These montane islands contain some of the most unique components of Texas’ avifauna. As a rule, human population in the region is relatively low and habitat quality remains good to excellent; habitat types that have been altered the most in modern times include riparian corridors and cienegas. Figure 1: Coverage area is indicated by the shaded area. This checklist covers all of the area west of the Pecos River and a corridor to the east of the Pecos River that contains areas of Chihuahuan Desert habitat types. There is overlap in coverage of other regional checklists, specifically in Val Verde and Crockett counties (Birds of the Edwards Plateau by Lockwood) and in Ector, Upton and Reagan counties (Birds of the High Plains and Rolling Plains by Sieffert). 1 Also influenced by elevation, the region’s climatic patterns read like a farmer’s almanac for an entire state. Normally, one rainy season occurs here on an annual basis, associated with the onset of the southwestern monsoon pattern that usually begins in July and ends in September. Winter seasons can be mild except at the higher elevations. Spring seasons are usually dry and windy; and landscapes dominated by the brown and yellow colors of dormant grasses typically reflect that. Although not a wasteland, areas of low desert-scrub, especially along the Rio Grande can be inhospitable at times; 100°+ temperatures can begin as early as February and persist as late as November. Rainfall for these areas usually averages less than 6 inches annually, while the eastern portions of the region and the highest elevations can receive more than 20 inches. Summer seasons in the higher elevations are usually cool to warm at best and generally wet in contrast to the lower desert and much of the rest of Texas. Although portions of the Chihuahuan Desert ecoregion extend north into southern New Mexico and southeastern Arizona, the major part of the region is found south of the border with Mexico. In fact, 65% of the physiographic area is in Mexico. Overall, the ecoregion covers 243,000 square miles. Still, the portion that occurs in Texas is large, covering approximately 50,000 square miles, or about one-fifth of the landmass of Texas. Most of the region remains privately owned, yet more public lands exist here than in any other region of the state. From a conservation (and birding) point of view several national parks (comprising ~956,208 acres) and numerous state holdings (~533,250 acres) provide access to many significant areas within the region. Many of these locations have well-developed bird lists with defined seasonal occurrence. There are several other publications that characterize the region’s avifauna and/or portions thereof (see the references listed below). Nevertheless, this is the first stand-alone field checklist to embrace the region as a whole. This checklist includes all of the species recorded within the region along with their expected seasonal occurrence. The author has followed the nomenclature and taxonomy presented in the 7th edition of the A.O.U. Check-list of North American Birds (1998) and supplements. chihuahuan desert birds This checklist includes 505 species that have been observed in the region, which is 81% of the species known to occur in Texas. A total of 244 of the species listed herein (48%) have nested at least once or are suspected as nesters. A dedicated column denotes nesting status as well as geographic occurrence (where needed) and status to provide users of this checklist with additional information on selected species. Characterization of the region’s avifauna is difficult at best because of the patchy nature of the habitats and the sporadic occurrence of numerous peripheral species. In the southeastern portion of the region a number of eastern U.S. birds reach the western limits of their ranges. Red-shouldered Hawk, Chuck-will’s-widow, Eastern WoodPewee, Acadian Flycatcher, White-eyed, Yellow-throated and Red-eyed Vireo, Carolina Wren, Northern Parula, Yellow-throated and Black-and-white Warbler are representative of this group. Montane habitats also harbor species of limited distribution. Numerous species of birds associated with the Rocky Mountains and/or Mexican highlands bird guilds normally occur only in islands of montane habitats within the region. Examples include Band-tailed Pigeon, Flammulated and Northern Saw-whet Owl, Whip-poor-will, Blue-throated and 2 Magnificant Hummingbird, Williamson’s Sapsucker, Cordilleran Flycatcher, Hutton’s Vireo, Mexican and Steller’s Jay, Mountain Chickadee, Pygmy Nuthatch, Colima and Grace’s Warbler, and Painted Redstart. Other “borderland” specialties help characterize the region’s avifauna. Included would be Gray and Zone-tailed Hawk, Common Black-Hawk, Elf Owl, Lesser Nighthawk, Common Poorwill, Lucifer Hummingbird, Vermilion Flycatcher, Verdin, Black-tailed Gnatcatcher, Varied Bunting, and Hooded Oriole. New discoveries are still being made in the region, especially in the Davis Mountains where increased access to private lands has allowed further study of Texas’ most expansive mountain range. As an example, the recent discovery of Buff-breasted Flycatcher added a new species to the Texas list. The Trans-Pecos of Texas is a region prime for similar discoveries in the future. Other than the montane islands previously mentioned, additional habitats contain rich birdlife. Riparian corridors contain especially important bird habitats harboring high diversity in arid environments. The Rio Grande valley both above and below El Paso is one such area. Several species can often be found there that are consid­ ered rare within the region. The Limpia Creek system in Jeff Davis County, the Alamito/ Cienega Creek systems in Presidio County, the Devils River system of central Val Verde County, and the Rio Grande/Pecos river systems contain highly diverse avifauna as well. The distribution of common species within this region can also be of a patchy nature primarily due to the extent of the region being covered. For those utilizing this document the exact occurrence of most species must be determined by referring to the range maps in any number of popular field guides. The geographical distribution and nesting column preceding the months of the year will aid in that effort. However, just because a particular species is designated as SE (southeast-normally expected only in that area) for instance, does not mean that it does not or cannot occur at other locations within the checklist area. Keep in mind that the geographical distribution of many species may change with season, especially with respect to areas utilized for nesting. A species with nesting status N* may migrate through or winter elsewhere. More widespread nesting species (N) may also be tied to specific habitats and certain broader areas of the region, or excluded from certain areas. For example, one of the most common birds of the region, the Black-throated Sparrow, finds montane habitats unsuitable for occupation at any time of the year. This desert sparrow has been labeled an “indicator” species of the ecological region and for that reason has been chosen to grace the cover of this checklist. The seasonal abundance codes (bar graphs) included herein represent a compilation of the most accurate objective data available as well as subjective evaluations by the author. Peripheral species and/or local species (e.g., Great Kiskadee, Juniper Titmouse, Mountain Chickadee, Colima Warbler, Grace’s Warbler and Olive Sparrow) have abundance codes applied that reflect only their status where they normally occur. Many species show strong ties to certain habitats, or they may be quite localized such as to a particular mountain range, making it difficult to define their abundance across the entire region. To aid in that designation, letter codes (as provided in the legend) have been added to delineate areas occupied by localized species. As an example both Mexican Jay and Colima Warbler are expected to occur only in the Chisos Mountains, thus designated with letter code of ‘C’. Also keep in mind that open water habitats for aquatic species are limited in the region. Less than ten permanent reservoirs exist, limited to two general areas – within the Pecos River and Rio Grande watersheds along the eastern edge of the region and in the 3 Rio Grande valley below El Paso. Accidentals are defined as those species that have occurred generally less than ten times in the area of coverage. Species listed as such are depicted with a closed circle. Numerous other species have been recorded only on a few occasions, as vagrants or very rare migrants, but are expected to occur again in the future. These species are listed as “rare”. Like any species checklist, this is a dynamic document that will require constant updating. Please submit any changes, additions, comments, or questions to Kelly Bryan via e-mail at kellyb@nexus.as.utexas.edu or phone (915) 426-3897. Selected references: Kutac, E. A. 1998. Birder’s Guide to Texas (second edition). Gulf Publishing Co., Houston, TX. Lockwood, M.W., W.B. McKinney, J.N. Paton and B.R. Zimmer. 1999. A Birder’s Guide to the Rio Grande Valley. American Birding Association, Inc. Colorado Springs, CO. Oberholser, H.C. 1974. The Bird Life of Texas. University of Texas Press, Austin, Texas. Paton, J.N. and B.R. Zimmer. 1998. Birds and Birdfinding in the El Paso Area. Local Pub. El Paso, Texas. Peterson, J. J. and B. R. Zimmer. 1998. Birds of the Trans-Pecos. UT Press, Austin, Texas. Wauer, R. H. 1996. A Field Guide to Birds of the Big Bend, 2nd ed. Gulf Publishing Co., Houston, Texas. Wauer, R. H. and M. A. Elwonger. 1998. Birding Texas. Falcon Guide, Helena, MT. Please help us protect the natural avian communities by refraining from using playback tapes of bird songs. Excessive use of these tapes disrupts normal avian activity patterns, including essential territorial behavior, and may lead to nest failure. Thank you for your cooperation. LEGEND Abundance (basically an abundance scale with abundant being the most common, accidental the least) Abundant – present and conspicuous in proper habitat and season indicated; often in large numbers Common – normally present, should be found in proper habitat and season; numbers vary Uncommon – usually present in proper habitat and season, but may be overlooked; typically in small numbers Occasional – normally encountered a few times during season indicated; may also occur in a narrow timeframe within a season or in very specialized habitat ...... Rare – seldom observed; may not occur each year during season indicated Accidental – generally one to three records region-wide each decade Lingering accidentals (Note: accidental records include both documented records and selected sight observations) 4 Status, Geographic distribution and Nesting (SGN) Shaded species are Texas Review Species; please submit details, photographs and/or recordings to the Texas Bird Records Committee, c/o Mark Lockwood, TBRC Secretery, Natural Resources Program, Texas Parks and Wildlife, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, Texas 78744 I – Irruptive species that may be abundant some years but absent, occasional or rare all others; also applies to species regularly occurring in the checklist area but exhibit movements of an irruptive nature into areas/habitats otherwise not normally occupied E – Extirpated or extinct W – Western portion of the region, specifically in El Paso and/or Hudspeth counties; abundance graph normally applies to this area only but migrants/vagrants may occur elsewhere G – Guadalupe Mountains; abundance graph normally applies to this area only but migrants/vagrants may occur elsewhere D – Davis Mountains; abundance graph normally applies to this area only but migrants/vagrants may occur elsewhere C – Chisos Mountains; abundance graph normally applies to this area only but migrants/vagrants may occur elsewhere PG – Plateau grasslands typically located at elevations ranging from 4,000' to 6,000'; abundance graph normally applies to this area only but migrants/vagrants may occur elsewhere RG – Rio Grande corridor (or portions thereof) from above Lake Amistad north to Brewster and Presidio counties; abundance graph normally applies to this area only but migrants/vagrants may occur elsewhere SE – Southeastern portion of region, specifically in Val Verde and Terrell counties including Lake Amistad; abundance graph normally applies to this area only but migrants/vagrants may occur elsewhere N – Regular and widespread nesting species N* – Rare and/or localized nesting species; also applies to species nesting in a specific geographic area or to those with only one or two nesting records N? – Status as a breeding species in the region is uncertain ( ) – Sub-regional geographic area specified for selected species with nesting status N* or N?; many species whose nesting distributions are limited as indicated by use this symbol may be (or typically are) widespread at other times of the year, i.e. Sharp-shinned Hawk, Western Wood-Pewee, Hermit Thrush, Orangecrowned Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Western Tanager, Spotted Towhee, and Green-tailed Towhee CITATION Bryan, Kelly B. 2002. Birds of the Trans-Pecos: A Field Checklist. Natural Resources Program, Texas Parks and Wildlife. PWD BK P4000-809 (3/02) 5 CHECKLIST Species SGN ___ Red-throated Loon ___ Pacific Loon Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec ....................... .................. .............. ................ ___ Common Loon ___ Yellow-billed Loon ___ Least Grebe SE ___ Pied-billed Grebe N* ........................................................................ ........ ___ Horned Grebe ..... ___ Red-necked Grebe ___ Eared Grebe ................ ......................... .......................... ................... ....... ............................ N* ___ Western Grebe N* ___ Clark’s Grebe N* ___ American White Pelican ...... ___ Brown Pelican ___ Double-crested Cormorant N* ___ Neotropic Cormorant N* ___ Anhinga SE ___ American Bittern ___ Least Bittern N*(RG) ___ Great Blue Heron N* ___ Great Egret N* ___ Snowy Egret N* ___ Little Blue Heron SE ___ Tricolored Heron SE ___ Reddish Egret ___ Cattle Egret N* ___ Green Heron N* ___ Black-crowned Night-Heron N* ___ Yellow-crowned Night-Heron SE ............... ............. .................... ........ ........... ................ ................... ............... ................................. ...... .... ....... ............. ................ .......... ___ White Ibis ___ Glossy Ibis ___ White-faced Ibis N* ................ ___ Roseate Spoonbill ___ Wood Stork SE ___ Black Vulture N, RG, SE ___ Turkey Vulture N ___ Black-bellied Whistling-Duck .... N*, SE 6 .... Species ___ Fulvous Whistling-Duck SGN Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec SE ............ ___ Greater White-fronted Goose .. .. ........................... ....... ...... ...... .... ___ Snow Goose ___ Ross’s Goose ___ Canada Goose ............... ___ Tundra Swan ___ Wood Duck ........... N*(SE, W) ......... ___ Gadwall ......................... ___ Eurasian Wigeon ___ “Mexican Duck” Mallard ........... ............ ___ American Wigeon ___ Mallard .... N* N ___ Mottled Duck SE ___ Blue-winged Teal N* ___ Cinnamon Teal N* ___ Northern Shoveler N* ___ Northern Pintail N* ............ .................................... .......... .............. ..... .............. ___ Garganey ___ Green-winged Teal N* ___ Canvasback N* ___ Redhead N* ___ Ring-necked Duck ___ Greater Scaup ___ Lesser Scaup ___ Surf Scoter ........ .................... .............. .............. .............................. ............... ................ ............... .............. ___ White-winged Scoter ___ Black Scoter ___ Long-tailed Duck ................... ___ Bufflehead .... ___ Common Goldeneye ..... ___ Barrow’s Goldeneye .... .... ... ___ Hooded Merganser ___ Red-breasted Merganser ___ Common Merganser I ___ Masked Duck RG ___ Ruddy Duck N* ___ Osprey ................. ___ Swallow-tailed Kite 7 .... .... . .... ... ......... Species SGN ___ White-tailed Kite SE, N*(W) ___ Mississippi Kite N*(W) Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec ...................................................................... .... .... .................... ................. ................. ......... ___ Bald Eagle ___ Northern Harrier ___ Sharp-shinned Hawk ___ Cooper’s Hawk N* N*(G, D, C) N ___ Northern Goshawk ___ Gray Hawk ___ Common Black-Hawk ___ Harris’s Hawk ___ Red-shouldered Hawk ...... N*, RG .......... N*(D, RG, SE) N, SE, RG N*, SE ___ Broad-winged Hawk SE ___ Swainson’s Hawk N ........ .......... ___ White-tailed Hawk ___ Zone-tailed Hawk N ___ Red-tailed Hawk N ___ Ferruginous Hawk PG ___ Rough-legged Hawk I ___ Golden Eagle N* ___ Crested Caracara SE ___ American Kestrel N ................... .............. ___ Merlin ___ Aplomado Falcon PG ___ Peregrine Falcon N*(RG, C, G) ___ Prairie Falcon N* ...................................................................... ___ Ring-necked Pheasant ___ Lesser Prairie Chicken E ___ Wild Turkey N ___ Scaled Quail N ___ Gambel’s Quail ___ Northern Bobwhite ___ Montezuma Quail N, RG, W N*, SE N* ___ Yellow Rail ............ .............................. ................. ___ King Rail ___ Virginia Rail N* ___ Sora N* ___ Purple Gallinule ___ Common Moorhen N* 8 Species ___ American Coot SGN Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec N* ___ Sandhill Crane ___ Whooping Crane .............................. ___ Black-bellied Plover .. ___ American Golden-Plover ___ Snowy Plover N* ............... .................... ............ .............. ... ___ Semipalmated Plover ___ Piping Plover ___ Killdeer ___ Mountain Plover N ___ Black-necked Stilt N* ___ American Avocet N*(W) ............. .... N*(PG) ......... .......... ............ ___ Northern Jacana ___ Greater Yellowlegs ___ Lesser Yellowlegs ___ Solitary Sandpiper ___ Willet ___ Spotted Sandpiper N?(G) ___ Upland Sandpiper ......... ............ ...... .. .... .. ... ... .... ... .......... ......... ....... .... .... ___ Eskimo Curlew ............. ....... ___ Whimbrel ___ Long-billed Curlew N* ___ Hudsonian Godwit ........ ... ...... ___ Marbled Godwit ___ Ruddy Turnstone ..... ............. ___ Red Knot ___ Sanderling .......... ... .. ___ Semipalmated Sandpiper ___ Western Sandpiper ............. ....... ___ Red-necked Stint ..... ___ Least Sandpiper ....... ___ White-rumped Sandpiper ... ___ Baird’s Sandpiper ___ Pectoral Sandpiper ___ Dunlin ... ... ... ........... .. ___ Stilt Sandpiper .... ..... ......................... .... ___ Ruff .......... ___ Short-billed Dowitcher 9 Species SGN Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec ........ ___ Long-billed Dowitcher ... ___ Common Snipe ___ American Woodcock .. SE ... ___ Wilson’s Phalarope ___ Red-necked Phalarope ...... ........ ... .... ......... ... ___ Red Phalarope ___ Parasitic Jaeger ___ Long-tailed Jaeger ___ Laughing Gull N*(SE) ........ .......... ___ Franklin’s Gull ___ Little Gull ............ ___ Bonaparte’s Gull ___ Heermann’s Gull ___ Mew Gull .................. ...................... ___ Ring-billed Gull .............. ___ California Gull .. ___ Herring Gull ............ .... ___ Thayer’s Gull ___ Lesser Black-backed Gull ___ Western Gull ___ Glaucous Gull .......... ___ Black-legged Kittiwake ........... .............. ___ Sabine’s Gull ___ Caspian Tern ___ Elegant Tern ...... ..... ___ Common Tern .... ___ Arctic Tern ___ Forster’s Tern ___ Least Tern ............ ........................ N*, SE N* ___ Sooty Tern .. ___ Black Tern ...... ...... ___ Black Skimmer ___ Rock Dove ___ Band-tailed Pigeon N N*(G, D, C) ___ Eurasian Collared-Dove N* ___ White-winged Dove N ___ Mourning Dove N ___ Inca Dove N ............... 10 ......... Species ___ Common Ground-Dove SGN Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec N*, SE, RG ___ Ruddy Ground-Dove ___ White-tipped Dove SE, RG ___ Monk Parakeet N*(W) ............ ___ Black-billed Cuckoo ___ Yellow-billed Cuckoo ___ Greater Roadrunner ___ Groove-billed Ani ___ Barn Owl ___ Flammulated Owl ........... N N ... SE, RG .................. N N*(G, D, C) ___ Eastern Screech-Owl N*,SE ___ Western Screech-Owl N ___ Great Horned Owl N ___ Northern Pygmy-Owl ___ Ferruginous Pygmy-Owl RG ___ Elf Owl N ___ Burrowing Owl N ___ Spotted Owl N*(G, D) ___ Barred Owl N*, SE ___ Long-eared Owl N*(G) ___ Lesser Nighthawk N ___ Common Nighthawk N ___ Common Poorwill N ___ Chuck-will’s-widow N*, SE ___ Whip-poor-will .................. .................. N*, I ___ Short-eared Owl ___ Northern Saw-whet Owl .. ............. .. ............. .............................. ................... ................... ...... ...... .... .... N*(G, D, C) ___ Black Swift ___ Chimney Swift ___ White-throated Swift ___ Broad-billed Hummingbird ... N*, SE ... N .............................. N*(RG) ___ White-eared Hummingbird ___ Berylline Hummingbird ___ Violet-crowned Hummingbird ___ Blue-throated Hummingbird ___ Magnificent Hummingbird ___ Lucifer Hummingbird ___ Ruby-throated Hummingbird ..... N*(C) ................ N*(G, D, C) .... N*(C) ... ....... I 11 Species SGN ___ Black-chinned Hummingbird N ___ Anna’s Hummingbird N* Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec .. ............ ... ___ Costa’s Hummingbird ___ Calliope Hummingbird ___ Broad-tailed Hummingbird ........... I N*(G, D, C) .......... ... ___ Rufous Hummingbird ___ Allen’s Hummingbird ___ Elegant Trogon ___ Ringed Kingfisher N?(SE) ___ Belted Kingfisher N* ___ Green Kingfisher N*, SE ___ Lewis’s Woodpecker I .......................... ........... ___ Red-headed Woodpecker ___ Acorn Woodpecker ___ Golden-fronted Woodpecker ___ Williamson’s Sapsucker N N*, SE, RG ....... I, D ... ....... ___ Yellow-bellied Sapsucker ___ Red-naped Sapsucker ___ Red-breasted Sapsucker ___ Ladder-backed Woodpecker N ___ Downy Woodpecker N?, SE ___ Hairy Woodpecker N*, G ___ Northern Flicker N ___ Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet ___ Tufted Flycatcher ___ Olive-sided Flycatcher ... N*(G) .. ___ Greater Pewee ___ Western Wood-Pewee N*(D, G) ___ Eastern Wood-Pewee N*, SE ... ............ .. ___ Yellow-bellied Flycatcher ___ Acadian Flycatcher N?, SE ___ Willow Flycatcher N? ___ Least Flycatcher ___ Hammond’s Flycatcher ___ Gray Flycatcher N*(D) ___ Dusky Flycatcher N*(D) ___ Cordilleran Flycatcher ___ Buff-breasted Flycatcher N*(G, D, C) ....................... ... ....... ...... .... ...... ... ... .. .......... .............. ...... ... ... N*(D) 12 Species ___ Black Phoebe ___ Eastern Phoebe SGN N*(SE) ___ Say’s Phoebe N ___ Vermilion Flycatcher N ___ Dusky-capped Flycatcher N* ___ Ash-throated Flycatcher Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec N N ............................ .......... ................... ....... ___ Great Crested Flycatcher ___ Brown-crested Flycatcher ___ Great Kiskadee N*, SE, RG N*, SE ___ Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher ___ Piratic Flycatcher ___ Tropical Kingbird N*, RG ___ Couch’s Kingbird N*, SE, RG ___ Cassin’s Kingbird ___ Thick-billed Kingbird ___ Western Kingbird .......................... N ............................. N*, RG N ............ ___ Eastern Kingbird ___ Scissor-tailed Flycatcher ......... .. N ___ Rose-throated Becard ___ Northern Shrike ___ Loggerhead Shrike N ___ White-eyed Vireo N*, SE, RG ___ Bell’s Vireo ___ Black-capped Vireo ___ Gray Vireo ___ Yellow-throated Vireo ___ Plumbeous Vireo N N*, SE, C N N*(SE) N*(G, D) ___ Cassin’s Vireo ___ Blue-headed Vireo ___ Hutton’s Vireo N*, G, D, C ___ Warbling Vireo N*(G, D) .......... ........ .................. ...... ___ Philadelphia Vireo ___ Red-eyed Vireo .. .... N*(SE) ................ ............ ...................... ........ .......... ___ Yellow-green Vireo ___ Steller’s Jay N*, I, G, D ___ Blue Jay I ___ Green Jay I, SE ___ Western Scrub-Jay N, I ........................... .................. 13 .............. .................. Species SGN ___ Mexican Jay N*, C ___ Pinyon Jay I ___ Clark’s Nutcracker I Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec ........... ............................. ....................... ___ Black-billed Magpie ___ American Crow .... W, I ___ Chihuahuan Raven N ___ Common Raven N ___ Horned Lark N ___ Purple Martin N*, SE ___ Tree Swallow ___ Violet-green Swallow N*(G, D, C) ___ N. Rough-winged Swallow N*(SE, RG) ___ Bank Swallow N*(SE) ___ Cliff Swallow N ___ Cave Swallow N ___ Barn Swallow N ___ Carolina Chickadee SE .... .......... ... ..... .......... ... .... ... ..... .. ....... ....... .. ............. ... .............. ___ Black-capped Chickadee ___ Mountain Chickadee ___ Juniper Titmouse I, N*, G, D I, N*,G ___ Black-crested Titmouse N ___ Verdin N ___ Bushtit ___ Red-breasted Nuthatch ___ White-breasted Nuthatch N N*, G, D, C ___ Pygmy Nuthatch N*, G, D ___ Brown Creeper N*(G) ___ Cactus Wren N ___ Rock Wren N ___ Canyon Wren N ___ Carolina Wren N*, SE, RG ___ Bewick’s Wren N ___ House Wren ................................. N*(G, D) .................... .......................... ___ Winter Wren ___ Sedge Wren ___ Marsh Wren ................ I, N*(G) .. ................ N* ___ American Dipper ....... ___ Golden-crowned Kinglet 14 ........ .............. Species SGN Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec ... ___ Ruby-crowned Kinglet ___ Blue-gray Gnatcatcher ___ Black-tailed Gnatcatcher N*(SE, C, G) N ___ Eastern Bluebird N*(SE) ___ Western Bluebird N*(G, D) ___ Mountain Bluebird I, N*(D) ___ Townsend’s Solitaire .................. I ___ Veery ___ Gray-cheeked Thrush ___ Hermit Thrush ...... ... ___ Swainson’s Thrush N*(G, D) ___ Wood Thrush ___ Rufous-backed Robin ___ American Robin N*(G, D) ___ Varied Thrush ___ Aztec Thrush .............................. ___ Gray Catbird ___ Northern Mockingbird N ___ Sage Thrasher I ___ Long-billed Thrasher N*, SE, RG ___ Curve-billed Thrasher N ___ Crissal Thrasher N ___ European Starling N ... ___ American Pipit ... .... ..... ___ Brown Thrasher ... .... .... ___ Spragues’s Pipit ___ Cedar Waxwing .... ... I ___ Gray Silky-flycatcher ___ Phainopepla N*(G, D, C) ___ Olive Warbler ........ ..... ___ Blue-winged Warbler ___ Golden-winged Warbler .......... ___ Tennessee Warbler ___ Orange-crowned Warbler N*(G, D) ___ Virginia’s Warbler .. ............ ___ Nashville Warbler .. N*(G, D) ___ Colima Warbler N*, C ___ Lucy’s Warbler N*, RG ......... ........... 15 ..................... Species SGN ___ Northern Parula N*(SE) ___ Tropical Parula N*, SE Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec .. ....... ___ Crescent-chested Warbler ___ Yellow Warbler .. N? ___ Chestnut-sided Warbler ___ Magnolia Warbler ........ ........... .............. ......... .......... ................ ___ Cape May Warbler ___ Black-throated Blue Warbler ___ Yellow-rumped Warbler ___ Black-throated Gray Warbler N*(G, D) ................ .................. N*(G) ___ Townsend’s Warbler ........... ........ .......... ... .. .... ... ............... ___ Hermit Warbler ___ Black-throated Green Warbler ___ Golden-cheeked Warbler SE ___ Blackburnian Warbler ___ Yellow-throated Warbler ___ Grace’s Warbler ........... N*, SE N*(G, D) ___ Pine Warbler ...... .......... ... .. ... .... ... .............. ___ Prairie Warbler .......... ___ Palm Warbler ........... ___ Bay-breasted Warbler ....... ___ Blackpoll Warbler ......... ___ Cerulean Warbler ___ Black-and-white Warbler ..... .... ............... ......... ..... ... ................. ....... ........... N?(SE) ___ American Redstart ___ Prothonotary Warbler ___ Worm-eating Warbler ___ Swainson’s Warbler .......... ............ ___ Ovenbird ___ Northern Waterthrush ............. ......... ___ Louisiana Waterthrush ___ Kentucky Warbler ............. ___ Mourning Warbler ............. .. ___ MacGillivray’s Warbler N?(D) ___ Common Yellowthroat N*(SE, RG, W) ............... ___ Hooded Warbler ___ Wilson’s Warbler ........ ___ Canada Warbler 16 ... Species SGN Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec ...... ___ Red-faced Warbler ___ Painted Redstart ...... ..... .... I, N*(C, D) ___ Slate-throated Redstart ___ Rufous-capped Warbler ___ Yellow-breasted Chat ................................................................ .. .... ... .. ....... ..... N?(SE) N ___ Hepatic Tanager N*(G, D) ___ Summer Tanager N ___ Scarlet Tanager ___ Western Tanager N*(G, D) ___ Flame-colored Tanager ___ Olive Sparrow ___ Green-tailed Towhee N*, SE I, N*(G, D) ___ Eastern Towhee ___ Spotted Towhee N*(G, D, C) ___ Canyon Towhee N ___ Cassin’s Sparrow N ___ Botteri’s Sparrow N* ___ Rufous-crowned Sparrow N ___ American Tree Sparrow ___ Chipping Sparrow N*(D, G, SE) .................. ___ Clay-colored Sparrow .......... ___ Brewer’s Sparrow ___ Field Sparrow ___ Black-chinned Sparrow N*(SE) N*, G, D, C ... ___ Vesper Sparrow ___ Lark Sparrow N ___ Black-throated Sparrow N ... ___ Sage Sparrow ___ Lark Bunting ............ .............. ....... N? ___ Savannah Sparrow .................... ___ Baird’s Sparrow ___ Grasshopper Sparrow ..... ... ...... N*(D, SE) ___ LeConte’s Sparrow .... .... .... ...... ___ Nelson’s Sharp-tailed Sparrow ___ Fox Sparrow .. .. ___ Song Sparrow ... ___ Lincoln’s Sparrow ...... ___ Swamp Sparrow 17 .. ... Species SGN Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec ....... ___ White-throated Sparrow .. ............. ............... ___ Harris’s Sparrow ... ___ White-crowned Sparrow ___ Dark-eyed Junco .............. ....................... ___ Golden-crowned Sparrow N*(G) ___ Yellow-eyed Junco ...... ..... ___ McCown’s Longspur ___ Lapland Longspur ___ Smith’s Longspur .... ___ Chestnut-collared Longspur ___ Snow Bunting ___ Northern Cardinal N ___ Pyrrhuloxia N .... ... ___ Rose-breasted Grosbeak ___ Black-headed Grosbeak ___ Blue Grosbeak N*(G, D, C) ... N ...... ........ ___ Lazuli Bunting ___ Indigo Bunting ___ Varied Bunting ___ Painted Bunting ___ Dickcissel ...... .. .... ... N*, SE N .... .............. ............ .. ....... N .

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